November 23, 2017

Archives for July 2017

Essex Historical Society Expands Popular “Walking Weekend” Program, Offers Four Tours This Weekend

EHS’s Brien Reidell leads a walking tour up Main Street, Essex.  Courtesy of Essex Historical Society.

Community Foundation of Middlesex County Funds New Centerbrook Tour 

 

Combining the outdoors and history, Essex Historical Society (EHS) expands its popular outdoor program, “Walking Weekend,” on July 28, 29 and 30.  The event features four different walking tours within the Town of Essex as follows:

Friday, July 28, 2017, 7 p.m.; Saturday, July 29, 2017, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Sunday, July 30, 7 p.m.

Pratt House, 19 West Avenue, Essex (July 28)

Ivoryton Library, 106 Main Street, Ivoryton (July 29)

Essex Elementary School, 108 Main Street, Centerbrook (July 29)

Foot of Main Street, Essex, (July 30)

During the tours, attendees enjoy an easy stroll along the Town’s historic streets learning about the major industries, structures and personalities that shaped the area. Essex Historical Society’s trained, knowledgeable guides will lead an hour+ long tour over fairly level, paved terrain, covering three centuries of history.

For the first time, this year’s Walking Weekend will feature a guided walking tour of Centerbrook Village, led by renowned Essex historian Brenda Milkofsky.  The walk is funded in part through a grant from the Community Foundation of Middlesex County.   New guides are welcome to join us and learn the tour.

An early view of Connecticut Valley Manufacturing, now Centerbrook Architects.  Courtesy of Essex Historical Society.

On July 28  at 7 p.m., the first tour will meet at the Pratt House, 19 West Avenue, Essex, for a trip down West Ave. and Prospect Street to explore the histories behind the structures of “Pound Hill” including several 19th century churches, Hills Academy, the Old Firehouse and more.

On July 29, at 10 a.m., the second tour will meet at Ivoryton Library, 106 Main Street, Ivoryton, for an in-depth look at this historic village, from its beginnings as a company town surrounding the Comstock-Cheney Co., the stories of 19th century immigration, the striking examples of Victorian architecture and its unique cultural attractions that continue to this day.  The tour will be led by historian and author Chris Pagliuco.

On July 29, at 1 p.m., the third tour will meet at Essex Elementary School, 108 Main Street, Centerbrook, for our newest walk featuring Essex’s oldest village.  Learn about Centerbrook’s transition from its early farming days as “Center Saybrook” to its later manufacturing development powered by the Falls River.  This walk will be developed and led by Brenda Milkofsky.


All spiritual, social and business matters in early “Center Saybrook” revolved around the Centerbrook Meeting House.    Courtesy of Essex Historical Society

Interested in being a guide for later walks of Centerbrook?   Contact the EHS offices to learn more, 860-767-0681, or ehs@essexhistory.org.  No experience is necessary and all training is provided.

On July 30, at 7 p.m., the final tour will meet at the Foot of Main Street, Essex, for a trip down Main Street in Essex Village to capture the rich maritime history of 18th century “Potapaug,” its working waterfront and ship-building prominence in the early 19th century as well as its development as a beautiful visitor destination of today.  The tour will be led by EHS’s knowledgeable guides Brien Reidell and Mary Ann Pleva.

Each walk is a separate event and you are welcome to attend all four or select your favorites.

Essex Historical Society is committed to fulfilling its mission of engaging and inspiring the community in the three villages of Centerbrook, Essex and Ivoryton.  Each tour is $5 per person and is open to the general public; free to members of EHS.  Admission helps support the educational and cultural programming of Essex Historical Society.

Essex Historical Society expresses its gratitude to the Community Foundation of Middlesex County for funding the new Centerbrook tour.  For more information, visit www.essexhistory.org or call (860) 767-0681.

 

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Last Chance to See ‘West Side Story’ at Ivoryton Playhouse This Afternoon

Arianne Meneses (Consuelo) and Jason Daniel Rath* (Pepe) rehearse a scene from West Side Story.

IVORYTON – Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet is transported to modern-day New York City in the breathtaking musical, West Side Story, which opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on July 5. With book by Arthur Laurents, music by Leonard Bernstein, and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, the original 1957 Broadway production ran for over 700 performances before going on tour, and garnered six Tony nominations.

Mia Pinero makes her debut at Ivoryton as Maria in ‘West Side Story.’

The story is set in the Upper West Side of New York City in the mid-1950s and explores the rivalry between the Jets and the Sharks, two teenage street gangs of different ethnic backgrounds. When, Tony, a Jet, falls in love with Maria, a Shark, the young lovers struggle to keep their love alive in a world of hate, violence and prejudice.

The dark theme, sophisticated music, extended dance scenes, and focus on social problems marked a turning point in American musical theatre when it was first produced; West Side Story remains one of the most innovative, heart-wrenching and relevant musical dramas of our time.

The film version starring Natalie Wood, Russ Tamblyn, Richard Beymer and Rita Moreno won 10 Academy Awards and in 2009, Karen Olivo won a Tony for her portrayal of Anita in the Broadway revival.

Stephen Mir* plays Tony in the Ivoryton Playhouse production of ‘West Side Story’ opening July 5.

Stephen Mir* returns to Ivoryton to play the role of Tony and Mia Pinero* makes her Ivoryton debut in the role of Maria.

The production is directed and choreographed by Todd Underwood and musical directed by Mike Morris, with set design by Dan Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Elizabeth Cipollina. Executive Producers are Michael A. Dattilo and Frank Perrotti

Tonight, Tonight, won’t be just any night!  Don’t miss the experience of this show live on stage at the Ivoryton Playhouse.

West Side Story opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on Wednesday, July 5, and runs through Sunday, July 30. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $50 for adults; $45 for seniors; $22 for students and $17 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org

Pictures by Ivoryton Playhouse

Group rates are available by calling the box office for information. The Playhouse is located at 103 Main St. in Ivoryton.

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Deep River Public Library Hosts a ‘Mad Hatter’s Garden Party’ Tonight

Will a hat like this win the contest?

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Public Library and the Deep River Garden Club would like to let you in on a secret … all the best people are simply MAD about Garden Parties! Join the fun on Friday, July 28, from 6 to 9 p.m. for the library’s third annual Mad Hatter Garden Party.

Tickets are on sale now at the library for $25 each. Join us for hors d’oeuvres, drink, live music, good conversation and a teacup raffle. Prizes will be awarded for the top two favorite hats. All funds benefit the beautification of the library garden and grounds.

Don’t be late for this very important date! Stop in the library and buy your ticket today.

For more information, visit http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 5 pm.

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Book Discussion at Deep River Library Focuses on 20th Century Tyranny, Sept. 28

DEEP RIVER — Join a discussion at Deep River Public Library on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 6:30 p.m. for a discussion of On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons From the Twentieth Century, by Timothy Snyder. This is an engaging, short read, regardless of your political perspective. Bring your best critical mind to discuss Snyder’s points.

Light refreshments will be served.

This event is co-sponsored by The Valley Stands Up and will be facilitated by Dr. Rick Hornung from Eastern CT State University.

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Montessori School Holds Informational Curriculum Night, Sept. 28

OLD SAYBROOK — The Children’s Tree Montessori School (CTMS), 96 Essex Road, Old Saybrook, will hold a curriculum night on Thursday, Sept. 28, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The Montessori certified teachers will take attendees on a step-by-step journey through the Montessori Math Curriculum to gain a better understanding of how a Montessori student spends their day.

By touring each classroom,  visitors can see the continuum of the material’s progression through the levels, from a Montessori toddler through a 6th grade Montessori elementary student. This free workshop is open to the public. Optional dinner and childcare is offered for $10 per family.

The mathematical mind begins to develop at a very young age through patterns, music, and visual discrimination. By recognizing and developing a continuum of materials to explain concepts using all of the senses – through, scientific method, Maria Montessori created a math program, which has not been changed in over a 100 years.

See how four-year-olds are exposed to multiplication and why Montessori students can sometimes answer Common Core questions simply because they have learned and understand the concepts concretely before working in the abstract.

The Children’s Tree offers authentic Montessori education and was founded in 1995 to provide an alternative to traditional educational programs. The Children’s Tree is the only Montessori school in the area to offer programs for students 1-12 years old.

For more information and to register for the workshop, call 860.388.3536 or visit www.childrenstree.org.

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Essex Cub Scout Pack 4 Hosts Recruitment Night, Sept. 28

ESSEX — Essex Cub Scout Pack 4 Recruitment Night will be held Sept. 28, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Essex Elementary School Cafe.  Boys from kindergarten through 5th grade are welcome to register.

For further information, visit www.essexcubspk4.com or email essecubspk4@aol.com

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Essex Republicans Endorse Candidates for Municipal Election

Bruce Glowac (left) stands with Vin Pacileo after their endorsement by the Essex RTC as candidates for Essex Selectman and First Selectman respectively.

ESSEX — At their Tuesday, July 25, caucus Essex Republicans endorsed the following candidates for this fall’s municipal election:

  • First Selectman – Vincent Pacileo
  • Selectman – Bruce Glowac
  • Town Clerk – Joel Marzi
  • Town Treasurer – Bruce MacMillian
  • Tax Collector – Megan Haskins
  • Board of Finance – Keith Crehan
  • Board of Finance – Phil Beckman
  • Essex Board of Education – Judie McCann
  • Region 4 Board of Education – DG Fitton

“We have a very strong slate of experienced candidates,” said Bruce MacMillian, Chairman of the Essex Republican Town Committee. “Our goal is to make Essex thrive as a safe, business friendly, and educationally minded town. This slate will accomplish that goal.”

The Essex Republican Town Committee (ERTC) meets at 7 p.m. on the second Wednesday of the month in Room A at the Town Hall. All Republicans are welcome to attend.

