July 30, 2014

High Kicking in Old Saybrook – Irish Dance Teacher Joins Dance School

Riverdance: Photo Credit Jack Hartin reproduced courtesy of Riverdance

Riverdance: Photo Credit Jack Hartin reproduced courtesy of Riverdance

The Gray School, Old Saybrook is delighted to announce that Craig Ashurst, TCRG will be joining their faculty this summer.

“Craig brings with him enormous talent, impressive experience, and immense passion for Irish dance. We could not be more excited to officially welcome him into our Gray School family!” said Iris Gray, principal of the Gray School of Irish Dance.

Craig Ashurst,  TCRG (Photo courtesy of Christina Dozall)

Craig Ashurst, TCRG (Photo courtesy of Christina Dozall)

Craig started dancing in his hometown of Melbourne, Australia at the age of 5. By the end of his competitive career, he held 10 Regional titles and 9 Australian National titles, in addition to winning the British National, Great Britain, and North American Championships.  Craig also had the honor of winning the much-coveted All Ireland title while dancing with the prestigious Danny Doherty Academy in England.

Upon making the switch to performing in shows, he danced along side Michael Flatley during the filming of the Lord of the Dance 3D movie. Craig performed as a principle dancer in Riverdance for most of his 6 and a half years with the show and was also awarded his Irish dancing teachers certificate (T.C.R.G) from the Irish dancing commission in Dublin Ireland. Craig has instructed Irish dance at the Camp Rince Ceol Irish Dance Camp for five summers and has conducted various workshops in different parts of the world.

“In addition to his international career, Craig is well known to this part of New England through his performances as dance soloist and choir member with the show, Celtic Woman and is featured on their PBS special, DVD and in concerts at the Radio City Music Hall, NYC,” said Maura Gray, joint principal of the Gray School. “We are very pleased announce that Craig will be joining our  faculty.  Craig will be with us at our July camps and we look forward to more exciting times at the Gray School as we continue to grow.”

Irish Dance is a great sport no matter what direction you choose to take. It is fantastic exercise that builds both confidence and discipline and offers students the opportunity to participate both individually and as part of a team.  The Gray School of Irish Dance, is the premier School of Irish Step Dance in Connecticut, with over 35 years of experience teaching dance to children from all over Connecticut, Massachusetts and New York.  They offer introductory or recreational dance class for fun and exercise, as well as competitive classes for those who wish to compete in the USA and Internationally. They offer classes and graded exams in Traditional Irish Dance taught to the standards of An Coimisiùn, Ireland for children and adults.

For more information about Craig and the Gray School of Irish Dance please visit:

http://www.grayschool.com/ pages/main/faculty.html or email Iris Gray Sharnick: iris@grayschool.com

Estuary Council of Seniors Celebrates 40th Anniversary “Forty & Fabulous” – Sept. 20

OLD SAYBROOK – The Estuary Council of Seniors’ Board of Directors and Staff are pleased to announce that this year honors the 40th Anniversary of the Senior Center in Old Saybrook. Plans are underway to celebrate this special occasion with a Gala, Forty & Fabulous… Life is a Cabareton September 20th, 6:00 pm at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center. The evening will include wine, hors d’oeuvres, entertainment, comedy, dancing and more under the Co-Chairmanship of President Gerri Lewis and Vice President Ruth Yakaitis. This benefit Gala will support the Center’s Meals on Wheels program. Last year, the Estuary Council provided 70,000 hot, nutritious meals to individuals in their nine town district and Madison.

According to Executive Director, Paul Doyle of the Estuary Council of Seniors, Inc., “Our mission is to enhance the quality of life for people fifty years and older by providing nutrition, transportation, health support services, education opportunities, and socialization.”

For additional information, call 860-388-1611.

Chestnut Hill Concerts Announces the 2014 Season

 

Chestnut Hill Concerts, under the artistic direction of cellist Ronald Thomas, will present four programs of great chamber music this August at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center in Old Saybrook.  In contrast to last season’s exploration of music by famous romantic composers and their lesser-known contemporaries, the upcoming season will embrace a wider time span, surveying well-known works from the classical era to the early twentieth century.

