November 22, 2017

Archives for September 2017

Final Day Today to Enjoy Ivoryton Farmers Market This Season

ESSEX — The Ivoryton Village Farmers Market is turning seven! Each Saturday starting at 10 a.m., the Ivoryton Green will be bustling with vendors showcasing Connecticut-grown products and prepared foods, creations from local artisans and crafters, and live music every week.

Each week. June 17 thru Sept 30, seasonal produce, meats, fish, cheeses, milk, ice cream, garlic, maple syrup, honey, coffee, flowers, shrubs, jams and jellies, bakery items and more will be available. Between 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., families are invited to visit Ivoryton, shop the market and enjoy live music playing each week in the Gazebo. New this year is our once a month, Lawnapalloza, free fun games for the whole family.

Sponsored by the Ivoryton Village Alliance, and located next to the iconic Ivoryton Playhouse, the mission of the Ivoryton Village Farmers Market is a simple one – to bring the farm to your table. Market Manager David Sousa says, “We offer fresh, locally grown food to our customers, and it’s a great way for everyone to learn about where their food comes from.”

More information at www.ivorytonfarmersmarket.com.

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Opera Expert Offers ‘Don Giovanni’ Lecture Today at OS Library

Opera writer and lecturer James Kuslan will give a free lecture at Acton Library, Sept. 30.

OLD SAYBROOK — Opera devotee and popular dynamic lecturer on operatic topics, James Kuslan, will present an informative program on Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” on Saturday, Sept. 30 at the Acton Public Library, 60 Old Boston Post Road, Old Saybrook, CT., 11 a.m.  This event is free, and sponsored by the Guild of Salt Marsh Opera.  Kuslan  will recap the plot of the opera and provide sound clips to highlight the music.

Kuslan is a graduate of Yale University’s School of Drama and has been a voice scout in the United States for the German classical recording giant, Deutsche Grammophon.  He contributed the essays that accompany the DVD releases of the Metropolitan Opera’s productions of Lucia di Lammermoor and Don Pasquale, both starring Anna Netrebko.

Salt Marsh Opera will present Mozart’s “Don Giovanni” on Friday and Sunday, Oct. 13 and 15, at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, 300 Main St. Old Saybrook.

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‘Cruise, Blues & Brews’ Festival Today Features Top CT Blues Bands, Benefits ‘At-Risk Boys’ 

CHESTER — When organizers for the 3rd Annual Cruise, Blues & Brews Festival approached legendary local blues performer Ramblin’ Dan Stevens, they received immediate and enthusiastic support. Stevens had the connections and the passion to recruit top blues talent for this unique festival to benefit the At-Risk Boys Fund.

“As soon as I was asked to help, I was confident my friends at the Connecticut Blues Society and fellow Blues musicians would want to help this important cause, and have a lot of fun doing it too” says Dan Stevens. Turns out, Dan was right. Ed Stack, Connecticut Blues Society President, promptly started promoting the Cruise Blues & Brews Festival to all the Society’s members to help boost attendance and raise more money for the At-Risk Boys Fund.

Stevens’ Blues musician friends were quick to respond too. One by one six bands agreed to perform on the Festival Stage between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. “We’ve got some of the best blues artist in Connecticut, many of whom have represented our state at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis TN, with several advancing to the finals. I’m so grateful they agreed to help in raising money and awareness for this great cause” says Stevens.

Here is the list of bands scheduled to play: Frank Breen, Traditional Acoustic Blues; Peter Magrane and the Drive by Blues Band,Upbeat Ragtime & originals; Blues on the Rocks, Genuine Blues; Ramblin’ Dan Stevens and the Fiery Band, Eclectic Fingerstyle Blues, Slide & originals; Jake Kulak and The Lowdown featuring Braiden Sunshine, a collaboration between award winning 17 year old blues Phenom Jake Kulak and finalist on The Voice, Braiden SunshineRyan Hartt and Tom FerraroNew England Blues super group.

In addition to live performance by these top Blues musicians the Cruise Blues & Brews Festival will also feature hundreds of antique and unique cars on display, a food court with a variety of up-scale food trucks, locally brewed craft beer by on tap by Thimble Island Brewery, a market place of vendors, a kids play area, trophies, games and prizes.

“Thanks to Ramblin’ Dan Stevens, we have more than doubled the number of blues bands for this year, and that is a really big deal for us” says Bill Guerra, Volunteer Chairman of the Festival.

“Established only four years ago, The At-Risk Boys fund has awarded over $61,000 in grants to organizations, throughout Middlesex County. These grants have helped hundreds of boys and young men achieve success and a better life”, Guerra added.

The 3rd Annual Cruise Blues & Brews Festival, will be held Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (rain date, Sunday, Oct. 1), at the Chester Fair Grounds. Admission: $5 donation, children under 12 free. To learn more about this Festival, buy tickets in advance or make a donation to the At-Risk Boys Fund of the Community Foundation of Middlesex County, visit:  www.atriskboysfund.org . Tickets may also be purchased at the gate during the Festival.

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In Tight Contest, Valley-Old Lyme Swim Team Ultimately Falls to H-K

On Sept. 28 at Haddam-Killingworth, the co-op swim team of Lyme-Old Lyme and Valley competed against Haddam-Killingworth. Despite a strong performance by Old Lyme-Valley, Haddam-Killingworth won the meet in the end with a score of 76 to 61.

Valley/Lyme-Old Lyme placed first in the following races:
-medley relay (Kim Beradis, Kaeleigh O’Donnell, Lily Cox, and Connie Pan)
-200 yard freestyle (Lily Cox)
-200 yard individual medley (Kaeleigh O’Donnell)
-100 yard freestyle (Connie Pan)
-500 yard freestyle (Lily Cox)
-200 yard freestyle relay (Kim Beradis, Kaeleigh O’Donnell, Lily Cox, and Connie Pan)
-100 yard backstroke (Kim Beradis)
-100 yard breaststroke (Kaeleigh O’Donnell)

Haddam-Killingworth came first in the 50 yard freestyle (Kiera Bragdon).

Valley/Lyme-Old Lyme notched second in the 50 yard freestyle (Connie Pan).

Valley/Lyme-Old Lyme divers Anna Donato and Britney Detuzzi earned Honorable Mentions in the 50 yard freestyle coming in respectively 5th and 6th.

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Region 4 Board of Education Acquires Property Adjacent to Valley Regional High School

DEEP RIVER – The Region 4 Board of Education has acquired a 34-acre parcel of land adjacent to Valley Regional High School for $350,000. The transaction closed on Aug. 31, 2017.

“This acquisition is great news for Valley Regional High School and the future of our community,” said Chris Riley, Chairman of the Region 4 Board of Education. “While there are no plans for the property at this time, the Board felt very strongly that the opportunity to acquire adjacent property was a smart investment for the future of our region.”

The Region 4 Board, consisting of three representatives from each of the towns of Chester, Deep River and Essex, voted unanimously to make the purchase. The First Selectmen in each of the towns were aware of the opportunity and all expressed their support for the acquisition. The purchase was funded with $350,000 from Region’s sinking funds, eliminating the need to bond or secure a mortgage. The sinking funds currently have a collective balance of $125,000.

For the past several years, the Region 4 Board has adopted the practice of returning 50 percent of any surplus to member towns and depositing 50 percent into sinking fund accounts. With a surplus of nearly $300,000 likely for the past school year, approximately $150,000 will be returned to the Region 4 sinking funds accounts once a final audit is completed. With regular deposits into the sinking funds, the entire purchase could be repaid
in three to five years.

The opportunity was first presented to the board in February of this year, and the board voted to direct Bruce Glowac to enter into negotiations to purchase the property. After several months of discussion with the previous owner and a substantial price reduction (the property was originally listed at $500,000), a deal was reached.

Superintendent Ruth Levy provided an update on the purchase at the September Region 4 Board meeting.

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Essex Harbor Management Commission Automates Mooring Permit Application Process

ESSEX — On Oct. 1, the Essex Harbor Management Commission will begin working exclusively with Online Mooring LLC for automating the Mooring Permit Application process, including renewals, Bushnell access storage permits and wait list requests. The new system will make the process “paperless” and more efficient.

Links to the new web based system will be available Oct. 1 through an email blast, through the Town’s web site or by connecting at onlinemooring.com, then going to Town of Essex, CT. Current permit holder information has been stored with Online Mooring to make the renewal process easier and faster. Permit holders will simply verify and/or update the information on file.

The system will handle all boat and contact information, including your state registration (or documentation) without requiring you to send in a paper copy.  Insurance certificates will also be handled electronically. Payment will be available through credit/debit card in a secure transaction.

The process has been tested by members of the Commission. Online Mooring LLC is a well established operation working with numerous harbors in the northeast.

The startup date of Oct. 1 is the normal renewal/application start for the coming year and provides a good point to initiate the simple paperless process. An eblast to current mooring permit holders will initiate the process.

Applicants for new mooring permits, as well as for Bushnell access storage permits will be placed on a wait list, pending the availability of space and review by the Harbor Master and Harbor Commission. Bushnell storage permit renewals will join the system with their eblast on March 1, 2018. Wait list renewals will join the program on April 1, 2018, following the completion of the other permit plans.

For renewing a current permit, you will receive an email on or after Oct.1 or you may go to my.onlinemooring.com/EssexCT and enter your email. The system will provide you with the current information on file. Correct or update the information, filling in any necessary blocks.

For new application, go to onlinemooring.com, Town of Essex, CT and choose whether you want to apply for a mooring permit or Bushnell storage permit.

Complete the application – red checked items must be completed. Double check your information and make sure your email address is accurate. Your insurance certificate can either be downloaded or photoed and included with your application.

Questions may be directed to the Essex Harbor Management Commission or the Harbor Master. You should make sure that your email is correctly  listed with your other information in the Harbor Commission/Harbor Master records.

Wait lists and permit holder lists are maintained by the Harbor Commission and are posted by the EHMC on the Town’s web site and at the Town Hall.

