October 30, 2014

Murphy Pushes For Federal Recognition of Battlefield Essex Project

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) recently wrote a letter to leaders at the Connecticut Historic Preservation Council to offer his support for the Battlefield Essex project and alert the Council that he would strongly advocate for the project to be named to the National Register of Historic Places. The project recognizes the tremendous contributions of the Essex shipbuilding industry to American history during the War of 1812, and will help increase tourism to the region.

“I’m encouraged to see our state remembering this noteworthy moment from a time in Connecticut’s past that gets too little recognition,” said Murphy. “Naming this site to the National Register of Historic Places will bring the area the recognition it deserves from the federal government, while boosting the local economy through increased tourism. The Connecticut River Museum has done tremendous work to restore this site and I’ll do everything I can to support its efforts.”

The Battlefield Essex project recognizes the British Raid on Pettipaug during the War of 1812. During the raid, Americans experienced the greatest shipping loss of the war. This April will mark the bicentennial of this raid.

Full text of the letter:

Mr. Daniel Forrest Chairwoman, State Historic Preservation Officer,  One Constitution Plaza, 2nd Floor, Hartford, CT 06103.

Sara O. Nelson, Historic Preservation Council, One Constitution Plaza, 2nd Floor, Hartford, CT 06103.
Dear Mr. Forrest and Chairwoman Nelson,

As you know, April 8th of this year will mark the bicentennial of the British attack on Essex during the War of 1812. While this attack was the largest American shipping loss of the war, those 136 British soldiers, 27 American vessels, and tiny local Connecticut militias seem to have been all but lost in the annals of history.

I commend the Connecticut River Museum for resurrecting this raid from history—while it was a terrible financial tragedy for the town, I believe this event also highlights the importance of the Essex shipbuilding industry and Connecticut’s trade ports during this period of American history. The history of the War of 1812 is so rarely remembered in our country and I am encouraged to see our state remembering this noteworthy moment from Connecticut’s past.

As the Battlefield Essex project makes its way through the Historic Preservation Council’s approval process, please know that I look forward to supporting and guiding this project through the federal process of being named to the National Register of Historic Places. Thank you for your attention to this important matter.

Sincerely,

Christopher S. Murphy
United States Senator