July 6, 2015

All Welcome to Join Essex Land Trust at Summer Concert & Picnic Today

ESSEX — The Essex Land Trust invites all to the lovely Essex Main Street Park on Sunday, June 14, from 5:30- 7 p.m. for a summer BYO beverages/picnic and concert by ‘Blues on the Rocks,’ a local band.

Bring chairs, blankets and relax … or dance! Bad weather cancels.

Contact Judy Saunders for further information at 860-581-8108.

Community Music School Presents Two Concerts, Three Musical Groups Today

The New Horizons band of the Community Music School gather for a photo.

The New Horizons band of the Community Music School gather for a photo.

The Community Music School (CMS) presents two spring concerts featuring performing ensembles on Sunday, June 14.

Under the direction of Karli Gilbertson, Glee for Grownups presents, “80’s Broadway Extravaganza,” at 1 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church in Centerbrook. Accompanied by Sue Sweeney, members will perform solo and ensemble pieces. These vocalists rehearse throughout the semester and never disappoint with a fun and lively concert.

Also this day, the New Horizons Band and Baroque Ensemble perform a Concert in the Park at the Gazebo at Deep River Landing at 4 p.m.

The New Horizons Band is a supportive group for beginners or those who have not played an instrument in years. Directed by Paddy Hurley, the group will perform a varied program of marches, Patriotic music, pop and rock, including performances by their Woodwind Ensemble and Brass Quintet.

The Baroque Ensemble is a 12-piece string group comprised of core members of the CMS String Ensemble and directed by Martha Herrle, and they will be playing works by Vivaldi, Bach and more. The rain location for this concert is the Centerbrook Meetinghouse, 51 Main St., Centerbrook.

Both concerts are free and open to the public. Come and meet the directors and members of each ensemble to find out more about the programs.

The CMS offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 30-year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. Community Music School programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives. Visit www.community-music-school.org or call 860-767-0026 for program information.

Film on LeWitt’s Landmark Synagogue to Premier Today at Madison Cinema

about_2

CHESTER — Complete with a red carpet, the Madison Art Cinemas will host the Sunday, June 14, world premiere of We Built This House, a one-hour film telling the story of Chester synagogue Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ)—known as a global art landmark for being the only public building that acclaimed artist Sol LeWitt ever designed.

Film producer-director Jon Joslow, a lifetime member of the Congregation, will discuss the movie and a reception will follow the screening. Tickets are open to the public and may be obtained for a donation of $18 each through the synagogue office, 860 526 8920. The start time is 11 a.m.

In a 2013 profile, Town & Country’s arts editor compared the striking Chester sanctuary with a masterpiece chapel Henri Matisse created in Nice, France. But the synagogue, opened in 2001, started as a napkin sketch. LeWitt first drew a structure inspired by traditional wooden temples of Eastern Europe combined with elements of colonial New England barns.

worshipWe Built This House traces how architect Stephen Lloyd translated LeWitt’s vision into post and beam, and how the Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek community collaborated and improvised—even adapting a design discovered in a medieval English watermill—to give structure to the sanctuary’s wooden dome. LeWitt’s iconic installation on the ark drew national attention when the building opened; it prompted Town & Country to observe “modern art as [the sanctuary’s] focal point.”

LeWitt, a Chester resident who died at 78 in 2007, is recognized as one of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century. The sanctuary has become known as one of the most astonishing, and spiritually welcoming, religious spaces in the world.

True to its roots, Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek has become one of the shoreline’s most vital cultural centers. Its Music & More performances draw hundreds and its art gallery features serial exhibitions from established and breakthrough artists.

Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek—Hebrew for “House of Peace Pursuing Justice”—is marking the 100th year since the founding of one of its two predecessor temples in Moodus. We Built This House is part of yearlong centennial celebrations culminating in an Oct. 3 gala and the inaugural presentation of the synagogue’s new annual Pursuer of Peace and Justice Award. Though it is located in Chester, temple members come from 36 towns, from West Hartford to Westbrook, Norwich to North Branford.

Producer/director Joslow is a crisis/transition leader for private equity who spent a year mining the history of the congregation and its building. Given time limitations in the documentary, which was conceived as a pilot, the synagogue is developing a parallel video archive to capture stories of all congregants who were part of the building’s creation. Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is also positioning the film to encourage financial contributions to support “Second Century” programming. Supporters can be listed in permanent screen credits as producers.

DVDs of We Built This House are expected to be released later this year. Given the film’s unique insights into art as architecture, and into how a community can join together in creative enterprise, organizers anticipate interest among public television stations, those engaged in architectural and design collaborations, and art museums, in airing it following the premiere.

The Madison Art Cinemas is located at 761 Boston Post Road, Madison CT.

For more information on We Built This House or Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, see www.cbsrz.org or www.ancientandcool.com. Or contact Temple Administrator Wendy Bayor at wendy@cbsrz.net or 860-526-8920.

Registration Open for Fundraising Valley Shore Y Golf Tournament to be Held July 20

East-Lyme-AS-EnrichmentAREAWIDE — The 24th annual Valley Shore Y Golf Classic will be held Monday, July 20, at the Clinton Country Club.

The event helps raise funds for the YMCA’s Annual Campaign supporting the Y’s scholarships and community health initiatives, which truly impact families in our community.  The goal of the tournament is to raise enough funds to ensure no one is turned away from any Y program for the inability to pay.

The foursome entry fee is $1,000 and individual fee is $250. Each entry includes:

  • 18 holes of golf, with a cart for four
  • Buffet lunch
  • Dinner
  • On Course Beverages
  • Prizes and Awards such as Hot Ball Raffle and Hole in One for a car
  • Individual and team prizes
  • Putting Contest

Golfers may find registration information at http://vsymca.org/golf-classic/Sponsorship opportunities are still available.

For additional information, contact Tony Sharillo at tsharillo@vsymca.org or 860.399.9622 ext. 107.

Toy Soldier Collection on Display at Acton Library During June

The Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook will be hosting a display of Jerry Basil’s toy soldiers for the month of June. Basil has been collecting different kinds of toy soldiers for many years and has an impressive collection.

The Acton Library is open from 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m.

Acton Library Hosts Annual Book Sale, July 16-18

OLD SAYBROOK — The Friends of Acton Public Library will host their Annual Book Sale at the library located at 60 Old Boston Post Rd., Old Saybrook on Thursday, July 16, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. (the sale has new extended hours on Thursday evening), Friday, July 17, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and again on Saturday, July 18, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Annual Bake Sale will be held during the Friday hours.  There will be a large assortment of all types of books, videos and audio items on the first and second floors.

The proceeds from the Friends’ Book Sale benefit numerous activities and events at Acton Library throughout the year.  Some of these programs have been the family concerts, children’s Halloween and Christmas parties, summer reading program for children, young adults and adults, and the annual poetry contest.

Also, the Friends’ fund-raising supported the cost of a new large screen television for the program room, book carts, copier and the various museum passes.

Take a minute out of your day to stop by the library and support the Friends while selecting some inexpensive summer reading and video for those long summer days and nights.

For further information, call the library at 860 395-3184 during library hours: Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

TriTown Youth Services Presents Soccer Coach Fearon with 2015 Generativity Award

Many youth soccer players and their parents attended the Generativity Award presentation      at Tri-Town.  Michael Fearon, fifth from left, stands with several members of his team.

Many youth soccer players and their parents attended the Generativity Award presentation
at Tri-Town. Michael Fearon, fifth from left, stands with several members of his team.

AREAWIDE — Tri-Town Youth Services recently presented their 2015 Generativity Award to Michael Fearon of Chester.  Passionate about soccer, Mick Fearon has been coaching soccer for 40 years.  He has been coaching high school soccer for 13years.

In discussing the success records of his teams, Fearon says, “there are different levels of success.”  He adds that kids often care about wins, but as a coach, he is concerned that the team is developing, players are improving and giving their best.  He chooses to focus on the process, not the outcome.

Fearon often attends his team members’ other activities, whether sports or the school musical, as he views them as whole people, not just soccer players and he wants to support them in their endeavors.

Tri-Town Youth Services has presented a Generativity Award annually since 2005.  Recipients of the award are people who, over time, have demonstrated an ongoing commitment to youth and have contributed significantly to building youth developmental assets.  Previous awardees include: Marilyn Malcarne, Rick Stebbins, Pat Kosky, Jane Cavanaugh, Ingrid Walsh, Rev. Tim Haut, Linda Hall, Barbara Nidzgorski, Phil Miller, and Dr. Ruth Levy.

Tri-Town Youth Services supports and advances the families, youth and communities of Chester, Deep River and Essex.  The organization coordinates and provides resources needed to make positive choices, reduce substance abuse, and strengthen the relationships that matter most.  Discover programs and information for families, as well as opportunities for community collaboration at www.tritownys.org

Acton Library Hosts Three Job Search Boot Camp Sessions; Second on Job Search Tools, July 27

CTWORKS Job Search Boot Camp will be held at Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook on three dates this summer as follows:

  • Monday, June 29: to discuss interview questions
  • Monday, July 27 : to discuss job search tools
  • Monday, Aug. 31: to discuss questions to ask employers during the interview

Boot Camp brings area people together who are unemployed or in career transition. These programs are free and presented by CTWORKS.

To register, call the Library 860-395-3184 or email TSells.ctwbs@ct.gov or for more information visit the library online at www.actonpubliclibrary.org.

Historic Waterfront Tours Scheduled During Summer in Deep River

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town's waterfront during walking tours this summer.

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town’s waterfront during walking tours this summer.

DEEP RIVER — Deep River’s commercial connection to the rest of the world started at the end of Kirtland and River Streets in the early 1800’s. What is now known as the Town Landing, was a shipyard and dock, which collectively, were the linchpin to Deep River’s mercantile success. The shipbuilding provided the vessels and the dock provided the point of delivery of raw materials and the shipment of end products, that made Deep River an economic success.

A lecture and tour of Deep River’s Historic Waterfront will be offered every second and fourth Saturday morning, this June, July, August and September. Tours are sponsored by the Deep River Historical  Society. The tour will start at the home of sea captain and ship builder, Calvin Williams, at 131 Kirtland Street, (immediately left of the Mt. Saint John entrance pillars), starting at 10 a.m. SHARP, each tour day. Each tour is expected to be about 1 1/2 hour duration and will start punctually at 10 a.m.

Reservations are recommended and tickets may be acquired at the door, or in advance, from the program’s director: James Hogan, by calling 860-391-2354, or at two convenient store locations: Celebrations, 161 Main Street, Deep River and Old Saybrook Antiques Center, 756 Middlesex Turnpike, Old Saybrook.

The costs for tickets is $20 per family; $10 adults; $5 students and senior citizens. 100% of all donations will benefit the Deep River Historical Society. All donations are tax deductable. Program is “rain or shine”.

For more information, call James J. Hogan III  at: 860-391-2354

Tour Dates are:
June: 13 and 27
July: 11 and 25
August: 8 and 22
September: 12 and 26

VRHS Musical Program Wins Major Awards at CT High School Music Theatre Gala

The cast of 'Band Geeks.'

The cast of ‘Band Geeks.’

