October 23, 2018

Archives for 2018

Letter to the Editor: Carney is a Fiscal Champion, Defended his Constituents from Tax Increases

To the Editor:

I am supporting Devin Carney for re-election as our State Representative for Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, and Westbrook. He has been the fiscal champion we need in a time of economic uncertainty.

Devin has always stood up for taxpayers in Old Lyme and fought against increases in taxes that would have negatively affected our quality of life. Did you know there were serious proposals to add a new tax every time you brought your dog or cat to the vet? Or serious proposals to add a new statewide tax on anyone who owned a secondary home (there are many in Old Lyme)? Or that the DOT wanted to spend our money on a study to look into a proposal that would tax us every mile we drive?

Has Hartford lost its mind? For the most part, yes. But, thankfully we have a representative who is rising above the insanity and standing up for us.

Devin successfully defeated all of these fiscally irresponsible proposals  and, instead, has focused on and making Connecticut more affordable. He supported reducing taxes on pensions and social security, reducing taxes on small businesses, and reducing government spending.

I hope you will join me on Tues, Nov. 6th in voting to re-elect Devin Carney – a representative taxpayers can be proud of.

Sincerely

Deb Czarnecki,
Old Lyme.

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Essex, Brainerd (Haddam) Libraries Jointly Sponsor State Senate Candidate Debate Tonight at VRHS

AREAWIDE — The Essex and Brainerd (Haddam) Libraries will jointly sponsor two debates in October.  Moderators will be Essex Library Director Richard Conroy and Brainerd Library Director Tom Piezzo.

The first debate took place last Wednesday, Oct. 17, and featured incumbent 36th District State Representative Bob Siegrist (R) and challenger Christine Palm (D).

Democrat Norm Needleman and Republican Melissa Ziobron, candidates for the open 36th State Senate seat, will debate at 6:30 p.m. this evening, Monday, Oct. 22, at Valley Regional High School.  Conroy and Piezzo will once again serve as moderators.

District residents are encouraged to submit questions for the candidates in writing by mailing or dropping them off at either the Essex Library (33 West Ave, Essex, CT, 06426) or Brainerd Library (920 Saybrook Road, Haddam, CT 06438) or by sending them via email to rconroy@essexlib.org or tpiezzo@brainerdlibrary.org. 

In order to be considered for inclusion questions must be relevant to issues facing our state, particularly at the district level, and not constructed in such a way as to favor a particular candidate. 

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Putting the Spotlight on Cheetahs, Raising Funds Locally for Their Conservation, Nov. 9

The cheetah is the world’s fastest land animal and Africa’s most endangered big cat. Photo courtesy of CCF.

AREAWIDE — Join Brian Badger, the Cheetah Conservation Fund’s (CCF) Director of Conservation & Outreach, for a talk Nov. 9 from 6 to 8 p.m.  Titled, ‘Cheetah in the Spotlight: Toast to Conservation,’ the talk will take you into the wilds of Africa as Badger discusses key conservation strategies for the endangered cheetah. Badger will speak about the current status of wild cheetah populations and what’s being done to protect Africa’s most endangered big cat.

Badger’s talk will focus on CCF’s innovative conservation methods that address the welfare of both cheetah and human populations over large landscapes. Learn about the highly effective set of integrated programs that work together to achieve CCF’s objective to save the cheetah in the wild.

This is a free event at a private residence. Space is limited so an RSVP required. Hors d’oeuvres will be provided.

The address in Old Lyme, Conn. will be given upon RSVP registration.

RSVP at this link.

Donations are encouraged to support the Cheetah Conservation Fund programs. One hundred percent of the proceeds will go towards helping to save the cheetah in the wild.

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How to Teach Kids About Consent, Healthy Relationships; Talk at Deep River Library, Wednesday

Jill Whitney, LMFT

DEEP RIVER — The news lately has brought home to all of us how easy it can be for teen sexual experiences to go wrong.  Kids of any gender can be victims of sexual assault – or may even contribute to a culture of sexual harassment and violence if they’re confused about what respect and consent should look like.

Jill Whitney, a licensed marriage and family therapist who writes about relationships and sexuality, will guide parents on how to talk with kids about consent and other sex-related topics.  She will provide:

  • Ideas for getting the conversation started
  • Sample language you can use
  • Ways to deal with strong feelings that may come up for you or your child

Join the conversation on Wednesday, Oct. 24, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Deep River Public Library.  Open to parents of children of any age.  All are welcome.

Registration at tritownys.org would be appreciated for planning purposes.

Resources will also be on hand from the Women & Families Center and the CT Alliance to End Sexual Violence.

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Talking Transportation: ‘Getting There’ – China’s Transportation Strategy


Quiz question #1:  
What country has the largest interstate highway system in the world?  Hint:  It’s not the United States.

Quiz question #2:  What country has the most miles of high-speed rail?  Hint:  It’s not France or Japan.

The answer to both questions is … China!

China’s superhighways, most of them built since 1984, now cover almost twice as many miles as the US interstates.  And on the rail side, China’s 15,000 miles of high speed rail represents nearly two-thirds of all such rail in the world.

China’s fast trains travel up to 217 mph, linking Beijing to Shanghai (the distance of New York City to Chicago) in a five-hour run.  Trains carrying 1000 passengers each depart at 10 to 15 minute intervals.  Compare that to Amtrak’s Acela, once an hour, carrying 300 passengers at an average of 70 mph.

Sure, China is big.  Though measured in square miles, the US is slightly larger.  But with a population of 1.34 billion, China is huge compared to the US’s 325 million residents.  That means China has a lot more people to move, and they’re investing accordingly.

China spends over $300 billion annually on transportation.  Compare that to the US Department of Transportation’s $80 billion annual spending on highways, rail and air transport.  No wonder we feel like we’re living in a third world country with crumbling roads and obsolete railroads.

But more importantly, China is also investing abroad.  Chinese money is being invested in 68 countries to build highways, ports and railroads to take its exports to market on what it sees as a 21st century Silk Road.

The country’s “Belt & Road Initiative” has pledged $8 trillion in projects for under-developed countries’ projects where it will be able to conduct trade.  These destinations account for 70 percent of the world’s population, 55 percent of its GNP, and 75 percent of its energy reserves.

There is already a rail link from China to Europe with daily trains carrying electronics and manufactured goods to Europe.  After unloading, those trains return to China filled with food.  A trip that can take a month by sea now links 35 Chinese cities with a like number of European cities in just 15 days by rail.

On the high seas China is also expanding its reach, building a modern fleet of vessels and investing heavily in port operations in Europe and South America. Containers filled with cell-phones sail out from Chinese ports and much-needed oil sails back.  And where Chinese merchant vessels go, so too will its Navy.  While the US fancies itself as policeman to the world, there’s no way we can keep up.

The US merchant marine has only 175 American-owned vessels flying the US flag while 800 others are registered abroad.  The Chinese government-owned COSCO shipping conglomerate owns 1114 vessels, the fourth largest fleet in the world.  And that’s just one company.

President Trump seems headed to an all-out trade war with China, matching them tariff for tariff and Tweeting regularly about how “unfair” the Beijing government has been to us.

Meanwhile, Washington can’t even pass a domestic infrastructure spending bill to patch up our decrepit roads and rails.  To my thinking, we’re not only getting outspent by China, but clearly out-smarted.  Transportation is about trade and China is clearly planning for the future while we wallow in the past.

Posted with permission of Hearst CT Media.

Jim Cameron


About the author:
 Jim Cameron is founder of The Commuter Action Group, and a member of the Darien RTM.  The opinions expressed in this column are only his own.  You can reach him at CommuterActionGroup@gmail.com

For a full collection of  “Talking Transportation” columns, visit www.talkingtransportation.blogspot.com

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Letter to the Editor: Ziobron Challenges Needleman on Negative Campaigning, ‘Double-Dipping’

To the Editor:

While Norman Needleman has been busy spending his own money (to the tune of a $250,000 personal check) for negative TV ads and expensive mailings, I’ve been spending my time knocking on doors every day for the last six months, directly communicating and listening to the people I want to represent at the capital.

Rather than simply run in the merits of his own record, Mr.  Needleman has resorted to doubling down on the negativity, going after me with misleading videos and campaign mailers distorting my record, knowing I have limited resources to push back.  He has even gone so far as to enlist dark money via a nasty political action committee to push out negative information. The people behind this PAC don’t even live in our district.

I’m not even sure Mr. Needleman understands the job he’s trying to buy. When he’s not taking shots at me, he’s repeating old tropes about how Hartford is broken, suggesting that only he can fix it.  Where have we heard that before?

Lastly, there’s Needleman’s stated position on double-dipping from taxpayers. When questioned, he explains he won’t give up his job as First Selectman in Essex.  I’ve been a legislator for 6 years, and I can tell you, even though it only pays as a part time job, it isn’t. I know firsthand that the CEO of a small town is a 60-70 hour a week gig, and that’s when things are quiet. Couple this with Needleman’s abysmal attendance record at the critical River Council of Government meetings, and one can’t help but ask: if elected, which job is going to get his attention?  Voters in the 33rd district deserve someone who isn’t going to treat the job of representing them as a side-hustle.

Sincerely,

Melissa Ziobron,
East Haddam.
Candidate for the 33rd district of the State Seante
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East Haddam Business Association to Host Business Development Expo/Fair, Oct. 30

Registration is now open for the East Haddam Business Association’s (EHBA) Business Development Expo on Tuesday, Oct. 30, from 1 to 5 p.m. at the Town of East Haddam’s new Municipal Office Complex, 1 Plains Rd. in Moodus, which will be followed by a networking reception to be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Gelston House, 8 Main St., East Haddam.