The forty-fifth season of Chestnut Hill Concerts will take place on August 1, 8, 15, and 22, 2014, all Friday evenings at 8:00 p.m. The season will present fourteen of today’s most distinguished musicians, including four violinists – Jessica Lee, Yura Lee, Jesse Mills, and Todd Phillips — and a violist, Mark Holloway, who will make their series debuts.

Each program has a notable feature. For the first time in several years, on August 1, a Chestnut Hill Concerts program will offer a piano quintet — Brahms’s magnificent F minor, along with Mozart’s G major violin sonata and Shostakovich’s E minor piano trio. The second concert features three of Beethoven’s most famous sub-titled works: his “Moonlight” piano sonata, “Kreutzer” violin sonata, and “Archduke” piano trio. The third concert on August 15 offers Lieder and chamber music — including the French horn — by Schumann and Schubert, and the theme of the final program is “Hungarian Flair,” with music by Dohnanyi, Bartok, and Brahms.

Sponsors of the concerts Guilford Savings Bank, Northstar Wealth Partners,  Phyllis MacDowell, and Dave Rackey & Emily Eisenlohr and Zoe and Mahlon Hale. Essex Savings Bank is the sponsor of CHC’s Kids and Teens Come Free program.

All concerts are Friday nights at 8:00 pm at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center (The Kate), 300 Main Street in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Subscriptions to the four concerts are $120 (orchestra) and $100 (balcony). Single tickets are $35 for orchestra seats and $30 for the balcony. To purchase tickets, visit chestnuthillconcerts.org or call 203-245-5736. After July 2, contact the Kate box office at 860-510-0453, or visit www.thekate.org

Chestnut Hill Concerts 2014 Programs and Artists
All concerts Friday evenings at 8:00 p.m.

Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, Old Saybrook

August 1
Brahms’s Great Piano Quintet

Mozart : Violin Sonata in G major, K. 379

Shostakovich: Piano Trio in E minor, Op. 67

Brahms: Quintet in F minor, Op. 34

Jessica Lee and Jesse Mills, violin; Mark Holloway, viola

Ronald Thomas, cello; Rieko Aizawa, piano

August 8

Three Beethoven Masterpieces

Piano Sonata in C-sharp minor, Op. 27 no. 2, “Moonlight”

Violin Sonata, Op. 47 “Kreutzer”

Piano Trio in Bb, Op. 97 “Archduke”

Todd Phillips, violin; Ronald Thomas, cello

Benjamin Hochman, piano

August 15

Schumann and Schubert

Schumann:  Adagio and Allegro, Op. 70

Schumann:  Selection of Lieder

Schubert: Auf Dem Strom, D. 943, for soprano, horn, and piano

Schubert: Piano Trio in Eb Major, Op.100

Hyunah Yu, soprano; William Purvis, horn

Jennifer Koh, violin; Ronald Thomas, cello

Mihae Lee, piano

August 22

Hungarian Flair

Bartók: Romanian Folk Dances, Sz. 56, for viola and piano

Dohnanyi: Serenade for String Trio, Op 10

Brahms: Piano Quartet in G minor, Op. 25

Yura Lee, violin; Dimitri Murrath, viola

Julie Albers, cello; Mihae Lee, piano

Girl Scout Volunteer Receives Local Honor

Left to right: GSOFCT CEO Mary Barneby, Maureen, and GSOFCT Board President Caroline Sloat. (Photo courtesy of Girl Scouts of Connecticut.)

Left to right: GSOFCT CEO Mary Barneby, Maureen, and GSOFCT Board President Caroline Sloat. (Photo courtesy of Girl Scouts of Connecticut.)

OLD SAYBROOK — Girl Scouts of Connecticut is proud to announce that Maureen Francescon of the Marsh Service Unit (Old Saybrook/Westbrook) was awarded the prestigious Girl Scouts of Connecticut Pin at the organization’s Annual Meeting on May 28.

The Girl Scouts of Connecticut pin was developed exclusively by Girl Scouts of Connecticut and is the highest award given to adults on behalf of the Council. The Girl Scouts of Connecticut Pin recognizes any registered Adult Girl Scout giving outstanding service to a Council-wide assignment, or whose service and dedication impacts the success and development of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience for Girl Scouts of Connecticut.

