July 19, 2018

Grant Awarded to Preserve Shoreline Electric Railway Powerhouse

image001 (1)As part of the effort to encourage revitalization and redevelopment of Mariner’s Way and the Ferry Point neighborhood, the Town of Old Saybrook applied for and received a Making Places Grant from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation to study potential new uses for the Shoreline Electric Railway Powerhouse located on the Connecticut River at Ferry Point.

Shoreline Electric Railway Powerhouse History

The building was constructed between 1908 and 1910 of poured concrete, a unique process considered revolutionary at the time. The Shoreline Electric Railway Powerhouse housed the boilers and turbines that provided the electricity for trolleys serving the transportation needs of shoreline residents between 1890 and 1930. The electric trolleys ran east to west from New Haven to New London and south to north from Old Saybrook to Chester.

Old Saybrook Making Places Grant from the CT Trust for Historic Preservation

Preservation and revitalization of this historic industrial structure were goals identified in Ferry Point planning workshops. Revitalizing the building would preserve local history, further redevelopment goals in the Mariner’s Way Plan and create a destination in the Ferry Point neighborhood for residents and visitors.

After meetings with Connecticut Trust staff members, property owners, the First Selectman, Old Saybrook Land Use staff, the Old Saybrook Historical Society and a consultant, The Town of Old Saybrook requested and received a $49,750 Making Places Grant from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation.

The Town of Old Saybrook hired Goman+York Property Advisors to conduct the market feasibility study. Goman+York Property Advisors have experience in strategic planning, property redevelopment and market feasibility research. Goman + York gathered input from residents and completed feasibility analyses on multiple reuse options. Their study identifies the best uses with the greatest potential for success to ensure the building can be preserved and contribute to the economic well-being and quality of life of Old Saybrook.

 

Presentation of the Findings

 

The public is invited to a presentation of the study’s results by Peter Holland of Goman+York Property Advisors.

Thursday, November 12 at 4:00pm

Saybrook Point Pavilion

150 College Street, Old Saybrook

Making Places Grant Overview

The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation (CTPH) Making Places Grants (MPG) are intended to catalyze and move forward efforts to preserve, stabilize, rehabilitate and re-use historic industrial places.

The MPG is a strategic planning and pre-development grant for non-profits, municipalities, private developers partnered with these entities for underutilized historic industrial buildings and sites. MPGs are cash reimbursements for pre-approved costs upon successful completion of the grant-funded project and do not require any match. Awards are $2,500 up to $50,000.

Making Places Grants are administered by the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, and funded by the State Historic Preservation Office of the Department of Economic and Community Development, with funds from the Community Investment Act of the State of Connecticut.

located on the Connecticut River at Ferry Point.

The public is invited to a presentation of the findings on November 12 at the Saybrook Point Pavilion at 4:00pm.

Shoreline Electric Railway Powerhouse History

The building was constructed between 1908 and 1910 of poured concrete, a unique process considered revolutionary at the time. The Shoreline Electric Railway Powerhouse housed the boilers and turbines that provided the electricity for trolleys serving the transportation needs of shoreline residents between 1890 and 1930. The electric trolleys ran east to west from New Haven to New London and south to north from Old Saybrook to Chester.

Old Saybrook Making Places Grant from the CT Trust for Historic Preservation

Preservation and revitalization of this historic industrial structure were goals identified in Ferry Point planning workshops. Revitalizing the building would preserve local history, further redevelopment goals in the Mariner’s Way Plan and create a destination in the Ferry Point neighborhood for residents and visitors.

After meetings with Connecticut Trust staff members, property owners, the First Selectman, Old Saybrook Land Use staff, the Old Saybrook Historical Society and a consultant, The Town of Old Saybrook requested and received a $49,750 Making Places Grant from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation.

The Town of Old Saybrook hired Goman+York Property Advisors to conduct the market feasibility study. Goman+York Property Advisors have experience in strategic planning, property redevelopment and market feasibility research. Goman + York gathered input from residents and completed feasibility analyses on multiple reuse options. Their study identifies the best uses with the greatest potential for success to ensure the building can be preserved and contribute to the economic well-being and quality of life of Old Saybrook.

Presentation of the Findings

The public is invited to a presentation of the study’s results by Peter Holland of Goman+York Property Advisors.

Thursday, November 12 at 4:00pm
Saybrook Point Pavilion
150 College Street, Old Saybrook

Making Places Grant Overview

The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation (CTPH) Making Places Grants (MPG) are intended to catalyze and move forward efforts to preserve, stabilize, rehabilitate and re-use historic industrial places.

The MPG is a strategic planning and pre-development grant for non-profits, municipalities, private developers partnered with these entities for underutilized historic industrial buildings and sites. MPGs are cash reimbursements for pre-approved costs upon successful completion of the grant-funded project and do not require any match. Awards are $2,500 up to $50,000.

Making Places Grants are administered by the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, and funded by the State Historic Preservation Office of the Department of Economic and Community Development, with funds from the Community Investment Act of the State of Connecticut.

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