New and existing businesses in East Haddam and surrounding towns are encouraged to attend. Topics will include information about customer service, marketing, tourism, project management, business planning, lending, insurance and business start-up basics.

Guest speakers/topics include:

  • Debi Norton, Bravo! Interactive Media/SCORE Mentor – Workshop:
  • SEO Roundtable; Eric Munro, SCORE Mentor ­– Workshop: How to Grow Your Business;
  • Tom Gezo, T Gezo Business Consulting Llc./SCORE Mentor – Workshop: Planning for Success;
  • Jim Jackson, Connecticut Small Business Development Center – Workshop: Consultative Selling;
  • Meg Yetishefsky & Jill Belisle, State of Connecticut – Workshop: How to do Business With the State of Connecticut;
  • Karen Tessman, Connecticut Economic Development Fund – Workshop: Business Financing;
  • Irene Haines, AAA Insurance – Insurance Needs of Small Business;
  • Jennifer Height, Liberty Bank – Financing for Your Small Business;
  • Rosemary Bove, CT Office of Tourism – The Tourism Economy in CT;
  • East Haddam Economic Development Commission – Starting a Business in East Haddam.

This event is free for EHBA members and $15 per person for non-members. Non-members who register before or on the day of the event will receive a one-year EHBA membership for 2019.

In addition, regional businesses are invited to promote themselves through a Business Services Information Fair scheduled for 1 to 4 p.m. The fair cost will be $25 to $50 per table depending on the size of the table. EHBA members will receive a discount.

Participants are welcome to attend workshops of their choosing, browse the business services fair, and network with attendees, speakers, and sponsors. Sponsorships and volunteer opportunities are available.

For more information contact: Judith M. Dobai 800-595-4912 or jdobai@ffcsconsulting.com.

Sponsors include: East Haddam News, Cold Spring Farm, Gelston House, Waide Communications, New Inn Kennels, and MoreFIT.

The East Haddam Business Association’s mission is to promote, support and advocate for local businesses through cooperative community outreach. For more information about the EHBA visit ehbact.org. or www.facebook.com/EHBusinessAssociation.

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Letter to the Editor: Correcting Errors in Ziobron Mailer About Needleman

To the Editor:

A mailer arrived at my house this past week that was so full of erroneous implications and information about Norm Needleman that I am compelled to publically (sic) correct some of it.

First, the truth about taxes in Essex:  in Norm’s four terms as First Selectman in Essex, taxes have remained lower than 90% of all other municipalities in the state.  And, this year the property tax rate in Essex was lowered.

Second, the truth about Norm Needleman’s salary:  when state support evaporated, he reduced his salary by 75% and donated the remaining 25% to area charities.  To call it ‘wasteful spending’ is more than misleading …it is an outright lie.

Norm Needleman is as much an “honest Abe” character as I have seen in politics.  He is totally committed to public service.  He has solved Essex’s problems with probity, ingenuity and intelligence and now he wants to bring these character traits and skills to Hartford where, by the way, he will not accept a salary.

Melissa’s Ziobron’s long-term reputation will depend on her taking a stand against  “dark money” slurs against her opponent.  I hope she does.

Sincerely,

Claire K. Matthews,
Essex.

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Local Historical Societies Commemorate End of WWI, Honor Local Veterans in ‘A Patriotic Salute,’ Nov. 4

The Corinthian Band will play patriotic music during the slide show.

To mark the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I and 100 years of women serving in the US military, the historical societies of Chester, Deep River and Essex will sponsor a program that combines local history, spirited patriotic music and a unique way to honor our veterans.

The area’s historical societies are combining forces to present “A Patriotic Salute,” a digital slide show of images of local veterans over the past 100 years, to be shown on Sunday, Nov. 4, at 3 p.m. at the Deep River Town Hall Auditorium at 174 Main Street, Deep River. The slide show will be presented with musical accompaniment by the Corinthian Jazz Band, performing patriotic music. Historic commentary will be provided by Angus McDonald.

The event is free and open to the public. Handicapped access is available. Refreshments will be served.

Questions? Call 860-558-4701 or go to chesterhistoricalsociety.org.

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Needleman, Ziobron to Participate in Senate 33rd District Debate Tonight at Bacon Academy

State Senate 33rd Democratic candidate Norm Needleman.

State Senate 33rd District Republican candidate Melissa Ziobron.

AREAWIDE — The Bacon Academy Young Democrats, Colchester Young Republicans, and the Bacon Academy Debate Club will host a debate for candidates vying to represent the Connecticut State Senate 33rd District. The debate will take place Tuesday, Oct. 16, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Bacon Academy in Colchester, Conn. Admission is free and all are welcome.

From 6:30 to 7 p.m., there will be a meet-and-greet with State Representative candidates in the auditorium lobby. 

From 7 to 8 p.m., the debate will take place in the auditorium with Democratic candidate Norm Needleman, who is currently First Selectman of Essex, and Republican candidate State Rep. Melissa Ziobron, who represents the 34th Connecticut House District.  Incumbent Senator Art Linares (R) is not seeking re-election.

The sprawling Senate 33rd District includes Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland, and Westbrook.

All candidates for the 33rd District State Senate race are welcome to participate in the debate as long as they have filed paperwork to be on the ballot with the Secretary of the State’s office by Oct. 1.

For further information, email mkeho399@colchesterct.org

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Middlesex Chamber Hosts Membership Open House at CT River Museum Tonight with Brad Galiette of Google as Guest Speaker

ESSEX — The Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce will host a membership open house & networking reception at the Connecticut River Museum on Tuesday, Oct. 16.  A special welcome is extended to persons in the member towns of Chester, Deep River, and Essex.

The event will be held along the banks of the Connecticut River outside the museum under a large tent courtesy of Chamber members Connecticut Rental and the Connecticut River Museum from 5 to 7 p.m. Food and drinks will be served at the event thanks to the sponsorship of Essex Savings Bank.

The kick-off speaker at the open house is Essex native Brad Galiette, Product Manager at Google NYC, where he helps drive the roadmap and execution for Google’s Display and Video Ads products. Growing up in the region, Galiette is passionate about the Middlesex County region and is proud to speak about his experiences as a young professional.

“We’re inviting prospective members to a wonderful evening at the Connecticut River Museum for our member open house and I thank Essex Savings Bank for their sponsorship of this event. We look forward to meeting new members down county and hearing Brad Galiette’s experience at Google,” said President of the Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce Larry McHugh.

The Connecticut River Museum is located 67 Main Street in Essex, CT. To register for the event visitmiddlesexchamber.com.

For more information call 860-347-6924 or email info@middlesexchamber.com

About Brad Galiette: Galiette is a Product Manager at Google NYC where he helps drive the roadmap and execution for Google’s Display and Video Ads products. Previously, he was a member of Google’s Strategy and Operations team where he collaborated with senior leaders to help grow Google’s search and YouTube/video advertising businesses.

Before Google, Galiette was a Senior Associate at McKinsey & Company in its Stamford, CT office where he developed strategies for senior executives at Tech, Media, and Telecom (TMT), Advanced Electronics, and Financial Institutions companies across the US.  He has also spent time at Microsoft in both Product Management and Finance Management roles, which included experience in the company’s CFO office. 

Earlier in his profession, Galiette founded a digital media company and was recognized as a Top Young Entrepreneur by BusinessWeek. Brad holds a BS in Economics and Computer Science, an MS in Computer Science, and an MBA, all from Yale University, and graduated from Valley Regional High School in Deep River.

About Middlesex Chamber: The Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce is a dynamic business organization with over 2,175 members that employ over 50,000 people. The chamber strives to be the voice of business in Middlesex County and the surrounding area.

From nine geographically based divisions, which meet on a monthly basis throughout Middlesex County, to industry based committees and councils, the Chamber works hard to provide a valuable service to members.

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Essex Library Presents True Story of ‘Lilac Girls’ During French Resistance, This Afternoon; All Welcome

A free, illustrated talk on the Bellamy-Ferriday House & Gardens will be presented by Connecticut Landmarks Educator Jana Colacinto at 3:30 p.m. Oct. 13 at the Essex Library.

ESSEX — Best-selling author Martha Hall Kelly’s Lilac Girls is based on the true story of Caroline Ferriday’s work as a member of the French Resistance and her interest in the fate of the “lapins” (rabbits) – female political prisoners subject to medical testing at the Ravensbrück concentration camp.

Miss Caroline Ferriday

In her debut novel, Kelly transforms the horrors and inhumanities of war into a story of sisterhood and perseverance. Experience Connecticut Landmarks’ Bellamy-Ferriday House & Garden through an illustrated lecture and discussion with Landmarks’ Educator, Jana Colacino at the Essex Library on Saturday, Oct. 13 at 3:30 p.m.

Enjoy a visual tour of the 18th-century historic house, built by Rev. Joseph Bellamy and the five-acre site which includes the 18th century residence, barns, and the historic formal parterre garden installed by Miss Caroline Ferriday, a philanthropist and the final resident of the house, and her mother, Eliza Woolsey Ferriday.  While Rev. Bellamy influenced everyday colonial life and preached with religious fervor throughout New England’s “Great Awakening,” Miss Ferriday championed human rights and social justice causes around the globe. 

Details from the lives of these notable residents will be interwoven with lovely images of site. Martha Hall Kelly’s forthcoming prequel, Lost Roses (2019), set in the World War I era, tells the story of Caroline’s mother Eliza and her fight to help Russian refugees displaced by the revolution.

This program is free and open to the public.

For more information or to register, call Essex Library at 860-767-1560. The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex.