For more information, visit harbormanagementcommission@essexct.gov or harbormaster@essexct.gov

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Rep. Siegrist Pitches in to Clean Up Haddam Meadows State Park

Pictured at the Haddam Meadows State Park clean-up are, from left to right, Bob Moore, Jim Woodworth, Judy and Ed Munster, State Representative Bob Siegrist, Cheryl Czuba, Sharon Bailey, Mary Lou Heger, Amanda Yourse and Henry Graulty. Kraig Gray, Jamie Burgess and Gregory Krom (back row). Not pictured above Steve Carey.

HADDAM – State Representative Robert Siegrist (R-36) participated in the Connecticut River Conservancy’s 21st Annual Clean Up at the Haddam Meadows State Park Boat Launch with volunteers from Haddam to get rid of invasive plant species in the area.

For more information visit: https://www.ctriver.org/our-work/source-to-sea-cleanup/join-a-group/.

For a link to the video from this event visit: https://youtu.be/OeKCj68zG1A.

Editor’s Note: Siegrist represents the 36th District communities of Chester, Deep River, Essex and Haddam.

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Essex Meadows Completes Renovations to Casual Dining, Wellness Areas

ESSEX – With an emphasis on physical, social and emotional well-being, Essex Meadows has announced the completion of upgrades and renovations to its Fitness Center, as well as an expanded and remodeled Pub for more casual dining. These projects, which totaled more than $350,000, offer residents further opportunities for socialization, fitness and friendship. The majority of these capital improvements were made in the Pub, and major additions and advancements to the state-of-the-arts fitness equipment and their environs.

“We’ve expanded our wellness center with an emphasis on cross-training,” said Susan Carpenter, Director of Community Life Services at Essex Meadows, and a certified personal trainer. “We’ve doubled our cardio space and vastly increased our strength training equipment. The focus is truly on a comprehensive workout.”

New equipment includes NuStep® cross-trainers, which are designed specifically with older adults in mind, along with other compatible and complimentary senior-focused physical fitness apparatus.

David Reynolds, Director of Food and Beverage at Essex Meadows, says a similar line of thinking went into expanding and improving the casual dining venue.

“The resident population is constantly changing, and our newer residents are looking for a more relaxed lifestyle.  Many prefer a less staid approach to their dining experience, and want more excitement in the food and drink offerings.  We have taken underutilized space and incorporated it into our existing relaxed-dining zone.  At the same time, we recreated the menu in the Pub to provide expanded selections with an emphasis on creativity and bold flavors.” he said.

To bolster this renaissance, David has added a modest, yet wide-ranging wine list along with fresh and locally brewed beers on-tap.  The success of this expansion is witnessed by the capacity seating at most lunches.

“The Baby Boomers who are retiring in record numbers don’t want to dress formally for meals like earlier generations,” he said.  “What we’ve got here is precisely what today’s, and probably tomorrow’s seniors are looking for,” quipping further, “What other retirement community offers a hot lobster roll and cold draft beer every day?”

Editor’s Note: Since 1988, Essex Meadows has provided a lifestyle of dignity, freedom, independence and security to older adults from Connecticut and beyond. A community offering full lifecare, Essex Meadows, located conveniently near the Connecticut River, prides itself on having a financially responsible and caring atmosphere. Essex Meadows is managed by Life Care Services®, a leading provider in lifecare, retirement living. For more information on Essex Meadows, visit the community’s website or call 860-767-7201.

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Reading Uncertainly: ‘Troubles’ by J. G. Farrell

When a world is collapsing all about us, how much are we willing to recognize? J. G. Farrell’s description of a veteran of the World War I trenches going to Ireland to rejoin a young lady he had met only once in London during the War is an allegory on human inertia and lethargy in the face of rapid change.

In 1919, Major Brendan Archer travels from London to Kilnalough, Ireland, thinking to ask Angela Spencer to join him in marriage, even though he could not remember ever asking her outright to do so. He finds an elusive young lady and a scene of inertia and decay. Ireland has entered the “Troubles” with Sinn Fein pushing for complete separation from the British Empire. And that Empire is collapsing just as the Majestic Hotel, owned and operated by Angela’s father, Edward, the scene of the entire novel, is doing the same.

Farrell gives us the Hotel dominated by “dust.” Every page describes dust, “mould”, gloom, creepers, grime, cobwebs, collapsing floors, “man-eating” plants, and an ever-expanding entourage of reproducing cats. One room featured “an enormous greyish-white sweater that lay in one corner like a dead sheep.” The weather wasn’t any better: “it rained all that July,” and the hotel residents complained of the coming  “dreadful gauntlet of December, January, February.” Both the hotel and Ireland exuded “an atmosphere of change, insecurity and decay.” But the residents continued to follow life’s rituals: prayers at breakfast, afternoon teas, dressing for dinner, and whist in the evening.

Add to this mordant scene the author’s interjection of gloomy news reports from around the world: White Russians and English military supporters being trounced in Russia, victorious Boers in South Africa, a mess in Mesopotamia and Egypt, rebellion in Poland, and, finally, the Indians attempting to remove themselves from British rule.

In the face of all this, the hotel’s owner and operator, Edward Spencer aggravates the Major: “ … his overbearing manner; the way he always insisted on being right, flatly stating his opinions in a loud and abusive tone without paying any attention to what the other fellow was saying.” Does this also describe the Brits in other sections of the world?

The Major remains always a drifter “with the tide of events,” never able to respond, dominated, it seems, by “the country’s vast and narcotic inertia.”

This is a story of the collapse of a hotel, descending at last into ashes, and an allusion to the similar collapse of the British Empire, with the Second World War being its enormous fire. It is a compelling read, one that some might say suggests some connections to the events of the second decade of the 21st century …

Editor’s Note:  ‘Troubles’ by J. G. Farrell is published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London 1970.

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction that explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farms Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His wife, Ann, is also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a bubbling village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visit every summer.

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A La Carte: Perfect Pork Chops with a Mustard Twist

Last week I bought a new grill cover for my Weber. I was a bit unhappy, since I have only had the grill for just over two years and the cover I bought with the expensive grill, is falling apart. I’m not sure I should he surprised, but I am getting to that age where I expect quality should last a while. At least I don’t start sentences by saying “When I was younger,”

This, however, doesn’t mean the grill won’t be used all winter. My patio is just a few steps from my living room/dining room and, unless this coming winter is like the one wo years ago, during which I could barely find my grill, you will still see me throwing some chicken or burgers and hot dogs onto the Weber (without a coat on, no matter how cold it is).

I took a tour into my garage freezer and found four three-packs of pork chops I’d bought on sale at the supermarket, so I took one of the packages out last night. I can eat one or maybe two; the other one or one and a half I will cut up and toss into a large salad tomorrow. (I do the same the same thing with strip steaks I buy in three-steak packages at BJ’s—I wrap aluminum foil on each and freeze them—I can’t eat an entire steak, but it is lovely on a salad or for a stir-fry the next day.)

I found this recipe in my computer and hadn’t made it in almost a decade. I love mustard and this is a great way to cook pork chops.

Pork Chops with Mustard Sauce

Adapted from Fine Cooking, November, 2008, page 94a

Yield: serves 4

Preheat oven to low (150 to 160 degrees)

8 one-half-inch-thick boneless pork chops (about 3 ounces each) or 4 thicker pork chops
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 or more tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon unsalted butter (regular butter will do since you use so little)
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil; more as needed
one-half cup dry white wine
three-quarter cup heavy cream
one-half cup lower-salted chicken broth
one-quarter cup stoneground or country-style mustard

Put salt, pepper and flour in a plastic bag and dredge chops in bag, shaking off the excess.

Put butter and oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium heat. When hot, add 4 of the pork chops and cook, turning once, until golden on both sides and just cooked through, 4 to 6 minutes total. Transfer pork to a serving platter, tent with foil and place in low-degree oven. If necessary, repeat with remaining chops adding another tablespoon of oil to the pan, if necessary.

Our off any fat in the pan, add wine and scrape up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon. Increase the heat to medium-high and boil until wine is reduced to about 2 tablespoons, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in cream, chicken broth and mustard and boil until reduced to a saucy consistency, about 5 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Return pork and any juices to the pan, turn to coat with the sauce and then transfer back to the serving platter. Drizzle any sauce remaining in the skillet over the chops and serve.

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Rep. Siegrist Meets with 9 Town Transit

HADDAM – On Tuesday, Sept. 27, State Representative Robert Siegrist (R-36) met with Joe Comerford the Executive Director of 9 Town Transit and Haddam First Selectwoman at Haddam Town Hall regarding the 9-Town Transit, which is the local bus service that provides dial-a ride service for many residents and especially seniors within the 36th District.

Rep. Siegrist met with Comerford and Milardo to discuss their efforts to expand 9-Town Transit over the last five years. Namely, to create a continuous loop from Middlesex Community College, down Rte. 154 with a stop in Higganum, a stop at Haddam Killingworth High School  and then down Rte. 81 all the way to Clinton. This loop is intended to assist students who take classes at Middlesex Community College, employees who work at local schools and the Outlets and residents in general.

“I was happy to meet with 9 Town Transit Executive Director Joe Comerford and Haddam First Selectwoman Lizz Milardo to learn more about this local bus service and their upcoming developments. This new 9 Town Transit loop would be a great addition to our district. This addition would also do great things for the local economy and our residents. I look forward to seeing how this project advances,” said State Representative Robert Siegrist.

For more information visit: http://estuarytransit.org/.

For more information regarding Dial-A-Ride visit: http://estuarytransit.org/schedules-services/general-public-dial-a-ride/.

 

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‘Ranky Tanky’ Brings American Roots Gospel Music to Chester, Nov. 26

Ranky Tanky will play the final Collomore Concert, Nov. 26.

CHESTER — Their music has been called “soul-stirring” and infectious, intoxicating and exotic,” and they’ll be at the Chester Meeting House on Sunday, Nov. 26, at 5 p.m.