Maureen Francescon has been the leader of Travel Troop #3 for 35 years, leading 45 girls in numerous opportunities abroad, including Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. She has also taken groups of girls to the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone National Park. In addition, she ensures the troop participates in two community service trips per year.

The photo attached, from left to right: GSOFCT CEO Mary Barneby, Maureen, and GSOFCT Board President Caroline Sloat. Photo credit is Girl Scouts of Connecticut.

For more information, visit www.gsofct.org.

About Girl Scouts of Connecticut

Girl Scouts of Connecticut is the largest girl-empowerment organization in the state, serving nearly 44,000 girls and more than 18,000 adult members. Girl Scouts of Connecticut’s mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place.

For further information, visit www.gsofct.org or call 1 (800) 922-2770.

New Principal Appointed for Deep River Elementary School

The Deep River Elementary School Board of Education is pleased to announce the  appointment of Mr. Christian Strickland to the position of Principal at Deep River Elementary School. Christian Strickland has most recently served as the Assistant Principal at Griswold Elementary School in Berlin, Connecticut for the past four
years.

Strickland replaces an interim principal who has directed the school since January, Nancy Haslam of East Haddam. Haslam, who had worked previously as principal at an elementary school in Waterford, was hired by the local school board at the end of last year to replace Jennifer Byars.

A local resident who was hired in 2012, Byars left to accept a position as assistant superintendent of schools for the Ledyard school district. The previous principal was Jack Pietrick, who held the job for 13 years before retiring in 2012.

Prior to his experience as Assistant Principal, Strickland was a Math Instructional Specialist for two years. Strickland began his career in education as a third and fourth grade teacher in Maryland and then in the Berlin Public Schools. Strickland has been recognized as a Teacher of the Year, and nominated for the CAS Assistant Principal of the year. Outside of school, Christian is an avid swimmer and enjoys participating in Spartan Races.

Strickland completed his Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary education, his Master of Science Degree and his Sixth Year Degree in Educational Leadership, all from Central Connecticut State University.

The Deep River Board of Education and Search Committee were very impressed with Strickland’s knowledge, commitment to excellence, integrity, sense of humor, and enthusiasm for elementary school students, families, and the Deep River community. The Board of Education unanimously endorsed Strickland on Thursday May 15th, at their Board of Education meeting. We are confident that Strickland will provide excellent leadership for the students at Deep River Elementary School.

Strickland resides in Middletown with his family. He will begin his tenure in the Deep River Public Schools on July 1st, 2014.

Micky Dolenz to Headline in ‘Comedy is Hard’ at Ivoryton Playhouse

Micky Dolenz (photo courtesy of dis Company)

Micky Dolenz (photo courtesy of dis Company)

Actor, writer, director, performer Micky Dolenz (of The Monkees) has been confirmed for the lead role in Mike Reiss’ new play Comedy Is Hard!, premiering Wednesday, September 24, at The Ivoryton Playhouse in Ivoryton, Connecticut.

Dolenz, who just began a tour with The Monkees last week, has delighted audiences with his performances on stage in the Elton John/Tim Rice production of Aida; Grease; Pippin’; A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum; and, most recently Hairspray in the West End playing Wilbur Turnblad.

A renaissance-artist of the highest order, Dolenz has continued his recording career, most recently with a solo album entitled Remember, released last year. He has also participated heavily in several Broadway charities; most notably for Rockers On Broadway. In fact, he was just announced as the recipient of their annual award; to be presented in November.

Said Dolenz, “The opportunity to originate this role in Mike’s new play is terrific. I am ready to un-leash my inner-comedian.”

Reiss’ play is set in a home for retired actors and the play takes an affectionate look at the relationship and rivalry between a retired stand-up comedian and a classical actress.

Reiss, who is writer and producer for the long running TV show, The Simpsons, also created the animated seriesThe Critic; the webtoon Queer Duck and worked on the screenplays for Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs; Horton Hears a Who!; The Simpsons: The Movies; and, My Life In Ruins. Ivoryton audiences turned out in droves in June 2013 for his hilarious play, I’m Connecticut, which was a huge popular and critical success.