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Letter to the Editor: Carney Consistently Demonstrates Commitment to Constituents

To the Editor:

I am writing in support of Devin Carney for State Representative, District 23 (Towns of Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Westbrook).  Devin was first elected in 2014 and through 2 terms has proven himself a strong advocate for our communities.  Devin was the first elected representative in any town along the shoreline to take a stand on the Federal Railroad Administration proposal to run a bypass through the region. In January 2016 his was the first voice we heard and the first to organize a meeting in the Town of Old Lyme to discuss the issue.  He went on to be a very effective advocate for the large numbers of local and regional community members who stood up against the proposal.

Devin has co-sponsored comprehensive legislation on the opioid crisis. This is a critical issue for our communities. Devin’s careful attention proves again how deeply he cares about this heartbreaking problem which affects far too many in our communities. In addition, Devin has helped to reduce the burden on local businesses by reducing the sales tax on boat sales. He has helped to reduce the propane tax on local homeowners and he has stopped the mileage tax.

As an experienced and effective leader Devin Carney has proven again and again his commitment to his constituents and to working across the aisle for solutions to improve the quality of life in our towns and state. Please join me in re-electing Devin Carney to the State Legislature on November 6th.

Sincerely,

Diane Mallory,
Old Lyme.

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Letter to the Editor: Needleman Thinks, Acts Independently; Works in a Bipartisan Manner for Good of Essex

To the Editor:

The time has come where we all need to get out and vote and try and pick representatives who will lead us out of the partisanship that is causing so much negativity and lack of progress in our governments; local, state and national.

If you saw 60 Minutes on Sunday, September 30th you saw Jeff Flake, a Republican Senator from Arizona and seemingly a reasonable and thoughtful person, admit that if he was running for Senator again, he would have not have reached out to Chris Coons, Democratic Senator from Delaware, to put some sense in the discussions over the allegations of sexual misconduct of Judge Kavanaugh. He stated that there is no longer any reward in politics for acting on personal beliefs and values if those beliefs and values do not fall in line with the political party with which you are affiliated. How sad. While this is a well publicized national issue, the same type of partisan behavior is happening much more quietly on local and state levels. I personally want to respect the person for whom I vote and want to believe that that person will do what he or she thinks is right, not what is being driven through the political party. And accept it that the chosen leader may not always support issues the way I would, but that leaders have a bigger and broader view than I could possibly have for what is good for the state or the nation.

It is for that reason I support Norm Needleman for Senator in the 33rd district. He is a man who follows his own mind and has proven in Essex his willingness to extend past party lines and attempt to do the right thing.

Getting out to vote this election is very important. Find out what you can about candidates, and vote for those who you think are most likely to help solve our local, state and national problems by working with the people and other leaders from all parties. I believe Norm is that person for 33rd district Senator.

Sincerely,

Robert Ward,
Essex.

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Ivoryton Library Association Hosts 5K Pumpkin Chase at Ivoryton Village Park, Saturday

ESSEX — The Ivoryton Library Association will host a 5K Pumpkin Chase on Saturday, Oct. 20, starting at Ivoryton Village Park, 109 Main St.  Registration begins at 7:30 a.m., with a kids’ fun run at 8:45 a.m., and a 5K run at 9:15 a.m.

Applications are available at the library across the street from the park (at 106 Main St.) or at wwww.ivorytonlibrary.org, or you can register online at www.aratrace.com. There will be prizes for multiple age groups, as well as prizes for best costumes.

Pre-register by Oct. 18 for $15. Registration on the day of the race is $20. T-shirts are $5, and registration for the kids’ run is $5.

For more information, call Chris Pagliuco at 860-759-6430.

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‘In The Elements’ on View at Chester Gallery Through Nov. 25

‘String Theory’ by Michael Pressman is the signature work of the ‘In the Elements’ exhibition opening at The Chester Gallery, Oct. 5.  Image courtesy of the Chester Gallery.

CHESTER — After a successful reopening by new ownership this past August, the Chester Gallery will present a new show titled, In the Elements, for this fall season.

Opening Friday, Oct. 5, for the Chester community’s First Friday celebration, the exhibit will bring fresh works from standing gallery artists like Sol Lewitt and Richard Ziemann, as well as Sosse Baker, Sheila Barbone, Gil Boro, Stephanie Chubbuck, Rosamund Christison, Sean Kratzert, Michael McLaughlin, Nancy Pinney, Fred Trinkaus, Jerry Weiss and Annie Wildey.

New to the gallery will be works from Ashby Carlisle, Mundy Hepburn, Ella Crampton Knox, Kimberly Monson, Mark Patnode, Michael Pressman and Michael Viera. Also to be featured are the paintings of the late Curt Hanson, a longtime friend and colleague of gallery owner Nancy Pinney. He is dearly missed and is thankfully carried on by his masterful works. 

In the Elements highlightthe innate ability of the artist to capture the nature of this reality, both in the real and the abstract in various mediums including glass and bronze sculptures, weavings, lithographs, photography, mixed media, and paintings. Using the seven elements of art, consciously or otherwise, these artists not only capture but enhance the four elements of life, creating an eclectic assortment of many fine and challenging views of our world.  

The opening reception will take place from 5 to 8 p.m. with live music from local band Low Pagoda in the sculpture garden. 

The Chester Gallery is located at 76 Main Street and is open Wednesday through Saturday (Sundays by chance) from noon to 6 p.m., or by appointment. In the Elements will remain on view through Nov. 25. 

For more information, call (860) 449-3617.

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Letter to the Editor: Needleman, Palm, and Pugliese are Value-Based Candidates

To the Editor:

With less than 50 days to the midterm elections candidates seem to be ramping up with canvassing, lawn signs, and public appearances. As a voter, I am ramping up my interest in the candidates and what they represent. I am looking for value-based candidates who will demonstrate integrity, authenticity, and a commitment to the people they serve. I have had enough of partisan bickering, lies and distortions of the truth, and downright crude behavior. Is it too much to expect truth, dignity, or empathy from our elected officials? I think not.

It is reported that 90% of Republicans approve of President Trump, but that report doesn’t tell the whole story. More accurately, it is 90% of remaining Republicans who approve of him. Yes, many Republicans are abandoning their party because they cannot align with current policies, tactics, or values. Neither can they align with a president who demonstrates little respect for honorable traditions, or who sacrifices national security for his own self serving purposes. The midterm elections seem to pose a conundrum for Republican voters. Do they betray themselves, their party allegiance, stay at home, or attempt to salvage what is left of the party of Lincoln? It seems to me, that casting a vote for Democrats, while counterintuitive, may be the best way to do that.

What better way to send a message to their party leaders than to vote for Democrats who better represent their values. Will you have the courage to make that choice? Norm Needleman, Christine Palm, and Matt Pugliese are local candidates who are honest, competent, and dedicated to the public good. They are committed to improving the economic wellbeing of our community, supporting young families and Seniors, protecting healthcare and the environment, and ensuring school safety. They are value-based candidates who deserve a look.

Sincerely,

Claire Walsh,
Deep River

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Letter to the Editor: Ziobron Confirms her Commitment to ‘Bipartisan Good Faith,’ Explains Her Reasons for Running

To the Editor:

As a moderate, I‘ve been open in my belief in working in a bipartisan good faith. It has been a cornerstone of my philosophy of public service. This was evident in May of 2018, when State Representatives from both sides of aisle spoke, unsolicited, of their experiences working with me in the State House. These comments were public and broadcast on CT-N.   I used those clips in a $375 video to answer the Needleman campaign’s recent spate of vitriolic attacks, soon to be disseminated in a $86,000 TV ad buy.  This is something my opponent can do because, unlike me, he is unrestricted by the rules of our Citizen’s Elections Program.

While out meeting voters in Colchester, a woman’s comment pulled me up short: why was I running at a time of such partisan divide?  My  reaction caught me off guard as much as the question.  I felt tears suddenly welling up and had to take a moment to compose myself.  I wanted to answer with sincerity.  I spoke to her of my passion for our community.  Of my earnest desire to protect our beautiful vistas and natural resources.  My appreciation for the volunteers that make our towns run and how I love our home state.

I can’t ignore how this question touches a recent fault line: in letters to local papers some have expressed upset that I used a personal photo in a campaign mailer that happened to include prominent local Democrats. The photo wasn’t captioned, it was standard campaign material: a picture taken during my tenure as President of Friends of Gillette Castle State Park in 2011 with a newly appointed State official.  It’s regrettable to me how some remain committed to fanatical partisan division at a time when we need to work together.

Sincerely,

Melissa Ziobron,
East Haddam.

Editor’s Note: The author is currently the State Representative for the 34th District and is now the endorsed Republican candidate for the State Senate for the 33rd District.
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Send Us Your Questions for the Candidates, Deadline is Today!

We will shortly be sending questionnaires to the local candidates running for state office in the Nov. 6 election.  We plan to publish their responses on Thursday, Nov. 1.  We invite readers to submit possible questions for the candidates to editor@ValleyNewsNow.com by next Tuesday, Oct. 2.

The candidates to whom we will be e-mailing questionnaires are:

STATE SENATE DISTRICT 33
This District includes Chester, Deep River, Essex and Old Saybrook.  There is no incumbent since the current state senator for the district, Art Linares, is not running again.

Candidates:
Norm Needleman – Democrat
Needleman is currently first selectman of Essex.

Melissa Ziobron – Republican
Ziobron is currently state representative for the 34th State Assembly District (Colchester, East Haddam, and East Hampton)

STATE ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 36
This District includes Chester, Deep River and Essex.

Robert Siegrist – Republican (incumbent seeking his second term)

Christine Palm – Democrat

STATE ASSEMBLY DISTRICT 23
This District includes Old Saybrook.