Valley Regional High School’s (VRHS) Drama Program continues its tradition of performance excellence with the Valley Regional Musical Production (VRMP) of “Band Geeks,” receiving two notable awards, including the brand new ‘The Future of Theatre Award’ and the ‘Outstanding Graphic Design Award’ on June 1, at the Connecticut High School Music Theatre Awards gala held at the Palace Theatre in Waterbury, Conn.

scene_from_playIngrid Walsh, ‘Band Geeks’ Director, noted that the ‘The Future of Theatre Award,’ “… was newly created to inspire all to enter uncharted territories and, rather than doing the same shows, to try and produce some new works.”

On receiving the inaugural award, she said,  “We were thrilled.  As you know, something new — or change — is very hard to find a populace, as it is incredibly risky.  But, they recognized all of our efforts to raise ‘Band Geeks’ to the stage and deliver it with success.  We were truly honored and humbled to be recognized, especially because we all were so attached to the show.”

Walsh added, “We would like to send out a special thanks to the following people and companies that supported our ‘Outstanding Graphics Design Award’

  • C. Proctor of Essex Printing – assisted with posters and programs,
  • Whelen Engineering – printing of programs,
  • Casey O’Brien of Gull Associates Old Lyme – assisted with costuming,
  • Tiffany Hopkins – assisted with projection images,
  • Luther Moen, Ingrid Walsh, and projection students: Garrett Boland, Tesla Lowrey, Roman Daniels – assisted with side projection panel adjustments, and
  • Chris LeQuire and Brad Pitman of VHRS – assisted in creating newscast footage that tied the whole thing together to the end.

singerAdditionally, CHSMTA nominated VRMP’s ‘Band Geeks’ for three prominent awards:

  • Leading Actress – Maggie Walsh as Laura,
  • Outstanding Sound, and
  • Outstanding Chorus.

One hundred and twenty-one students from VRHS were involved in cast, crew, and pit to produce the newly released musical.  The involvement of students represents 20 percent of the entire school population, along with countless volunteer hours of the parents, teachers, and community direct commitment to this long-standing tradition of producing excellence in musicals in the Region 4 School District.  As always, the five-performance date and times of the musical were sold out early in our community.

As a surprise to all, the creators Tommy Newman and Gordon Greenberg of ‘Band Geeks’ drove in from New York City along with original Goodspeed Producers to view their final dress rehearsal in March.

The students attended the June 1 black-tie Gala at the Palace Theatre in Waterbury and performed “Lost in the Brass” one last time. Valley Regional High School was among 20 other Connecticut high schools involved in the event, which celebrates high school music theatre.

Editor’s Notes: See VRHS Performing Arts activities on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/VRHS.MusicBoosters/

See VRHS Band activities on http://vrhsband.weebly.com/

Region 4 Board, VRHS Honors Top Ten Percent Seniors

REGION 4 — The Region 4 Board of Education and Valley Regional High School (VRHS) has honored the Top Ten percent ranking seniors who have achieved outstanding scholastic records.  A Senior Awards ceremony and reception was held Wednesday, June 3, in the VRHS auditorium.

The Top Ten percent senior students listed alphabetically are:

Julianna Grace Alvord — daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Alvord, Ivoryton

David Joseph Berardis — son of Mr. and Mrs. David Berardis, Deep River

Giulianna Maria Bosco — daughter of Mrs. Mary Ann Cannella and Mr. Dominick Bosco, Deep River

Benjamin Steven Bourez — son of Mr. and Mrs. David Bourez, Chester

Indigo Jean Rollins Carlson — daughter of Mr. Jeffrey Carlson and Mrs. Jacque Rollins, Ivoryton

Dakota Rose Dione — daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Dione, Deep River

Donald Parry Robert Dione — son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Dione, Deep River

Daniel Joseph Figuenick III — son of Mrs. Daniel Figuenick and Mrs. Melissa Figuenick, Ivoryton

Elias C. Mueller — son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mueller, Chester

Patrick Eugene Myers — son of Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Myers, Essex

Holly Marie Riccitelli — daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Riccitelli, Deep River

Margaret A. Rodriguez — daughter of Mr. Leonard Rodriguez and Mrs. Colleen Rodriguez, Essex

Megan Elizabeth Ryan — daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Ryan, Ivoryton

Kaitlin Margaret Sandmann — daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Sandmann, Essex

Benedict Novinski Robert Stevens — son of Mr. and Mrs. Gary Stevens, Essex

Jenna Taylor — daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Bryan Taylor, Ivoryton

Jacob Michael Tisdale — son of Mr. Greg Tisdale and Mrs. Debbie Tisdale, Ivoryton

Abigail Louise Wolff — daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wolff

Friends of Essex Library Announce New Board

From left to right,  Judy Fish, Betsy Godsman, Peggy Tuttle, Linda Levene, Jo Kelly and Genie Devine.  Absent is Pat Mather.

The new board of the Friends of Essex Library gather for a photo. From left to right, Judy Fish, Betsy Godsman, Peggy Tuttle, Linda Levene, Jo Kelly and Genie Devine. Absent is Pat Mather.

ESSEX — The Friends of the Essex Library announced its new board at the annual meeting on June 4.  Linda Levene will again lead the group as President.  Others on the board include Jo Kelly: Vice President, Pat Mather: Treasurer, Genie Devine: Secretary, Peggy Tuttle: Book Coordinator, Betsy Godsman: Publicity, and Judy Fish: Liaison between the Essex and Ivoryton libraries.

Linda Levene, President of the Friends, presented Library Director Richard Conroy with a check for $15,000 that will be used for a variety of services that enrich the library’s offerings.

Linda Levene presents a check for $15,000 to Richard Conroy.

Linda Levene presents a check for $15,000 to Library Director Richard Conroy.

It was noted that volunteers spend thousands of hours each year keeping book shelves in order and helping in the children’s room. Volunteers also prepare and run the annual spring and fall book sales.

In addition, the Friends sponsor events such as last summer’s “Our Library Rocks.”  This year, a special night at the Ivoryton Playhouse’s production of “South Pacific” will be a major fundraiser.  Tickets are on sale at the Essex and Ivoryton libraries.

Quinnipiac Professor, Author Thomas Reveals Gibson Guitar’s Female Workforce Story Tonight

The extraordinary craftswomen of WWII Kalamazoo.

The extraordinary craftswomen of WWII Kalamazoo

CHESTER –  When Quinnipiac University law professor, author and guitar aficionado John Thomas stumbled upon a 1940s photo of 70 female workers in front of the Gibson Guitar factory in Kalamazoo Michigan, he was determined to find them and uncover their stories. He was also intent on learning why Gibson’s advertising denied the factory was making guitars during the war, despite the fact that their female workers produced 25,000 guitars from 1940 to 1945.

Thomas’ interviews with 12 of these remarkable women – and how he and colleagues at Quinnipiac’s medical school proved the superior quality of their work as their men fought in the “Good War” – are detailed in his book, “Kalamazoo Gals: A Story of Extraordinary Women and Gibson’s Banner Guitars of WWII”.

In a free and open to the public multimedia presentation, Thomas will tell the story of Gibson Guitar’s “Kalamazoo Gals” on Friday, June 12, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Chester Village West, 317 Main Street, Chester Conn. 06412.

Space for the presentation is limited; call 860.526.6800 or email chestervillagewest@lcsnet.com to reserve your seats.

Located in historic Chester, Connecticut, Chester Village West gives independent-minded people a new way to experience retirement and live their lives to the fullest. Within a small community of private residences that offer convenience, companionship, service and security, Chester Village West enriches lives with a comprehensive program that enhances fitness, nutrition, active life, health and well being. Find out more at chestervillagewestlcs.com.

OSHS Senior Nochera Presents $1,400 Check to Vista from Senior Project Endeavors

Sam Nochera (center) meets students at Vista's Westbrook Campus after delivering the proceeds from youth football clinics he organized to benefit Vista.

Sam Nochera (center) meets students at Vista’s Westbrook Campus after delivering the proceeds from youth football clinics he organized to benefit Vista.

OLD SAYBROOK — Sam Nochera, a soon-to-be graduate of Old Saybrook High School, turned his senior project into an opportunity to benefit Vista Vocational & Life Skills Center, an organization he came to know four years ago through his love of sports.

For his project, Nochera teamed up with the Old Saybrook Parks and Recreation Department and Old Saybrook-Westbrook (OSW) Football to host youth football Spring Training clinics on May 30 and June 7. All proceeds from the clinics—nearly $1,400— were donated to Vista and will benefit the Ed Gallant Financial Aid Fund, which provides scholarship opportunities to individuals in Vista’s programs.

“Vista made a big impact on me,” said Nochera, who was introduced to Vista students and members in 2011 through basketball. “It’s a great cause and I wanted to give back.”

clinic group

For at least two seasons, Nochera joined Vista members for casual games of basketball at Daisy Ingraham School in Westbrook. The experience, he said, was rewarding and enjoyable. It also stuck with him over the years. So much so, Nochera wrote his senior research paper on individuals with disabilities transitioning out of high school—which led him back to Vista.

Nochera, an alumni of the OSW program, has been playing football since he was 8-years-old. The Spring Training clinics, which catered to second through eighth-graders, allowed Sam the perfect opportunity to raise awareness for two programs he cares about.

This fall, Nochera is headed to Tulane University in New Orleans, where he plans to pursue a double major in International Relations and Finance.

Based in Madison and Westbrook, CT, Vista Vocational & Life Skills Center is a 501©3 nonprofit organization.  Vista’s mission is to provide services and resources to assist individuals with disabilities achieve personal success.

For more information about Vista, visit www.vistavocational.org

‘Concert in the Garden’ Tonight Features ‘The Dizzy River Band’

The Dizzy River Band. Photo courtesy of The Dizzy River Band.

The Dizzy River Band. Photo courtesy of The Dizzy River Band.

CHESTER — Leif Nilsson hosts another ‘Concert in the Garden,’ Thursday, June 11, from 7 to 9 p.m., this time featuring ‘The Dizzy River Band’ at the Spring Street Studio and Gallery. This monthly concert series highlights eclectic international singer/songwriter artists from cool jazz to blue grass.

Tom Soboleski comments,”Dizzy River Band is one of the best original bands you’ll find anywhere. They do some covers for people like Clapton and Red Hot Chili Peppers but what makes them special is the unique original songs they’ve written and composed – great lyrics about life’s ups and downs. To top it off, they’re all outstanding musicians and their harmonies are heavenly – you need to hear them to grasp and be awed by their signature sound.”

Gates open half hour before the show — first come first seated. Seating is Bistro Style in the amphitheater. The concert will be moved indoors in the event of inclement weather.

A $10 donation is appreciated. The event is BYOB – pack a picnic and buy your own wine or beer at the Chester Package Store across the street.

Celebrated Seattle Architect Presents “True To Its Nature” Tonight in Essex Town Hall

Grace Episcopal Church Entry/Baptismal Font, Bainbridge Island, Washington. Photo credit:  Art Grice

Grace Episcopal Church Entry/Baptismal Font, Bainbridge Island, Washington. Photo credit: Art Grice

ESSEX — James Cutler, an acclaimed Northwestern architect who founded his own firm and has taught at Harvard and Dartmouth and elsewhere, examines his environmentally attuned design work on Thursday, June 11, at the Essex Town Hall at 7 p.m.