The Ranky Tanky quintet from Charleston, South Carolina, revives the extraordinary Gullah music of America’s southeastern Sea Islands, mixing the low country traditions with large doses of jazz, gospel, funk and R&B. Their music is a variety of traditional tunes, from playful game-songs to ecstatic shouts, and heartbreaking spirituals to delicate lullabies.

Fresh out of college, trumpeter Charlton Singleton, guitarist Clay Ross, bassist Kevin Hamilton and drummer Quentin Baxter originally worked together as an in-demand jazz quartet on the Charleston scene in the late 1990s before splitting off to each make their way as freelance musicians, working with names like Houston Person, Freddy Cole, Cyro Baptista and René Marie. Gaining years of valuable experience plus international acclaim, Grammy nominations and thousands of performances around the word, they developed a deeper appreciation for the South Carolina Gullah tradition they came from. They reunited and formed Ranky Tanky, along with the dynamic low-country vocalist Quiana Parler, celebrated for her big, stunning, soulful voice. (Ranky Tanky translates loosely as “Work It,” or “Get Funky!”)

Their Chester Meeting House concert is brought to you by the Collomore Concert Series in the last concert of its 44th season. Tickets are $28 for adults and just $5 for students (up through grad school) and can be purchased online at www.collomoreconcerts.org or by calling 860-526-5162. The concert will be followed by an informal reception, with refreshments by La Vita Restaurant at Goodspeed Landing. More information about Ranky Tanky is available on the website.

 

 

“Ranky Tanky proved that exotic music can be both unfamiliar enough to be surprising, and yet familiar enough to provoke swinging hips and nodding heads. When it works, it’s the best of both worlds.” – Paste Magazine

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Deep River Historical Society Extends Hours to Offer a ‘Feast on History,’ Nov. 24-25

DEEP RIVER — The Stone House, 245 Main St. Deep River will be open after Thanksgiving to encourage visits over the holiday weekend.  Both Friday, Nov. 24, and Saturday, Nov. 25, the doors will be open from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Make it a Tri-Town history adventure since both Essex and Chester Historical Societies will also have additional hours.

The Stone House will be focusing on Deep River Legends and have interactive activities planned.

For more information, call Rhonda Forristall, Curator, at 860-526-5086.

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Enjoy, Explore Festively-Decorated Pratt House, Nov. 24-25

ESSEX — Got a houseful for Thanksgiving Weekend? Then skip the malls and deck the halls!

Join Essex Historical Society as members usher in the holidays at the beautifully decorated Pratt House, 19 West Ave., Essex, on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 24 and 25, from 11 a.m. through 2 p.m.

Learn about life in an early seaport town from our knowledgeable guides. The house will evoke scenes from Christmases past, decorated with locally-sourced materials.

Guided tours are free. The Museum shop will be open for holiday gifts.

For more information, visit www.essexhistory.org or call 860-767-0681.

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RISD Professor, Architect Discusses ‘Historic Houses: Inside & Out’ at Essex Library, Friday

“Historic Houses: An Architect’s View Inside and Out” is the subject of a lecture Sept. 22, at Essex Library.

ESSEX — The 10th season of the Essex Library’s Centerbrook Architects Lecture Series kicks off Friday, Sept. 22, at 7 p.m. with Rhode Island School of Design Professor and Architect Jim Barnes. Barnes lives with his wife in a Queen Anne period home in the Elmwood Historic District of Providence. His talk, “Historic Houses: An Architect’s View Inside and Out” is a subject dear to his heart and will be held in The Cube at Centerbrook Architects’ offices at 67 Main St. in Centerbrook.

Barnes states that our experience of historic houses is most often framed by their exterior appearances.  We come to identify and understand historic time periods and changing styles of architecture through building forms, rooflines, materials, and even paint colors.  These are the elements of a public realm accessible to all.  Exterior patterns can build whole neighborhoods and clearly reflect our culture’s constantly shifting shared values.

We know less well interior spatial patterns, the private domestic realm hidden from view.  Yet we know the power of interior spatial arrangement to convey cultural values. Room placement, stairway arrangements and fireplaces are among the many tools that architects and builders use to shape and express domestic life. This illustrated talk will address the changing styles of historic houses in an historic Providence neighborhood by comparing the shifting patterns of exterior forms and interior floor plans from the mid-19th century to the beginning of the 20th century.

This program is free and open to the public. Call the Essex Library at (860) 767-1560 to register or for more information. Centerbrook Architects is located at 67 Main St. in Centerbrook.

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Essex Land Trust Welcomes Volunteers for ‘Source to Sea’ Clean Up on ‘Great Meadow,’ Friday

ESSEX — The Essex Land Trust (ELT) is looking to do its part in helping to clean the shores and marshes of our beautiful Connecticut River and, specifically, on Essex’ Great Meadow. The event, coordinated by ELT and sponsored by the Connecticut River Watershed Council, will also be conducted simultaneously by volunteers along the length of the river from Old Saybrook to Canada.

Meet for your assignment at 9 a.m. at the Essex Boat Club, at the far end of the dirt road accessed between #143 and #145 River Rd., the lane that also serves Pettipaug Yacht Club. Wear waterproof boots, bring gloves and come rain or shine.

Refreshments will be served. All ages and abilities are welcome.

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Music Now Foundation Hosts Sunset Soiree Fundraiser at Griswold Point, Saturday

AREAWIDE — Music Now Foundation hosts its second annual Sunset Soiree Fundraiser at beautiful Griswold Point in Old Lyme Saturday, Sept. 23, from 4 p.m. Come out to support the initiatives of Music Now, while you enjoy beautiful water views, a great meal, and live musical performances by talented young artists until sunset.

Ticket cost is $50 for adults and includes food, beer, wine and soft drinks. There will also be a vegetarian option offered. Youth ticket cost is $20.

The MusicNow Foundation, Inc. is a 501(c)3 charitable organization based in Old Lyme CT. Its mission is to engage, enrich, and inspire young aspiring artists by providing performance opportunities, workshop programming and mentorships thereby nurturing creative and artistic growth and supporting the development of live music in our communities.

For more information about MusicNow, visit www.musicnowfoundation.org

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Reception Held to Celebrate Photography Exhibit by 7th Grader to be held at Deep River Library

The Deep River Public Library is hosting a reception to celebrate the photography of Isabella Capezzone on Sunday, Sept. 24, from 3 to 6 p.m.

Capezzone is a 7th grade student at John Winthrop Middle School and has had a fascination with photography from an early age, photographing pets, sunsets, flowers and the beauty she sees in nature. After completing a photography course through Girl Scouts, Capezzone continued her studies by participating in a photography enrichment program at Deep River Elementary School.

Light refreshments will be served. Capezzone’s collected works will be on sale and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Deep River Food Pantry.

No registration is required. All are welcome.

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High Holy Day Services Continue at CBSRZ

CHESTER — At Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ), in Chester, CT, on Jewish holidays, High Holy Days – Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur – are major highlights every year, with music led by Cantor, Belinda Brennan and the CBSRZ Choir, inspiring teachings from religious and spiritual leader Rabbi Marci Bellows, and lay people within the CBSRZ community, as well as special services and activities for children and young families.

The schedule for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur is as follows:

Erev Rosh Hashanah: Wednesday, Sept.20, 7:30 p.m.

Rosh Hashanah morning service: Thursday, Sept. 21, 9:30 a.m.; children’s service 2:30 p.m.

Second day of Rosh Hashanah, Friday, Sept. 22, 9:30 a.m.

Kol Nidre, Friday, Sept. 29, 7:30 p.m.

Yom Kippur, Saturday, Sept. 30, morning service 9:30 am; children’s service 2 pm; afternoon Yizkor, Neilah, 3:30 pm

Communal break-the-fast will be at the conclusion of services. All are welcome.

For information regarding tickets, contact the CBSRZ office or visit cbsrz.org.

Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.

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Musical Masterworks, Community Music School Announce Scholarship Recipient

From left to right, Alden Murphy and Abigail Nickell stand with Musical Masterworks scholarship winner Giovanna Parnoff at the piano.

AREAWIDE — Musical Masterworks and Community Music School are pleased to announce the recipient of the first Musical Masterworks Scholarship in Honor of Nancy D. Thomas.

Giovanna Parnoff, already an accomplished pianist and exceptional sixth grade student from Old Lyme, was presented with the scholarship by Alden Murphy, President of Musical Masterworks and Abigail Nickell, Executive Director of Community Music School.

“We are so pleased to honor Nancy’s memory with an award to one of her very own students, in partnership with another of her most beloved arts organizations.’ said Nickell.  Nancy Thomas was a devoted staff member of Musical Masterworks for nearly 25 years.   “It is particularly fortuitous that Giovanna, as a life-long student of Nancy Thomas, is the first winner of this scholarship; we couldn’t be more pleased,” added Murphy.

Giovanna has attended The Community Music School since she was six months old. She discovered her love of music through Kindermusik and Kate’s Camp programs and eventually started individual piano instruction under the tutelage of Nancy Thomas at the age of 3.

She has received perfect scores at the New London Piano Festival organized by the Middlesex/New London Chapter of the Connecticut State Music Teacher’s Association. Giovanna is a member of Mensa and Intertel, two high IQ societies and was recently inducted into the Junior Mensa Honor Society for her academic performance, leadership skills and volunteerism/community service.

Giovanna has been accepted into Duke University’s Talent Identification Program, Stanford University’s Gifted and Talented Program, and Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth. She is a competitive foil fencer, and has been coached for six years by the Fencer’s School of CT.

Giovanna is an award-winning poet, having seen her work published in “The Mensa Bulletin” and “The Young American Poetry Digest.” She lives in Old Lyme with her parents, Dr. John Parnoff and Ms. Monique Heller, and her younger sister, Mattea, who is also a piano student at The Community Music School.