Candidates:
Devin Carney – Republican (incumbent seeking his third term)

Matt Pugliese – Democrat

We look forward to publishing reader’s Letters to the Editor.  We have a strict 350-word limit for these letters and will enforce a two-week break between letters submitted by the same author.

The final day that we will publish letters will be Sunday, Nov. 4: we will only publish new letters on Nov. 5 if they are in response to a letter published on Nov. 4.

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Letter to the Editor: Ziobron’s Record is Impressive, Deserving of Her Election to State Senate

To the Editor:

Melissa Ziobron has been serving as the State Representative for the 34th District for almost 6 years.  Her record is an impressive one.  Now we need her legislative experience in the State Senate.

Since her election in 2016 she has become the Ranking Member on the Appropriations Committee, the highest committee position for a Republican member of the House.  She was instrumental in instituting a constitutional spending cap in last year’s bipartisan budget agreement, created a plan to fund the unfunded pensions of state employees, prioritized education funding for small towns, and developed state budgets that didn’t involve tax increases.

Serving on the Environmental Committee throughout her time in the legislature she is passionate about protecting our State Parks and Fisheries and was recognized for her leadership by the CT Land Conservation Council and was named a 2017 Legislative Champion by the CT League of Conservation Voters.

I urge you to go to her website, http://melissaziobron.com/ to read her full background and list of accomplishments. 

Please join me in supporting Melissa Ziobron for State Senate on November 6.

Sincerely,

Adrienne Forrest,
Essex.

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Op-Ed: Needleman Says His Experience, Attitude Are Needed in Hartford, Will Benefit 33rd District

This op-ed was submitted by Norm Needleman, the current first selectman of Essex, who is the Democratic candidate for 33rd District State Senator.

I’ve been First Selectman in Essex for seven years. In all of those years, I’ve delivered a balanced town budget. And in most of those years, Republicans, Democrats, and Independents on our Board of Finance and in our town meetings have unanimously approved the budget.  But as importantly, I am directly responsible for making sure every service funded in those budgets actually happens in the real world, even when state support evaporates. So, every day I directly confront the fallout from the financial crisis in Hartford…not in theory or from the sidelines…but as the core of my responsibility as First Selectman. 

That experience on the front lines of both financial management and service delivery in a small town has given me some insight and perspective on what the towns in our district need in their next state senator. In my view, there are three criteria: first, does the candidate have hands-on experience and real world success in making a small town function and prosper? Second, can you measure the results the candidate has actually delivered? And third, what motivates the candidate to run for the state senate?

I’d like to address those criteria about my own candidacy.

Experience and measurable achievements: If you choose me as your next state senator, I’ll go to Hartford as a leader who has created jobs (225) in his own business, and who has helped make his small town home to over 700 businesses. I’ll go to Hartford as a tax cutter, not a tax raiser…Essex property taxes have remained lower than 90% of the municipalities in our state. I’ll go to Hartford as someone who has streamlined town government to make it more efficient and more responsive.  I’ll go to Hartford as a financial manager who has created years of balanced budgets, and actually been responsible for making those budgets work in the real world. And last but not least, I’ll go to Hartford as a problem solver who has worked every day with Democrats, Republicans and Independents by creating an inclusive decision-making dialogue. 

My motivation for running: I’m not running as a stepping-stone to higher office. I’m not a politician, and I don’t need a job. I want to be your State Senator for two reasons: to help every town in our district get their fair share of support for education and infrastructure improvements; and to help make certain that every individual in every town has a fair and equitable chance to live a safe, healthy, and fulfilling life.

That’s the experience and the attitude I’ll bring to Hartford.

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Explore the ‘Hidden History of Middlesex County’ at Deep River Historical Society’s Carriage House, Oct. 9

DEEP RIVER — Middlesex County has a rich past. From dinosaur tracks and famous authors to the world’s largest gathering of fife and drum corps. But those fascinating facts are just part of the story. Join the Deep River Historical Society (DRHS) and the Deep River Library when local authors Robert and Kathleen Hubbard reveal more hidden mysteries on Tuesday, Oct. 9, from 7 to 8 p.m. at the DRHS Carriage House.

The authors present many unforgettable stories in their recently published book, Hidden History of Middlesex County. They will present slides and discuss their research, which took them to Chester and the other 14 cities and towns of Middlesex County and included conversations with over 100 people who were knowledgeable of the historic people, places, and events that are discussed in the book.

Robert Hubbard is a retired professor at Albertus Magnus College in New Haven Connecticut. Kathleen Hubbard is a retired teacher from the Middletown Connecticut public school system. Both have lived in Middlesex County towns for 30 years. They are the authors of Images of America: Middletown and Legendary Locals of Middletown. In addition, Robert is the author of the recent biography, Major General Israel Putnam, Hero of the American Revolution.

This program is a collaboration between the Deep River Library and the Deep River Historical Society.

For more information, visit http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.comand click on the monthly calendar, or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 1 – 8 pm; Thursday 10 am – 6 pm; Friday 10 am – 6 pm and Saturday 10 am – 2 pm.

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CT Valley Camera Hosts Equine Photographer Tonight, All Welcome

An example of photography by Sarah Grote.

The Connecticut Valley Camera Club (CVCC) will host a presentation on Equine Photography by Sarah Grote on Monday, Oct. 1, at 7 p.m. at the Lymes’ Senior Center, 26 Town Woods Road, Old Lyme. The public is welcomed to attend.

Sarah Grote is a lifestyle and nature photographer specializing in projects, equine, and event photography. After 20 years in corporate and nonprofit companies in various operational, development, and managerial roles, she decided to follow her artistic dreams and visions based on her Mom’s inspirational quote, “celebrate everything”.

Since 2014, Sarah has been the photographer for the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum and the Connecticut Draft Horse Rescue (CDHR). Her photos and paintings were selected for CDHR’s juried art show “Save a Horse – Buy Art!” in 2015 and 2017. Her photography was used for the “Demolish or Preserve: The 1960’s at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion” exhibit, which won the most prestigious award given by the American Association of State and Local History.

In 2018, her photos were selected for three juried shows in the Mystic Museum of Art, the Essex Art Association Gallery, and The Voice of Art Gallery. She has been a board member of the Connecticut Draft Horse Rescue organization since 2015.

The CVCC, which was founded in 2002, has a simple mission — to give its members the opportunity to become better photographers.  The ways that the Club achieves this objective include offering a variety of presentations and workshops to help members expand their technical and creative skills.  During these popular events, members explore such areas as photographic techniques, computer processing, artistic interpretation and commercial applications, often under the tutelage of a professional photographer.

The CVCC welcomes new members at any time. Meetings are generally held on the first Monday of the month at the Lymes’ Senior Center in Old Lyme.  For more information about the CVCC, visit the club’s website at ctvalleycameraclub.smugmug.com.

Meeting dates, speakers and their topics, and other notices are also published on the club’s Facebook page at ww.facebook.com/CTValleyCameraClubPage.

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Meehan’s Presidential Memorabilia on Display at Acton Library Through Nov. 7


OLD SAYBROOK — From Oct. 1 until Nov. 7, the Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook will be hosting a display of James Meehan’s presidential memorabilia in their atrium display case. 

The Acton Public Library is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. (starting Oct. 14.)

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Essex Steam Train Offers ‘Brats & Beer’ Cruise, Oct. 11

ESSEX — Enjoy ‘Brats & Beer’ along with beautiful fall foliage on the Connecticut River! A great night is in store for you from the minute you smell the brats sizzling on the grill to the last sip of beer as you glide into dock after the last rays of a stunning sunset.

This unique evening on Thursday, Oct. 11, runs from 5:45 to 9 p.m. 

Arrive 5:30 p.m. in Essex for departure at 5:45 p.m. for a two-hour cruise on the Becky Thatcher Riverboat. Return to Essex at 9 p.m.

The evening offers:

•    tastings of several carefully selected craft beers
•    a buffet of brats and all the fixin’s (additional beverages and snacks are available for purchase onboard.)
•    gift bag including an engraved beer glass as a memento

Note this event is for adults 21+.  Ticket prices are $65 in advance/ $75 Walk-up (pending availability.)

Visit EssexSteamTrain.com for tickets and more information.

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Today’s ‘Cruise, Blues & Brews’ Festival Features Top CT Blues Bands, Benefits ‘At-Risk Boys’ 

CHESTER — Cruise Blues & Brews was started in 2015 and has operated as a fund raiser to support the At Risk Boys Fund.  Each year this event contributes thousands of dollars to the fund which uses 100% of the proceeds to support non-profits in Middlesex County.  The At Risk Boys fund has been operating since 2013.

Giving away over $60,000, it supports grass-root, local initiatives who work to help the at-risk boys in our communities.  The festival is a fun and exciting event that has generated a lot of buzz in the community.

Each year hundreds of families and car and music enthusiasts come out to enjoy the festival.  There is something for everybody with upscale food vendors, retail items and stores, cars, cars, and cars, all while listening to some of the best Blues bands in Connecticut.

Up-scale food trucks provide the top food choices for the festival.  With choices from home-style barbecue to fish and chips, you will never go hungry at this festival.

Craft Beer is provided by Thimble Island Brewery, one of the festival sponsors.  You can enjoy cars, food, and music that will make your day at this festival one to round out your summer.

Another reason to attend is the Vendor Marketplace.  Only hand-picked vendors are allowed to make your selection diverse and interesting.

Kids will enjoy the festival, as well, with their own Kids Zone complete with free face painting and fun and games for all kids.

And there’s more … prizes, games, and surprises make this a festival not to miss.