Known for his innovative and sustainable use of wood and other natural materials, his “Seattle style” has been widely admired and imitated. Architectural Record described him this way: “James Cutler, FAIA, is known for superbly wrought wood structures, including buildings on the [Bill] Gates family compound in Medina, Washington … He is a staunch environmentalist who believes God is in both the details, which he himself meticulously turns out, and the materials.”

Titled “True to its Nature,” Cutler’s illustrated presentation will review several projects that attempt to reveal and reflect the tangible set of circumstances in which they are placed.

Cutler’s philosophy is based upon the idea that, in recognizing the natural beauty in a site, owners can be moved to cherish and protect the land themselves. His work has been featured in The New York Times, Smithsonian and the Wall Street Journal, and has been the subject three books. Cutler cofounded the Bainbridge Island Land Trust in 1988.

Established in 1977 and located on Bainbridge Island in Washington, Cutler Anderson Architects (http://cutler-anderson.com/) is internationally renowned for its environmental awareness and attention to detail. The firm has designed more than 300 residential, commercial, and cultural projects around the world. It also has designed a myriad of home products in conjunction with its architecture, such as hardware, furniture and lighting.

His talk is free and part of the Centerbrook Architects Lecture Series, which is one of many programs that are offered regularly by the Essex Library (http://www.youressexlibrary.org/). Call the library at (860) 767-1560 to register. Sponsored by Centerbrook Architects, the series is in its seventh year.

Ivoryton Resident Awarded Fairfield University’s Bellarmine Medal

IVORYTON – Fairfield University’s 2015 Bellarmine Medal, awarded to the student with the highest academic average, was presented to Ashley Rose Paholski, of Ivoryton, Conn. She maintained a perfect 4.0 grade point average throughout her undergraduate years at Fairfield.

Fairfield University President Rev. Jeffrey P. von Arx, S.J., presented the medal to Paholski at the Jesuit institution’s 65th
commencement exercises held May 17.

Paholski earned a bachelor’s degree in English, with a concentration in Literature and Cultural Studies from the College of Arts &
Sciences. She minored in mathematics and education. She plans to attend Georgetown University Law School beginning this fall.

Fairfield University is a Jesuit University, rooted in one of the world’s oldest intellectual and spiritual traditions. More than
5,000 undergraduate and graduate students from 36 states, 47 foreign countries, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico are enrolled in the University’s five schools. In the spirit of rigorous and sympathetic inquiry into all dimensions of human experience, Fairfield welcomes students from diverse backgrounds to share ideas and engage in open conversations. The University is located in the heart of a region where the future takes shape, on a stunning campus on the Connecticut coast just an hour from New York City.

Image: Graduating senior Ashley Rose Paholski received Fairfield University’s Bellarmine Medal at the University’s 65th
commencement exercises.

Essex Land Trust Hosts Early Summer Kayak/Canoe Trip This Afternoon

IMG_5348

ESSEX — The Essex Land Trust invites you to bring your own boat Tuesday, June 9, for an early summer kayak/canoe trip into peaceful North Cove and Falls River, accompanied by a naturalist. See the abundant wildlife and revisit the history of this waterway where many of Essex’s colonial ships were built.

Participants should arrive at 4:30 p.m. to register on-site and launch their crafts on the rising tide prior to the 5:00 departure time.  A safety boat will accompany.  Bad weather cancels.

North Cove is a 230-acre body of tidal water between the Falls River and the Connecticut River. The cove is formed in part by Great Meadow, a 200-acre “pendant bar” or levee along the Connecticut River. Great Meadow has no public access.

North Cove was noted for shipbuilding, and the nearby Williams’ yard turned out sloops and schooners for the commercial trade in the 19th century. Empty now, Great Meadow was also a beehive of activity. Cattle were grazed, salt hay was harvested and duck hunting blinds once lined the shore. The bar was also a base for the local fishing industry and its lucrative seasonal shad run.

Marine Art Exhibition on View at Lyme Art Association Through July

“A Seaport Moment” by James Wagner is one of the signature paintings of the ‘American Waters’ exhibition.

Lyme Art Association (LAA) presents its summer exhibition, American Waters, in the LAA’s sky-lit galleries from June 12 through July 31. The exhibition will feature work by the country’s premier maritime artists, who are members of the American Society of Marine Artists as invited guests, alongside exciting marine work by LAA artists.

An opening reception for the exhibition will be held Friday, June 19, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the LAA, 90 Lyme St., Old Lyme, Conn. All are welcome and refreshments will be served.

'Marshall Point' by Kent Winchell.

‘Marshall Point’ by Kent Winchell.

Russ Kramer, an internationally recognized marine painter, will jury the exhibition. Kramer comments, “What better place for an exhibition of marine-inspired art than the Lyme Art Association?” continuing, “It is a true landmark in our region’s artistic history, whose proximity to the Lieutenant and Connecticut rivers and Long Island Sound has inspired artists for a century. These new works in the exhibition American Waters are by many of the finest practitioners of marine art working today. To think the same subjects continue to inspire us 100 years later is testament to this area’s enduring, irresistible allure.”

'Afternoon Light' by the late Yves Parent.

‘Afternoon Light’ by the late Yves Parent.

Concurrent with the American Waters exhibition, the LAA presents a large exhibition of Yves Parent maritime paintings. Many of these paintings are of coastal landmarks, recognizable to boaters who have spent time in the waters around the New England coast. This will be the final opportunity to view and purchase paintings from the estate of Yves Parent at the LAA.

Lyme Art Association Board President, Katherine Simmons, states, “American Waters continues an LAA tradition of exhibiting the very best of fine contemporary American marine painting. We are grateful to the members of the American Society of Marine Artists who are joining us as invited guests, and we would especially like to thank our premier media sponsor, The Day, and our presenting sponsor, Suisman Shapiro Attorneys at Law, along with juror Russ Kramer, for making this exhibition happen.”

The LAA was founded in 1914 by the American Impressionists and continues the tradition of exhibiting and selling representational artwork by its members and invited artists, as well as offering art instruction and lectures to the community. The Association’s home is a building designed by Charles Adams Platt and located within a national historic district.

Admission is free with contributions appreciated. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m.

For more information on exhibitions, purchase of art, art classes, or becoming a member, call (860) 434-7802.

Popular Essex Shad Bake Takes Place Today at CT River Museum

1.Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

1. Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the
traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

ESSEX — Fifty-seven years ago, the Rotary Club of Essex introduced the quintessential New England shoreline tradition; a dining experience known as a shad bake.  Yankee Magazine has called it one of the “Top 20 Summer Events”.

The Essex Shad Bake returns to the Connecticut River Museum on Saturday, June 6, from 3 to 6:30 p.m.  This year, the bake is made possible through the generous support of Admiral Sponsor Gowrie Group, along with Fishermen Sponsors Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, and Guilford Savings Bank.

The museum’s executive director, Christopher Dobbs says, “We are once again pleased to host and partner with the Rotary Club of Essex on this iconic event that celebrates part of the River’s heritage and that supports the many worthwhile projects of the Rotary.” This volunteer-run event has been organized by the Rotary Club of Essex and is now coordinated by Bake Master Joseph Shea.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones  from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones
from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Shea states, “We offer one of the most unique culinary traditions in New England; at one of the most historic sites along the River. . . it is a winning combination!”  You might find one of your favorite doctors or dentists at the de-nailing table where they take the shad off the oak planks or enjoy a freshly shucked clam or oyster from a local banker.

Join seasoned Shad Bake pioneers for a story from shad bakes of yesteryear including the year of the big flood.  The Shad Museum in Haddam, the Connecticut River Museum, and the Connecticut River Watershed Council will also offer programs during the day on the history and traditions of the shad fishery.

Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

For shad lovers, the lure is the secret ingredients and the authentic method of preparation and cooking handed down from Connecticut natives.  Done in front of the fire, the fish picks up the smoky flavor of the fire with the seasoned oak boards on which it is cooked.  Add to this delicacy homemade potato salad, tossed green salad, and scrumptious pies from Lyman Orchards and you have yourself a gourmet meal.

Don’t care for shad?  The event also offers BBQ chicken and hot dogs.

Share a piece of Connecticut and Essex history with your friends and family.  In addition to the food, participants will enjoy live music and touring the museum which will be open until 6 p.m.  The atmosphere is vibrant with antique cars, picnickers, and the delicious smell of shad roasting around the open fire.

To whet your appetite, on Wednesday, June 3 at 7:30 p.m., the Connecticut River Museum will host a shad fishing excursion on board RiverQuest.  Participants will get a chance to hear about traditional shad fishing, see related artifacts, and go on a boat ride to view shad fisherman ply their trade on the water.  The boat ride will include dessert and non-alcoholic beverages.  Beer and wine will be available for purchase.

Buy your tickets today to the Shad Bake.  The $30 adult and $10 child (10 and under) ticket include the full meal and admission to the museum.  Beverages (soda, beer and wine) will be available at an additional price.  No carry-in alcohol will be permitted.

To purchase tickets, visit www.rotaryclubofessex.com or buy them in person at the Centerbrook Package Store and the Connecticut River Museum.  For additional information on the Shad Fishing Excursion, visit the Connecticut River Museum’s website.

Onsite and street parking at the Connecticut River Museum is limited.  On the day of the event, an Essex Meadows shuttle will be running between the museum and several key parking locations that include the Essex Town Hall parking lot and Pratt House field (29 West Ave.).  The free shuttle service will start at 3 p.m. and run until 7:30 p.m. with pick-ups and drop-offs every 15 minutes.

 

The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street and is open 10 am to 5 pm, closed Mondays until Memorial Day. The Museum, located in the historic Steamboat Dock building, offers exhibits and programs about the history and environment of the Connecticut River. For a full listing of Museum programs and events, go to www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

 

The Rotary Club of Essex is the local chapter of Rotary International that is made up of service minded professionals.  The club and its members are committed to improving the community, connecting with other professionals, sharing their time and experience with the young, supporting global causes, and using their skills to help others.  For more information about the Shad Bake and Rotary Club visit http://www.rotaryclubofessex.com.

 

#          #          #          #          #          #          #          #          #

 

Photo Captions:

 

  1. Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the

traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

 

  1. Baking Shad – Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

 

  1. Boning Demonstration – Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones

from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Lyme Farmers Market Open Saturdays for the Season

Fresh vegetables are always one of the big draws of the market.

Fresh vegetables are always one of the big draws of the market.