The Musical Masterworks Scholarship in Honor of Nancy D. Thomas provides the tuition for a middle school student to take music lessons, 30 minutes each, for one full year at Community Music School.  The scholarship will be awarded annually for the next four years.  To be eligible, the candidate must be a student of classical voice or instrumental music and reside in Middlesex County or New London County.

Community Music School offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 34-year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity, and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.  Learn more at www.community-music-school.org or call 860.767.0026.

Musical Masterworks brings to Southern New England world-class chamber music performances and outreach programs which attract, entertain, and educate a diverse audience. Now planning its 27th season, Musical Masterworks offers five weekends of performances from October through May in Old Lyme.  Learn more by visiting www.musicalmasterworks.org or by calling 860.434.2252.

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Essex Garden Club Announces Officers for 2017-2018


ESSEX —
Officers for the Essex Garden Club for 2017-2018 are Barbara Burgess, president, 1st VP Augie Pampel, 2nd VP, MyLan Sarner, Recording Secretary, Betsy Godsman, Corresponding Secretary Phyllis Graf, Treasurer , Patricia Mather and Assistant Treasurer is Barbara Muhlfelder.
In her opening remarks at the September meeting, Burgess said that the focus of the Essex Garden Club this year will be on enhancing each member’s floral design skills. These design principles will be applied when the Garden Club decorates the town’s window boxes and planters for the holidays.
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Deep River HS Hosts Native American Exhibit This Weekend at Stone House

Deep River Historical Society presents an exhibition titled Native American Harvest at the Stone House, 245 Main St. Deep River.

DEEP RIVER — In conjunction with Deep River Family Day activities on Saturday, Sept. 16, the Deep River Historical Society (DRHS) will present an exhibition at the Stone House, 245 Main St. Deep River. This is a guided exhibition titled Native American Harvest and will be available for viewing from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and again on Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017 from 2 to 4 p.m. during the regular open hours of the Stone House.

Richard Kalapos, trustee of DRHS and town historian, will be discussing the relationship that the Native Americans had with their environment and how the forest, waterways and sea provided them with all their wants.  Through their relationship with nature, they felt as one with their surroundings.  The forest was, in today’s terms, their grocery store, hardware store and pharmacy.

This is a multi-generational program so drop by and bring the whole family to explore the heritage of our first Americans. Come and learn about the unique relationship they had with their world and find out about the foods that nourished them.

For further information contact, Richard Kalapas at (860)-526-3254 or Sue Wisner at (860) 526-9103.

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‘Junior Souls Yoga Program’ Starts in Old Saybrook for Youth, Grades 4-8

OLD SAYBROOK — Working with the Old Saybrook Parks and Recreation department, Saybrook Soul Sweat will be running an eight week long after school program, Junior Souls Yoga Program (JSYP), for grades 4 – 8.  The program will be held at the Recreation Center Gym every Monday beginning Sept. 18, from 2:45 to 4 p.m.

A description of the program states, “Yoga is a practice that exercises your body on a physical, emotional, and mental level; the younger we can get kids practicing, the better prepared they will be for the world as they progress. Junior Souls Yoga Program is a weekly, 60-minute practice that is derived from the vinyasa style of yoga, but with a New Age twist.

Instead of teaching students to sit down and meditate, JSYP uses the philosophy that to work into a meditation of the mind, you first must physically work out your body. Combining a youthful, energetic series of postures with fast tempo, upbeat pop music, JSYP gets kids moving and grooving for 45 minutes, followed by a 15-minute meditation.

The junction of physical fitness with positive mindfulness is a great way to teach kids poses, self-empowerment, stress relief, and healthy living.”

Junior Souls Yoga Program is instructed by Courtney Brooks, a 200-hour registered yoga teacher in Vinyasa yoga. Brooks has been practicing yoga for six years and teaching full-time for over one year, with experience teaching yoga to children at Corpus Christi in Wethersfield, CT, and developing a yoga program with the Hartford Police Athletic League throughout various schools in Hartford, CT.

The Saybrook Soul Sweat studio will open for business Oct. 14.

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Cappella Cantorum Concert Late Registration Scheduled for Tomorrow

Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus by Madeleine Favre of Deep River.

AREAWIDE — Late registration for Cappella Cantorum’s 2017 Christmas concert is Sept. 18, at 7 p.m. at John Winthrop Middle School, 1 Winthrop Rd., Deep River. No auditions are required. Use the rear entrance.

All are welcome to join Cappella Cantorum and its new director, Simon Holt, to prepare for the Dec. 2 concert. Holt is also the artistic director of the Salt Marsh Opera and director of music at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme. He joins Cappella in its 48th year.

The program will feature Bach’s Cantata #140 (“Sleepers Wake”), Rutter’s “Gloria” and Vaughan Williams’ “Fantasia on Christmas Carols.”

Registration fee is $40; music is $20.

For more information or to register in advance, visit www.CappellaCantorum.org.

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David Handler Presents His Latest Book Today at Essex Library

ESSEX — On Saturday, Sept. 16, at 4 p.m. the Essex Library will host Edgar and American Mystery Award-winning author David Handler, who will discuss his latest book, The Girl With Kaleidoscope Eyes, published in August by William Morrow.

This is the ninth entry in the Hoagy and Lulu mystery series that Harlan Coben calls “One of my all-time favorite series! … David Handler is so good at writing one smart, funny page-turner after another that he makes it look easy.” 

Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing at the event.

David Handler

Handler has also written eleven novels in the bestselling Berger & Mitry series. He lives in a 230-year-old carriage house in Old Lyme, Conn. 

This event is free and open to the public. Call the Essex Library to register or for more information at (860) 767-1560. The Essex Library is located at 33 West Ave. in Essex.

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State Orders Recount in Republican Primary for 33rd District Probate Judge; Delia Wins by Nine Votes in First Count

Tuesday’s unofficial winner, Anselmo Delia.

AREAWIDE — The Connecticut Secretary of State has informed all the towns that comprise the 33rd District Probate Court that they need to conduct a recount of Tuesday’s Republican Primary. The Town of Essex has scheduled their recount on Sunday, Sept. 17 at 11 a.m. at the town hall. Deep River held their recount yesterday, Thursday, Sept. 13. We do not have details of the timing of recounts in other area towns at this time.

Tuesday’s race between the party-endorsed candidate Attorney Anselmo Delia of Clinton and challenger Attorney Kevin Hecht of Old Saybrook ended with a 859-850 win for Delia after all the unofficial results had been declared in the nine towns.

Unofficial results given on the Connecticut Secretary of State’s webpage for towns covered by ValleyNewsNow.com towns are as follows:

Chester: Hecht 23 – Delia 12
Deep River: Delia 24 – Hecht 14
Essex: Delia 79 – Hecht 59
Old Saybrook: Hecht 277 – Delia 46
Westbrook: Hecht 90 – Delia 41.

Results for the remaining towns in the District are:

Clinton: Delia 444 – Hecht 228
Haddam: Delia 140 – Hecht 37
Killingworth: Hecht 78 – Delia 53
Lyme: Hecht 44 – Delia 20.

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Take a Tree Swallow Cruise Tonight With OS Land Trust

Tree swallows gather on branches. Photo (inset) by Diana Atwood Johnson.

AREAWIDE — The Old Saybrook Land Trust (OSLT) hosts a tree swallow watching cruise Sept. 15, from 5 to 8 p.m. on the vessel Adventure located at Eagle Landing State Park in Haddam.  The cruise will be run by Connecticut River Expeditions.

For the past 14 years, Connecticut River Expeditions have taken individuals and groups to a special spot on the Connecticut River where hundreds of thousands of tree swallows gather. After spending the day miles away, the swallows return each night to sleep in the reeds. They gather at sunset and perform aerial ballets forming an amazing display of art, coordination and cooperation.

Over the years, Captains Mark and Alex have found the best way to maneuver the boats to allow perfect views from open decks. Travel on Adventure, a newly refurbished classic riverboat with flexible seating that ensures everyone gets optimal “up close and personal” viewing.

Enjoy the entire evening aboard. You will spend about three to five hours on the water. There is so much to see while cruising along the river. Many birds are migrating through the area now; last year we saw a record number of Bald Eagles and Great Egrets.

On-board naturalist(s) will educate you on the swallow phenomenon and all the other wildlife we see.

On the return cruise home, there is time to chat with others and experience the river at twilight, blending into night. The OSLT will be serving appetizers and you are able to bring your own picnic basket or snacks and your favorite “beverage” to enjoy on this special cruise. Don’t forget your camera and binoculars (or borrow a pair of our binocs)!

This is a small group experience that is unique each sailing. This is a fundraising event to benefit the OSLT Scholarship, which is awarded each year to a graduating Old Saybrook student pursuing Environmental Studies.

Cost: $50 per person. Limited seating. Reservations can be made by emailing oldsaybrooklandtrust@oslt.org

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Essex Democrats Announce Party Platform For 2017 Municipal Elections

Essex Democrats have again endorsed incumbent First Selectman Norman Needleman as their candidate for the same position in November.

ESSEX — Rejecting divisive politics and continuing a bi-partisan approach to solving problems is the cornerstone of the platform announced today in a press release by First Selectman Norm Needleman and Brian Cournoyer, Chairman of The Essex Democratic Town Committee.

“Towns throughout the state look to Essex as a model for best management practices. Under Norm’s and Stacia Rice-Libby’s leadership over the past six years, taxes are among the lowest in the state, yet we deliver high quality services and excellent schools,” Cournoyer said.

Needleman said that the collaborative, non-partisan approach to government will continue if he and running mate Stacia Rice-Libby are re-elected.

“First, and perhaps most important, we reject toxic partisan politics. Instead, we value and encourage independent thinking and inclusive dialogue that lead to real-world solutions,” Needleman said.

“Second, we will continue to manage our town with emphasis on fiscal responsibility. Essex operates in contrast to the dysfunction in Hartford. We have balanced our town budget every year I have been in office. Our budget policies have kept Essex self-reliant, while maintaining property taxes lower than 87% of the municipalities in our state.”