All proceeds of the event are raised on behalf of the At-Risk Boys Fund at the Community Foundation of Middlesex County

The 4th Annual Cruise Blues & Brews Festival, will be held Saturday, Sept. 29, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (rain date, Sunday, Oct. 1), at the Chester Fair Grounds. Admission: $5 donation, children under 12 free. To learn more about this Festival, buy tickets in advance or make a donation to the At-Risk Boys Fund of the Community Foundation of Middlesex County, visit:  www.atriskboysfund.org . Tickets may also be purchased at the gate during the Festival.
Photos courtesy of Caryn B. Davis Photography www.carynbdavis.com

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Last Chance to Visit Ivoryton Village Farmers’ Market, Saturday; Season Ends Today


IVORYTON — Summer’s back and so is the Ivoryton Farmers’ Market.  The Ivoryton Green will be bustling with vendors showcasing Connecticut-Grown produce and prepared foods. Local artisans and crafters will be displaying their latest creations and area musicians will be performing, live.

Brought to you by the Ivoryton Village Alliance, the market is open Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and runs weekly from June 16, through Sept.29. Everyone is invited to visit our village, shop the market and enjoy the free, live entertainment.

More information is available at www.ivorytonfarmersmarket.com or www.facebook.com/ivorytonfarmersmarket

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Estuary Offers Chair Massages, Wednesdays

OLD SAYBROOK — The Estuary Council of Seniors 220 Main St Old Saybrook is offering Chair Massage by appointment every Wednesday. Relieve stress, sore muscles, and improve circulation not to mention relax. Call Susan Graham L.T.M. at 860-510-1376 for a private appointment.

Walk-ins are welcome as time permits. Isn’t it time to treat yourself to a relaxing chair massage?           

  • 20 minute chair massage: $20.
  • Organic facial massage for face, neck, shoulders 30 minutes: $30.

For more information and to schedule an appointment, call Susan at 860-510-1376 

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CRT Offers Early Registration for Annual Energy Assistance Program

AREAWIDE — Income-eligible residents in Hartford County and Middlesex County are encouraged to apply now through the Community Renewal Team’s (CRT) Energy Assistance program to get help paying for their home-heating bills this winter.

“Winter may be a few months away, but it is never too early to start planning how you will pay your home-heating bills,” says Patricia Monroe-Walker, Director of Energy Services for CRT. “We are happy to help eligible families make sure that they have the resources to heat their homes properly throughout the winter.”

Low to moderate-income households in Hartford and Middlesex Counties may be eligible for help paying their utility or fuel bills. Home heating includes oil, natural gas, electricity, propane, kerosene, or wood. Even if heat is included in the cost of rent, tenants may be able to receive a one-time cash payment.

CRT’s Energy Assistance program helps thousands of families in Connecticut every year. In 2017, the program served nearly 20,000 eligible households in Hartford and Middlesex Counties.

More information about how to apply for energy and weatherization assistance is available on CRT’s website at:
http://www.crtct.org/en/need-help/energy-a-weatherization or by calling their 24-hour automated attendant at 860-560-5800.

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Middlesex Coalition for Children Hosts Candidate Debate in Middletown, Oct. 11

AREAWIDE — The Middlesex Coalition for Children will host a 2018 Candidate Forum, Oct 11, from  9 to 10:30 a.m. at deKoven House in Middletown.Candidates running for office for State Senate and State Representative for
Middlesex County seats will be present.

In this panel discussion-style event, candidates will be asked questions about their views on issues that affect children and families in Middlesex County

All are welcome and admission is free.

Confirmed guests include:
Anthony Gennaro
Irene Haines
Madeline Leveille
Matt Lesser
Norman Needleman
John-Michael Parker
Matthew Pugliese
Quentin Phipps
Colin Souney
Linda Szynkowicz
Melissa Ziobron

Candidates are still in the process of confirming and this list will be modified as confirmations are received. Check the Facebook event page for the updates.

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NARAL Pro-Choice America Endorses Needleman For State Senate

Essex First Selectman and 33rd State Senate District candidate Norm Needleman.

AREAWIDE — NARAL Pro-Choice America, one of the nation’s leading women’s health advocacy organizations, has announced its endorsement of Norm Needleman for the State Senate seat from the 33rd District in Connecticut.

The objective of NARAL Pro-Choice America candidate endorsements is to, “elect champions who don’t just pay lip service to values of reproductive freedom, but who truly fight for them…and help defeat those who want to roll back the clock on our rights.”

In accepting the endorsement, Needleman said: “We must continue our efforts to make certain that women have the right to choose how and when to raise a family, that paid family leave is assured, and that pregnancy discrimination is erased from the workplace. The endorsement by NARAL-Pro-Choice America is deeply gratifying. It strengthens my longstanding commitment to insure that basic reproductive rights are guaranteed to all women in or district, our state, and our nation.”

Needleman is the Democratic candidate for the 33rd State Senate District, which consists of the towns of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Portland, Westbrook, and part of Old Saybrook.

Needleman is the founder and CEO of Tower Laboratories, a manufacturing business. As CEO, he has built the business to become a leader in its field, employing over 225 people.

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Cappella Cantorum Hosts Late Registration Tonight for December Concert; Includes Works by Puccini, Saint-Saens


AREAWIDE: 
Join the Cappella Cantorum Masterworks Chorus for its first rehearsal of Puccini’s Messa di Gloria and Saint-Saens’ Christmas Oratorio on Monday, Sept. 17, 7 p.m., at John Winthrop Middle School, 1 Winthrop Road, Deep River. Use the rear entrance.

These melodious and inspiring works will be performed in concert Sunday, Dec. 2, at John Winthrop with professional orchestra and soloists. Simon Holt of the Salt Marsh Opera will direct.

Auditions are not required.

Registration is $50 plus music: Puccini $9, Saint-Saens $11. Late registration is the following Monday, Sept. 24, at the same time and place.

For more information, visit www.CappellaCantorum.org or call 860-526-1038.

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St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Hosts Tree Swallow Cruise and Benefit, Sept. 30

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church of East Haddam has announced a benefit cruise on the Connecticut River aboard RiverQuest’s Adventure to view the Tree Swallow migration on Sunday, Sept. 30.  One of nature’s extraordinary events is the annual gathering of hundreds of thousand of Tree Swallows on the Connecticut River in the fall, just prior to their migration south. The swallows converge at dusk and form large clouds from which they descend into the communal roost along the shoreline. This has been declared as one of nature’s greatest spectacles.

There are two ticket levels. Patron for $150.00 which includes a private pre-cruise reception at the Gelston House in East Haddam with champagne and hors d’oeures from 3:45pm to 4:30pm; and, general price of $75.00. Both levels include food and beverage aboard the Adventure. Cruise starts promptly at 5:00pm so arrive early. Departure is from Eagle Landing State Park in Haddam.

This cruise will be a unique St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church fundraising opportunity with a portion of the funds raised through ticket sales going to the East Haddam Fuel Bank.

Captain Mark has found the best way to maneuver The Adventure to allow optimum views from her open decks on the bow and stern. Flexible seating ensures everyone gets “up close and personal” viewing. The cruise is about 3.5 hours on the water. The cruise is primarily about the Tree Swallows, however, it is also about the journey there is so much to see while cruising along the river.

Many birds are migrating through the area at this time; for the fall season, we saw a record number of Bald Eagles and Great Egrets last year. On board Naturalist(s), will educate you on the Tree Swallow phenomenon and all the other wildlife we see. On the return cruise home, there is time to chat with others and experience the river at twilight, blending into night. Don’t forget your camera and binoculars.

“This Tree Swallow cruise and viewing experience on the Connecticut River is an incredible opportunity to see the beauty of nature up close, to bring people together in a unique event and to provide a way for St. Stephen’s to raise money both for the church and a portion of the money raised will go to the East Haddam Fuel Bank”, comments Tom Angers, Chair of the Tree Swallow Cruise Committee at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church. “We are delighted to bring this event to the church and the East Haddam community,” Tom concludes.

To purchase tickets and for more information, visit www.ststeves.org/cruise.

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Salt Marsh Opera Performs ‘La Boheme’ at ‘the Kate’ This Afternoon


AREAWIDE — In a cold Parisian apartment, a poet is so poor he burns pages of his own manuscript for heat. A chance encounter and cleverly pocketed key lead him to discover a love strong enough to warm his soul. But in impoverished 19th-Century Paris even love is not free, and he is faced with a price he may not be able to pay.

What cost is too high for the woman he loves, and is it worth living without her by his side?

Find out the answers to these questions and more in a spectacular performance of Puccini’s ‘La Boheme’ at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center — the Kate — at 300 Main Street, Old Saybrook, this evening at 7 p.m. or Sunday at 3 p.m.  A few tickets are still available for both performances by calling the Kate box office at 860.510.0453 or online by clicking here.

Tomorrow evening, Saturday, Sept. 22, there will another performance of La Boheme at 7 p.m. at the George Kent Performance Hall, 119 High Street, Westerly, RI.  For tickets, call 860.535.0753.

This performance at Kent Hall  is a special “Opera in the Round,” an immersive experience that puts you right in the middle of 19th-Century Paris! Eat, Drink and Be Merry with your own Parisian picnic basket as you celebrate with the cast their brief taste of happiness, then march with them from the café into the streets of Paris at the climax of Act II.

These tickets are available on a first come, first served basis.

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Deep River Public Library Holds Mayflower STEM Challenge, Nov. 15

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Library will be holding a Mayflower STEM Challenge geared toward children in grades 2 – 4 on Nov. 15, from 4 to 5 p.m. Registration is required for this event.