LYME — The perennially popular Lyme Farmers Market at Ashlawn Farm in Lyme opens for the season today from around 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.
But the sad news accompanying the joy of Opening Day is that the irrepressible, larger-than-life impresario of the market, Chip Dahlke, has announced this will be his last season with the market, “Unless…” and this is Chip’s endearing dry humor rising to the surface, “… a deranged individual or some goody two-shoes organization wants to take on the burden.”
In his ever upbeat, positive spirit, however, Chip urges, “Let’s make this summer one to remember. The field should be full of vendors and the entertainment the best of what we’ve had for the last 12 years,” adding with his usual sharp wit, “There’s still not going to be eggplant carving contests, erotic vegetable displays, or god forbid poodle parades.”
tentsThe big draw of farmers’ markets is, of course, the fresh, local produce. What makes the one in Lyme so special is that it’s held on a real farm. And since this is the Lyme countryside, it’s as a pretty as a picture. In fact, Ashlawn Farm is a magnet for local artists who are attracted by its beauty—the old white homestead, the red barns, and the stone walls crisscrossing the pastures. An original member of the Connecticut Farmers Market Trail, Ashlawn Farm is located at 78 Bill Hill Rd. in Lyme
The farm is celebrating its 126th anniversary this year. Ray Harding, a dairy farmer, bought Ashlawn in 1909. Today his grandson Chip lives there with his wife Carol and their three children. By profession, Chip is a portfolio manager and Carol runs her popular coffee-roasting business in one of the old barns on the property.
As always, Dahlke has lined up a stellar selection of vendors, which includes:
flowersThe vendors change week by week but you can be certain that every Saturday morning from June to October, tents will go up in front of barns and local purveyors will sell vegetables, fruit, breads, cheese, meat, soaps, chicken, fish, fiber, specialty food, crafts, flowers, herbs, eggs, seafood and more. Music will be played — Dogbite are performing on Opening Day –and Chip will surely spring a few Saturday surprises!
Before the Market opens, Ashlawn Farm Yoga will be held at 8 a.m. each Saturday on the grass beyond the parking field for all levels. The class is taught by Lisa Tompkins Nasser. Drop in for only $15, which includes a free Ashlawn Farm cup of Coffee.
And, most of all, follow Chip’s advice to make it a summer to remember at the Market — see you there!

Editor’s Note:
Extracts of this article are taken from one written by Linda Ahnert that was originally published on LymeLine.com in June 2009.

Community Music School Jazz Ensemble Performs Today

CMS Jazz Ensemble
CENTERBROOK –
Community Music School will present a concert by the CMS Jazz Ensemble on Saturday, June 6, at 7:30 p.m. at the Centerbrook Meetinghouse, 51 Main Street, Centerbrook.

The ensemble, comprised of students ages 13 to 18, will perform a mixed repertoire including pieces by Scott Joplin, Thelonious Monk, Earl Hagen and much more. The concert will feature group ensemble performance with an emphasis on improvisation.

Directed by Tom Briggs, the CMS Jazz Ensemble is now in its 19th year. Briggs is a retired member of the US Coast Guard Band and former musical director of the Coast Guard Masters of Swing. He is a well-known percussionist, pianist, and composer and has been on the CMS faculty since 1985.

The concert is free and open to the public. Call 860-767-0026 for additional information.

Community Music School offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 30 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.

Visit www.community-music-school.org or call 860-767-0026 for program information.

Opening Reception Tomorrow for Wnek’s ‘Soul of the Landscape’ Photo Exhibit at CBSRZ

'Whispers of Past' by Peter Wnek illustrate's the photographer's captivating style.

‘Whispers of Past’ by Peter Wnek beautifully illustrate’s the photographer’s captivating style.

CHESTER — Award-winning photographer Peter Wnek explores the ‘Soul of the Landscape’ in his exhibition of fine art photography at the Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ), which runs through July 28, with an opening reception on Sunday, June 7, from 4 to 7 p.m.

‘Soul of the Landscape’ celebrates the beauty and spirit of our woodlands and waterways, as seen in Whispers of the Past and its breathtaking view along the Connecticut River. Wnek’s work captures the light and details one might expect from a painting—which is no accident. He has long been inspired by the purity and innocence of the American landscape as portrayed by the 19th century Hudson River painters. “I strive for that same warm light, the luminous or stormy skies, to invoke a charm or a mood,” he explains.

Wnek’s photographs often reveal the story of the landscape—its whisper of bygone days, the intrinsic cycles of nature. With a focus on local scenes, this exhibit speaks to the beauty that surrounds us, the coastal vistas and woodland spaces that are unique to our state. In a familiar kaleidoscope of colors, see the rising and setting sun, the harmony of sky and land, the collusion of rock and sea.

As Wnek explains, “I am intrigued by the soothing compositions and repetitive patterns that collectively reveal the Divine at work.”

Featured in this exhibit is Silver Glade, an image of trees on a ridge near Meriden. It recently won the Salmagundi Club of NYC’s 2015 “Henry O’Connor Award” for excellence, portraying the gentler, quieter landscape of New England.

It is that voice of New England which Wnek most hopes to capture in his photographs, “those intimate moments of our own landscapes” waiting to be revealed.

‘Soul of the Landscape’ runs through July 28, Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, 55 East Kings Highway, Chester, CT 06412.

For gallery specific information, call 860-526-8920.

For more information about photographer Peter Wnek, visit www.PeterWnekPhoto.com.

Chester Museum at The Mill Tells Chester’s Story

The Chester Museum at The Mill is the new permanent home of the two millstones from the Waterhouse Grist Mill that operated between 1740 and 1810.

The Chester Museum at The Mill is the new permanent home of the two millstones from the Waterhouse Grist Mill that operated between 1740 and 1810.

CHESTER — The Chester Museum at The Mill opened for its sixth year on May 31. Owned and operated by the Chester Historical Society since 2000, the museum is located on the historic 1850s Griswold Mill site, overlooking a waterfall and the Pattaconk Brook near the center of town. The mill site was once used to produce anchors, wagon springs and augers.

Two exhibits, filling the two floors of the museum, tell the story of the life, development and growth of Chester, since it was first home to the Wagunk Indians.

New this year is the first floor exhibit, “Pastimes in Past Times: Chester at Play,” curated by Keith Dauer and Sandy Senior-Dauer. From dolls and blocks to Lotto and Erector Sets, the exhibit focuses on the ways Chester families spent their leisure time indoors, as well as outdoors with baseball games and winter sports such as sledding and skating.

The exhibit includes an interactive section of toys and games for children of all ages.

On the second floor of the museum (reachable by elevator as well as stairs) is the permanent award-winning exhibit, “Streams of Change: Life & Industry along the Pattaconk,” which interprets the growth and evolution of Chester and how the town adapted over 300 years. Of special interest this year is a piece of the 1913 trolley track unearthed from under Main Street last December and the story of how it was found.

Dolls, a dollhouse and a doll carriage are featured in the Chester “Pastimes” exhibit as an example of playtime enjoyed by little girls for hundreds of years. This doll, owned by the Chester Historical Society, dates back to the early 1900s and has human hair.

Dolls, a dollhouse and a doll carriage are featured in the Chester “Pastimes” exhibit as an example of playtime enjoyed by little girls for hundreds of years. This doll, owned by the Chester Historical Society, dates back to the early 1900s and has human hair.

Play Ball! Baseball was a perennially favorite game in Chester, along with all the Connecticut River Valley towns. This left-handed 1920s baseball glove was made by the A.G. Spalding Bros. Company and is made of kangaroo skin.

Play Ball! Baseball was a perennially favorite game in Chester, along with all the Connecticut River Valley towns. This left-handed 1920s baseball glove was made by the A.G. Spalding Bros. Company and is made of kangaroo skin.

Outside, the front of the museum has recently been landscaped with native plantings.  Two historic millstones, probably the oldest Chester artifacts, flank the front door.  These enhancements were made possible through a grant from the Community Fund of Middlesex County and the contributions of Landscape Specialties.

The Chester Museum at The Mill is open to the public for self-guided tours on Saturdays from 1 to 4 p.m. and Sundays, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., through the end of October. It is air-conditioned as well as handicapped accessible. Admission is free.

For more information, visit www.ChesterHistoricalSociety.org or Facebook.com/ChesterCTHistoricalSociety.

Essex Garden Club Honors Barbara Edwards

Pictured from left to right are Linda Newberg, President of the Essex Garden Club, Augie Pampel, club member and Essex Tree Warden with members of the Edwards family:  Kem Edwards, Debbi Lindstrom, Sarah Edwards Feeney, David Edwards, Mary Edwards Mather, and Lucy, the family yellow labrador.

Pictured from left to right are Linda Newberg, President of the Essex Garden Club, Augie Pampel, club member and Essex Tree Warden with members of the Edwards family: Kem Edwards, Debbi Lindstrom, Sarah Edwards Feeney, David Edwards, Mary Edwards Mather, and Lucy, the family yellow labrador.

ESSEX — The Essex Garden Club has planted a tree in celebration of the life of Barbara Edwards, longtime member of the club, avid gardener, and lover of all thing growing.  The tree, A London Plane (Plantanus x Acerifolia), can be seen on Dennison Rd., Essex, across the street from the Edwards homestead.

Pictured from left to right are Linda Newberg, President of the Essex Garden Club, Augie Pampel, club member and Essex Tree Warden with members of the Edwards family:  Kem Edwards, Debbi Lindstrom, Sarah Edwards Feeney, David Edwards, Mary Edwards Mather, and Lucy, the family yellow lab.

Weekly Bingo at The Estuary Through Summer

The new Bingo board at the Estuary Seniors Center.

Proudly displaying the new Bingo board at the Estuary Senior Center.

OLD SAYBROOK – The Estuary Council of Seniors, Inc. (ECSI) has announced the Grand Opening of BINGO at their facility, located at 220 Main Street on Thursday, June 18, at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6 p.m.) Join in on the fun for this weekly event. Admission, including game package, is $12 per player. All are welcome. Cash prizes.

The Estuary Council of Seniors Inc. (ECSI) is a non-profit regional senior center located in the M. Monica Eggert Senior Center on the Connecticut River Estuary at 220 Main Street in Old Saybrook. Our mission is to enhance the quality of life for people 50 years and older.

The ECSI is a community resource for the nine-town Estuary region’s residents over 50-years-old providing nutrition, transportation, health support services, education opportunities, and socialization.

For more information, call 860-388-1611 or visit our website at www.ecsenior.org

Artists of Gallery One Exhibit at ELLE Design Studio in Chester Through Aug. 30

Forced Narcissus, by Catherine Christiano, on linen, 14 x 8 inches, 2005.

Forced Narcissus, by Catherine Christiano, on linen, 14 x 8 inches, 2005.

CHESTER — Gallery One, a cooperative of mid-career artists working in a wide variety of media and styles from representational to abstract, including painting, sculpture and works on paper, will exhibit at the ELLE Design Studio from June 2 through Aug. 30, with a reception on Friday, June 5, from 5 to 8 p.m.

“We are very pleased to have this opportunity to exhibit our artists’ work in Chester,” says Judith Barbour Osborne, “and particularly at ELLE Design Studio, both of which are art destinations.”

Gallery One artists include David Brown, Old Saybrook; Ashby Carlisle, Old Lyme; Catherine Christiano, Old Lyme; Bette Ellsworth, Madison; Mary Fussell, Clinton; Gray Jacobik, Deep River; Judith Barbour Osborne, Ivoryton; T. Willie Raney, Ivoryton; Diana Rogers, Clinton; Victoria Sivigny, Meriden; and Jill Vaughn, Ivoryton.

The Artists of Gallery One, whose vision is to provide southeastern Connecticut with a stimulating resource and to support one another artists, exhibit in various locations along the Connecticut shoreline from Stonington to New Haven. The Artists will be showing at the Mystic Arts Center Sept. 25 through Nov. 7 (in the Leibig Gallery). Additional information, the artists and any upcoming exhibitions can be found at www.galleryoneCT.com.

ELLE Design Studio is open from Tuesday through Saturday from 11am until 6pm, Sunday from 10am until 4pm, and by appointment.