Libby added focusing on economic growth is another important area of focus.

“An essential element is support for the business community. Essex is home to over 700 businesses, and that number is growing. We have reduced regulations and simplified processes in the past six years, and it is essential that we sustain our policy of eliminating barriers to success,” Libby said, adding that streamlining and optimizing land use regulations will be critical for retaining and attracting local companies.

“Another vital element in our plan for the next two years is support for the robust volunteer base in our town,” Needleman said, “Municipal government, quality of life, and social services have evolved in Essex to become a partnership among elected officials, volunteer organizations, and dedicated individual volunteers. That partnership defines life in our town, and we will continue supporting the volunteers who support us.”

Needleman said if re-elected he will continue to fight the proliferation of unfunded state mandates.

“Your vote for our bipartisan slate of candidates on November 7 is vital to keeping Essex moving in the right direction,” Cournoyer said.

Democratic Town Committee Chairman Brian Cournoyer invites all Essex voters to learn more about the candidates by visiting the Essex Democratic Town Committee website/Facebook page at: essexdems.com.  The candidates will also be available to discuss issues and ideas at neighborhood meet-and-greet gatherings throughout the campaign.

Essex Democratic Candidates

  • First Selectman/Selectwoman: Norm Needleman/ Stacia Rice-Libby
  • Town Treasurer: Jim Francis
  • Tax Collector: Megan Haskins
  • Essex BOE: Loretta McCluskey
  • Region 4 BOE: Kate Sandmann
  • BOF: Ethan Goller
  • BOF : Keith Crehan
  • Board Assessment Appeals: Mark Bombaci
  • Town Clerk: Joel Marzi
  • Judge Of Probate: Jeannine Lewis
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Deep River Historical Society’s ‘Stone House’ Open to Visitors This Weekend

Stone House, owner by the Deep River Historical Society, opens July 1.

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Historical Society presents an opportunity to step back in time. This house and property is considered the crown jewel at 245 Main St., Deep River. The Stone  House was built in the 1840’s by Deacon Ezra Southworth for his bride. Three generations of the Southworth family have lived here and left their mark on Deep River.

Ada Southworth Munson bequeathed the family home to the Deep River Historical Society in 1946. It has since been used by them to highlight the town’s history along with offering events and community interaction.

There are many exhibits that showcase the lives of the family; sea faring stories to the Industrial Revolution, lace and textiles and of course the history of ivory in the area.

There is a World War I exhibit that tells of the Deep River “boys” in the Great War, which dates back 100 years.  The small settlement of Winthrop (in the northwest corner of Deep River) and is featured also with recent research updated.

Come and stop in for a free visit throughout the summer, Saturday and Sunday afternoons from 2 to 4 p.m., starting Saturday July 1st.  Greeters will be available to help with making the self-guided tour a learning experience.

Visit the Deep River Historical Society at their website at  http://www.deepriverhistoricalsociety.org or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/deepriverhistoricalsociety/

Call the DRHS at 860-526-1449 or the curator Rhonda Forristall, at 860-526-5086.

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Final Day of Community Music School’s Free Preview Week is Today

AREAWIDE – Community Music School, located at 90 Main Street in Centerbrook and 179 Flanders Rd. in East Lyme, welcomes the general public to visit during Free Preview Week Sept. 11 through 15. Children and adults can tour the School’s studios, meet teachers and staff, enjoy a free preview lesson, and learn about a vast array of programs for all ages including private and group lessons, adult cabaret, jazz ensemble, string ensembles, music therapy services, Kindermusik for babies and toddlers, and more.

During the academic year, Community Music School is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.Monday to Thursday, and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays. Those interested in a 30-minute preview lesson are requested to call 860-767-0026 for scheduling.  The public is also welcome to observe any group class or ensemble during Free Preview Week.

For additional information, visit www.community-music-school.org/programs or call CMS at 860-767-0026.

Community Music School offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 34 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity, and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.  Learn more at www.community-music-school.org or call (860)767-0026.

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Take a Trip with the Estuary to NY’s Botanical Gardens, Sunday

The Estuary Council of Seniors at 220 Main St Old Saybrook is offering a trip on Sunday, Sept. 17,   to New York’s Botanical Gardens at a cost of $115 per person.

The tour includes: roundtrip motor-coach transportation, lunch at Ann & Tony’s Restaurant, admission to the NY Botanical Gardens, all taxes and gratuities (including driver and tour director.)

For more information, stop by the Estuary Council at 220 Main St., Old Saybrook for a flyer or call 860-388-1611 ext.204.

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Next ‘Lifelong Learning’ Lecture at Chester Village West Features ‘Paradoxes of Wellbeing,’ Nov. 13

CHESTER — Chester Village West, an independent senior living community, continues its Lifelong Learning Program with six free-and-open-to-the-public lectures in September, October and November. The program, in its fourth season, is in partnership with the Wesleyan Institute for Lifelong Learning and Middlesex Hospital. A Q&A and reception with light refreshments will be held after each program.

Registration is required. To register for one or more programs, call 860.322.6455, email ChesterVillageWest@LCSnet.com or visit https://www.chestervillagewestlcs.com/lifestyle/calendar-of-events/.

Chester Village West is located at 317 W. Main St., Chester, CT 06412.

The final lecture was:

Monday, Nov. 13, 4 p.m.

Some Paradoxes of Wellbeing
Karl Scheibe, Ph.D., B.S.
Professor of Psychology, Emeritus, Wesleyan University
Director Emeritus, Wasch Center for Retired Faculty, Wesleyan University

Wellbeing has recently moved to center state of psychologists’ field of attention. This is in part a reaction to the traditional focus of psychology on problems of human suffering. But research on this topic has turned up some fascinating contradictions. Pleasure and pain do not accumulate in the same way, revealing a curious asymmetry in our emotional lives. Paradoxes of wellbeing are conspicuous, not the least of which is the observation that older people manifest an unexpected level of satisfaction with their lives.

Editor’s Note: Located in historic Chester, Connecticut, Chester Village West gives independent-minded people a new way to experience retirement and live their lives to the fullest. Since the independent seniors community was founded more than 25 years ago, Chester Village West residents have directed and embraced active learning. Within a small community of private residences that offer convenience, companionship, service and security, Chester Village West enriches lives with a comprehensive program that enhances fitness, nutrition, active life, health and well-being. Find out more at chestervillagewestlcs.com; visit the community on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ChesterVillageWest.

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CBSRZ Adds New Programs to Current Education Offerings for Fall

CHESTER — The education team at Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ) is offering new programming in the Kivvun wing. Kivvun means “direction” or “pathway,” and this year it is CBSRZ’s intention to provide more “paths” or “access points” into Judaism, while empowering each child to grow into their best selves, and experience their lives through a Jewish lens, within a vibrant Jewish Community.

Utilizing the Shalom Learning curriculum, and incorporating many aspects of the Project Based Learning model, learners will drive the creation of “questions” in order to determine how to answer the question,“What makes a strong Jewish community?”

Students will explore answers to their questions through the study of Hebrew, Prayer, Holidays and Values.  The learners will begin to formulate ideas while they analyze and express their thoughts through modes such as art, legos, cooking and storytelling. These electives or “Chugim” will be chosen by the students according to their interests and will offer an opportunity for learners of all grades to interact.

In addition to restructured program for young learners, new opportunities for teens will be offered, including student teaching, social action and recreational interaction. Gesher, a monthly class for 8th and 9th grade students, and Makom, a confirmation class for 10th grade students, will continue to be offered.

Registration is now open to everyone. To obtain your registration packet, contact Belinda Brennan, Cantor and Educator, at Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, belinda@cbsrzorg, the office at 860-526-8920 and visit www.cbsrz.org/learn/youth for more information. CBSRZ is located at 55 East Kings Highway, Chester, CT 06412.

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A La Carte: Incredible Cookies Combine Caramel and Chocolate

At the end of my spacious, galley-like kitchen, there is a bay window under which is a window seat that holds all my somewhat heavy, counter-type appliances. These include two Cuisinart (one a big one, one a little one), a Ninja Pro that purees faster than a blink of one’s eye, a big Crock-Pot, two grinders, a machine that turns water into carbonated drinks and a blender. In the back is an industrial-grade Bernzomatic to make crème brulee. (What? You don’t have one? Really?)

What has been missing for almost three weeks is the biggest of my tiara of gadgets: my KitchenAid mixer. It is about 10-years-old and a new one costs around $600.

At some point, the arm that holds the bowl had become stuck. Nothing I did would make it go up and down. As the diagnostician, I figured out what was wrong and looked at YouTube to see if I could fix it. It would have involved taking the head off, removing the engine, taking off the arm and buying the plastic part that was broken.

Were I able to do this, it involved about 16 screws. I am sure I would have lost many of them. So I called KitchenAid who were of little help.

Finally, HomeAdvisor gave me the name of a man in Rhode Island. He sounded lovely on the phone, so I drove the monster to his house in Central Falls. A few days later, he called and told me what was wrong. I gave him the go-ahead. A week and $166 later, my baby is back.

By the way, my diagnosis was wrong.

I am now a happy camper. I am hoping this will last for another 10 to 20 years. My aunt had one when she got married, in 1934. When she died, in 1995, I gave it to my friend Marilyn Whiney. She still uses it.

What did I make first? I doubled the recipe for a cookie that called for the muscles of a weight lifter or, in my case, my KitchenAid.

Caramel-Stuffed Chocolate Chip Cookies

From Martha Stewart Living, September, 2017, page 76

Yield: 12 cookies

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 and one-half cups packed light brown sugar
One-half cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
Three-quarter teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon kosher salt
2 sticks cold unsalted butter, cut into one-half inch pieces
12 ounces semisweet chocolate chips (1 whole bag)
2 large eggs, room temperature
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
24 caramels, such as Kraft, halved

Preheat oven to 375 degrees with racks on top and middle. In the bowl of a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together flour, both sugars, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Add butter; beat on medium speed until combined but some pea-size butter chunks remain. Add chocolate chips and beat until combined, then beat in eggs, one at a time, and vanilla.