Participants will be split into two teams and will work cooperatively through a series of tasks to complete the challenge. Students will need to be able to add decimals, work though a simple engineering task as a team and crack a rebus code to follow the clues.

For more information, visit http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 1 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 2 pm.

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See ‘Once’ at Ivoryton Playhouse Through Oct. 14

Katie Barton plays the lead role of Girl in ‘Once,’ which opens Sept. 19 at Ivoryton Playhouse.

ESSEX — The Broadway smash hit Once is currently enjoying a successful run at the Ivoryton Playhouse.

On the streets of Dublin, an Irish musician about to give up on his dreams and a beautiful young Czech immigrant are drawn together by their shared love of music. Over the course of one fateful week, an unexpected friendship and collaboration quickly evolves into a powerful but complicated love story, underscored by emotionally-charged music.

Winner of eight 2012 Tony Awards including Best Musical, Once is an original theatrical experience. Featuring an impressive ensemble of actor/musicians who play their own instruments onstage, Once is an unforgettable story about going for your dreams and the power of music to connect us all.

Based on the 2007 movie of the same name, written by Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova, the show features all of the haunting songs from the critically acclaimed film, including the Oscar-winning “Falling Slowly”. This uplifting show strikes an unforgettable chord in audiences and speaks to the power of music to connect us all. As Irglova said in her remarkable Oscar acceptance speech, “Fair play to those who dare to dream and don’t give up.”

A show like this only comes around Once.

Ivoryton welcomes back Ben Hope*, who has performed at Ivoryton in Million Dollar Quartet and Stand by Your Man. Hope is making his directorial debut with this show, which is dear to his heart, since he performed the role of Guy on Broadway many times.  What makes this production special is that Hope is directing his wife, Katie Barton*, in the role of Girl. Barton has also performed in Ivoryton, playing the lead role of Tammy Wynette in Stand by Your Man.

Joining them in this production are Sam Sherwood*, last seen in Ivoryton in The Road — My Life with John Denver, as Guy; Steven G. Anthony* as Billy; Jonathan Brown as Svec; Margaret Dudasik* as Reza; Andreina Kasper as Bank Manager; Marcy McGuigan* as Baruska; John Mervini as Eamon; Morgan Morse as Andre; Rachel Mulcahy as Ex-Girlfriend; Don Noble* as Da; Victoria Wepler as Emcee and Cadyn Malary and Lizzie Pantano as Ivanka.

Musical direction is by Eric Anthony, set design by Glen Bassett, lighting design by Marcus Abbott, and costume design by Cully Long.

Once runs through Oct. 14, 2018.  Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p. m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $55 for adults; $50 for seniors; $25 for students and $20 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org 

Group rates are available by calling the box office for information. The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

*denotes member of Actors Equity.

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All Youth — Boys and Girls — Invited to Join Chester/Deep River Cub Scout Pack 13

CHESTER & DEEP RIVER – Cub Scouting wants you!

Now is the time to join the fun and excitement of America’s foremost youth program for boys and girls — Cub Scouting. 

Cub Scouting is for boys and girls in the kindergarten through fifth grades. The program combines outdoor activities, sports, academics, and more in a fun and exciting program that helps families teach ideals such as citizenship, character, personal fitness, and leadership.

For more information, visit www.beascout.scouting.org and enter your zip code for more information, also at http://chesterdeeprivercubpack13.scoutlander.com

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Letter to the Editor: Democrat Pugliese Represents a Fresh, Viable Alternative in House 23rd District Race

To the Editor:

Matt Pugliese offers a refreshing, non-partisan voice in the state House of Representatives for Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and Westbrook. Matt brings business experience from the non-profit sector where he has managed tight budgets and competing union interests to deliver theatrical arts to communities in Middletown and at U Conn. Matt has been recognized for his business acumen by the Hartford Business Journal 40 under 40.

As a resident of Old Saybrook raising a young family, Matt knows first hand the importance of supporting education, working women and families. With his courage to speak up for policies that make sense, Matt has earned the endorsements of Moms Demand Gun Sense, CT Chapter of National Organization of Women and Planned Parenthood.

Connecticut has distinguished itself as a leader in gun control and voting equality. To retain these advances, our legislature needs to be controlled by those willing to stand up for these values. Connecticut needs to become a leader in business and the arts. Matt Pugliese has the experience and fortitude to be our next leader.

Sincerely,

Candace Fuchs,
Old Lyme.
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Renowned Wildlife Photographer Speaks Tonight on Photographing Birds, Other Wildlife at CT Valley Camera Club Meeting; All Welcome

Shawn Carey, who took this photo, will speak tonight at the Connecticut Valley Camera Club meeting at the Lymes’ Senior Center on tips taking nature photos.

AREAWIDE — The guest speaker at the Monday, Sept. 17, meeting of the Connecticut Valley Camera Club (CVCC) will be the renowned wildlife photographer Shawn Carey, who will give a talk titled, “ Photographing Birds and Other Wildlife in New England and Beyond.” The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at the Lymes’ Senior Center, 26 Town Woods Rd., Old Lyme, Conn.

All are welcome and there is no admission charge.

Over the last 10 years, bird and wildlife photography has seen a surge in popularity—thanks in large part to vast improvements in digital technology. Digital cameras are better, easier to use, and more affordable than ever. But how do you choose the right one? And once you have the camera, what’s next? Where do you go? When should you get there? And how do you turn those great views you’re getting into memorable images that truly capture the moment?

Don’t panic: wildlife photographer and educator Shawn Carey has you covered. Join Carey as he expertly guides you through these topics and shares some tricks of the trade to help you truly enjoy your experience.

Originally from Pennsylvania, Carey moved to Boston, Mass. in 1986 and has been photographing birds and other wildlife for over 20 years. He’s been teaching wildlife photography for Mass Audubon for the past 18 years. On the board of directors for Eastern Mass HawkWatch where he serves as their Vice President, he is also on the advisory board for the Massachusetts Audubon Society and Mass Audubon Museum of American Bird Art.

“I love the natural world,” Carey says, “if it walks, crawls, flies, swims or slithers … I’ll photograph it!”

Carey’s work can be viewed on his website at www.migrationproductions.com.

The CVCC is dedicated to offering its membership the opportunity to become better photographers. The group offers a variety of presentations and interactive workshops to help members expand their technical and creative skills. Photographers of all levels of experience are welcomed.  The club draws members from up and down the river, from Middletown to Old Saybrook; from East Hampton to Old Lyme; and along the shoreline from Guilford to Gales Ferry.

For more information, visit the club’s website at https://ctvalleycameraclub.smugmug.com/. CVCC meeting dates, speakers/topics, and other notices are also published on the club’s Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/CTValleyCameraClubPage.

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Enjoy ‘Once,’ Two Receptions at ‘A Night of Theater’ to Benefit Sister Cities Essex Haiti, Sept. 27

ESSEX — Sister Cities Essex Haiti is joining with the Ivoryton Playhouse for “A Night of Theater” on Thursday, Sept. 27. The evening begins under the tent with a pre-show cocktail and light fare reception 6 to 7:15 p.m. “Once” cast musicians will stroll through the tent and entertain during the reception.  

The 2012 Award winning musical “Once” begins at 7:30 p.m. “Once” is an unforgettable story about going for your dreams and the power of music to connect us all.  It is winner of eight 2012 Tony Awards.  

Enjoy dessert and meet the cast immediately following the show under the tent. 

For tickets visit, info@sistercitiesessexhaiti.org or call 860-227-0848.  Tickets are on sale through Monday, Sept. 17.

Proceeds from this event will enable Sister Cities Essex Haiti to continue its good work in Deschapelles, Haiti by providing funds for the operation of the Deschapelles Community Library and projects in Music, Tennis and Early Education Teacher Training. Essex and Deschapelles are Sister Cities.

For more information, visit www.sistercitiesessexhaiti.org

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Major Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition on View in Old Lyme

Looking across Gilbert Boro’s Sculpture Grounds towards his own Studio 80, the sculptures shown in the photo are all by Boro himself.

OLD LYME — Gilbert Boro, owner and curator of Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme, will host Summer Sculpture Showcase 2018: An Exhibition of Unique Landscape Sculptures on his property in the center of this historic town. Boro’s towering studio is also on the beautiful four-and-a-half acre landscaped grounds, as well as his home.

Featuring 20 works by both established, nationally renowned sculptors, as well as fresh new faces, the summer-long show opens June 4. A meet-the-artist opening reception is set for Saturday, June 9 from 5 to 7 p.m., which will feature a live jazz band and a performance by David Dorfman Dance. There is no charge for admission and all are welcome.

Competition to exhibit was keen, with 120 submissions from around the country. Entries were evaluated for concept, execution, creative process, artistry, and how it would fit in the landscape. Boro, a nationally acclaimed sculptor in his own right, hosts this annual show to provide a venue for both young and mid-career sculptors to showcase their work to a diverse audience.

Boro also holds a firm conviction that art and viewer should be interactive. His Sculpture Grounds are an environment where viewers are not only permitted – but encouraged – to touch sculptures. “I really think that three-dimensional art should be handled, touched, pushed, and experienced in three dimensions,” he says. “It’s the only way you can understand it.”

The exhibitors accepted for the Summer Sculpture Showcase embrace this concept. Acclaimed exhibitor artists from Connecticut, the northeast region, and around the country are represented in the show.

‘Lustration’ by Sarah Haviland is one of the features works in Summer Sculpture Showcase 2018.

New York sculptor Sarah Haviland, who received a Fulbright Award to study in Taiwan this fall, had two pieces selected: Lustration, a contemplative female figure of aqua resin and mirrors, and Seraphim Mirror, a butterfly-shaped wall hanging created with galvanized mesh, resin, and a mirror. Haviland’s abstract work explores female identity and is exhibited both nationally and internationally.