For more information, visit Gallery One online at www.galleryoneCT.com and the ELLE Design Studio at elledesignstudio.net

Old Saybrook HS Senior Nochera Partners with OSW & OS Park & Rec to Benefit Vista

spring camp_kids_playing

OLD SAYBROOK — More than two dozen boys and their families met in Clark Park this past Sunday to get ready for the 2015 football season.  The Old Saybrook-Westbrook (OSW) Youth Football Clinic is an annual event, but this year’s clinic was much more than spring training.
spring camp 1-1
Old Saybrook High School (OSHS) senior Sam Nochera chose the OSW clinic as his senior project and has directed all the proceeds to benefit the Vista Vocational & Life Skills Center where Nochera has been a volunteer since 2011.  Nochera was joined by several OSW coaches and a few of his OSW football buddies – Connor Eastman, a senior at Eastern Connecticut State University, Brendan McElhone, a junior at Western Connecticut State University, and Ethan Casberg, a fellow OSHS senior heading to the University of Connecticut in the fall.
spring_camp_huddle
The boys had a chance to train and try out the new tackling dummy while parents had the opportunity to talk to coaches and board members as wellas see the equipment and level of commitment to player safety.
Nochera chose the project to benefit the program he credits with teaching him dedication and perseverance.  “I want the kids to take away from my project that with hard work and perseverance they will be able to accomplish their goals whether on the football field or another facet of life. And that helping and giving back to something you truly support is always a good move.”
spring camp_group_pic
This coming fall Nochera starts his freshman year with a double major in International Relations and Business at Tulane University, La.
A second clinic will take place on Sunday, June 7, from 9 to 11 a.m.
For more information or to register, visit www.oldsaybrookrec.com
To donate, make checks payable to Vista with the notation Ed Gallant Financial Aid Fund.
To register for the 2015 OSW Football & Cheer season, visit www.oswyouthfootball.com.

Roto Frank of America Hosts Manufacturer’s Meeting at Chester HQ

Chester First Selectman spoke at the event.

Chester First Selectman Ed Meehan gave welcoming remarks at the event.

CHESTER — Addressing the challenges of the growing availability of number of jobs with higher level manufacturers in the state and developing skilled workers to fill those positions was the focus of a special meeting for members of the Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce Manufacturing Council on May 27, hosted by Roto Frank of America, Inc. at the company’s North American headquarters in Chester, CT.

Chris Demou (left) and Larry McHugh

Roto Frank of America President & CEO Chris Demou (left) and Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce President Larry McHugh

The well-attended event attracted more than a dozen manufacturing companies i nMiddlesex County, as well representatives from the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, and the U.S. Department of Commerce. After welcoming remarks by Chester First Selectman Ed Meehan, Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce President Larry McHugh, and Roto Frank of America President & CEO Chris Dimou, attendees listened to presentations from members of the University of Connecticut and the German American Chamber of Commerce.

Lawrence Silbart

Lawrence Silbart

Lawrence K. Silbart, MPH, Ph.D., UConn’s Vice Provost for Strategic Initiatives, discussed highlights of UConn’s Next Generation Connecticut, an initiative designed to expand educational opportunities, research, and innovation in the STEM disciplines at UConn over the next decade, which includes a new 125,000 square-foot Technology Park facility.

Anson Ma, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, in UConn’s Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Department, addressed the audience on UConn’s additive manufacturing initiatives, with a focus on the Additive Manufacturing Innovation Center and the learning opportunities for students in realizing the full potential of additive manufacturing for metals, plastics, and biomaterials.

Tom Dzimian, Director, Career Services of the German American Chamber of Commerce, discussed skills and innovation strategies that have been developed and used successfully in Germany and which can be used to strengthen U.S, manufacturing training programs.

Founded in 1979, Roto Frank of America, Inc. is a Chester, Connecticut-based manufacturer of window and door hardware. Roto Frank of America is a wholly owned subsidiary of Roto AG, a global company headquartered in Germany, with 13 production plants and 40 subsidiaries worldwide.

Roto Frank of America offers solutions for North American and European hardware applications, has an extensive product line including its renowned X-DRIVETM casement and awning window systems, sash locks, window-opening- control-devices, sliding patio door systems, and European window and door hardware, among others.

For more information, visit www.rotohardware.com

The Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce is the largest Chamber in the state, with more than 2,200 members and encompassing nine geographically-based divisions throughout Middlesex County. The Chamber hosts a number of large-scale events, such as the Middlesex County Business to Business Expo, member breakfasts and dinners featuring notable speakers, including U.S. Senator John McCain and UConn President Susan Herbst.

New Town Photo Category at This Year’s Chester Fair

AREAWIDE — What makes a town special? Take a picture.

An appealing category, Town Photo, has been added to the annual Chester Fair Photography Contest for 2015. Photos should capture the spirit and/or beauty of any Connecticut town. First, second and third place ribbons and prizes will be awarded. As a bonus, Events Magazine will be selecting a photo from this category to appear on the cover of one of its quarterly town-wide publications.

This year’s Chester Fair will be held August 28-30 at the Chester Fairgrounds. Full Chester Fair information, including the complete entry guide, can be found at www.chesterfair.org.

Chester Selectmen, Board of Finance Voice Opposition to Regionalization Proposal in Advance of Monday Meeting

REGION 4 — A meeting is scheduled tonight at 6 p.m. at John Winthrop Middle School regarding the proposed Regionalization plan for Chester, Deep River and Essex Elementary Schools.

The Chester Board of Selectmen and Board of Finance have issued a joint statement in advance of the meeting regarding the draft Inter-municipal agreement, and the Board of Finance statement regarding the latest May 12, 2015 Region 4, K-12 Regionalization Plan, both unanimously approved.  The statement concludes, “In summary, we believe the Regionalization Plan is not ready to be approved or implemented.”

This statement is being distributed to the Deep River and Essex Boards of Selectmen and Finance, Region 4 Board members, the three town Elementary Boards of Education members, and everyone else invited to Monday night’s joint meeting at John Winthrop.

The full text of the statement is printed below:

“We, the Chester Board of Selectmen and Board of Finance, do not support the Inter-municipal agreement as we believe strongly that it has a disproportionately negative financial impact on Chester. The two Boards unanimously agreed not to approve or recommend the proposed agreement to go to a Town Meeting or referendum in Chester.

Additionally, the Chester Board of Finance, after reviewing the proposed K-12 Regionalization Plan, believe many details need to be resolved before we could endorse the Plan. Consequently we do not support the regionalization of the elementary schools as described in the May 12, 2015 plan. We believe the risks outweigh the projected financial and administrative benefits.

  1. (1)  We do not and will not support closing Chester Elementary school or either of the other two elementary schools due to the potential risks and impacts to students, education, property values, population, and tax rates.a. We do not support grade re-allocation to other schools unless the following safeguards are implemented: Cross-over vote – change to a majority vote by the Region 4 District members from the affected town(s) (not one vote).b. Study Committee(s) – Board of Selectmen control and appoint the local representatives to serve on these committees. Also a member from each Board of Finance must be included in the study committee(s).
    c. Individual affected towns must retain local control of their elementary schools and have final referendumveto power over any grade moves.
  2. (2)  Elected officials in the three towns are responsible for the overall financial management of their respective towns and should exercise oversight of a regional school budget. K-12 regionalization will encompass almost 70% of towns’ budgets and regionalization results in loss of checks and balances. Research needs to be done to see how this might be addressed.

(3) Educational Opportunities due to regionalization:

  1. Specifics need be presented regarding educational opportunities/benefits to students due toregionalization.
  2. There is a need to address and protect Chester Elementary School’s high statewide ranking in studentachievement scores so they will not be compromised by regionalization.
  3. How will enriched educational programs be created to address diverse educational needs, specializedstaffing, equipment and resources and how will such programs be allocated across the three elementary schools – equal cost sharing or a formula?

(4) Request for transparency in all the methodology and assumptions used in producing the detailed plans and budget forecasts. Additionally:

  1. Clarity regarding what is considered maintenance and what is considered Capital costs.
  2. Specifics on how capital costs will be paid by Towns vs. District if a school has students from more than onetown attending.
  3. Draft lease agreements for each of the three elementary schools should be provided and incorporated intothe Regionalization Plan to demonstrate their impact: including length of lease; cost of maintenance of the three buildings to each town; uses of the schools if partially utilized or used by other Town agencies; termination policy; and financial impact of returning a school building back to a town.

In summary, we believe the Regionalization Plan is not ready to be approved or implemented. We strongly recommend that the issues cited above as well as others that may arise be resolved so that a consensus can be reached among the three towns.”

Gowrie Group is Lead Sponsor of Essex Shad Bake

Shad Bake  Sponsor.2 (1)

From left to right in the photo above are Gowrie Group’s Carter Gowrie, CEO and Whitney Peterson, VP of Marketing; Rotarians Joseph Shea and Stephen Brinkmann; and Joan Meek and Christopher Dobbs, Connecticut River Museum.

ESSEX — On Saturday, June 6, the Essex Shad Bake returns to the banks of the Connecticut River from 3 to 6:30 p.m.  Over 700 people will come out to enjoy this timeless, epicurean delight.

This year’s Bake is made possible by “Admiral Sponsor,” Gowrie Group, Connecticut’s leading independent insurance agency, and numerous other generous community supporters.

The 2015 Essex Shad Bake is a collaboration between the Rotary Club of Essex and the Connecticut River Museum.

For more information on Gowrie Group, visit www.gowrie.com. To purchase tickets go to www.rotaryclubofessex.com or buy them in person at the Centerbrook Package Store and the Connecticut River Museum.

Music & Memory Documentary Film Screening, Panel Discussion at ‘The Kate’ Tomorrow

An Alzheimer’s patient reacts to music of "The Beach Boys.” Photo courtesy of BOND360

An Alzheimer’s patient reacts to music of “The Beach Boys.” Photo courtesy of BOND360

OLD SAYBROOK – Community Music School, the Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter, and The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center present a screening of the award-winning documentary film “Alive Inside” on Tuesday, June 2, at 7 p.m. at The Kate, 300 Main Street, Old Saybrook. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased by phone at 860-767-0026 or in person at Community Music School, 90 Main Street, Centerbrook; or by visiting www.thekate.org.

“Alive Inside” follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he demonstrates music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short.

The documentary visits family members who have witnessed the miraculous effects of personalized music on their loved ones, and offers illuminating interviews with experts including renowned neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks and musician Bobby McFerrin. Many will remember the viral video “Henry Wakes Up!” – a clip from the film that shows a 92-year old nursing home resident enthusiastically responding to music.

The evening will include a brief performance by the New Horizons Band and post-screening panel discussion with experts in the field of memory loss. The New Horizons Band is a program of the Music School that offers active adults the opportunity to play music with their peers in a supportive environment.

This film is not rated, but is recommended for ages 13 and up.

For additional information, contact Community Music School at 860-767-0026.

Editor’s Notes: Community Music School offers innovative educational music programming and music therapy led by a board-certified music therapist for infants through adults, building on a 30 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.