The municipal election will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.

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Chester Republicans Endorse Linn, Grzybowski for Chester’s Top Seats in November

CHESTER — The Chester Republican Town Committee has announced the endorsement of Selectwoman Carolyn Linn for First Selectman and James Grzybowski for Selectman in November’s election. Both Linn and Grzybowski received unanimous endorsement at the Town Committee Caucus held July 24, when the complete slate of Republican candidates was also endorsed.

Both candidates come with solid backgrounds of service to the community and beyond. Linn currently serves on the Chester Board of Selectmen, is actively involved in the Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce, and is a long-time member of the Chester Merchant’s Association. Linn chaired the 2017 Winter Carnivale, working with the Shoreline Soup Kitchen, EMT for the Chester Ambulance Association and one of the three members of the VRHS Touch Down Club, which spearheaded the addition of lights, field house and snack shack to Friday Night Football.

 

James Grzybowski is following in the footsteps of his dad (former selectman) Edward Grzybowski and his godfather (former selectman – among other roles) Joseph Bergonzi, so serving the Town is, truly, “in his blood”.

He is currently Facilities Manager for the Chester Elementary School, sits on the Town’s Retirement Board; is one of the Town’s representatives to the Valley Shore Communication Board and has served in many capacities for 27 years in the Chester Hose Company, including as Chief.

With two sons who are active in local sports, Grzybowski coached his sons’ teams, and recognizing, first hand, the effects of concussions, he pushed for concussion training for all youth coaches and in 2013 was appointed by the State legislature to serve on its Youth Concussion Task Force, which is charged with making recommendations to enact statutes to better protect against the effects in youth and increase awareness of that danger. Many of the recommendations are in effect today.

 

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Essex Attorney Selected as Official Democratic Candidate for District 33 Probate Court Judge

Attorney Jeannine Lewis

AREAWIDE — On Thursday, July 20, delegates representing nine towns within the 33rd State Senate District selected Jeannine Lewis, an attorney at Hudson and Kilby, as the Democratic candidate for the upcoming vacancy of District 33 probate court judge.  Connecticut’s 33rd Probate Court District includes the Town of Lyme as well as Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Old Saybrook and Westbrook.  The probate court for District 33 is located in Old Saybrook.

In announcing her selection, the District 33 Democratic Town Committee delegates commended Lewis for her extensive experience and expertise in Connecticut probate law; her deep understanding of the issues and responsibilities involved; and her personal and professional commitment to protecting the rights of – and serving the needs of – area residents who require the assistance of the probate court.  The delegates also thanked the other three individuals who had been vying for this nomination – attorneys James Carey, Sean Donlan and Stephen Sheehan. 

Probate judges typically handle estates, trusts, adoptions, name changes, and the termination of parental rights and conservatorships, among other important matters. All candidates for the position must be members of the Connecticut bar. 

Upon receiving the nomination, Lewis said, “Since I first applied to law school, it has been a dream of mine to serve my community as judge of probate.  If elected to this position in November, I plan to dedicate my time outside of the  court’s daily duties to mentoring new attorneys, and to providing assurances that our elderly and disabled community members are properly cared for and protected.”

Lewis, in addition to her law practice – which is focused on probate matters, estate planning and elder law – is the Chair of the Continuing Legal Education Committee of the Connecticut Bar Association’s (CBA’s) Elder Law Section, and serves on the Integrity of the Practice/Pro Bono Committee of the CBA’s Estates and Probate Section.  She is a board member of the Shoreline Soup Kitchens and Pantries, and provides pro bono legal counsel to Sister Cities Essex Haiti, a local charity that helps residents of the town of Deschapelles, Haiti.

Lewis will face Republican and other challengers in the Tuesday, Nov. 7, special election later this year.

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Essex Art Association Hosts “Weather, Whether” Juried Show

‘Cloud Formation’ by Pam Carlson.

ESSEX — “Weather, Whether” is the second juried show of the Essex Art Association’s (EAA) 2017 season. Gallery visitors will delight in the variety of high quality artwork in this exhibit, which will be juried for entry and awards. Monetary prizes totaling $1900 will be awarded in addition to the prestigious Exit Gallery Award which offers the winning artist a solo exhibit in the Art Association’s Exit Gallery during the next gallery season.

To quote the originators of the show’s theme:  “Weather, whether it’s sunny or cloudy, hot or cold, raining or snowing, windy or calm, there is beauty to be found. Cover your brush with your weather paint and just have fun putting it on your canvas where it will last forever…but do it quickly before it changes.”

The exhibit’s opening reception is Friday, July 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. The show runs July 29  through Aug. 19. The EAA Gallery is located at 10 North Main Street, Essex, CT. Gallery hours: 1-5 pm daily, closed Tuesdays. For more information visit essexartassociation.com or call 860-767-8996.

‘Wave Action’ by Pam Carlson is an acrylic painting on display in the Exit Gallery “Forever” show.

The Exit Gallery show, “Forever,” showcases paintings by Pam Carlson, who was born and raised in Darien, Conn., where she loved art and participated in local school art shows. While attending college she utilized her Art Major skills by working each summer in N.Y. in commercial art within the advertising world. Teaching won her heart and she finished college with a degree in both Fine Art and Education.

Carlson taught in public schools in Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania, before becoming a full-time mother, dress designer, and bringing her craft back into her own home studio. She has exhibited her work in local galleries and ‘town green’ art shows up and down the east coast for over twenty years. She is now concentrating on gallery shows.

Carlson is the Vice President of the Essex Art Association. She developed and participates annually in the October invitational exhibit at the EAA gallery, ‘Five Women Painting,” and is a charter member of the Maple and Main Gallery in Chester. Sherecently completed a One Woman Show at Maple and Main’s Stone Gallery, which raised thousands of dollars for the Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter. In addition to several recent commissions, five of her paintings depicting Connecticut’s Farm animals are hanging in the Congressional Office Building in Washington DC.  www.artmajeur.com/en/artist/pastelpam

Exhibition juror, Lenny Moskowitz, is a Connecticut landscape painter who lives in New Haven with his wife. He graduated with his B.F.A from the Philadelphia College of Art and received his M.F.A. from Michigan’s Cranbrook Academy. He has participated in both group and solo shows at numerous galleries throughout the U.S. and has taught classes and workshops in Connecticut, Block Island, and Nantucket. Presently, he teaches at Quinnipiac University and several community art schools.

Moskowitz has been awarded several artist residencies, including at the Anderson Center in Michigan and at the NISDA Foundation on Nantucket, Mass. In the summer of 2011, he was awarded a residency at Weir Farm in Wilton, Conn.  He makes yearly painting trips to Maine, Nantucket, and frequent sojourns to the surrounding the Connecticut woods to paint the landscapes.

For more information, visit www.lennymoskowitzart.com

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Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival Opens With Concert Tonight, Fun Continues All Day Tomorrow

Flowers at the Festival: the Florence Griswold Museum hosts a number variety fresh flower, fruit and vegetable vendors.

OLD LYME– A “quintessential New England” weekend, this year’s Old Lyme Midsummer Festival kicks off July 28, with a toe-tapping Friday night concert on the lawn of the Florence Griswold Museum, and continues Saturday, July 29, up and down Lyme Street with new offerings and old favorites throughout the day.

This year’s 31st annual festival again takes place in the heart of Old Lyme’s historic district. The mission of the festival partners is to celebrate the cultural heritage of Old Lyme, with art, music, food and family fun.

Nick and the Shady Creek band will entertain in a free concert on Friday evening, July 28.

The festivities kick-off Friday night featuring the bluegrass sounds of Nick and the Shady Creek with a lawn concert beginning at 7 p.m. This free concert is sponsored by All Pro Automotive and the Graybill Family.  Before the concert the Florence Griswold Museum will host an open house, with free admission to the special exhibition Flora/Fauna: The Naturalist Impulse in American Art from 5 to 7 p.m.

The Saturday Festival continues with arts exhibitions, kid’s activities, music, food and specialty shopping at locations along historic Lyme Street. Many locations also include “hands on” arts activities.

The bulls at the Lyme Art Association are alway a major draw at the Festival.

Shuttle buses will be available for the length of the festival, and take participants from designated parking lots to stops along Lyme Street. Parking lots will be open at the high school campus on Lyme Street, as well as the Old Lyme Marketplace on Halls Road.

Partner activities and events on Saturday include the following (from the north end to south end of Lyme Street):

Old Lyme Lions Club: Annual Antique Car Show, held at the Bee & Thistle. The Lions will also serve hamburgers and hot dogs.

Florence Griswold Museum: a new Bohemian Street Fair, Hands-on/Minds-on Activities, Parading Paws Dog Show, food trucks, Folk Musician Dave Fry, The Shop Super Sale, and reduced admission to historic house and exhibitions

Lyme Art Association: Art sales and exhibitions, savory pies, LAA’s famous Ice Tea and Lemonade, and a fun and interactive “Masterpiece Photo Op”

Old Lyme Inn: Live music and refreshments under the tent, air-conditioned table service inside the historic inn

The “Fence Artists” will be back at the Old Lyme Inn this year.

Fence Artists Show: Now at the Old Lyme Inn, this group of local artists will sell artwork and provide art demonstrations throughout the day.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts: Art demonstrations, student/alumni exhibition, live music and refreshments

Chamber of Commerce: A Vendor Fair and youth music tent

The 2017 Summer Sculpture Showcase features exhibits from more than 15 guest sculptors as well as some 80 pieces by owner and sculptor Gil Boro.

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds: Summer Sculpture Showcase, fashion show, dance performance, live music and artist talk

Patricia Spratt for the Home: The always-anticipated warehouse sale of specialty linens

Lymes Youth Services Bureau: The Midsummer 5K

See a selection of historic looms in action at the old Lyme Historical Society’s presentation in the former Grange building on Lyme St.