Line two baking sheets with parchment (I use Silpat instead.) Scoop dough into 4-ounce balls (each about one-half cu), make a deep, wide hollow in each center. Enclose 3 pieces of caramel in each; roll back into a ball. Place 6 balls on each sheet. Freeze 15 minutes.

Bake, with one sheet on each rack, 10 minutes. Reduce heat to 350 degrees, swap sheet positions and bake until centers are almost but not completely set (press gently on tops with your fingers to check), 7 to 10 minutes more. Remove from oven. Bang sheets on a counter a few times to create cracks on tops of cookies. Place sheets on a wire rack; let cool completely. Cookies can be stored in an air-tight container at room temperature up to 3 days.

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Applications Due by Nov. 9 for Rockfall Foundation Grants

AREAWIDE — Continuing the philanthropic tradition of its founder, Clarence S. Wadsworth, the Rockfall Foundation invites non-profit organizations, municipalities, and schools in the Lower Connecticut River Valley to apply for grants through the annual Competitive Grant Program. The Foundation seeks to support projects that preserve and enhance the environment and to increase public knowledge of and respect for natural resources. Projects that demonstrate new and imaginative ways to achieve this are encouraged.

Applications are due by Nov. 9 and can be downloaded from www.rockfallfoundation.org.  For detailed eligibility criteria or additional information, call 860-347-0340 or visit www.rockfallfoundation.org.

Founded in 1935 by Middletown philanthropist Clarence S. Wadsworth, the Rockfall Foundation is one of Connecticut’s oldest environmental organizations. The Foundation supports environmental education, conservation and planning initiatives in the Lower Connecticut River Valley through public programs and grants.  In addition, the Rockfall Foundation operates the historic deKoven House Community Center that offers meeting rooms and office space for non-profit organizations.

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Pam Carlson of Essex to be Featured at Glastonbury Arts Holiday Art Sale, Nov. 11-12

On Saturday, Nov. 11, and Sunday, Nov. 12, Glastonbury Arts will host its 8th Annual Holiday Art Sale from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm at the Riverfront Community Center, 300 Welles Street, Glastonbury, CT. 

Pam Carlson of Essex, will be a participant in the show. She has been in the art world since before college where she majored in fine art and education.  She worked in commercial art prior to becoming an art teacher in various public school systems and she now concentrates on painting river, land and sky-scapes of the Connecticut River, but can also be found painting Montana’s “Big Sky” mountains, farms and high plains vistas. 

The diverse selection of styles and subject matter that will be on display offers something to fit most any artistic taste and budget. Meet & Greet Reception from 3:00 – 5:00 pm Saturday.

The artists invited to participate in this two day show were selected for the top-notch caliber of their work and talent; many have been recognized regionally and nationally.  “The secret to the show’s success is the high quality of art work exhibited for sale,” say Glastonbury Arts Co-Presidents Carol Ahlschlager and Richard Hoff, “and visitors to the show will find artists who are eager to engage with an appreciative audience.”

“The show takes place in an inviting setting,” says exhibiting artist Katherine Simmons, “at the Riverfront Community Center, located near the town’s new Boathouse.  Free parking is plentiful.  And, admission to the show is free.”  A portion of show proceeds benefits the education and community enrichment programs of Glastonbury Arts and are tax-deductible.  There will be tax-free shopping on both days, another great reason to browse and buy at the show.

GLASTONBURY ARTS was founded in 1962 by a dedicated group of men and women who were passionate in their commitment to the visual arts. Today, Glastonbury Arts continues to enrich and engage individuals in the creation and appreciation of art. It is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization that provides art appreciation programs, art instruction, mentoring, scholarships, and art exhibitions. Proceeds from the Holiday Art Sales will benefit the education and community outreach programs of Glastonbury Arts.

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Republican Primary Today for Judge of Probate

Anselmo Delia is the Republican party endorsed candidate for Judge of Probate in the 33rd District.

AREAWIDE — Registered Republicans in Chester, Deep River, Essex, and Old Saybrook are eligible to vote tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 12, in a primary election to determine the party’s candidate for 33rd District Probate Judge in the November election.

Kevin J. Hecht of Old Saybrook is challenging the party-endorsed candidate, Anselmo Delia, of Clinton.

In addition to the towns listed above, the 33rd District Probate Court, which is located in Old Saybrook, covers  Clinton, Haddam, Killingworth, Lyme, and Westbrook.

There is no Democratic Primary since party-endorsed candidate Jeannine Lewis is not being challenged.

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Remodeled OS Wal-Mart Opens, Grand Reopening Celebration Scheduled, Nov. 11

OLD SAYBROOK — Old Saybrook residents got first look at the newly remodeled Walmart at 665 Boston
Post Road this morning.

“This remodel project, along with our everyday low prices, represents our continued investment in Old Saybrook,” said Store Manager William Pindell. “Listening to customers and incorporating the products and experiences they want is what it means to be a store of the community.”

Customers will enjoy the following store improvements:

  • State-of-the-art electronics department with interactive displays that
    allow customers to try laptops, tablets and other technology prior to
    purchase
  • New layout in home and intimate apparel with additional assortment
  • New lighting in cosmetics
  • Refreshed pharmacy with private consultation room
  • Nine new self-checkouts at the front of the store (bringing the total
    to 13) to help save customers time

Customers are invited to attend a grand reopening celebration from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 11. There will be activities for kids, hot dogs and customer giveaways.

At Walmart, associates have access to competitive wages, affordable benefits, and the chance to build a career. More than 75 percent of store management teams started as hourly associates and 40 percent of those promotions went to associates within the first year of their employment.

Walmart is committed to serving Old Saybrook and in celebration of the grand reopening will support the following local organizations through a combined $3,000 in grants to: Old Saybrook Senior Housing, Westbrook High School and Old Saybrook Police Department.

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Join CT River Museum Tonight for a ‘Taste of The Netherlands’

Spend an evening enjoying historic Dutch cultural traditions at the Connecticut River Museum and take a cruise aboard Onrust. Photo by Pim Van Hemmen.

ESSEX — On Saturday, Sept. 9, from 5  to 8 p.m., experience The Netherlands as the Connecticut River Museum hosts a night to support The Onrust Project.  Enjoy Dutch culture with samples of traditional food and drinks.  There will also be classic Dutch tavern games, music, and a cannon demonstration – all from the Museum’s beautiful north deck overlooking the Connecticut River. 

The Onrust is a reproduction of the famed Captain Adriaen Block’s 1614 era vessel that was the first European vessel to chart and explore Long Island Sound, parts of Rhode Island, and the Connecticut River.  Block’s accomplishments ushered in great changes that would forever alter life along the Connecticut River, help lead to the fur trade, and the eventual founding of New Netherlands and what would become Hartford. 

A Dutch drink tasting will take place with Mark Griswold and Stephen Gencarella.  Griswold and Gencarella are the talent behind the popular weekly radio show “Fermented,” which airs every Thursday night on iCRV Radio.  The two will share some of the history and interesting characteristics of traditional Dutch drinks.  One such beverage that will be sampled is genever – a spirit that is the forerunner of gin and has been popular since the 1500s. 

Catering by Selene, enjoyed by the Museum for their excellence and creativity in recreating historic recipes, will provide several traditional Dutch foods for people to sample.  This includes stamppot which is the Dutch name for any puree made of vegetables and often served with sausage.  There will also be bitterballen (tiny meatballs) and the delectable stroopwafel. 

Also taking place this night will be a cannon demonstration by Dan Walls.  Walls will not only shoot off one of Onrust’s reproduction cannons, but will share a little history on the evolution of such weaponry.  There will also be live music and some traditional tavern games for people to play.

The historic replica vessel Onrust is docked at the Connecticut River Museum through mid October for public cruises and programs. Photo by Judy Preston.

A Supporting level ticket will include a 45-minute cruise aboard the Onrust, a special mixed drink and a conversation with Greta Wagle, Director of The Onrust Project. 

The Standard ticket includes the drink and food tasting, music, games, and cannon demonstration and is $30 for members/$35 for non-members.  The Supporting ticket includes the above as well as the special cruise and is $50 for members/$55 for non-members (When reserving you will need to select a cruise time of 5:15 or 6:30 p.m.) Additional beverages will be available at a cash bar.  Participants must be 21 years of age or older and show ID.  To buy a ticket, visit the Connecticut River Museum’s website at ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

Funds will go towards supporting the educational mission of The Onrust Project, a nonprofit floating museum that provides the public with a living history experience of 17th century life and maritime exploration. 

The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street in Essex and is open daily from 10 am to 5 pm. The Museum, located in the historic Steamboat Dock building, offers exhibits and programs about the history and environment of the Connecticut River. For a full listing of Museum programs, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

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Chester Rotary’s ‘Lobster Festival’ Takes Place Today

Loving lobster! Happy LobsterFest-goers savor the feast. (File photo.)

CHESTER — Join the Rotary Club of Chester’s 47th Annual Lobster Festival to be held at the Chester Fairgrounds on Saturday, Sept. 9.

The event is highlighted by classic double entree dinners featuring Twin Lobster, Twin Steak, or Surf and Turf and single entrée Lobster or Steak dinners. Traditional sides include corn on the cob, potatoes and coleslaw.  The gates will open at 4 p.m. for table decorating and general admission.  Dinners will be served from 5 p.m. and continue until 7 p.m.   Soft drinks, bottled water, beer and wine are available for sale throughout the evening.

Live music for your dancing and listening pleasure will be provided by two great bands, Driving Route 9 and Old Dog New Trick until closing at 10 p.m.