Alzheimer’s disease affects more than 70,000 people in Connecticut. The Alzheimer‘s Association provides services to those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias; advocates for policy change and research funding; and advances research toward prevention, treatment and a cure. The Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter’s main office is in Southington, with regional offices throughout the state in Hamden, New Milford, Norwich, and Norwalk. To learn more contact the Connecticut Chapter at 800-272-3900www.alz.org/ct

‘Calendar Girls’ Opens at Ivoryton Playhouse, Fundraising Calendar Now on Sale

Photo by Michelle Tuite. Pictured from left are Maggie McGlone Jennings, Lily Dorment*, Maria Silverman*, Jacqui Hubbard, Beverley Taylor, Katrina Ferguson* *Denotes member of Actors Equity

Photo by Michelle Tuite.
Pictured from left are Maggie McGlone Jennings, Lily Dorment*, Maria Silverman*, Jacqui Hubbard, Beverley Taylor, Katrina Ferguson* *Denotes member of Actors Equity

IVORYTON – The summer season opens June 3 in Ivoryton with the US professional premier of one of the UK’s most popular shows, ‘Calendar Girls.’  Adapted by Tim Firth from his smash hit Miramax film of the same name, it is based on an inspiring true story that is both poignant and hilarious.

A group of extraordinary women, members of a very ordinary Yorkshire Women’s Institute, spark a global phenomenon by persuading one another to pose au natural for a charity calendar with a difference.  As interest snowballs, the ‘Calendar Girls’ find themselves revealing more than they’d ever planned …

Dazzlingly funny, shamelessly sentimental and utterly captivating, this is one of the best-selling shows in British theatre history. It will make you laugh, cry … and walk out singing Jerusalem!

The fundraising phenomenon of the Calendar Girls was inspired by the death of Angela Baker’s husband, John Richard Baker, an Assistant National Park Officer for the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority, who died from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma at the age of 54 in 1998.

During his illness Angela’s friends began to raise money, initially with the aim of purchasing a sofa for the visitors’ lounge in the hospital where John was treated. Nothing could have prepared them for the way their original calendar took off (selling 202,000 copies in its first year). To date they have raised over £3 million for Leukemia & Lymphoma Research, the UK’s leading blood cancer charity.

The Ivoryton Playhouse is also helping to raise awareness for several cancer charities by hosting a Cancer Survivor Night on Wednesday, June 3, at 7:30 p.m. – tickets are only $21 for those individuals who have survived the challenge of cancer (this is half price the adult ticket price).  Participating organizations include Little Wonder (littlewonder.org), Middlesex Hospital‘s Center for Survivorship and Integrative Medicine, Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation (terribrodeurbreastcancerfoundation.org) and the Valley Shore YMCA – Hope is Power Program (vsymca.org).  For more information, call the Ivoryton Playhouse box office 860.767.7318.

To further support these charities, Ivoryton Playhouse is producing a calendar of the theatre’s Calendar Girls with a portion of the proceeds going to support the work of these organizations featuring the cast in their hilariously “revealing” poses!  The June 2015 – May 2016 calendars will be available for purchase from the Ivoryton Playhouse for $20.00.  Photography for the calendar was donated by Chris Devlin Photography (http://devlinphotography.com) and the calendar printing is sponsored by Essex Printing.

Jacqui Hubbard, Artistic/Executive Director, is directing the production and is also stepping on stage in the role of Annie. Beverley Taylor, Ivoryton Company Manager, will be joining her in the role of Chris.

“We are both Northern English lasses” says Hubbard, “I spent four years trying to get the rights to produce this wonderful play and, though directing and performing at the same time will be a challenge, I knew I had to do it. These women are in our bones and it will be a rare treat to get to step in front of the curtain for a change.”

Joining them on stage are Vickie Blake, Danielle Bonanno, Erik Bloomquist, Victoria Bundonis*, R. Bruce Connelly*, Lily Dorment*, David Edwards*, Katrina Ferguson*, Maggie McGlone Jennings, and Maria Silverman*.

Set design is by Tony Andrea, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Cully Long.

Calendar Girls opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on June 3, and runs through June 21. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.)

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Join CT River Museum for a Shad Fishing Informational ‘Riverquest’ Trip, Wednesday

A trip to learn 'All About Shad Fishing' is being offered on RiverQuest.

A trip to learn ‘All About Shad Fishing’ is being offered on RiverQuest.

ESSEX — On Wednesday, June 3 at 7:30 p.m., the Connecticut River Museum (CRM) will host a shad fishing excursion from its docks.  The evening will include a trip on RiverQuest to learn about shad fishing traditions.

Participants will see examples of shad nets and other gear, watch fishermen at work on the River, and enjoy a dessert and non-alcoholic beverage.  Beer and wine will be available for purchase.

Tickets are $40 for CRM members and $45 for the general public.  Reservations are required.

For more information, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org or call the museum at 860-767-8269.

 

#          #          #          #          #          #          #          #          #

 

Photo:

 

  1. RiverQuest and the Connecticut River Museum will offer a Shad Fishing Night, June 3rd. Photo: Joan Meek, Connecticut River Museum.

Final Lecture in Audubon Society’s CT River Series Considers Estuary’s Role in Painting & Writing, Thursday

painting

ESSEX — The Connecticut River Estuary Lecture Series hosted by the Connecticut Audubon Society continues Thursday, June 4, with a presentation titled, “Aesthetic Beauty of the Estuary: Vision of Artists and Writers,” at Essex Meadows starting at 4 p.m.    Jeffrey Cooley, founder and owner of The Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme. will give the lecture, which will look at the role of the estuary in painting and writing.

The first two lectures of the Connecticut River Estuary series have been terrific successes, with over 100 people attending each one.

Admission to the lecture is free but RSVP’s are required. To RSVP, contact Allison Bryant at the Connecticut Audubon Society at abryant@ctaudubon.org or 203 259-0416 x106. A reception follows each lecture.

For more information on the lecture series, visit www.ctaudubon.org/2015/04/connecticut-river-estuary-lecture-series/.

These lectures are one of the initial projects of a new regional board formed by the Connecticut Audubon Society to focus on the lower Connecticut River valley and southeastern Connecticut.

The new board will work in conjunction with Connecticut Audubon Society staff and state Board of Directors to provide direction and support to the organization’s conservation and education work in Old Lyme, Lyme, Essex, Old Saybrook, and other communities in southeastern Connecticut.

The board’s other seminal projects include the introduction of Connecticut Audubon’s award-winning Science in Nature outdoor education program at Essex Elementary School and an effort to expand Osprey Nation, Connecticut Audubon’s citizen science Osprey monitoring program.

For decades Connecticut Audubon Society has maintained nature sanctuaries in Montville, Haddam, East Haddam, Stonington and Middletown. In addition to being a key component of the region’s native habitat, the sanctuaries serve as portals of opportunity into nature for children and families in the region.

The chair of the new Regional Board is Herman Blanke of Old Lyme. Other members are Patsy McCook (secretary) of Old Lyme; Emily Bjornberg of Lyme; Elsie Childs of Old Lyme; Jim Denham of Essex; Margarita Emerson of Niantic; Eleanor Robinson of Old Lyme; Dr. Ted Vanitallie of Old Lyme; and Claudia Weicker of Old Lyme.

Herman Blanke and Jim Denham are also members of Connecticut Audubon Society’s Board of Directors.

In addition, Old Lyme resident John Forbis and Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder have provided essential support to this effort.

“Having had the fortune to live in Essex for 15 years, I have always appreciated the values of the Connecticut River; its incredible aesthetic beauty, its ecological contributions, and its great historical legacy to the people of this nation., said Alexander Brash, president of Connecticut Audubon Society.

He continued, “In keeping with the great tradition of conservationists of the area, we are looking to work with its citizens and school children in order to highlight and protect the area’s birds, unique biodiversity and habitats, and leverage such interactions for greater awareness of conservation issues across the state.”

“There is a great conservation tradition to uphold in this region,” said Herman Blanke. “Roger Tory Peterson of Old Lyme helped make birding the popular pastime that it is and also drew the connection between birds and conservation. A century ago, the painters of Old Lyme turned this beautiful landscape into art. We view it as our goal and our responsibility to carry on that tradition of conservation and appreciation for the beauty of the natural world.”

Jim Denham said, “From its inception, Connecticut Audubon Society has made conservation education the foundation of its work. Each generation is responsible for helping the next generation understand how the natural world works and why conservation is important, and for making sure the wonders of nature don’t get lost amid all the distractions of the modern world. That’s what we are trying to accomplish at Essex Elementary School, and we intend for it to be a stepping stone to collaborations with other schools as well.”

Science in Nature, which provides curriculum-based outdoor science education to students in elementary and high schools, recently completed its first session at Essex Elementary, with a field trip to Chatfield Hollow State Park in Killingworth. The second session is set for May 28 at Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison.

Science in Nature teaches the principles of conservation science in local outdoor settings, focusing on climate and weather, rocks and soils, ecological adaptations, and wetland ecology. The goal is to increase environmental literacy among elementary, middle and high school students so they will understand basic environmental science principles and be more likely to participate in finding solutions to environmental issues within their communities.

In October it was named the best outdoor conservation program in the region by the New England Environmental Education Alliance. Schools from almost 50 communities in Connecticut have participated in Science in Nature, although Essex Elementary is the first in southeastern Connecticut to take part.

Osprey Nation uses volunteer citizen scientists, working under the direction of Connecticut Audubon’s conservation staff, to find and monitor nests of the state’s resurgent Osprey population.

More than 400 Osprey nests have been identified and plotted on a map. The greatest concentration in the state is on Great Island in Old Lyme. Connecticut Audubon is hoping that increased awareness of the project will propt more local residents to volunteer to as Osprey stewards in Old Lyme and elsewhere throughout the southeastern part of the state.

Founded in 1898, Connecticut Audubon Society is the state’s original and still independent Audubon Society. The Society manages four nature centers, two museums, and 19 sanctuaries across the state. It uses the charismatic nature of birds to inspire the next generation of conservationists, and to work with the current generation to protect and improve the state’s natural habitats for the betterment of state residents, birds and other wildlife.

Connecticut Audubon Society’s headquarters are at Birdcraft Sanctuary in Fairfield. It has regional centers and associated boards in Fairfield, Pomfret, Glastonbury and Milford.

Mozart & Mendelssohn as Child Prodigies, Presentation by Acclaimed Musician at Essex Library, Thursday

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

ESSEX — The name Mozart is synonymous with the word prodigy. He certainly displayed incredible talent as a composer, pianist and violinist at a ridiculously young age. Mendelssohn is usually ignored in the conversation about prodigies, but he was no less extraordinary and topped Mozart in at least one way. He was composing masterpieces as a teenager, several years before Mozart wrote anything comparable.

Beginning with Mozart, Jeffrey Engel will compare the two youngsters and let you decide who was the more remarkable. Attend his presentation at Essex Library on Thursday, June 4, at 7 p.m. and discover some of the wonders of musical history.

Engel is an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut in Torrington and a music historian and orchestral cellist, who trained in Paris and Austria before returning to the U.S. to teach. He was selected as one of the 50 most influential people in Litchfield County, Conn., by Litchfield Magazine in 2010.

This program is free and open to the public. Seating is limited; call (860) 767-1560 to register or for more information.

The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex, CT.

Essex’s New ‘Pocket Park’ to be Dedicated Tomorrow, All Welcome

ESSEX — All are welcome to attend the dedication of Morgana’s Place, May 31, at 1 p.m. on the corner of North Main St. and New City St. in Essex.

The unveiling of the statue of Morgana, Ina Bomze’s beloved companion, will take place.

Approximately a year ago, Ina Bomze purchased the property, removed the remnants of the building, replenished the grounds and deeded it for perpetuity to Essex Land Trust.