Aether by Andreas von Huene is on display at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds.

Miguel Castillo Hernao, a native of Colombia, evolved to sculpting after university studies in literature and philosophy. Hernao explores geometry, color and repetitive forms in his works composed of stone, wood, metal and plexiglass. His seven-foot tall entry, Composition #28, is formed of painted riveted aluminum.

Chicago artist Ruth Aizuss Migdal’s bold and striking Radiate, standing more than eight feet tall, also plays with female forms and is composed of patinated bronze gilded with gold leaf.

Connecticut-based artists include Deborah Hornbake, whose Running Man is a fusion of wood, pipe, copper tubing, wire and stones; Eric Camiel, who has works in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and The Library of Congress, and whose film work has received numerous Emmy and Academy Award nominations, will have his aluminum sculpture, Sail Dream, on display; and Denis Folz’s monumental 11- foot steel sculpture, Feathered Resting Spot.

Boro is committed to supporting and exhibiting promising new artists. This year he presents Shelli Weiler as the featured indoor artist, with her photography exhibit titled Intimate Exchange. Weiler, a native of Scarsdale, NY, is studying photography at Wesleyan University in Middletown. Her photography explores the deep hidden character of people through ground-breaking and provocative poses and settings. Boro is presenting her work in the small, freestanding ESB Gallery, created in honor of his late wife, Emily.

Situated halfway between Boston and New York, Summer Sculpture Showcase 2018 is set on Boro’s four-and-a-half acre estate in the heart of Old Lyme’s historic village. In addition to special exhibits, the permanent display consists of approximately 100 works strategically placed around the park-like grounds.

Now in its 14th year, the Sculpture Grounds host more than 5,000 visitors a year. Visitors are welcome to bring their own picnic to the cafe. The grounds are open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, year-round, admission is free, and touching the sculptures is encouraged.

The show runs through Oct. 26 and is curated by Gilbert Boro, and Exhibitions Coordinator and photographer, Christina Goldberg.

For more information about Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds, visit www.sculpturegrounds.com. The David Dorfman Dance group performs and holds workshops around the country and will be in residence at Conn College in New London June 6-11.

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Enjoy ‘Music on the Riverboat’ Tonight Featuring ‘Seat of our Pants’

‘Music on the Riverboat’ will be held on the Becky Thatcher, pictured above.

Enjoy live music while sailing down the Connecticut River during a gorgeous sunset at Essex Steam Train’s annual summer concert series, Music on the Riverboat. Offering four nights of music on the Becky Thatcher riverboat on select Fridays this summer, this is a fun and unique live music series offering the opportunity to dance the night away in front of a beautiful, natural backdrop.

There is one act remaining on the schedule:

  • on Sept. 14, the series closes out with Seat of our Pants.

Features of the cruise include:

  • Board the train at Essex Station at 6 p.m. for a 6:15 p.m. departure
  • Two-hour cruise down the Connecticut River aboard the Becky Thatcher riverboat
  • Bands perform between 6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
  • Train returns to Essex Station approximately 9 p.m.
  • Food and beverage service are available at the fully stocked bar (No BYOB permitted)
  • Due to the time of day and duration of the cruise, Music on the Riverboat is not recommended for children under 10.
  • $45 per person

The Essex Steam Train is located at 1 Railroad Ave., Essex.  For more information, visit the Essex Steam Train website or contact Pam Amodio at 860.767.0103 or pamodio@essexsteamtrain.com

To reserve tickets, visit this link.

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Centerbrook Architects Promote Deep River Resident Batt to Associate

Daniel Batt

ESSEX – Centerbrook Architects & Planners has announced that Daniel Batt, AIA, LEED AP has been promoted to associate.

A graduate of Miami University in Ohio and the Rhode Island School of Design, Batt is just shy of 10 years with Centerbrook. His diverse résumé includes having served as the project manager for built projects such as the expansion of the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center and the new Red Barn at Mitchell College.

Batt, a Deep River resident, is currently the project manager for Rocky Corner, Connecticut’s first cohousing development that is now under construction. He is also managing a project currently in planning for The Basilica of St. John the Evangelist in downtown Stamford.

“Dan is one of the most well-rounded architects I’ve worked with,” said Centerbrook Principal Jim Childress, FAIA. “Not only is he a creative and thoughtful designer, but he’s excellent at delivering a project on-time and on-budget. He really knows how to keep the water out.”

Centerbrook also announced that its architectural staff is now 90-percent licensed with David Peterson most recently passing the Architect Registration Examination. The other latest licensees on the design staff include Aaron Emma, Hugo Fenaux, Anna Shakun and Aaron Trahan.

Centerbrook Architects & Planners is a firm conceived in 1975 as a community of architects working together to advance American place-making and the craft of building. A collaborative firm with an exceptional history of building, Centerbrook is known for inventive design solutions that are emblematic of its client and their traditions.

Centerbrook’s designs have won 380 awards, including the Architecture Firm Award, a distinction held by only 36 active firms nationwide. Centerbrook is currently designing for clients in seven states, Canada and China.

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Letter to the Editor: Protection of the Environment is Good for the Economy

To the Editor:

We in the lower Connecticut Valley live in one of the world’s “last great places”. But can we afford to protect the environment if it raises our taxes and costs us jobs and money? This question always comes up around election time but it is based on an incorrect assumption and it leads to the wrong answer. For a state like Connecticut with its knowledge based economy, the environment is actually good for the economy.

China has one of the fastest growing economies in the world and it is a leader in the environmental technology. Some of the wealthiest places on earth (Germany, Denmark, California) are the most environmentally conscious. Solar voltaic installers and wind turbine service technicians are projected to be among the fastest growing occupations in the United States. Connecticut is home of some of the pioneers of the future (the fuel cell industry) and has some of the best resources in the world for the green economy; e.g.: the Connecticut Green Bank (the first in the nation) and the Yale Center for Business and the Environment. Our own locality has initiatives such as Sustainable Essex and the Chester Energy Team and engines of sustainability such as Centerbrook Architects and Noble Power Systems. All of this is in addition to the tourist industry which brings jobs and money to the area as well as making it a nice place to live. These signs are telling us something – that the future belongs to the clean and the efficient.

You don’t need to be a member of the Sierra Club or a follower of the Pope’s Encyclical to care about the environment. It is good enough to care about turning “Green to Gold” (to quote from the book by Dan Esty of Yale). The green economy is the wave of the future and if jobs and money are what we want, we ought to get on board or we will lose BOTH our environment and our economy.

Sincerely,

Frank Hanley Santoro,
Deep River.

 

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Needleman To Host East Haddam Issues Forum, Aug. 29

Essex First Selectman and 33rd State Senate District candidate Norm Needleman.

AREAWIDE — State Senate candidate Norm Needleman has announced plans to host a series of public forums to discuss the issues facing the towns in the 33rd State Senate District.

The forums will take place in towns throughout the district, with the first one planned for the East Haddam Grange Hall,  488 Town St, East Haddam, on Wednesday, Aug. 29, at 6 p.m.

In announcing his plan to host the public forums, Needleman said: “The most important perspective on the issues facing our district comes from the folks who live and work in our small towns, not from politicians. The people of our district deserve to have their voices heard by the legislators they will be electing to address those issues. These public forums will be a vital public dialogue … a way for all of us to exchange views and lay the groundwork for common sense solutions to the issues our small towns deal with every day.”

Needleman is the Democratic Candidate for Connecticut’s 33rd Senatorial District which includes: Clinton, Chester, Colchester, Deep River, Essex, East Hampton, East Haddam, Haddam, Lyme, Westbrook, Old Saybrook and Portland.

For more information about Needleman’s campaign for state senate, visit NormForSenate.com.

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Ann Nyberg to Receive 3rd Annual Spirit of Katharine Hepburn Award at the Kate’s Summer Gala, Saturday

Ann Nyberg. Photo by Lora Karam Photography.

Ann Nyberg, Connecticut’s longest-serving, full-time female news anchor/reporter will receive the 3rd annual Spirit of Katharine Hepburn Award. The award is given by the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center (the Kate) to an individual who embodies the spirit, independence, and character of the legendary actress and will presented to Ann on Saturday, Aug. 25, at the Kate’s annual Summer Gala in Old Saybrook.

A resident of Madison, Nyberg is WTNH-TV’s longest-serving anchor/reporter in station history and has been nominated for multiple Emmys. In addition to anchoring several evening newscasts, she also produces and hosts the show Nyberg an on-air and online show she developed to share people’s stories with the masses.

In November of 2015, Nyberg was inducted into the prestigious Silver Circle of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (NATAS) Boston/New England Chapter – an honor given to television professionals who have made significant contributions to their community and to the vitality of the television industry. In 2017, Nyberg was recognized, during the year of Harper’s Bazaar Magazine’s 150th anniversary, as a woman of success who pays it forward.

Nyberg has been a storyteller her entire life, which all started with a diary her mother gave her for Christmas when she was just 8-years-old, and the rest is history. As she says, “I never met a story I didn’t want to tell.” Her first book, Slices of Life, A Storyteller’s Diary debuted in October 2015, and is based on her diary. Her second book, released October 2016, is on the legendary Connecticut film actress, Katharine Hepburn. It is called Remembering Katharine Hepburn: Stories of Wit and Wisdom About America’s Leading Lady.

Nyberg began her journey in broadcast journalism immediately following graduation from Purdue University, where she earned a degree in journalism. She was a television journalist in Indiana and Oklahoma before making Connecticut her home. She and her husband have three daughters and two dogs, Henry Watson, a rescued Coon Hound and Mr. Trip Meeshu, a Golden Retriever.