Old Lyme Historical Society: Handweavers’ demonstration and community loom, troubadour Jim Lampos, Historical Society publications for sale.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools: Learn more about the extracurricular activities of the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools including the High School Crew Team and musical opportunities.

Town of Old Lyme/Senior Center: Music & Movement yoga for families, Magician “Mr. Magic,” caricature drawings, King Arthur Flour Cookie Truck

Old Lyme-PGN Library: Phoebe’s BookCellar Midsummer Sale, hourly story times, Young Adult’s screenprinting, History Press authors, hands-on learning on e-books and more

Most locations will have food options available.

A detailed listing of events and activities is available at www.OldLymeMidsummerFestival.com.

Key sponsors of the Festival include Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, Pasta Vita, LymeLine.com/ValleyNewsNow.com, and The Day Publishing. Additional financial support comes from Paul Burdick Oil Company, Old Lyme Marketplace, Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, Florence Griswold Museum, Zelek Electric, and Caliber Computing.

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‘Theater Along the River’ Returns Tomorrow With ‘The Tempest’

2. Flock Theatre will bring Shakespeare to life on the Connecticut River Museum lawn with their performance of The Tempest.

ESSEX — New London’s Flock Theatre Company returns to the Connecticut River Museum on Saturday, July 29, this time bringing their production of Shakespeare’s classic play The Tempest.  This evening of outdoor theater is made possible through the generous support of the Essex Wellness Center.

The Tempest is an exciting story set on a remote island, where the sorcerer Prospero, rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful place using illusion and skillful manipulation.  A tempest, shipwreck, marooning, and redemption are all twisted into this classically inspired storyline.

According to director Derron Wood, “We are pleased to return for a fourth year to the Connecticut River Museum.  It offers a spellbinding backdrop for outdoor theater and allows us to reach a new audience.”

The Tempest, a story of shipwreck and magic, is one of Shakespeare’s most musical plays and will be the featured performance for Theater Along the River this July 29 at the Connecticut River Museum. Art by Flock Theatre.

The Connecticut River Museum’s executive director, Christopher Dobbs, said that “Flock Theatre is a master of Shakespeare.  We feel fortunate to offer this level of entertainment at the Museum and hope that the audience enjoys the production and its backdrop – the River.”  Dobbs was quick to note that the Museum is only able to host this event and keep the ticket prices reasonable for all ages to enjoy through the “generosity of the Essex Wellness Center.”

The Museum’s grounds will open at 6 PM for picnickers to layout blankets and chairs.  Museum staff encourage the audience to make the picnic part of the experience.  In fact, there will be a special prize awarded to the “best” picnic arrangement.

Tickets are $18 for the general public, $12 for museum members, and $10 for children (12 and under).  A cash bar serving beer and wine will be available for theatergoers.  No carry-in alcohol is permitted.

Tickets may be bought at www.ctrivermuseum.org or at the door starting at 6 PM the night of the performance. Curtain opens at 7 PM.

Flock Theatre is a professional, not-for-profit theatre company founded in 1989. The theater company is dedicated to creating original, collaborative and educational theater. Perhaps best known for their long-standing summer Shakespeare in the Arboretum, Flock Theatre performs year-round in a variety of venues, including their winter “nest” at the First Congregational Church, on the New London Pier, at the historic Shaw Mansion Museum and throughout New England.

Essex Wellness Center offers a range of holistic-minded health services, including, Fitness on the Water, a beautiful, private workout studio. The Essex Wellness Center experience is focused solely on you and the achievement of your goals, physically, mentally and emotionally.

For more information on the program, contact the Connecticut River Museum at 860.767.8269 or visit the website, ctrivermuseum.org.  The Connecticut River Museum is dedicated to the study, preservation and celebration of the cultural and natural heritage of the Connecticut River and its Valley.  Explore the three floors of exhibits, take a sail on the Onrust or rent a canoe, kayak or SUP to paddle the coves of Essex when you visit.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

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Bingo is Back at the Estuary Council Thursdays, Doors Open 5:30pm


OLD SAYBROOK —
Beginning June 15 and continuing through Nov. 9, Bingo is back at The Estuary Council of Seniors, Inc. (ECSI) and open to all ages. Game play begins at 6:30 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. The Estuary Council is located at 220 Main Street in Old Saybrook.

Join in on the fun for this weekly event.  Admission, including game package, is $12 per player. Cash prizes with the progressive jackpot maximum payout of $1,000 (increases $100 each week.)  

For more information, call 860-388-1611 or visit www.ecsenior.org

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Essex Foundation Completes Second Phase of Gateway Landscape Project

Sullivan Lawn Service crew members install evergreen shrubs and ornamental perennial plants at the intersection of Route 154 and Route 153 in Essex, the second phase of a landscape beautification project funded by The Essex Foundation.

300+ Perennials Planted Along Intersection of Rte. 154 and Rte. 153 in Essex

ESSEX – Just three months after funding the installation of 12 Chanticleer pear trees along Rte. 154 near the intersection of Rte. 153, The Essex Foundation, Inc. has completed the second phase of a multi-phase gateway beautification project.

Over 300 low-growing, low-maintenance evergreen and perennial ornamentals were planted in the southeast corner of state-owned land in the Rte. 9/ Exit 3 underpass area of Essex. The charitable organization hired Matthew Verry Landscape Design for design planning and state approval oversight while Sullivan Lawn Services, LLC was contracted for the installation services. 

Sullivan Lawn Service crew members install evergreen shrubs and ornamental perennial plants at the intersection of Route 154 and Route 153 in Essex, the second phase of a landscape beautification project funded by The Essex Foundation.

With the goal of creating a colorful, year-round visual display that is both drought-tolerant and pest-resistant, The Essex Foundation board of directors opted for a combination of Vibernum, KnockOut Rose,  Black-eyed Susan, Sedum Autumn Joy and Winterberry. Funds for the cost of the planning, plant purchase and installation were provided through a bequest to The Essex Foundation by the late Elizabeth “Diz” Barnes Callender and her predeceased sister Mary Frances Barnes.

The gateway beautification project, which also included funding for the highway bridge painting, is a good example of the types of community efforts supported by The Essex Foundation.  The Foundation’s community projects tend to be unique, require quick action, and have an immediate impact.

The Essex Foundation was founded in 1970. It is a non profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to making a difference in the lives of Essex residents. The foundation is funded through donations from the community and strives to fill needs not met by other organizations or sources. In general, funds are granted for special purposes, including buildings, equipment, land, and programs, but not to recurring expenses. More information can be found at www.theessexfoundation.org.

PHOTO CAPTION: Sullivan Lawn Service crew members install evergreen shrubs and ornamental perennial plants at the intersection of Route 154 and Route 153 in Essex, the second phase of a landscape beautification project funded by The Essex Foundation.    

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Ready for Some Football? Old Saybrook Conditioning Camp Attracts More Than 40 Youngsters

More than 40 students in Grades 2through 8 participated in the four-day football conditioning camp held at Old Saybrook High School.

OLD SAYBROOK — The coaches from Old Saybrook High School and Old Saybrook Westbrook Youth Football & Cheer (OSW) recently partnered with the Town of Saybrook Parks and Recreation Department to host a four-day football conditioning programming for children from 2nd through 8th grade.

Youth from several towns on the shoreline participated in warm-up exercises and performed drills to learn the fundamentals of football and hone their skills.

Intensity and enthusiasm were evident at all times during the camp.

Coach Ryan Percival founded the program to help shoreline youth learn the fundamentals in a safe and non-competitive environment.

Subsequent to the Old Saybrook High School football coaches and staff joining ranks with the OSW coaches, the program swelled this year to more than 40 participants.

Coach Rob Marone summed up the philosophy of the program, “It’s all about the kids.  We teach skills, but we also emphasize safety, listening, teamwork and respect.”

For more information on the upcoming season or to register for football or cheerleading, visit oswyouthfootball.com.

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Estuary Seeks Line Dancing Instructor

OLD SAYBROOK — The Estuary Council at 220 Main St. in Old Saybrook is looking for a line dancing instructor.

Are you looking for a way to give back to the community? Looking for a volunteer opportunity? The Estuary has a fun group of seniors who love to line dance but need an instructor.

For more information, call Deb at 860-388-1611, ext. 204.

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1772 Foundation Grant Awarded for deKoven House Exterior Maintenance

The historic deKoven House Community Center in Middletown received a grant of $10,700 for exterior maintenance.

MIDDLETOWN — The Rockfall Foundation recently received a matching grant of $10,700 to support exterior maintenance of the historic, 18th century deKoven House Community Center located at 27 Washington Street, Middletown. The grant was awarded by the 1772 Foundation in cooperation with the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and will allow for painting, wood repair, and chimney repointing.

Bequeathed to the Foundation by the organization’s founder, Clarence S. Wadsworth, the deKoven House is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Captain Benjamin Williams House. The brick Georgian mansion was built between 1791 and 1797 and is just yards from the banks of the Connecticut River. Previously renovated with architectural work by Jeffrey Dale Bianco, AIA, the current exterior project is part of a long-range plan to care for the building.

“One of the Rockfall Foundation’s main responsibilities is stewardship of the deKoven House,” said Robin Andreoli, the Foundation’s executive director. “In addition to the Foundation, its offices are occupied by several groups whose missions are concerned with natural resource education, research, and conservation in the Lower Connecticut River Valley.”

Since 1942, the Rockfall Foundation has provided subsidized, low-cost office space in the deKoven House to a variety of nonprofit environmental and educational organizations. Current resident organizations include the Middlesex Land Trust, Connecticut River Conservancy, Connecticut River Coastal Conservation District, Mattabeseck Audubon Society, Connecticut Land Conservation Council, Artists for World Peace, Connecticut Center for Spiritual Living, and the Connecticut Association of Conservation and Inland Wetlands Commission.Two meeting rooms are also available to community groups for use and host more than 150 gatherings per year.