Admission tickets for twin lobster or twin steak or surf and turf dinners are $40 in advance, $45 for remaining tickets at the gate. Single lobster or single steak dinner tickets are $30 in advance, $35 for remaining tickets at the gate.  Seating is limited, so early purchase is recommended.  Access to the Lobster Festival is restricted to dinner ticket holders.

Tickets are available at the following Chester locations: LARK, Pattaconk Bar & Grill, Chester Package Store, Chrisholm Marina, Chester Bottle Shop and at the Sunday Market as well as on-line at  http://www.ChesterRotary.org.

Proceeds from this event will be used to benefit the community.  Join friends and family for a memorable evening of great food, good fun and live music!

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Take a Challenging Hike in ‘The Preserve’ Today with Essex Land Trust

View looking south of The Preserve. Photo by Bob Lorenz.

ESSEX — Join the Essex Land Trust on Saturday, Sept. 9, for a fast paced, challenging two-hour hike through the Preserve, starting in Essex and going to Old Saybrook and back. Chris Cryder will lead this hike while sharing his knowledge of The Preserve, its history and its many special natural characteristics. Cryder represented the Connecticut Fund for the Environment in the protracted effort to save this unique property.

The Preserve is a 1,000-acre coastal forest located in Old Saybrook, Essex, and Westbrook, CT. It is the largest unprotected coastal forest remaining between New York City and Boston and is larger than New York City’s Central Park.

The dense canopy of forest and the Pequot Swamp Pond act as a refueling stop for many migratory birds, and the many freshwater seeps on the property are home to amphibian species such as the northern dusky salamander, spotted turtles, and box turtles. Bobcats and fisher cats have also been spotted on the property. The land includes 38 vernal pools, 114 acres of wetlands, headwaters of the Oyster River, and tributaries of the Mud and Trout Brook Rivers. These rivers eventually flow into Long Island Sound.

Meet at 9 a.m. at the West Parking Lot off Ingham Hill Rd., Essex. Leave from the second/west entrance at the end of Ingham Hill Rd. Easy to moderate terrain. Hiking boots suggested. Bad weather cancels.

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21st Annual Venture Smith Day Festivities to be held This Afternoon

Keynote speaker, Russell Shorto, will talk about “Venture Smith and American Freedom” at the 21st annual Venture Smith Day on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 1 to 4 pm in the cemetery at the First Church of Christ, 499 Town St. (Rte. 151), in East Haddam.

EAST HADDAM, CT – The 21st annual Venture Smith Day Festivities will be held on Saturday, Sept. 9, from 1 to 4 p.m. in the cemetery at the First Church of Christ, 499 Town Street (Rte. 151), East Haddam, Conn.where he is buried (1729-1805).

Son of an African king, Venture Smith became the first black man to document his capture from Africa and life as an American slave and successful black freeman in Connecticut.  Well-known and respected, Venture Smith spent the majority of his freedom years in East Haddam and Haddam Neck, Conn.  His grave is one of the original sites on the Connecticut Freedom Trail.

Keynote speaker, Russell Shorto, author of the best seller “The Island at the Center of the World,” about the Dutch founding of Manhattan, will talk about “Venture Smith and American Freedom.” His newest book, “Revolution Song: A Story of American Freedom,” which weaves together the lives of Venture Smith, George Washington and four other early Americans, will be released Nov. 7.

Shorto believes the revolutionary period, through which Venture Smith lived, is more relevant now than ever. Shorto has won numerous awards for his writing, and his books have been published in 14 languages.

Dr. Karl P. Stofko, East Haddam’s Municipal Historian and Venture Smith family genealogist since the 1970s, will talk about “Charles Holt, the Forgotten Publisher of Venture Smith’s 1998 Narrative.” Venture Smith’s family genealogy and artifacts and crafts from Ghana and other regions of Africa will be on display. A town proclamation will be presented and wreath-laying ceremony by the descendants of Venture Smith and the annual Venture family reunion photograph will take place in the cemetery by Venture’s grave.

The ladies of “Sisters In Stitches Joined by the Cloth” of eastern Massachusetts will return this year with their magnificent African American quilts on display. The recent discovery of the Starks family, descendants of Venture’s granddaughter Cynthia Smith Matson, was added to Venture Smith’s family genealogy and will be on display. In addition, a restored original copy Venture Smith’s 1798 narrative will be on exhibit at the event. A facsimile of this booklet will be on sale for $5.

Adults and children who are interested in learning more about Connecticut history in the 1700 and 1800s are encouraged to attend. Bring lawn chairs or blanket. In case of inclement weather the celebration will move into the parish house of First Church.

There will be plenty of time to renew old friendships, talk with speakers, and Venture’s descendants and enjoy light refreshments in the Parish Hall next to the cemetery.

Call (860) 873-9375 with questions.  To review the original Venture Smith autobiography, visit  www.docsouth.unc.edu/neh/venture2/menu.html

A Brief Biography of Venture Smith

Born around 1729, Venture Smith’s African birth name was Broteer, and he was the eldest son of King Saungm Furro of the tribe of Dukandarra in Guinea, West Africa. He was captured about 1736 when he was seven years old and was sold for “4 gallons of rum and some calico” at Anamabo on Africa’s Gold Coast to Robinson Mumford, the steward of a Rhode Island slave ship. Broteer was renamed Venture because he was purchased by Mumford’s own private venture. Venture grew up as a slave on Fishers Island, New York, which was being leased by the Mumford family at that time.

Around 1750 he married Meg, another Mumford slave, and they had four children. After a failed escape attempt in 1754, Venture was sold to Thomas Stanton of Stonington Point, Connecticut. In 1760, he was purchased for the last time by Oliver Smith, of Stonington. Smith allowed Venture to purchase his freedom in 1765 and in return Venture took the name Smith as his surname.

Venture then lived and worked on Long Island to raise money to purchase the freedom of his wife and children. During these years he cut wood, farmed, fished, and spent seven months on a whaling voyage. In 1774, Venture sold all his land on Long Island and in Stonington and moved his family to East Haddam. He then began purchasing land on Haddam Neck along the Salmon River Cove from Abel Bingham and others. His farm grew into 134 acres with three houses; twenty boats, canoes and sailing vessels; two fishing businesses and a commercial orchard. His entrepreneurial ventures included river trafficking, lumberjacking, carpentry and farming. All this he accomplished without the ability to either read or write.

In 1798, Venture dictated his autobiography to teacher Elisha Niles, which was then published in pamphlet form by Charles Holt, editor of the New London Bee weekly newspaper. It has been reprinted many times. It is the only slave narrative of the 18th century that recounts life in Africa. His life story has been an inspiration to many over the years. Venture died on September 19, 1805, at age 77 as a highly respected man by all in the Haddams. His wife, two sons, Cuff and Solomon, and several grandchildren survived him. Several of his descendants still live in Connecticut.

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Estuary Hosts ‘Shoreline Artists’ Workshop’ Show

AREAWIDE — Members of The Shoreline Artists’ Workshop are exhibiting their paintings at the Marshview Gallery of the Estuary Council of Seniors in Old Saybrook for the month of September. An opening reception for the exhibition will be held Friday, Sept. 8, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Start your weekend with a lovely gathering to meet the artists and enjoy their works.

Representing six shoreline communities from Niantic and the Lymes to Old Saybrook and Essex, these artists paint and grow in their art each Friday at the Lymes’ Senior Center in Old Lyme.

The group includes: Beverly Ahlers, Gene Bekaert, Linda Beagle, Cathy Castonguay, Susan Coppejans, Jane Critchett, JoAnn Dongweck, Gerri Hallgren, Elin Larson, Keiko Kaiser, Frank Ossman, Hilde Reichenbach, Susan Simler, Sharol Stewart, Andre Walker, Valerie Washburn, Bob Whitcomb and Brian Willis.

Marshview Gallery is located at 220 Main St, Old Saybrook. Call 860-388-1611 for details.

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Registration Open Through Today for Madhatters December Production

AREAWIDE — Madhatters Theatre Company is registering for their December production of ‘Scrooged, with a twist.’  Registration is open to students age 6-18 years.  Rehearsals begin on Saturdays in September at Lyme’s Youth Service Bureau in Old Lyme.

Performance week is Dec. 11-17 at Chester Meeting House in Chester.  Registration is open through Sept. 8.

For further information and to register, email: madhattersctc@aol.com or call (860) 395-1861  www.ctkidsonstage.com/madhatterstheatrecompany

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Essex Library Hosts Jeffrey Engel to Speak on Dvorak in America, Nov. 6

Antonin Dvorak. Image created by Anna Cierocki.

ESSEX — Dvorak was the first major European composer to take up residence in America. For nearly three years he was the director of the National Conservatory in New York City. Outside of his teaching duties he still found time to compose some of his finest music.

On Monday, Nov. 6, at 1:30 p.m. at the Essex Library, Jeffrey Engel will detail Dvorak’s time in America and play excerpts from some of his American works.  Engel is an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut in Torrington, and also a music historian and orchestral cellist, who trained in Paris and Austria before returning to the U.S. to teach. He was selected as one of the 50 most influential people in Litchfield County, Conn. by Litchfield Magazine in 2010.

This event is free and open to the public.

For more information or to register, call the Library at (860) 767-1560. The Essex library is located at 33 West Ave. in Essex.

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CT River Museum Issues Call for Actors, Production Crew; Auditions Monday

AREAWIDE — The Connecticut River Museum is looking for a variety of volunteer actors to help with the 2017 production of Haunted River.  Auditions will take place on Sept. 6 and 11 between 4:45 and 6:15 p.m.  Available parts are for adults and children (ages 10 and up).  Roles include actors for seven-minute scenes, theatrical tour guides, and musicians.  No prior acting experience is necessary.  Rehearsals will be held on Wednesday nights and run from Sept. 20 through Oct. 18 with a dress rehearsal on Oct. 25 and evening performances on Oct. 27, 28, and 29 from 5 to 9:30 p.m.

Also needed is production crew.  Positions include stage crew, prop and scene fabricators, and costumers. 