Comedy is Hard! opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on September 24 and runs through October 12, 2014. Directed by Playhouse Artistic Director, Jacqueline Hubbard, the rest of the cast is not yet announced.

Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2pm. Evening performances are Wednesday andThursday at 7:30pm, Friday and Saturday at 8pm. Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Tri-Town Youth Services Adopts New Logo

TTYS New Logo

TTYS New Logo

When Tri-Town Youth Services updated its logo recently, it dug deeply into the history of the region.  Chester, Deep River and Essex were all towns in the Saybrook Colony up until 1644.  Repurposing a simple border element found in the original Saybrook Colony coat of arms, the rendering is both geometric and symmetrical, motivational and energetic, and speaks to a sense of deep history and community pride that is evident throughout the tri-town area.

“Our goal is to promote health, wellness, strength, and collaboration among our youth, families, community institutions and organizations,” says Tri-Town Youth Services Director Gail Onofrio.  “We may be three towns but it is our intentional, supportive interconnectivity – cultivated by all of us for all our kids all the time – that ensures that the whole tri-town community thrives.”

The process of developing the new logo itself involved youth and adult community members’ participation in focus groups, the engagement of the brand development and design organization, co:lab, which works exclusively with organizations committed to social value.  Sandy Vaccaro of Smart Graphics has designed the agency’s new letterhead and business cards.  The new logo arrives just in time for Tri-Town Youth Services to celebrate its 30th anniversary this fall.

Tri-Town Youth Services continues to coordinate and provide resources needed to make positive choices, reduce substance abuse, and strengthen the relationships that matter most.  Discover programs and information for families, as well as opportunities for community collaboration, at www.tritownys.org

State Rep. Giuliano Supports STEAP Grant for Old Saybrook

OLD SAYBROOK - State Rep. Marilyn Giuliano petitioned the Small Town Economic Assistance Program for a grant of $500,000 to fund the town of Old Saybrook’s creation of the Main Street Connections Park and Parking Lot Project.

“This grant will improve our Main Street business district with much needed downtown parking and a recreational park for people to enjoy our downtown attractions,” said Giuliano.

The town will use the grant funding for capital improvements including redeveloping the irreparably storm-damaged Police Department property.  Additional downtown parking and a park with a canopied pathway and seating area are planned.

Giuliano said, “Old Saybrook has made an outstanding effort to redesign our downtown area. I am thankful to all those who assisted with this project and I look forward to seeing the progress.”

Valley Regional’s Production ‘Secret Garden’ Receives 12 Nominations for Music Theater Awards

Valley Regional Musical Productions’ newest cast member(s), Mr. Robin, arrives at rehearsal of THE SECRET GARDEN at Valley Regional High School.  (Back, left to right): VRMP cast members Megan Ryan, Shelby Talbot, Kristen Kilby and Annie Brown. (Front): Puppet artist Linda Wingerter

Valley Regional Musical Productions’ newest cast member(s), Mr. Robin, arrives at rehearsal of THE SECRET GARDEN at Valley Regional High School. (Back, left to right): VRMP cast members Megan Ryan, Shelby Talbot, Kristen Kilby and Annie Brown. (Front): Puppet artist Linda Wingerter

Valley Regional High School’s 2014 Production of The Secret Garden received 12 nominations for Connecticut High School Music Theater Award this year. The Award ceremony will take place at the black tie gala on Monday June 2, at the Palace Theater in Waterbury, CT. Good luck to all our nominees!

OUTSTANDING HAIR & MAKE UP ACHIEVEMENT

OUTSTANDING COSTUMING ACHIEVEMENT

OUTSTANDING LIGHTING DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT

OUTSTANDING SET DESIGN ACHIEVEMENT

OUTSTANDING DIRECTION

OUTSTANDING CHOREOGRAPHY

OUTSTANDING MUSIC DIRECTION

OUTSTANDING LEADING ACTRESS, Maggie Walsh -MARY LENNOX

OUTSTANDING LEADING ACTOR, Andrew Goehring -ARCHIBALD CRAVEN

OUTSTANDING SUPPORTING ACTOR, Casey McKeon – DICKON SOWERBY

OUTSTANDING CHORUS

OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION OF THE YEAR

Letters: Pleased with Sen. Linares’ Voting Record

To the Editor:

I’m sorry to read Mr. Harfst (letter May 13, 2014) is unsatisfied with Sen. Linares’ voting record.  I am quite pleased with it myself.