The Rockfall Foundation is a private, non-profit foundation that supports environmental education, conservation programs and planning initiatives in the Lower Connecticut River Valley. Established in 1935, it is one of Connecticut’s oldest environmental organizations. The Foundation annually awards environmental grants to other non-profits and sponsors education programs and symposia.

For additional information, call 860-347-0340 or visit www.rockfallfoundation.org.

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Diabetes Screening Ongoing at the Estuary Council, 2nd & 4th Wednesdays

OLD SAYBROOK — The Estuary Council of Seniors offers diabetes testing for people age 50 and over twice a month at their facility at 220 Main St. Old Saybrook.

Testing is done by a registered nurse, fasting is required and no appointment is necessary.

Testing is available on the 2nd Thursday of each month from 7:30 – 9am and the 4th Wednesday of each month from 7:30 – 9am. There is no charge for this service, donations are welcome.

For additional information call the Estuary Council at 860-388-1611 x 202

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Estuary Hosts “Lunch With Pat,” All Welcome, Sept. 21

The public is invited to attend “Lunch with Pat” on Thursday, Sept. 21, at 12 p.m., at the Estuary Council of Seniors, 220 Main Street, Old Saybrook. This monthly event is hosted by Estuary Board Member Patricia Schneider.

Come for lunch and stay for fun and music with the vocal group “Deep River Chicks.”

Call the Estuary Council of Seniors at 860-388-1611 Ext. 204 to make reservations.  An Ice Cream Social follows at 1:15 p.m.  According to Pat, “Let’s get to know one another …”

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Essex Democrats Endorse Candidates For Municipal Elections

Bipartisan Slate Of Proven Leaders Announced

Incumbent Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman and Selectman Stacia Rice-Libby have been endorsed again for those positions in the November 2017 election by the Essex DTC (File photo by Jerome Wilson)

ESSEX — On Wednesday, July 19, the Essex Democratic Town Committee (EDTC) endorsed 10 candidates for the November municipal elections.  The endorsed candidates included incumbents seeking reelection, new candidates and members of both major politic parties.

“Democrats in Essex endorsed the best candidates to serve our town irrespective of their political party.  What is important is that the candidates are proven leaders in our community and will work to retain the quality of life we all enjoy,” stated Brian Cournoyer, Chairman of the EDTC.

He continued, “By cross-endorsing candidates from the opposing party, the EDTC has rejected the vitriol and damaging rhetoric being played out on the national level,” 

Endorsed Candidates include:

First Selectman: Norm Needleman (D)

Selectwoman:  Stacia Rice-Libby (D)

Town Treasurer:  Jim Francis (D)

Tax Collector: Megan Haskins (D)

Town Clerk: Joel Marzi (R)

Essex Board Of Education: Loretta McCluskey (D)

Region 4 Board of Education: Kate Sandmann (D)

Board of Finance: Keith Crehan (R)

Board of Finance: Ethan Goller (D)

Board of Assessment Appeals: Mark Bombaci (D)

“We believe the endorsed slate of candidates brings the proven experience, knowledge, passion and dedication to best serve the town of Essex and look forward to a spirited and respectful campaign,” said Cournoyer.

Municipal elections will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 7.  Contact Brian Cournoyer at brian_cournoyer@hotmail.com or 781-483-2021 to learn how to become involved in the campaign.

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Senators Formica, Somers and Linares Applaud Governor’s Signing Tribal Casino Expansion Bill

Senator Paul Formica (left) and Art Linares (right). File photo

AREAWIDE — State Senators Paul Formica (R-East Lyme), Heather Somers (R-Groton) and Art Linares (R-Westbrook) applauded the Governor’s ceremonial signing of legislation that will allow for the expansion of southeastern Connecticut’s tribal casinos to support thousands of local jobs.

“I thank the governor for his support of this bill and the bipartisan efforts of many lawmakers. Supporting the tribes is an important piece of a long-term puzzle to enhance tourism, support our community, protect economic development and preserve all that the tribes have accomplished for our region thus far,” said Senator Paul Formica. 

“We have seen firsthand the impact of the tribes on the local economy and on the thousands of casino employees and their families who live in our Senate districts. I applaud the legislature for working together in bipartisanship to make this important piece of legislation a reality,” said Senator Heather Somers.

“From tourism to manufacturing, southeastern Connecticut has seen quality growth thanks to the enormous efforts of the Mohegans and Mashantucket Pequots and the impact of their destination casinos. That’s why it was so important that lawmakers and the governor come together this year to help the tribes protect the thousands of jobs they’ve created,” said Senator Art Linares.

Senator Paul Formica (R-20) represents the communities of Bozrah, East Lyme, a portion of Montville, New London, Old Lyme, a portion of Old Saybrook, Salem, and Waterford.

Senator Heather Somers (R-18) represents the communities of Griswold, Groton, North Stonington, Plainfield, Preston, Sterling, Stonington and Voluntown.

Senator Art Linares (R-33), represents the communities of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland and Westbrook.

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Mr. Gym Comes to Deep River Library This Morning

DEEP RIVER — Get movin’ and groovin’ to the musical stylings of Mr. Gym on Friday, July 21, at 10:30 a.m. Mr. Gym, aka Chris Keithan, is a certified gym/health teacher with 15 years experience in elementary education.

Kids will enjoy his interactive music and parents will love his positive messages about health, fitness and fun. This program is geared for children aged 2 to 8. Free and open to all, no registration required.

Programs are sponsored by the Friends of the Deep River Public Library.

For more information,visit http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, email the Children’s Department at drplchildrensdept@gmail.com or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am to 6 pm; Wednesday 12:30 to 8 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a’m. to 5 p.m. *July and August, Saturday 1 a.m to 2 p.m.

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Ride the Riverboat, Fend Off the Pirates in an Evening of Swashbucklin’ Fun, Aug 2 & 3

Yo-ho-ho, where’s that bottle of rum?!

ESSEX — Yo-ho-ho, thar’ be pirates on that thar’ Riverboat!

Will Captain Paul be able to save the passengers on the Becky Thatcher Riverboat from the nefarious band of pirates known as the Saybrook Swashbucklers?

Join the Essex Steam Train folk for an exciting journey on the “high seas” of the Connecticut River on Aug. 2 and 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. to find out!

Your family won’t want to miss this plunderous adventure– packed with pirates, scallywags and sprogs, lads and lassies in distress, sea shanties, gold doubloons, and one heroic captain, who it is to be hoped can save the day … and there’ll be plenty o’grog to be sure for sale at the bar for the grown-ups.

Seats are limited so brush up on your pirate speak and order your tickets today!

X marks the spot at www.essexsteamtrain.com or call 860-767-0103.

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A La Carte: Bring on the Bountiful Blueberries! Must be Time for a Sour Cream Cake

Blueberry sour cream cake

What would make me think that if I go from one farmer’s market to another, I will find tomatoes at one and not on another? The nice people at Whittle’s told me their tomatoes would not be available until the end of July, but that their sweet corn would be ready in about 10 days.

So I went to Becky’s, in Waterford, and found out that their tomatoes would not be ready for another couple of weeks. Corn? I asked. Not yet, she said.

I looked at the beautiful strawberries/ Are they yours, I wondered? No, they have been gone for a couple of weeks, but the blueberries are just picked, she said. So I got a quart of blueberries, even though I really like the teeny little Maine blueberries rather than the big local cultivated ones.

Just in case the people were wrong at Whittles, I stopped by two days later, a week after I’d stopped before. There was the big sign: Corn. I bought half a dozen, since I am making a corn salad for tomorrow. I peered at the baskets of tomatoes? Yours? I asked. I am sure she recognized me. No, soon, she said.

Feeling like a dweeb, I bought some of the middle Connecticut tomatoes. Truth is, they are delicious, too. As for the corn, just gorgeous.

So this afternoon, I made a recipe given to me by Edie Freeman for the blueberries I got at Becky’s. This recipe is sort of a cake, but also a little like a cheesecake. It calls for a little butter, but sour cream instead of cream. Her family calls it blueberry orgasm. It is really delicious.

Blueberry Sour Cream Cake

From Edie Friedman, cadged from Bon Appetit, sometime in the 80s

Yield: 8 to 12 servings

Butter an 8- or 9-inch springform pan; heat oven to 350 degrees with oven rack in the center

For the cake:

One half cup butter, softened (1 stick)
One-half cup sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
One and one-half cups all-purpose flour
One and one-half teaspoon baking powder
1 quart fresh blueberries, washed and picked over for stems

For the custard:

2 cups sour cream
2 egg yolks
one-half cup sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the cake: In an electric mixer, cream butter and sugar together for about 1 minute. Add egg and vanilla extract. In a separate bowl, whisk flour and baking powder, then add to the mixed ingredients and stir together. Pour batter into prepared springform pan and level the batter. Evenly toss blueberries onto the batter and set aside.

For the custard: Mix well sour cream, egg yolks, sugar and vanilla and pour custard over the blueberries.

Place cake on the rack in the preheated oven and bake about 1 hour or until custard is set. Cool cake in springform pan on a rack on the counter. When cool, run a thin knife around the cake, then open the springform pan. Serve somewhat cool or refrigerate.

While Edie’s recipe says to bring cake to room temperature before serving, I like it colder.

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Join Essex Land Trust Tomorrow for a Butterfly Garden Party

A Great Spangled Fritillary butterfly lands on a coneflower.

ESSEX — The Essex Land Trust (ELT) invites the public to join them for an early evening exploration of ELT’s butterfly habitat on Thursday, July 20, starting at 5:30 p.m. at Cross Lots Preserve, 40 West Avenue, Essex. Anne Penniman will speak about this project and how everyone can do their part in promoting butterflies.