For more information and to arrange an audition, call the Connecticut River Museum at 860-767-8269  x122 or send an email to kperkins@ctrivermuseum.org.

The Connecticut River Museum is located in Essex, Conn., and is the only museum dedicated to the study, preservation and celebration of the cultural and natural heritage of the Connecticut River and its Valley.  The recreation of Adriaen Block’s ONRUST, the first vessel to explore and chart Long Island Sound and the Connecticut River, is on display and available for cruises through Oct. 14. 

The Museum is located at 67 Main St., Essex and open seven days per week, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. until Columbus Day. After Columbus Day the Museum is closed on Mondays.  Visit online at www.ctrivermuseum.org.   

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CT Valley Camera Club Hosts Professional Nature Photographer at Nov. 6 Meeting

‘Hurricane Ridge’ by nature photographer Mark Bowie

Mark Bowie to Speak on Techniques for Taking Stunning Landscape Photographs

AREAWIDE: The guest speaker at the Monday, Nov. 6 meeting of the Connecticut Valley Camera Club (CVCC) will be the acclaimed photography writer and public speaker Mark Bowie, who will give a presentation titled “Multiple Exposures for Maximum Landscapes.”  The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at the Lyme’s Senior Center, 26 Town Woods Rd., Old Lyme, Conn. All are welcome.

By shooting multiple exposures in the field and combining them in-camera or in the digital darkroom, photographers can extend exposure latitude, depth of field and camera resolution. They can push the bounds of what can be captured with a camera and open opportunities for taking “never-before-possible” images.

In this new presentation, designed for both amateur and seasoned shooters looking to take their landscape imagery to new levels, Bowie covers the field techniques and state-of-the-art software he uses to produce many types of multi-shot composites.

Mark Bowie is a professional nature photographer, writer and much sought-after public speaker. His work has been published internationally in books and magazines, on calendars, posters, and greeting cards, and in advertising media. His first two coffee table books, Adirondack Waters and In Stoddard’s Footsteps, have become landmark regional publications. He followed those with The Adirondacks: In Celebration of the Seasons. Each won the Adirondack Center for Writing’s Photography Book of the Year Award.

He has also authored two extensive e-books on night photography: The Light of Midnight and After Midnight: Night Photography by Example, and recently released one on his photographic journey, Finding November.  Mark is a staff instructor for the Adirondack Photography Institute and leads digital and landscape photography workshops and tours.  For information, please visit www.adkpi.org.

This event is sponsored in part by Hunt’s Photo & Video (http://www.huntsphotoandvideo.com/).

The CVCC is dedicated to offering its membership the opportunity to become better photographers.  The group offers a variety of presentations and interactive workshops to help members expand their technical and creative skills.  Photographers of all levels of experience are welcomed.  The club draws members from up and down the river, from Middletown to Old Saybrook; from East Hampton to Old Lyme; and along the shoreline from Guilford to Gales Ferry.For more information, visit the club’s website at https://ctvalleycameraclub.smugmug.com/.CVCC meeting dates, speakers/topics, and other notices are also published on the club’s Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/CTValleyCameraClubPage/

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Reading Uncertainly? ‘The Tide’ by Hugh Aldersey-Williams

A present from a New Hampshire daughter, The Tide is a delightful, entertaining, and thought-provoking mix of lucid, often poetic, language with numerous literary quotations plus detailed scientific explanations of the tides that embellish our lives on this earth. It is Aldersey-Williams’s thought-experiment.

It is also his history of the oceanic tides, mixed with a bit of mathematics. But not more than you can handle. As he notes, “You may be relieved to know that I will leave the mathematics aside here.” And, given that many tell us the world’s tides are soon to be much higher, this is a most worthwhile book.

It is, as he states, “not a book about the sea” (sailors, ships, and winds), but rather a book “about the seas” and the ever-changing space between land and water. The tide, he explains, “offers an irresistible mathematical tease” as we attempt to understand and predict it. It is both a horizontal and a vertical force. That is a “scientific challenge” and “a physical; and psychological influence on our culture.” The classic story of King Canute’s (or Cnut, as the author spells it) attempt to stem the tide may have altered the English view of nobility.

This is the author’s story of watching tides around the world, from the English Channel to, of all places, Griswold Point on the Connecticut River, with a cousin, David Redfield. Tides are entrancing: they give us slow, relative motion that produces a “hallucinatory feeling.” Water is, after all, “an inelastic fluid (that) cannot be compressed or expanded.” I too have been mesmerized: by the 10-foot tides in Tenants Harbor, Maine; by the rising waters in Bosham, West Sussex, England, that regularly swamp cars in the local bar’s parking lot; and by the rushing tidal currents in the Straits of Shimonoseki, between Honshu and Kyushu, Japan, through which we once sent our Navy ship (at slack water, of course!)

He acknowledges the inevitability of climate change and global warming, and the fact they will lead to rising seas: “The greatest impact of rising sea levels and the changing tides that may accompany them will be on human habitation.” After all, we easily succumb to the human drive to cling to shores. “In the long term, if not the short, ‘managed retreat’ is our only option. The sea always wins in the end.”

Trying to ‘stop the sea? “It is a futility that Sisyphus would understand all too well.” So New York is a potential Venice … and New London too!

But do not be deterred by such pessimism. The Tide is full of rich, poetic language, as in this description of birds above the sea: “Once aloft, the birds first coalesce as an egg-shaped cloud low over the water, before gaining height and taking on ever more extravagant, twisted shapes like a pixelated flamenco dancer.”

It is enough to send me down to the end of Ely’s Ferry Road to watch the Connecticut River slip by the marshes of Essex.

Editor’s Note: ‘The Tide’ by Hugh Aldersey-Williams was published by W. W. Norton, New York 2016.

Felix Kloman

About the Author: Felix Kloman is a sailor, rower, husband, father, grandfather, retired management consultant and, above all, a curious reader and writer. He’s explored how we as human beings and organizations respond to ever-present uncertainty in two books, ‘Mumpsimus Revisited’ (2005) and ‘The Fantods of Risk’ (2008). A 20-year resident of Lyme, he now writes book reviews, mostly of non-fiction that explores our minds, our behavior, our politics and our history. But he does throw in a novel here and there. For more than 50 years, he’s put together the 17 syllables that comprise haiku, the traditional Japanese poetry, and now serves as the self-appointed “poet laureate” of Ashlawn Farms Coffee, where he may be seen on Friday mornings. His wife, Ann, is also a writer, but of mystery novels, all of which begin in a bubbling village in midcoast Maine, strangely reminiscent of the town she and her husband visit every summer.

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A La Carte: Apricots and Almonds Make Great Galette!

Apricot and Almond Galette

My mother always wanted to live in San Diego, but as far as she got was Troy, NY.

She was born in the beginning of the 20th century, died in the beginning of the 21st century and was buried in an ecumenical cemetery not more than 20 blocks or so from where she lived her whole life.  San Diego, she said, correctly, had the perfect climate: fairly sunny, warm in the daytime and cooler at night. No snow ever.

For me, almost any season is okay. I like the autumn smell of wood smoke in the air and in winter, curling up with two cats as I read long, meandering novels. Spring never seems to linger too long and, now, we bid adieu to summer.

No matter the season, I love to cook. I am still having such fun with all the summer vegetables. I eat two or three tomatoes a day. I am grilling zucchini and summer squash outside or sautéing them with a little butter and garlic and salt on the cooktop in the kitchen. Last night I roasted a spaghetti squash, then tossed the innards with chopped tomatoes, basil and a little butter. Today I will make a frittata with sweet peppers for a 9:30 am meeting at my house.

Next weekend I will make a little dessert with fresh peaches and almonds. The recipe below, from calls for apricots, but any stone fruit will do.

Apricot and Almond Galette

From Bon Appetit, June, 2017

Yield: 4 servings

One-half cup blanched almonds
One-third cup sugar, for more for sprinkling
1 large egg
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
One-half teaspoon almond extract (optional, but I do love almond extract)
One-half teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour (plus more for surface)
1 package frozen puff pastry, preferably all-butter, thawed
12 apricots (about 1 and one-quarter pound), halved and pitted (or other stone fruit, quartered if large)

Place a rack in middle of oven and preheat to 425 degrees. Pulse almonds and one-third of sugar in a food processor until very finely ground. Add egg and pulse to combine. Add butter, almond extract (if using), vanilla extract, salt and 1 tablespoon flour; pulse until almond cream is smooth.

Roll out pastry on a lightly floured surface just enough to smooth out any creases.

If you are using a package of pastry than as 2 sheets, stack and roll out to a one-quarter- to one-third rectangle.

If your package contains a single 16-inch to 10-inch sheet of puff pastry, halve it crosswise and roll out one half on a lightly floured surface until rectangle is one-quarter to one-third inch thick, saving remaining half for another use. Transfer to a parchment-lined (or Silpat-lined) baking sheet. Fold over edges of pastry to make a one-half inch border around sides. Prick surface all over with a fork (this keeps the pastry from rising too much when baked and helps it cook through. (Spread almond cream over pastry, staying inside borders. (Chill dough in the freezer for a few minutes if it becomes too soft to work with.) Set apricots, cut sides up, on top of the cream. Sprinkle lightly with sugar.

Bake until pastry is golden brown and puffed, 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees and continue to bake until pastry is deep golden brown and cooked through and apricots are softened and browned in spots, 15 to 20 minutes longer.

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Registration Open for Tri-Town Youth Services’ First Aid, CPR Courses, Course Starts Nov. 6

TRI-TOWN — Tri-Town Youth Services will offer the American Heart Association’s Pediatric First Aid and CPR course along with a babysitter training certificate program.  This course is for youth ages 11-17.  The $75 fee includes instruction, books, and certificate.

The fall session will be held at Tri-Town Youth Services, 56 High St., Deep River on Monday evenings, Nov. 6, 13, 20 and 27 from 6 to 8 p.m.  Register online (www.tritownys.org) or by calling 860-526-3600.

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