The Trust invites you to consider making donations for the ongoing care and maintenance of this new pocket park or as additional support to assist Essex Land Trust (P.O. Box 373, Essex) in keeping all of their properties vibrant and groomed for all to enjoy.http://essexlandtrust.org/

Contact Ed Tucker, MD at edtuckermd@aol.com or 860-767-2332 for further information.

Light refreshments will be available.  This event will be held rain or shine.

Maple & Main Celebrates its Sixth Anniversary with New Exhibition, on View Through July 19

'In a Yellow Vase' by Claudia van Nes is one of the signature paintings of the Anniversary Exhibition at Maple & Main Gallery in Chester.

‘In a Yellow Vase’ by Claudia van Nes is one of the signature paintings of the Anniversary Exhibition at Maple & Main Gallery in Chester.

CHESTER – Maple and Main Gallery’s Anniversary Exhibit opens Wednesday, May 27, with a gala celebration Saturday, May 30, from 5 to 8 p.m.

To mark the launch of its sixth year, Maple and Main will serve appetizer platters donated by both L&E and Good Elephant restaurants located across Main Street from the gallery. Cake, champagne and wine will also be offered.

The gallery will be filled with new paintings and sculptures by 38 Connecticut artists – the vast majority of which will be shown for the first time.

Maple and Main has come a long way since its start by a handful of artists, but it still adheres to the goal set six years ago: to show only original fine art in as wide a selection of styles and medium as possible.

The Anniversary Exhibit runs through July  19.

Maple and Main, at One Maple Street, is open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, call 860-526-6065, email mapleandmain@att.net. or visit the gallery’s Facebook page and/or on-line gallery and website at mapleandmaingallery.com.

Celebrated Pianist Dalia Lazar Plays Beethoven at CBSRZ Tomorrow

Pianist Dalia Lazar

Pianist Dalia Lazar will play Beethoven at CBSRZ.

CHESTER — The celebrated classical pianist Dalia Lazar returns to Chester Sunday, May 31, at 5 p.m. at Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ). She will play a variety of Beethoven’s piano works, including the “Moonlight Sonata” and the “Pathetique.”

The first time she played for in Chester several years ago, the audience was wowed by her performance and her charm. The Music & More series didn’t expect to be able to lure her back so soon. But Miriam Gardner-Frum, producer of the program, revealed how this unexpected event came to be, and took form over the last few months.

“Dalia offered us a gift. She explained that she is starting an all-Beethoven program in Europe this fall and would love to perform it before a live audience at CBSRZ before going to Europe.  She noted the beautiful space and acoustics in our building in which she would love to play again. She offered to do this performance as benefit for the synagogue.”

Born in Croatia, Dalia began studying piano at an early age. Her first piano teacher recognized her uncommon talent and pianistic ability, and at the age of 16 she was admitted to Moscow’s P.I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory.  During her studies in Moscow, Lazar performed throughout Soviet Union. Immediately after her graduation at the Moscow Conservatory, Lazar decided to continue her career in New York and London where she studied with Karl Urlich Schnabel and Maria Curcio.

As a finalist in New York Concert Artist Guild Competition, Lazar made her New York debut at Rubenstein Hall, followed by her Carnegie Recital Hall debut later that year. Since then she has performed a broad repertoire as a soloist in concerts and recitals worldwide, including the United States, Russia, Venezuela, Israel, Switzerland, Croatia, Mexico and Romania.

Her chamber music repertoire includes the works for violin and piano duo and piano trio, which she performed extensively with her late husband, violinist Lucian Lazar.  Her recent CD includes works by Schumann and Chopin.

Dalia’s playing has been well received by critics, who have characterized her performance as “such noble playing,” (Yediot Achronot, Tel Aviv),  “un sentimento profundo” (Panorama, Venezuela), “that rare combination of charisma, personality and terrific pianistic facility” (pianist Tzimon Barto), and “… an inspiring display of musical excellence”  (Daily Republic).

Tickets for the general public are $25 and children under 16 are admitted without charge (this is a great time to introduce children to the work of a world-class musician.) To order advance tickets, call the CBSRZ office at 860.526.8920, or buy tickets at the door.

CBSRZ is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.

Essex Corinthian YC Explores “Teaching Life Lessons & Character Through Sailing,”

arctic_tern_sailboat

ESSEX — For more than 100 years, the United States Coast Guard Academy (CGA) has consistently developed exceptional leaders of character who are Semper Paratus (Always Ready) to perform courageously in any conditions of the maritime environment.

Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Zeke Lyons, one of the Officers in Charge in the Coast Guard Academy’s Coastal Sailing Program, will visit the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club on Sunday, May 31, at 4 p.m. to reflect on three years of adventure and guiding experiential learning with CGA cadet crews during summer cruises throughout New England on board the Academy’s fleet of eight custom designed Leadership 44 sloops.

Lt. Cmdr Lyons is completing a three year assignment as a Company Officer on the Academy’s staff.  In addition to sailing each summer as part of the Coastal Sailing Program, he was also an Instructor of Organizational Behavior and Leadership in the Management Department.

Prior to his assignment at the Coast Guard Academy, he graduated from the Eisenhower Leadership Development Program at the United States Military Academy at West Point in conjunction with Columbia Teacher’s College in New York City.

Lt. Cmdr Lyons will combine humor and insights about the CGA experience to shed light on how the Academy develops leaders of character and his talk will highlight why, as Vice Admiral James Pine said, “The sea has, though the ages, been of all schools, the best for bringing out the qualities of leadership.”

This talk is open to the public but space is limited.   Contact the club’s office at 860-767-3239 or ecyc@essexcorithian.orgto reserve space.  There will be an informal reception following the talk.

The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 9 Novelty Lane in Essex.   For more information about the Club, visitwww.essexcorinthian.org

Old Lyme Church Continues 350th Celebrations with Concert Tomorrow Featuring Vivaldi’s ‘Gloria’

FCCOL_exterior_Photo_by_Nigel_Logan_122KB

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme. Photo by N.B. Logan

Throughout 2015, the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme is celebrating 350 years of history. A series of concerts and a talk on the historic landscape of Lyme Street have been scheduled to commemorate the rich legacy of the past and ongoing connections that link the church and the larger community.

The next event is a concert to be held at the church on Sunday, May 31, at 4 p.m. when the Senior Choir from the Congregational Church will be joined by choristers from Saint Ann’s Episcopal Church and Christ the King Church, both in Old Lyme, to perform Vivaldi’s ‘Gloria.’

Vivaldi composed the ‘Gloria’ in Venice, probably in 1715, for the choir of the Ospedale della Pietà, an orphanage for girls (or more probably a home, generously endowed by the girls’ “anonymous” fathers, for the illegitimate daughters of Venetian noblemen and their mistresses). The Ospedale prided itself on the quality of its musical education and the excellence of its choir and orchestra.

A priest, music teacher and virtuoso violinist, Vivaldi composed many sacred works for the Ospedale, where he spent most of his career, as well as hundreds of instrumental concertos to be played by the girls’ orchestra. This, his most famous choral piece, presents the traditional Gloria from the Latin Mass in 12 varied cantata-like sections.

The wonderfully sunny nature of the ‘Gloria’ with its distinctive melodies and rhythms is characteristic of all of Vivaldi’s music, giving it an immediate and universal appeal. It is written for female soloists, chorus and small orchestra.

All are welcome to attend this concert and join the continuing celebrations of this important year in the life of the Church. Admission is $10 per person or $20 per family.

Public worship on the east side of the Connecticut River can be traced back to 1664 when the Court acknowledged that there were “thymes and seasons” when inhabitants could not attend Sabbath meetings in Saybrook and ordered them to agree on a house where they would gather on the Lord’s Day. A year later, Articles of Agreement defined a “loving parting” that created a separate “plantation” on the river’s east side, which would soon be named Lyme.

The first three meetinghouses stood on a hill overlooking Long Island Sound. After a lightning strike destroyed the third of those structures in 1815, the church was relocated to its present site closer to the village. Master builder Samuel Belcher from Ellington was hired to design a fourth meetinghouse beside the town green and the cornerstone was laid on June 10, 1816. That stately white church with its graceful steeple and columned façade, painted repeatedly by the country’s most prominent landscape artists, burned to the ground on July 5, 1907, in what was almost certainly an act of arson.

Rebuilt to replicate Belcher’s design after a community-wide, fundraising campaign, the fifth meetinghouse, which was dedicated in 1910, remains today as both a vibrant center of faith and fellowship and Old Lyme’s most important historic landmark.

For more information on the concert of church life and events, visit www.fccol.org or call the church office at (860)-434-8686.

The First Congregational Church of Old Lyme is located at the intersection of Ferry Rd. and Lyme St.in Old Lyme, CT.

Wheeler Gives Out Hands & Hearts Appreciation Awards

Wheeler-H&H-LorensonFamily

Susan Walkama, LCSW, president and chief executive officer, Wheeler Clinic, with Wheeler Hands & Hearts Appreciation Award recipient Ralph, Harold and Ed Lorenson of the Lorenson Family; not pictured: Carolyn Lorenson.

DEEP RIVER — The Lorenson Family of Cromwell and Deep River was among five organizations and individuals to receive a Hands & Hearts Appreciation Award at Wheeler’s fifth annual Hands & Hearts reception on May 20 at The Country Club of Farmington.

The event honors an array of individuals, business and non-profit leaders for their continued, outstanding support of Wheeler’s mission and improving the health of the individuals, families and communities that Wheeler serves.  Thirty businesses and individuals have been recognized by Wheeler since the inception of this event.

“For more than 25 years, the Lorenson family has supported Wheeler in word and in deed,” said Susan Walkama, LCSW, Wheeler’s president and chief executive officer. “They have supported our service to the community with steadfast dedication.”

Additional 2015 Hands & Hearts Appreciation Award recipients include: Hooker & Holcombe, Mott Corporation, Reid and Riege, P.C., and the Red Sox Foundation.

Editor’s Note: Wheeler provides comprehensive solutions that address complex health issues, providing individuals, families and communities with accessible, innovative care that encourages recovery, health and growth at all stages of life.  Their integrated approach to primary and behavioral health, education and recovery creates measurable results, positive outcomes and hopeful tomorrows for more than 30,000 individuals across Connecticut each year. Learn more:www.wheelerclinic.org.

Literacy Volunteers Recognize Student Achievements at Annual Awards Ceremony

Award winners
On Wednesday, May 14 approximately 80 students, tutors, volunteers and friends gathered at St. Mary’s church in Clinton for their annual International Dinner and Student Awards ceremony. Diners enjoyed delicacies from such countries as Ecuador, Columbia, Brazil and China.

Awards were given for Outstanding Student Participation and Citizenship. Additionally, the dinner is the culmination of the student essay contest with winners in each contest reading their works in front of their peers.

If there could be a single event, which describes the impact LVVS volunteer tutors have on their community and that validates the mission of LVVS, this is that event.

The Outstanding Student Participation Awards were given to those who achieved goals they had set for themselves at the beginning of year. Some achieved long-term goals, such as gaining U.S. citizenship while others realized short-term goals such as obtaining a library card. Many of the students improved their employment status because of their increased English speaking skills while others can now communicate in English with their children’s teachers or with doctors.