This 1200 square foot bed created in May 2016 includes 850 plants comprising 22 different varieties of perennials and shrubs. The emphasis is on native plants including hyssops, milkweed, indigo, coneflower, asters and many more.

The area includes good forage plants for the caterpillars that will encourage the butterflies to stay rather than just visit. And the selection of plants is also designed to provide a good sequence of blooms across the seasons. The habitat is located on the field that is beside the stonewall rising from the parking lot.

Bring your favorite beverage. Snacks will be provided. Rain date is Thursday, July 27.

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Essex Foundation Provides Support For Essex Place Furnishings

Bruce Glowac. President of The Essex Foundation, Inc. presents a check to Janice Atkeson, President of Essex Elderly and Affordable Housing, Inc. outside Essex Place, the newly constructed affordable senior housing complex on Main Street in Centerbrook.

Foundation underwrites cost of common area furniture in newly constructed senior housing 

ESSEX — Two weeks before the grand opening of Essex Place, a 22-unit, affordable senior rental housing complex developed by Essex Elderly & Affordable Housing, Inc. and the Women’s Institute of Housing & Economic Development, The Essex Foundation was called upon to help cover the cost of furniture for the common area spaces.

Last minute adjustments to the overall project budget left no available resources for completing the already constructed community room, game room, office, and kitchen.  After a thoughtful presentation by Janice Atkeson and Yolanda Lowe, both representing Essex Elderly & Affordable Housing, Inc., members of The Essex Foundation Board of Directors approved the request for financial assistance.

Funds from The Essex Foundation were used to cover the cost of upholstered furniture, dining tables, game tables, occasional tables, stacking chairs, office furniture, and miscellaneous kitchen items.  Essex Place is located at 26 Main Street in the Centerbrook section of Essex, adjacent to the Essex Court senior apartments.

The common areas are accessible to all residents of Essex Place and Essex Court, and will also be used for general meetings and as a designated emergency shelter. Community members who would like to donate to the project can send a check made out to The Essex Foundation, PO Box 64, Essex, CT 06426, indicating that it is for the Essex Place community room.

The Essex Foundation was founded in 1970. It is a non profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to making a difference in the lives of Essex residents. The foundation is funded through donations from the community and strives to fill needs not met by other organizations or sources. In general, funds are granted for special purposes, including buildings, equipment, land, and programs, but not to recurring expenses. More information can be found at www.theessexfoundation.org.

 

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PHOTO CAPTION: Bruce Glowac. President of The Essex Foundation, Inc. presents a check to Janice Atkeson, President of Essex Elderly and Affordable Housing, Inc. outside Essex Place, the newly constructed affordable senior housing complex on Main Street in Centerbrook.

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Essex Art Association Hosts “Wild and Crazy” Late Summer Show Through Sept. 16

‘Steel Vines’ by Ellen Gaube is the signature work in her upcoming show in the Exit Gallery at Essex Art Association.

ESSEX — “Wild and Crazy” is the last open show of the Essex Art Association’s 2017 season. Open shows tend to have a large variety of art subjects and styles for gallery visitors to enjoy. The show’s theme “Wild and Crazy,” encourages artists to let their imaginations take charge and create art that surprises with its originality and style!

Monetary prizes totaling $1,800 will be awarded in addition to the prestigious Exit Gallery Award which offers the winning artist a solo exhibit in the Art Association’s Exit Gallery during the next gallery season.

The show runs Aug. 26 to Sept. 16. The EAA Gallery is located at 10 North Main Street, Essex, CT. Gallery hours: 1-5 pm daily, closed Tuesdays. For more information visit essexartassociation.com or call 860-767-8996. 

The Exit Gallery show, “Scars, Wounds and Other Insults,” is a display of artwork by Ellen Gaube. Gaube received a BFA with a major in Painting and a minor in Art History from Lyme Academy College of Fine Art. Gaube exhibits regularly in national and international shows and has received awards for her drawings.

Show juror Eileen Eder received her MFA from the New York Academy of Art. Eder has won numerous prizes for her work in competitions both locally and nationally, and exhibits widely. For more information on Eder, visit www.eileeneder.com

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CT River Conservancy Launches Source to Sea Jump-In Journey, Celebrating 65 Years of Success

AREAWIDE – To celebrate its 65th anniversary, the Connecticut River Conservancy (CRC), formerly Connecticut River Watershed Council, is traveling the length of the Connecticut River this month to celebrate the many successes that have significantly improved the health of New England’s great river. Just as importantly, this Journey will lay out the work still to be done to meet the legal requirements and public expectations to make our rivers truly clean and full of life.

The Source to Sea Jump-In Journey begins at the source of the Connecticut River near the Canadian border on July 15 and ends at the Long Island Sound on July 30. The Source to Sea Jump-In Journey is an opportunity for everyone who loves our rivers to join CRC in speaking up for our rivers.

The public is invited to join the Source to Sea Jump-In Journey at events celebrating the many ways people use, enjoy, and take sustenance from their rivers. These events include opportunities to directly engage with important issues as well as have fun and celebrate. Opportunities include boating events as well as joining Splash Mobs, ‘flash mob’ style events where groups of river fans will jump in the river to publicly show support for their rivers. To learn more or follow the Journey online, visit www.ctriver.org/s2sjourney.

“Our rivers have come a long way,” says CRC Executive Director Andrew Fisk. “This Journey is retracing a trip taken by one of our trustees in 1959. Back then, they wore gas masks and scooped sludge from the river to highlight pollution problems. On this Journey, we have the pleasure of highlighting how clean our rivers have become and all the awesome ways people use our rivers for recreation. But our rivers still face challenges every single day. Our job is to find environmental problems and help solve them.”

The important work that remains to be done includes:

  • Removing deadbeat dams and making flood ready culverts to connect habitat and protect infrastructure
  • Restoring migratory fish populations so that millions of fish return each year
  • Fighting roll-backs of environmental regulations that protect our rivers, streams and lakes
  • Investing in aging and outdated water and wastewater infrastructure

CRC Executive Director Andrew Fisk and his wife Karen will make the trip down the Connecticut River.

The two most local events on the itinerary are as follows:

Saturday, July 29
What: 43rd Connecticut River Raft Race & Splash Mob
Where: Portland, CT
Details: 10am – 2pm, 43rd Annual Connecticut River Raft Race, Race begins at Gildersleeve Island and ends at the Portland Riverside Marina
Large community event with very creative rafts being raced.

What: Bass Fishing
Where: Salmon River boat launch E. Haddam, CT (Rt 149, E Haddam Moodus Road)
Details:  4:00 – 8:00 pm

Sunday, July 30
What: Onrust Cruise with CT River Museum
Where: Connecticut River Museum, Essex, CT
Details: 4 – 8pm, Join Connecticut River Museum and Connecticut River Conservancy to celebrate the completion of the Source to Sea Jump In Journey, food & drinks provided.
Sunset sail to the Sound on the historic Onrust, a replica of Dutch explorer Adriaen Block’s 1614 vessel, the first European ship to sail up the Connecticut River

What: Kayak the Salmon River & Pizza Party, Splash Mob
Where: Haddam, CT
Details: Paddle 10am – 12pm, Pizza Party 12 – 2pm

The remainder of the itinerary is as follows:

Sunday, July 16
What: Hike to the source of the Connecticut River, 4th Connecticut Lake to launch the journey
Where: Pittsburg, NH

Monday, July 17 to Wednesday, July 19
What: Paddle the upper reaches
Where: Canaan, VT to Guildhall, NH

Thursday, July 20
What: Pontoon Boat trip & Splash Mob
Where: Hanover, NH

Friday, July 21
What: River Parade & Community Paddle, Splash Mob
Where: Lyme, NH / Thetford, VT
Details: Launch from Orford, NH boat ramp, Paddle 1:30-3:30pm, Celebration at 599 River Road Lyme, NH 3:30-4:30pm. Lyme Town Band will perform on boats on river joined by flotilla of paddling friends.

Saturday, July 22
What: Reception & Community Conversation
Where: Windsor Welcome Center, 3 Railroad Ave., Windsor, VT
4-6pm, Walking tours of Windsor river recreation projects.

What: Float with the Kennetticut River Pigs & Splash Mob
Where: Cornish to Claremont, NH
Details: Paddle Launch at11am, near the Cornish-Windsor covered bridge.

Sunday, July 23
What: Riverboat Cruise with Tribal Leaders
Where: Northfield Mtn Recreation Facility, 99 Millers Falls Rd, Northfield, MA
Details: 12:45 – 3pm, Cruise departs from Riverview picnic area dock.
David Brule from Nolumbeka Project (MA), Roger Longtoe Sheehan Chief of Elnu Abenaki tribe (VT), and Rich Holschuh of VT Commission for Native American Affairs will speak about the Native American history of the river and their vision for its future.
What: Scuba Diving & Splash Mob
Where: Brattleboro, VT

Monday, July 24
What: Honor David Deen’s Retirement with CRC
Where: Whetstone Station, Brattleboro, VT
Details: 4-7pm, Recognize David Deen’s retirement after 19 years as River Steward with CRC and welcome new River Steward, Kathy Urffer.

Tuesday, July 25
What: Waterskiing at the Oxbow & Splash Mob
Where: Easthampton, MA

Wednesday, July 26
What: Watch a Dragon Boat Race & Splash Mob
Where: Northampton Community Rowing & Connecticut River Greenway Park, 80 Damon Road,Northampton, MA
Details: Approx 5:30 – 7pm, Watch a dragon boat challenge race with the Paradise City Dragon boat team and several of our local officials and community members. Learn relationship to Cancer Connection.

