April 27, 2017

First 2017 Environmental Forum at CT River Museum Reviews Waterway Manipulations, April 13

This aerial photograph by Tom Walsh shows the manipulation of the River’s natural flow in Turner’s Falls, Mass.

ESSEX — Join the Connecticut River Museum for “Waterway Manipulations”, our first 2017 Environmental Forum on Thursday, April 13, at 5:30 p.m.  Speakers will present issues and include time for discussions about water legislation, the necessity of floodplains and the preservation of the American Beaver. 

Alicia Charamut, Connecticut River Steward at the Connecticut River Watershed Council, will present Water Diversions: An overview of the state’s water planning process, what citizens can expect from the process and how individuals can become involved in water management in finding balance of water-use. 

Chris Campany, Executive Director of the Windham Regional Commission based in Brattleboro, Vermont will present  “Do Unto Those Downstream As You’d Have Those Upstream Do Unto You”:  Preserving and restoring floodwater access to floodplains is essential not only from a scientific and biological perspective, but from a moral perspective as well. 

The final presenter, local Naturalist at The Incarnation Center, Phil Miller will discuss American Beaver: Celebrating a keystone species and the habitat they build for wildlife. The program is sponsored by the Rockfall Foundation.

The Connecticut River Museum is the only museum dedicated to the study, preservation and celebration of the cultural and natural heritage of the Connecticut River and its Valley.  The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open Tuesday – Sunday from 10 a.m.  to 5 p.m.  The Museum currently has a special exhibition, Connecticut’s Founding Fish, exploring the story of the Shad. For more information on exhibits and related programs please contact the Connecticut River Museum at 860.767.8269 or visit the website, ctrivermuseum.org. 

Photo Caption: This aerial photograph by Tom Walsh shows the manipulation of the River’s natural flow in Turner’s Falls, Massachusetts.

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