Students were recognized at the ceremony for essays they submitted to the essay contest sponsored by the Book Sale Committee. This event provides students an opportunity to practice their writing skills. Essays are judged in several different categories according to their language proficiency. Prizes are awarded in both English as a Second Language and Basic Reading

A full list of the essay winners, outstanding participation and citizenship recipients can be found at www.vsliteracy.org.

Pre-Order Tickets, Lunch for Ivoryton Library’s Homes & Gardens Tour, June 20

One of the beautiful gardens, which can be viewed on the June 20 tour.

One of the beautiful gardens, which can be viewed on the June 20 tour.

The Ivoryton Library is delighted to offer a tour of Historic Homes and Gardens in Centerbrook and Ivoryton on Saturday, June 20, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Through the Garden Gate” offers an opportunity for visitors to walk through seven 19th century homes and gardens lovingly renovated by their present owners and two additional gorgeous gardens bursting with color as well as interesting native trees.

This year, visitors can both tour and enjoy lunch at the elegant Copper Beech Inn, which also has beautiful English gardens with fountains.

Tickets may be purchased and lunches pre-ordered at the Ivoryton Library, 106 Main St., Ivoryton or Gather of Ivoryton, 104 Main St., Ivoryton.

For further information, visit www.ivoryton.com or call 860-767-1252.

Letter to the Editor: A Note of Thanks from Essex Garden Club

To the Editor:

Essex Garden Club‘s (EGC) May Market on May 9th was a huge success.  Augie Pampel and Mark Pratt again did an excellent job organizing the many details in making this special day go smoothly.  Hard working EGC members spent many days and hours in preparation for May Market.

Our community is extremely important to the success of May Market.  We appreciate all those who returned again this year to make purchases and the merchants who provided valuable donations to the Café, the Silent Auction, and Treasures.  Because of all your support at this year’s May Market, we were able to give more camperships this year to Essex Park and Recreation and to Bushy Hill Nature Preserve for children living in Centerbrook, Essex, and Ivoryton.  Thank You All!

Sincerely,

Linda Newberg,
President of Essex Garden Club

Summer Reading Programs Announced at Acton Public Library

OLD SAYBROOK — This summer Acton Library is celebrating the joy of reading with our summer reading programs for adults, teens and children from June 18 to July 30.

Summer Reader is the statewide online summer reading log for all levels.

Follow the link on the library’s website at www. actonlibrary.org. Sign up at home or in the Library to track your minutes or books…write and share reviews…and earn prizes!

For Adults: Escape the Ordinary  with the adult summer reading program. Register either in person or online and select books to read of your choosing. If you register online, you will enter titles read. If you register in person, you will fill out a raffle ticket for each book read. Drawings will be held weekly for gift cards to local businesses. The more books you read, the more chances to win!

Check the library website at www.actonlibrary.org for the link to sign up via “Summer Reader”, or stop by to register in person.

For Teens: Unmask!  for students entering Grades  6-12. Welcome to “Summer Reader” the statewide online summer reading log.  Follow the link on our website at www. actonlibrary.org to sign up…track your books…write reviews…and enter a chance to win gift cards to local businesses.
For Kids: Make your summer sizzle with our summer reading program “Every Hero Has a Story  for children birth to grade 5.  Track 20 minute blocks of time reading or being read to and earn Acton Reading Bucks . Remember, all reading counts, including being read to, or reading to someone else.

Earn an Acton Reading Buck for every 20 minutes of reading time to “spend” on prizes at Acton’s General Store.

Weekly fun: All programs are free and drop-in. Please note: children under age 8 must be accompanied by an adult.

  • Crafternoons on Tuesdays, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.: Supplies are provided by the library.  Suitable for all ages.
  • Picnic Story Times, Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Bring a blanket and your  lunch to eat indoors while listening to a story.  Best for ages 2 – 5.
  • Family Nights! Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. Entertaining and educational family performers.
  • Story Time with Rocky the Rock Cat and guest reader Phyllis DaCorte                                                    on Friday, July 17 at 10:30 a.m.  Great photo op!
  • It’s Theater Time! with Judy Potter. Listen to a story and learn how to act it out.
    July 7, 14, 21 and 28 from 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Best for ages 3-7. Please register.

Kindermusik on Wednesday, July 1, 10 – 10:45 a.m. for toddlers 18- 48 months, with caregiver. Introduce your child to the wonderful world of music. A fun class filled with singing and dancing.

All programs are free and drop-in unless otherwise noted. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by an adult.

Family Nights 

Thursdays, June 18 – July 30 from 7 to 8 p.m.

  • June 18: Summer Reading Program kick-off event! Family Dance Party with DJ Dave! DJ Dave will get the whole family rockin’ and rolling with the greatest dance party music ever.
  • June 25: Horizon Wings: Experience the thrill of being up close to a magnificent eagle, hawk,  and owl. Be inspired about their stories of survival, explore fascinating facts about each species and learn what you can do to help them.
  • July 2: Family MoviePaddington (2015, Rated PG; 95 mins.)   Free popcorn.
  • July 9: Nappy’s Puppets: Entertaining shadow puppet theater featuring the classic tale of  Jack and the Beanstalk.
  • July 16: Riverside Reptiles: Jeepers Creepers! Encounter some creepy looking creatures. See and touch a variety of reptiles, amphibians, arachnids and insects.
  • July 23: Magic of Christopher: Chris has the right mix of comedy, impressive  magic and one liners to keep the kids howling and the parents chuckling.
  • July 30: Robert Rivest Mime Theater: Comic mime Robert Rivest will lead you on a fun, upbeat journey of everyday heroes, superheroes, and heroes from Greek Mythology. Get a chance to learn mime and create a new hero on the spot.

Special appreciation is extended to the Friends of the Acton Library for sponsoring all of the Family Night performers, the summer reading prizes and gift cards. Without their hard work and dedication, the summer reading program would not be possible.

For more information, go to the library’s website at www.actonlibrary.org  or call the library at 860-395-3184 during  library hours: Monday- Thursday, 10 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; closed Sundays from June – September.

Essex Art Association’s Elected Member’s Show on View Through June 12

'The Flying Bergdorfs' by Carol Young.

‘The Flying Bergdorfs’ by Carol Young.

Each year, at every individual summer exhibit, the Essex Art Association gives a special top prize to “the artist they would like to see more of.” The prize is an opportunity to have a solo exhibit in the Exit Gallery alongside the next year’s regular exhibits.

The honoree for June is Carol Young of Essex, who will present paintings, mixed media, sculptures and assemblages in her show titled, “Through Rose-Colored Glasses.”

Young’s work has been variously described as “curious, imaginative, colorful, quirky, sometimes naughty, but never calm.”  “The Flying Bergdorfs,” for example, are a group of acrobats that the artist saw inside a microscopic photograph of a basal teardrop. “Maude’s Disturbing Wallpaper” is a portrait of a clearly chaotic, easily-confused nanny that she had had to endure.

Young’s most important mentors were her inventive father and more than a thousand creative art class children who, for over 30 years, privately taught ‘Mrs. Young’ at her previous home in Westport, Conn.

The Gallery at 10 North Street, Essex, will continue to be open and free to the public every day of the week from 1 to 5 p.m. from May 30 to June 12, when the gallery will close for indoor renovations.

Conversations About Regionalization Continue at Essex Elementary Today

REGION 4 — A series of informal conversation for parents at elementary schools about Regionalization concludes Friday at Essex Elementary School Cafeteria from 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Coffee and pastries will be provided.  All are welcome.

Superintendent Dr. Levy, the school principal and board of education will be available at the event for informal discussions.

RiverFare 2015 Returns Thursday for 22nd Year of Fun on Essex Waterfront 

Kick off Summer on the shoreline with some of the best culinary delights the River Valley has to offer. Join Allen G. Ciastho (The Tea Kettle Restaurant), Brian Checko & David Schumacher (Red House), David G. Caistho (Impressive Catering Services), Norm Needleman (Tower Labs.) Chris Dobbs (Executive Director, Connecticut River Museum)  Rob Peterson (C Sherman Johnson Co., Inc.) Anna Lathrop (Gourmet Galley Catering) Frett Marsha (Catering by Selene) & Earl Swain (Cloud Nine Catering) for the 22nd annual RiverFare.

Kick off Summer on the shoreline with some of the best culinary delights the River Valley has to offer. Join Allen G. Ciastho (The Tea Kettle Restaurant), Brian Checko & David Schumacher (Red House), David G. Caistho (Impressive Catering Services), Norm Needleman (Tower Labs.) Chris Dobbs (Executive Director, Connecticut River Museum)  Rob Peterson (C Sherman Johnson Co., Inc.) Anna Lathrop (Gourmet Galley Catering) Frett Marsha (Catering by Selene) & Earl Swain (Cloud Nine Catering) for the 22nd annual RiverFare.

ESSEX — On Thursday, May 28, from 6 to 9 p.m., the waterfront lawn of the Connecticut River Museum will come to life again as the scenic setting for RiverFare 2015.

Known as the unofficial kick off of summer on the shoreline, RiverFare, the area’s most popular tasting event, will feature gourmet food, wine, micro brews and silent auction all on the museum grounds overlooking the beautiful Essex Harbor.  Like a kid in a candy store, move from table to table sampling the best culinary delights the Connecticut River Valley has to offer.

This year’s lineup of Connecticut’s leading restaurants and food purveyors includes RiverFare newcomers Impressive Catering, The Tea Kettle Restaurant, Coastal Cooking Company and Big Nanny’s Soft Biscotti, and back by popular demand are Red House, Fromage Fine Foods, Deep River Snacks, Gourmet Galley Catering, Griswold Inn, Essex Coffee & Tea, Catering by Selene, The Cheese Shop of Centerbrook, The Ivory Restaurant, Cloud Nine Catering and others.

RiverFarers will also have the opportunity to join in the fun of bidding in the silent auction which features a diverse array of fine gifts, services, and entertainment experiences.  Items include a refurbished ’76 Sunfish Sailboat and Trailer, a private kayak tour, a 2 night stay in Cooperstown, NY plus tickets to the Baseball Hall of Fame and a seasonal Mooring on the Connecticut River.  Check out additional auction items at ctrivermuseum.org.

Major Support for RiverFare is provided by Tower Labs and C. Sherman Johnson Co.  Addition support is provided by, Bogaert Construction, Centerbrook Architect and Planners, Clark Group, Edidio Assante Wealth Management, iCRVRadio.com, Middlesex Hospital, Reynolds’ Garage & Marine, Inc. Bob’s Discount Furniture, Sapia Construction, Wells Fargo Advisors, blp Enterprises, Carr Douglas & Cline, Caulfield & Ridgway, Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, Treasure Hill Farm and Trowbridge Stone Masonry.

Additional in-kind support is provided by Bob’s Centerbrook Package Store, Rhode VanGessel Design, Essex Printing, Guilford Savings Bank, Connecticut Rental Center and Apparel Plus.

Media support is provided by Valley Courier.

RiverFare admission is $60 per person in advance and $65 on the day of the event.  Patron tickets may be purchased for $150 and include a premium bar and $100 tax deduction.  Net proceeds will help support the Connecticut River Museum’s mission to increase public awareness and access to the heritage, culture, and natural beauty of New England’s Great River.

For more information or to make advance reservations, go to www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860.767.8269.    The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street in Essex.