Thursday, July 27
What: Rowing Flotilla & Splash Mob
Where: Holyoke to Springfield, MA
Details: Time TBD, Rowing activities start at Holyoke Rows, 25 Jones Ferry Rd in Holyoke, and finish at Pioneer Valley Riverfront Club at the North Riverfront Park, 121 West Street, Springfield, MA. 

Friday, July 28
What: E. Windsor American Heritage River Commission Paddle & Picnic
Where: East Windsor, CT
Details: Approx. 2 – 6pm, Launch at Kings Island boat ramp in Enfield, CT. End paddle & picnic at Volunteer Park in E. Windsor, CT.
Paddle with an active group of local citizens who have worked to maintain the legacy of the American Heritage River designation of the CT River

What: Air-boating with Conte Refuge
Where: Enfield & Hartford, CT

 

Since 1952, Connecticut River Conservancy has been the voice for the Connecticut River watershed, from source to sea. We collaborate with partners across four states to protect and advocate for your rivers and educate and engage communities. We bring people together to prevent pollution, improve habitat, and promote enjoyment of your river and its tributary streams. Healthy rivers support healthy economies. To learn more about CRC, or to make a contribution to help protect the Connecticut River, visit www.ctriver.org.

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Deep River Parade Kicks Off at 11am Today, Followed by Muster

Screen Shot 2015-07-16 at 8.09.56 PM

Photo credit: Town of Deep River website.

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Ancient Muster is the oldest and largest gathering of fife and drum participants and enthusiasts in the world and has been referred to as “The Granddaddy of All Musters” and “A Colonial Woodstock.”  The Parade and Muster will be held again this Saturday — the Muster is always held the third Saturday in July — and the Tattoo takes place Friday evening.

The Parade starts at 11 a.m. at the corner of Main and Kirtland Streets and proceeds down Main Street to Devitt’s Field. The host corps is the Deep River Ancient Muster Committee and the Deep River Drum Corps.

The Muster starts immediately following the parade at Devitt’s Field.  Roads will be closed at 10:30 a.m.

The Tattoo starts Friday at 7 p.m. at Devitt’s Field with the host corps being the Deep River Junior Ancients

Parking will be available in several locations along Main Street, Deep River Congregational Church, The Stone House, Deep River Hardware, Deep River Public Library and Rte. 80.

Click here to read an article by Caryn B. Davis about Fife and Drum Corps and published on AmericanProfile.com.

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Old Lyme First Selectwoman Hails FRA ‘Record of Decision’ as a Victory, CT Historic Trust’s Stroud Urges Caution

Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder

AREAWIDE — Almost unable to contain her delight, Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder told LymeLine.com in a phone call Wednesday afternoon that she was absolutely delighted with the Record of Decision (ROD) announced today by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), which takes the proposed Old Saybrook to Kenyon by-pass, “… out of the plan.” “It’s exactly what we asked for,” she said with noticeable emotion in her voice, adding excitedly, “We fought Goliath and we won.”

Reemsnyder acknowledged that the area between New Haven and Providence has been identified by the FRA as a “study area,” but said firmly that the idea of the by-pass has now been “eliminated,” and “… cannot be reinstated.” She added enthusiastically, “This is a great day for Old Lyme!”

Reemsnyder noted she had been concerned all the way through the process as to whether enough had been done by the Town, while also being told unequivocally, “The FRA will not be bullied by a small town.”  In the final analysis, she said, “The plan will be what it should have been from the beginning …” meaning that the Connecticut and Rhode Island DOT’s will work together to find a solution that does not ignore the residents.

Greg Stroud

In a more measured response, Greg Stroud, Executive Director of Special Projects at Connecticut Historic Trust, who has worked tirelessly against the FRA proposal in the northeast — especially in southeastern Connecticut — noted in a telephone conversation yesterday with LymeLine.com that the ROD is “very good news” for southeast Connecticut, but also cautioned, “We can’t declare victory.”  He said that unquestionably the ROD offers “breathing room,” but declared firmly that the work is “far from over.”

Commenting on the major effect of the opposition to the proposal, Stroud said, “The communities of southeast Connecticut have shown a united front against the by-pass.” He added that the unfailing support of Senator Richard Blumenthal and Congressman Joe Courtney had been “key” in achieving the result and would be “very influential in the work ahead to find a better solution.”  Stroud also commended the  significant input of State Rep. Devin Carney and State Senator Paul Formica.

Looking to the future, Stroud said in a post on the SECoast Facebook page, “This Record of Decision does not assure a good solution, nor does it assure a better process, it does however, provide the communities of southeastern Connecticut with a some breathing room. As we move forward SECoastand the Connecticut Trust will continue to engage this issue, and push for a better planning process in the next stage.”

Editor’s Note: Read full details of the FRA’s Record of Decision at this link.

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Saybrook Stage Presents ‘Barefoot in the Park’ at ‘the Kate’ Through Saturday

The cast of ‘Barefoot in the Park’ gather for a photo.

OLD SAYBROOK — The Saybrook Stage Company presents “Barefoot in the Park” by Neil Simon at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, ‘the Kate,’ July 13 through July 15, at 8 p.m. with matinées July 15, at 2 p.m. and Sunday, July 16, at 3 p.m.

Neil Simon is at his best in this hilarious and touching romantic comedy about a conservative straight-as-an-arrow young lawyer and his free-spirited new bride. They are newlyweds in every sense of the word – still giddy from their over-the-top honeymoon at The Plaza – and now find themselves in a less-than-perfect Greenwich Village fifth-floor walkup in New York City.

The pricey apartment with bad plumbing and in need of a paint job is only the beginning of their rocky happily-ever-after life. The play is clever and funny, filled with snappy dialogue and witty one-liners. – Neil Simon is simply masterful in this 1960’s story of newlywed life.

A rehearsal scene from ‘Barefoot in the Park.’

The comedy unfolds as the couple moves into their new apartment and receives a surprise visit from the bride’s easily-winded, loopy mother and decide to play matchmaker during a dinner with their neighbor in-the-attic – where everything that can go wrong does. The antics just get started as the mother and neighbor surprisingly get along better than anyone expected; while the newlyweds can only argue. The bride thinks the groom is too staid and boring – she wants him to be more spontaneous – and running barefoot in the park would be a nice start!

“Barefoot in the Park” originally opened in 1963 to rave reviews and was nominated for three Tony Awards. The play ran for over 1530 performances making it Neil Simon’s longest running Broadway hit. The New York Times wrote at the time “I don’t think anybody stopped laughing while the curtain was up”.

The Saybrook Stage Company is pleased to return once again to The Kate in Neil Simon’s romantic comedy directed by Jim Hile. This will be their 14th production at The Kate and the second Neil Simon play having performed “Rumors” in July 2014 – the more recent previous plays are Noises Off, Deathtrap, The Wayside Motor Inn, Moon Over Buffalo and this past January, The Farnsworth Invention.

Visit www.thekate.org or call 877.503.1286 and reserve your tickets now. Also, visit www.SaybrookStage.org for more information about The Saybrook Stage Company.

The Saybrook Stage Company was founded as a non-profit organization dedicated to providing quality local theater on the Connecticut Shoreline at the Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center. Saybrook Stage welcomes actors of all levels and abilities – and anyone who genuinely loves the arts – to come together and share in the experience that only live theater can provide.

The actors that have been part of The Saybrook Stage Company to date have varied backgrounds and “day jobs” from teachers, artists and homemakers to lawyers, business people and judges. The Company looks forward to producing many more quality productions at the beautiful venue of The Kate and continuing to thrive in this wonderful, artistic region of Connecticut.

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Deven Spear Named Chief Innovation Officer at ‘Overabove’ in Essex

ESSEX — Deven Spear has joined Connecticut-based Overabove as the strategic marketing firm’s Chief Innovation Officer.

Former managing partner of Spear Consultants Ltd. and CEO and founder of BrightDoor Systems,
Inc., Spear previously partnered with the Overabove team on successful sales and marketing
engagements including Homestead Preserve in Virginia and New Hampshire’s Mount Washington
Resort.

“Joining Overabove gives me a great opportunity to apply the lessons I’ve learned in real estate
sales and marketing to a wide variety of Overabove clients,” comments Spear, who notes the firm is
also developing targeted strategies for Fortune 500 high-tech companies.

In addition to cultivating new business opportunities for Overabove, Spear is closely involved in
Overabove’s work on strategic marketing for Wildlight, a new community being developed by
Rayonier’s community development subsidiary Raydient People + Places.

“Overabove was built for the way people consume information today,” states cofounder and
principal John Visgilio, “and digital is changing everything.” Hiring Deven to focus on marketing
technology is another step in the firm’s continuing evolution as a disruptive marketing leader, he
notes.

Editor’s Note: Overabove is a full-service strategic marketing firm located in Essex, Conn. The company was built from the start for the way people consume information today.

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A la Carte: Savor Mexican Quinoa Salad with Black Beans, Corn and Tomatoes

Mexican quinoa salad

This year out boules group will play a few more games than our usual seven or eight parties. For those of us who no longer have courts of our own, and I am one of those, I could use all the extra play I can get.

The first couple of years, all our games were pot luck. Not only were some of the members amazing players (many of our French players had been playing since childhood) and many of those same players were way beyond the rest of us when it came to cooking (Jacques Pepin, Claude Martin, Jean-Michel Scammarello) and Jean Pierre Vuillermet, Michel Nishan, Priscilla Martel and Charlie Van Over),. The parties became incredible food memories.

This year will probably be the same, but, as I mentioned, with more league play, there will be a few more pot luck dinners. Since I am among the not-so-terrific players and far from the best cooks, pot luck is my métier, to put a French lick on it.