Nyberg feels strongly about philanthropy and in 1993 she founded the Toy Closet Program at Yale-New Haven Children’s Hospital. Thousands of toys and other items are given to children of all ages to help ease their trauma. A lover of the arts, she is a Trustee of the Kate, the only theater in the world named after the iconic four-time Academy Award winning Connecticut actress. Nyberg is also the only honorary female member of the Walter Camp Football Foundation, which raises thousands of dollars for charity every year.

An advocate for all things local, Nyberg’s website Network Connecticut spotlights people and places, small businesses and innovators and entrepreneurs all over the state. She also owns a boutique in Madison, called Annie Mame, where she carries several Connecticut-made goodies to help small businesses push ahead. The name of her shop is in tribute to her favorite movie, Auntie Mame which came out in 1958 and starred Waterbury native, Rosiland Russell.

The Spirit of Katharine Hepburn Award, which will be presented to Ann Nyberg on Saturday.

The Kate’s August 25th Gala takes place on the historic Old Saybrook Town Green at 6 pm and includes a cocktail hour with silent auction and dinner by Max Catering. Ann will receive the award, a graceful statuette in the likeness of Hepburn by Kimberly Monson, an artist and faculty member of the Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts. An exciting auction and live music and dancing round out the evening. GSB Wealth Management, a subsidiary of Guilford Savings Bank, is the Executive Producer sponsor for the event.

For additional information and/or to order tickets at $275 per person and up, visit www.thekate.org or call 860-510-0453.

The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center is a non-profit performing arts organization located in an historic theatre/town hall on Main Street in Old Saybrook. Originally opened in 1911 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Center has been renovated with public funds from the Town of Old Saybrook and donations raised by the Trustees of the Center. It includes a 250-seat theatre and a small museum honoring Katharine Hepburn, Old Saybrook’s most celebrated resident. As befits an organization born of such a public/private partnership, programming is eclectic, offering something for all ages and income levels on the Connecticut shore and in the lower river valley.

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Last Week to Vote for Fred! Hearing-Impaired Brooke is One of Three National Finalists for ‘Focus on People’ Award

Fred Brooke of Old Lyme is the founder of AngelRide and one of the three finalists for the Oticon ‘Focus on People’ award.

Frederick Brooke of Old Lyme is a finalist for a national award.

The Oticon Focus on People Award celebrates the accomplishments and contributions of individuals with hearing loss, and Brooke is one of the top three individuals across the country in the Adults category.  His final placement in the Awards now depends on online votes, which are open through Aug. 24.

Brooke doesn’t let his hearing loss slow him down.

In 2001, inspired by 12-year-old Angel Uihlein, he swam across Long Island Sound, raising enough money for Angel’s mom to stay at home with her seriously-ill daughter.  AngelSwim continued over the following years, as Brooke swam 850 miles along the coast of Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Maine to reach the Canadian border, all to benefit sick children.

In 2004, Brooke and his partner Lynn McCarthy started AngelRide, a trans-Connecticut (135 miles, two-day) charity bicycling event with nearly 100 percent of the money raised donated to The Hole in the Wall Camp, founded by actor Paul Newman for children too sick to go to conventional camps.

The money raised enabled the camp to start a Hospital Outreach program that sends specially-trained employees to enrich the lives of children in oncology wards. Today, AngelRide is an annual Memorial Day event that has raised more than $5.75 million to benefit hospitalized children.

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Oticon Focus on People Awards, the first national awards program recognizing individuals who challenge outdated stereotypes and demonstrate that hearing loss does not limit a person’s ability to make a difference. Through the awards program, Oticon continues its mission to raise awareness and open doors of opportunity for people with all degrees of hearing loss.

The other two finalists in the Adult category for this year’s Focus on People Awards are Garth Baker of Twin Falls, Idaho and Clare Wolf of Rubicon, Wis.

“For 20 years, the Oticon Focus on People Awards program has brought inspiring individuals into our lives, and this year is no exception,” says Nancy Palmere, Director of Consumer Marketing and Public Relations. “We’re honored to introduce the country to our finalists and celebrate how they defy the stigma of hearing loss. Each story is unique and we encourage people to visit our website to cast a vote.”

Voting is open through Aug. 24, and the results will be announced in October. All finalists receive a cash prize. First place winners also receive a donation to a charity of their choice.

To vote and to learn more about the awards, visit www.Oticon.com/FOP.

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Chestnut Hill Chamber Music Concert Series Finale is Friday at the Kate


OLD SAYBROOK — Now in its 49th season,Chestnut Hill Concerts will present four programs of chamber music this August at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center in Old Saybrook. The prestigious series is highly-regarded, not only for its programming, but also for the world-class musicians that artistic director Ronald Thomas invites for the performances.

The concerts will take place August 3, 10, 17, and 24, all Friday evenings at 8 p.m. Cellist and artistic director Ronald Thomas will host and perform in each concert.

The Aug. 3 concert features Ronald Thomas performing the 5th Bach Cello Suite. The remainder of the concert presents John Novacek’s Rags for Violin and Piano, and the Brahms Piano Quartet in  G minor, Op. 25. In addition to Ronald Thomas, artists include Steve Copes, violin; Matthew Sinno, viola; and Randall Hodgkinson, piano.

On Aug. 10, Chestnut Hill presents two string sextets and a string quartet. Chestnut Hill welcomes the Amernet String Quartet, whose members include Misha Vitenson, violin; Franz Felkl, violin; Michael Klotz, viola; and Jason Calloway, cello. The quartet will perform Schubert’s String Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 125, No. 1. The quartet will be joined by Vivek Kamath, viola and Ronald Thomas, cello to perform two string sextets: Richard Strauss’ String Sextet from Capriccio, Op. 85 and Tchaikovsky’s String Sextet Souvenir de Florence, Op. 70

The program on Aug. 17 presents music by Debussy, Kodály, and Dvořák. Ronald Thomas and Mihae Lee will perform Debussy’s Sonata for Cello and Piano; Catherine Cho, violin, Tien-Hsin Cindy Wu, violin, and Todd Phillips, viola will perform Kodály’s Serenade for Two Violins and Viola, Op. 12; and the ensemble will perform Dvořák’s Piano Quintet in A major, Op. 81.

The season finale on Aug. 25 explores the music of Mozart, Mendelssohn, and Schumann, including the rarely-heard Horn Quintet in E-flat by Mozart, K. 407, written for one violin and two violas. The concert also includes Mendelssohn’s Piano Trio in D minor, Op. 49 and Schumann’s Piano Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 47. This performance introduces Frank Huang, concertmaster of the New York Philharmonic, to the Chestnut Hill audience, and brings back some of its favorite performers: William Purvis, horn; Tien-Hsin Cindy Wu, violin and viola, Cynthia Phelps, viola; Ronald Thomas, cello; and Mihae Lee, piano.

The 2018 season of Chestnut Hill Concerts is made possible with support from the Connecticut DECD Office of the Arts.

All concerts are Friday nights at 8 p.m. at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center (The Kate), 300 Main Street in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Subscriptions to the four concerts are $140 (orchestra) and $120 (balcony). Single tickets are $40 for orchestra seats and $35 for the balcony. Kids and teens come free. To purchase tickets, contact The Kate’s box office at 860-510-0453, or visit www.thekate.org.

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‘Con Brio’ Hosts Auditions in Old Saybrook, Aug. 28

AREAWIDE — Do you want the challenge of performing glorious music with 70 other dedicated singers hailing from 11 Towns in the region? Why not consider joining the Con Brio Choral Society, a 70-member auditioned, classical chorus performing under conductor Dr. Stephen Bruce.

Rehearsals are on Tuesday evenings from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at St. Paul Lutheran Church, 56 Great Hammock Road, Old Saybrook, Ct and will begin on Tues., Sept. 4, for the Dec. 2018 concerts. The program includes the baroque masterpiece Te Deum by Czech composter Jan Zelenka along with other pieces.

Concerts will be on Fri., Dec. 7, at 8 p.m. and on Sun., Dec. 9. The chorus will perform  with the Con Brio Festival Orchestra and professional soloists at Christ the King Church at 1 McCurdy Lane in Old Lyme.

Appearing in these photos of Con Brio singers are faces you may recognize as your friends, neighbors, or colleagues:

From Towns east of the CT River: Top Row: John Noyes, Karl Stofko, Next Row, Pam Ryley, Susie Rahr, Middle Row: Tom Meisenzahl, Marilyn Currier, Helen Charov, Elin Larson, and Con Brio Choral Society Music Director Dr. Stephen Bruce

Bottom Row: Heather Meisenzahl, Abby Bruce

From Old Saybrook: Old Saybrook Photo: Wendy Humes Mill, Elizabeth Ramirez-Medina, Phyllis Gregor, Larry Hamre

From Deep River, Chester: Bottom: Emily May, Alicia Melluzzo; Middle: Amy Winchell, Luther Moen, Rolf Peterson; Top: Dan Bernier, Pauline Hyla, Barbara Quinn, Ivey Gianetti, John Williams

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Deep River Public Library Hosts Talk on ‘Preventing Chronic Conditions,’ Wednesday

DEEP RIVER — Certified Holistic Health Coach, Tracy Livingston will be at the Deep River Library on Wednesday, Aug. 22, from 6 to 7  p.m. to talk about weight loss and the prevention of chronic conditions, such as thyroid disease and diabetes. Livingston has 18 years of healing experience and is committed to helping people learn how to live a balanced life.

This class is free and open to 20 participants. Registration is required. Visit the library website at http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, or call the library for more information at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 5 pm.

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