For my teams, Marla is our captain and she has to heed to a gluten-free menu, which means there are many dishes she can’t even taste. For our first pot luck game in mid-July, I am making a salad that includes quinoa, black beans, sweet corn and fresh-from-the-garden tomatoes. The fact that I love all these ingredients will make me as happy as Marla. I am tripling the recipe so that it will serve at least 15 people.

Mexican Quinoa Salad with Black Beans, Corn and Tomatoes

Adapted from SimplyRecipes.com, by Elise Bauer

3 cups uncooked quinoa, well rinsed
1 teaspoon salt
6 cups water
1 cup diced red onion
6 tablespoons lime juice
3 15-ounce cans black beans, drained and rinsed
3 cups frozen corn or 3 cups fresh corn kernels parboiled, drained and cooled
9 medium tomatoes, seeded and cut into chunks (grape tomatoes, halved, would be good, too)
12 ounces queso fresco or fresh mozzarella cut into one-quarter or one-half inch cubes
2 jalapeño, seeded and finely chopped
One-half cup chopped cilantro, including tender stems, packed
One-quarter cup olive oil (or your own vinaigrette)*

Put rinsed quinoa, salt and water into a pot and bring to a boil. Cover and simmer gently until quinoa absorbs all the water, about 10-15 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit for 5 minutes. Place in a large bowl and fluff up with a fork to help it call more quickly.

While quinoa is cooking, prepare rest of the salad: soak red onions I lime juice and set aside (soaking onions in lime juice helps take the edge of the onions.) Mix prepped beans, corn kernels, tomatoes, cheese, jalapenos, cilantro and oil (or vinaigrette) into a large bowl.

When quinoa has cooled, mix it into the bean mixture. Add onions and lime juice, add salt, more oil or time to taste. Serve at room temperature.

*If you would like my own vinaigrette (which makes a lot and will keep in refrigerator for a month, e-mail me at leeawhite@aol.com.

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Maple & Main Hosts Special Poetry Reading Tonight; Open to Public

Members of the Connecticut River Poetry Conference gather for a photo.

CHESTER — Members of the prestigious Connecticut River Poetry Conference will do a reading in the round in Maple and Main’s Stone Gallery Wednesday, July 19, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. A reception of wine and food follows.

This unusual event, open to the public, is the second year the group has read in the Stone Gallery where “Sharing the Vision,’’ a two-woman exhibit by Maple and Main artists Linda DeStefanis and Barbara Rossitto is being shown during July.

‘Beach Day’ by Barbara Rossitto is a signature painting for the new show at Maple & Main.

For the past seven years a singular group of poets meets for a summer week of workshops, seminars, readings, camaraderie and literary high-jinx at Chester’s Guest House Conference Center Shoreline. Gray Jacobik, a poet and Maple and Main artist and Nancy Fitz-Hugh Meneely founded this conference, which grew out of an advanced poetry seminar at The Frost Place in Franconia, NH.

‘Mandarin Sky II’ by Linda DeStefanis is featured in the two-woman show at Maple & Main Gallery.

Jacobik and Meneely will be joined by notable and much-published poets: Ruth Foley of Attleboro, MA., Sharon Olson of Lawrenceville, NJ., Carole Stasiowski of Cotuit, MA., Hiram Larew of Upper Marlboro, MD., Anne Harding Woodworth of Washington, D.C., and Lawrence Wray of Pittsburgh, PA.

Maple and Main, at One Maple Street, is open Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 6 p.m.; Friday, noon to 7 p.m.; Saturday, noon to  7 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mapleandmaingallery.com; 860-526-60605; mapleandmain@att.net; visit the gallery on Facebook and Instagram.

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The Country School Offers Fun, Learning Opportunities Throughout the Summer

Budding authors craft their own stories and enjoy collaborative writing in Word Play: Creative Writing at The Country School. Check out the school’s July and August offerings: Victory and Shoreline FC Soccer, Intro to A Cappella, Intro to Algebra, Young Actors, and Beginning Robotics. 

AREAWIDE — Each year the offerings at Country School’s Summer Fun and Learning become more engaging and more popular with area families. Not limited to students at The Country School, children in grades PreK-8 are welcome to attend the full or half-day week-long programs, all of which take place on the school’s newly appointed 23-acre campus in Madison.

Whether you’re searching for something academic, artistic, or athletic, The Country School has got you covered. Country School teachers, outside educators and professionals, athletes, and alumni will present workshops throughout the summer.

Academic camps include Scratch, Minecraft and Crafting, 3-D Printing, Beginning Robotics, Robotics for Girls, Intro to Algebra, Word Play Creative Writing, Exploring Media and Technology, Debate, and Learning Olympics.

Recording thoughts in her writer’s notebook for the camp Word Play: Creative Writing at The Country School.

More interested in the arts? Check out Intro to A Cappella, Young Actors’ Workshop, and Art Adventure. Need to release some energy? Multi Sport Camp with Madison Racquet and Swim Club, Soccer with Victory or Shoreline FC, and Running will keep the children moving.

Learn more about these camps at http://www.thecountryschool.org/summer2017. Follow your passions and discover new ones.

Editor’s Note: Founded in 1955, The Country School serves 200 students in PreSchool-Grade 8 on its 23-acre campus in Madison. The Country School is committed to active, hands-on learning and a vigorous curriculum that engages the whole child. Signature programs such as Elmore Leadership, Public Speaking, STEAM, and Outdoor Education help prepare students for success in high school and beyond. Learn more at www.thecountryschool.org.

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Join Essex Land Trust to Trail Blaze Invasive Plants Today on Johnson Farm


ESSEX —
Want to help control invasive plants at Johnson Farm?

Join Essex Land Trust Stewards Geoff Furtney and Dana Hill Saturday, July 8, in identifying, managing and clearing invasive plants on Johnson Farm.  In line with the Land Trust’s mission, of maintaining properties in a natural state, this group is working to address the presence of invasive plants on our properties.

This is a work project so bring loppers, clippers and heavy work gloves. All ages and abilities welcome.

Meet at parking lot off Read Hill Rd. at 9 a.m. Read Hill Rd. is accessed off Comstock Avenue in Ivoryton. Rain date July 9.

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It’s ‘First Friday’ Tonight, Celebrate ‘The Rest of Chester’ From 5 to 7pm

A Sosse Baker original basket at Blackkat Leather.

CHESTER — ‘The Rest of Chester’ will be celebrated at “Biz Bash” tonight on “First Friday,” from 5 to 7 p.m. when businesses from outside the downtown will set up on Main Street with giveaways, demonstrations and drawings.

Come visit with an alpaca farmer, a picture framer and an art therapist or take a turn on a gym’s treadmill, get a brush out from a hair stylist, enjoy chocolate chip cookies, watch a demonstration of camp songs and more.

Meanwhile, all the restaurants, shops and galleries in the center will be open late with special offerings.

There are two art opening receptions that night at Maple and Main Gallery for a pair of shows running through July.

‘Beach Day’ by Barbara Rosetti is a signature painting for the new show at Maple & Main.

The first is Sharing the Vision, a two-woman show of new paintings by long-time gallery artists Barbara Rossitto and Linda DeStefanis in the Stone Gallery and a show of sculptures by the Connecticut Society of Sculpture in the main gallery.

At Blackkat Leather, well-known local basket maker Sosse Baker’s work will be featured and wine and snacks will be served. Strut Your Mutt will also be serving wine.

Lark is highlighting Olivia Engel, a jewelry designer from West Hartford while

L&E will be selling dollar oysters at the bar and serving a First Friday French Cocktail.

Refreshments will be served at the Historical Society’s Museum at the Mill and visitors will be able to see the new exhibit, Three Chester Notables.

This tempting summer cocktail will be served at L&E on Chester’s upcoming First Friday.

Bastille Day (July 14) is being kicked off at The Perfect Pear with 14 percent off while porcelain and ceramic ware and samples of a red, white and blue bundt cake will be available.

To celebrate its one year anniversary in town, The French Hen will be serving special sips, bites and sale and at Dina Varano Gallery, new jewelry designs by Dina and a new line of porcelain by Elizabeth Benotti will be introduced.

 

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Cappella Cantorum Presents Men’s Chorus Concert in Centerbrook, Sunday

Cappella Cantorum’s Men’s Chorus sings ‘Music from Around the World,’ Sunday. Members of the group shown in the photo above are from left to right, (front row) Norm Andrea, Dean Cloutier, Bob Stosse, Rolf Perterson, Barry Asch , Deborah Lyon, Len Dongweck, Tony Carrano, John Van Epps, Bob Johnson; (back row) Dud Bickford, Michael Minkos, Tor Hepburn, Alan Macgregor, Larry Morse, Fred Johnson, John Newman, Missing-Tom Speer, Ed Bosse. The Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus includes members from a dozen Shoreline Communities

CENTERBROOK — Cappella Cantorum will present the final Men’s Chorus Concert of this season, Sunday, July 9, at 3 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 109 Main St., Centerbrook,. The Chorus will present an extraordinary afternoon of great male choral music under the direction of Barry B. Asch with accompanist Deborah Lyon.

This performance will be followed by a reception.

“Music From Around the World”  includes: Brothers, Sing On! Viva L’Amour, Cantique de Jean Racine, Ezekiel Saw de Wheel, Johny Cash Medley and Hallelujah, Leonard Cohen.

Tickets are $20 at the door or www.CappellaCantorum.org

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Pettipaug Sailing Academy Teaches Young Sailors Their Craft


ESSEX —
The staff of the Pettipaug Sailing Academy is currently in the throes of teaching over 300 young students how to sail a sailboat. Instruction occurs mainly in sailboats on the water.

Although a staff member cruises around in a motor boat, when students capsize their sailboats, it is their responsibility whenever possible to right the vessel, climb on board and start sailing again.

Initially, many of the boats capsize but after a few embarrassing dunkings, the sailing students quickly learn their preference is to sail rather than capsize!

Some more photo highlights of the Petttipaug Sailing Academy’s Class of 2017 follow.

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Reading Uncertainly? ‘The Tide’ by Hugh Aldersey-Williams

A present from a New Hampshire daughter, The Tide is a delightful, entertaining, and thought-provoking mix of lucid, often poetic, language with numerous literary quotations plus detailed scientific explanations of the tides that embellish our lives on this earth. It is Aldersey-Williams’s thought-experiment.

It is also his history of the oceanic tides, mixed with a bit of mathematics. But not more than you can handle. As he notes, “You may be relieved to know that I will leave the mathematics aside here.” And, given that many tell us the world’s tides are soon to be much higher, this is a most worthwhile book.

It is, as he states, “not a book about the sea” (sailors, ships, and winds), but rather a book “about the seas” and the ever-changing space between land and water. The tide, he explains, “offers an irresistible mathematical tease” as we attempt to understand and predict it. It is both a horizontal and a vertical force. That is a “scientific challenge” and “a physical; and psychological influence on our culture.” The classic story of King Canute’s (or Cnut, as the author spells it) attempt to stem the tide may have altered the English view of nobility.

This is the author’s story of watching tides around the world, from the English Channel to, of all places, Griswold Point on the Connecticut River, with a cousin, David Redfield. Tides are entrancing: they give us slow, relative motion that produces a “hallucinatory feeling.” Water is, after all, “an inelastic fluid (that) cannot be compressed or expanded.” I too have been mesmerized: by the 10-foot tides in Tenants Harbor, Maine; by the rising waters in Bosham, West Sussex, England, that regularly swamp cars in the local bar’s parking lot; and by the rushing tidal currents in the Straits of Shimonoseki, between Honshu and Kyushu, Japan, through which we once sent our Navy ship (at slack water, of course!)

He acknowledges the inevitability of climate change and global warming, and the fact they will lead to rising seas: “The greatest impact of rising sea levels and the changing tides that may accompany them will be on human habitation.” After all, we easily succumb to the human drive to cling to shores. “In the long term, if not the short, ‘managed retreat’ is our only option. The sea always wins in the end.”

Trying to ‘stop the sea? “It is a futility that Sisyphus would understand all too well.” So New York is a potential Venice … and New London too!

But do not be deterred by such pessimism. The Tide is full of rich, poetic language, as in this description of birds above the sea: “Once aloft, the birds first coalesce as an egg-shaped cloud low over the water, before gaining height and taking on ever more extravagant, twisted shapes like a pixelated flamenco dancer.”

It is enough to send me down to the end of Ely’s Ferry Road to watch the Connecticut River slip by the marshes of Essex.

Editor’s Note: ‘The Tide’ by Hugh Aldersey-Williams was published by W. W. Norton, New York 2016.

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction that explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farms Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His wife, Ann, is also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a bubbling village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visit every summer.

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So Much to See This Summer at Chester Museum at The Mill

A front view of Chester Museum at the Mill. Photo from chesterhistoricalsociety.org.

Upstairs and down, all the new Chester history being featured at the Chester Museum at The Mill this year will delight you.

Downstairs is the seasonal exhibit prepared by Keith Dauer and Sandy Senior-Dauer, called “Chester Postcards & Three Chester Notables.” There are more than 200 Chester postcards on display as well as exhibits devoted to three people who lived in or impacted Chester, namely, Judge Constance Baker Motley, The Leatherman (see the life-size sculpture made by Weymouth Eustis), and photographer Hugh Spencer.

There is a replica of the Waterhouse Gristmill, intricately and lovingly handcrafted by Nathan Jacobson, in the entry level. And on the second floor, there’s a redo of the Museum’s permanent exhibit, which now includes a replica of Chester Pharmacy’s soda fountain (guaranteed to make you hungry!)

Museum hours are Saturdays 1 to 4 p.m. and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and admission is free (but donations are always welcome to help the Historical Society continue to collect and preserve items of Chester history).

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A La Carte: Corn Chowder with Lobster Makes Perfect Ending to Beach Day

Corn chowder

There are beach days and there are beach days.

I am not sure there has ever been a summer that didn’t include a salt-water vacation.

As a baby, toddler and teenager, there was Belmar, N.J. I had Angrist and Kasdan cousins who lived there full-time, although the two Angrist brothers worked in New York City, one as a librarian at CCNY and the other a pathologist at Albert Einstein medical school.

Charlie’s wife, Claire Kasdan Angrist, was a teacher of French as Asbury High School. Her twin brother had a son, who became a well known movie director. Claire and her sister, Sylvia Angrist, had married brothers. Claire and Sylvia used to play Scrabble in French.

And every day the sun shone, there was the beach.

Today is July 4, 2017. And today was a beach day as glorious as any I can remember.

Today, too, were two beach stories in The Day. On the front page was a story about the Miami Beach Association fencing in Old Lyme to stop a “significant increase in the inappropriate behavior of persons using the beach.” The second story, first page of the second section, was a feature saying Groton’s Eastern Point Beach “concession stand still serving up favorites”

My beach used to be Old Lyme. You needed a beach pass and there were very few parking places, but it wasn’t fenced.

Today, my beach is the one in Groton. As a City of Groton citizen, and an old woman, too, it costs $11 for the season. The beach is gorgeous and huge. And on this gorgeous, sunny Fourth of July, as I left the beach to go home to write this column, there are dozens more parking places available and the $1.75 foot-long hot dog is as good as it ever was, as long as a gull doesn’t get to it first.

Summer doesn’t get much better than this. And just imagine, fresh tomatoes and sweet corn are still to come. I still have packets of the latter in the freezer and I bought some lobster to go with it.

Corn Chowder

Adapted a lot from an 1964 edition of Joy of Cooking

One of the best things about this recipe is there is neither butter nor heavy cream in this recipe. Sure, some salt pork for flavoring, but this is pretty healthy.

Yield: serves 6 to 8 as a main dish with a salad and maybe some good bread

2 tablespoons olive oil
6 to 8 ounces salt pork, diced
One-half cup chopped onions
One-half cup chopped celery
1 green pepper, seeded and chopped
1 and one-half cups peeled diced raw potatoes (with Yukon Gold, you needn’t peel)
2 cups water
One-half teaspoon salt
One-half teaspoon paprika
1 bay leaf
3 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk*
6 to 8 ears of fresh corn, blanched for 2 minutes in boiling water, then drained in iced water
Meat from claws and tail of one and one-half to two-pound cooked lobster, cut into small chunks
3 cups hot milk*
Chopped fresh tarragon, and more for garnish
Salt and pepper to taste

Pour oil into a heated, heavy-bottomed stock pot, add salt pork and sauté until browned.
Add onions, celery and green pepper and sauté until translucent.
Add potatoes, water, salt, paprika and bay leaf and simmer until potatoes are soft, around 15 minutes.
Add flour and 1 cup of milk and stir until mixture is thick.

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Run ‘Four-on-the Fourth’ in Chester Today! Registration Opens at 7am

In this 2016 Al Malpa photo,  runners in last year’s ‘Four on the Fourth’ are seen at the start of the popular race.

CHESTER — The 39th Annual Four-on-the Fourth Road Race sponsored by the Chester Rotary will take place tomorrow, Tuesday, July 4.

The race will start at 9 a.m. tomorrow and early registration takes place today, Monday, July 3, from 4 to 6 p.m. Race day registration will be from 7 to 8:30 a.m.  Registration will be held at St. Joseph’s Parish Center, 48 Middlesex Avenue, Chester.

On-line pre-entry is encouraged through www.Active.com.  Teams must pre-register on-line.

Pre-registered runners may pick up their packets either during early registration on Monday or on race day.   Information for this year’s event and a link to www.Active.com  are available at the club’s website, www.chesterrotary.org.

Chester Rotarians are dedicated to providing funding and service to local, national and international charitable organizations.  All proceeds from this event support these causes.

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Organizers of Ivoryton’s Fourth of July Parade Invite Participants

ESSEX — The Ivoryton Fourth of July Parade Committee invites all who are interested in participating in this year’s parade to sign up and march! Groups, organizations, businesses, individuals are welcome. March on foot, pull a wagon, ride a bike, drive a tractor or any other vehicle.
Musicians: we’d love to have you!
Animals: fantastic! Decorate in our nation’s red, white and blue and join the fun.
The 2017 4th of July Parade will be held on Tuesday, July 4. This year’s parade honors the Essex Ambulance Association Volunteers. Parade steps off at 10 a.m. A short ceremony follows the parade at the Ivoryton Park Gazebo.
Are you interested? Contact Cotty Barlow at cmbarlow@snet.net.
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Summer Show on View at Maple & Main Thru Sept. 3

‘The Way we Wore’ by Claudia Van Nes of Chester is a signature painting of the ‘Summer Exhibit’ at Maple & main.

CHESTER – The opening reception for the Summer Exhibit at Maple and Main Gallery is Saturday, June 24, from 6 to 8 p.m. when newly created works by 55 artists will be shown.

Wine and a variety of appetizers will be served and live music will be played by Alan James, an accomplished musician and artist from Deep River who is also showing his watercolors in the show.

The artists featured in the Summer Exhibit are from all corners of Connecticut and beyond and their work ranges from luminous landscapes to abstract multimedia works. The show runs through September 3.

“Summer Tides,” a solo show of beach, water and marine scenes by Rhode Island artist Vanessa Piche is on view in the Stone Gallery through June. There is a small, special exhibit of paintings in the main gallery by Bob Dietz who will do a demonstration of pastel painting Saturday, June 25 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Maple and Main Galley, at One Maple Street, is open Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 6 p.m.; Friday, noon to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mapleandmaingallery.com; 860-526-6065; mapleandmain@att.net. Visit the gallery on Facebook and Instagram.

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