Senator Linares understands what raising the minimum wage does to small businesses.  He understands in this abysmal economy, forcing small business owners to pay a higher minimum wage can mean forcing them to cut low-wage jobs in order to stay afloat.  Otherwise the businesses go under, and then who does that help?  If Mr. Harfst believes those in menial jobs deserve higher pay, why stop at $10.10?  Why not go to $15?  How about $25 as the Swiss have proposed?  Low skill jobs were never intended to be the highlight of one’s career.  They were to be rungs in the ladder to help them achieve a higher ambition.  My own children did unpaid internships, worked for less than minimum wage in jobs during the summers, and now, as adults, they all have careers they busted their tushes to attain.  That’s the way our system is supposed to work.  People get rewarded for hard work done well.

Absentee ballots have been abused over the years.  With all the volunteers who are willing to drive people to the polls and the long hours the polls are open, it’s hard to believe people can’t get themselves to the polls one way or another.  It’s called personal responsibility.

Gun safety laws (i.e., gun control) after a tragedy like Sandy Hook help the population feel as though they’re doing something good after such a horrific event, however all the laws already on the books at the time of the tragedy didn’t prevent it.  Maybe if people at the school had been armed, someone may have been able to stop the perpetrator before he killed so many innocents.  We don’t read of the crimes stopped and people saved by armed citizens with concealed carry permits because those kinds of reports don’t fit the liberal narrative.  Personally, I feel safer thinking there might be someone in the shopping mall, theater, or restaurant who, at a moment’s notice, could fend off a madman.

And, speaking of the Constitution, I assume Mr. Harfst is for it.  I assume he enjoys the freedoms it assures.  If he is, then he is a Tea Partier.  Welcome!  Tea Party members, like me, believe in protecting the document that has been the envy of people all over the world, hence the reason so many want to become Americans.

As far as Sen. Linares voting “no” to certain legislation, I’m sure his reasons were as valid for his no vote as Mr. Harfst’s party’s reasons for voting for it.  As Justice Antonin Scalia says, and I’m paraphrasing, “Our system is set up to have roadblocks when it comes to legislation.  It helps prevent bad bills from being passed.  If both sides finally agree on a bill, it’s probably a good bill.”  I trust Sen. Linares to represent his constituents by using his judgment as to whether a bill is good or bad.  I also find it sad Mr. Harfst considers Sen. Linares’ “exploits” like supporting toy drives and hosting flag collections as unworthy endeavors.  I doubt the children who receive the toys or the patriots who know their tattered flags will be disposed of properly consider these events a waste of time.  And for him to vote “no” on even higher gas prices, I say “YAY”!  They’re already some of the highest taxes in the country and any increase hurts most the aforementioned low-wage earners Mr. Harfst presumes to want to help.

Senator Linares is continuously meeting, speaking to, and most of all, listening to his constituents so he can do the work they want him to do.  In other words, he’s doing exactly what he was elected to do.

Sincerely,

Adrienne Forrest
Essex

Carney Cruises to Victory in 23rd District Republican Convention

Devin Carney

Devin Carney

Devin Carney, Republican candidate for State Representative, won the 23rd District Convention by a vote of 10-4. His campaign was able to earn unanimous support from Lyme, Old Saybrook, and Westbrook. This included votes from the Lyme First Selectman, Ralph Eno, the Old Saybrook First Selectman, Carl P. Fortuna, Jr., and the current State Representative for the 23rd District, Marilyn Giuliano, who also gave Carney his nominating speech and has endorsed him.

In a statement, Giuliano said, “I believe Devin will work for all of us with energy and integrity, and with an interest not in politics, but public service.” Giuliano lost her convention in 2002 by onlytwo votes on a second ballot vote after the first vote failed to determine a winner by majority, but defeated her opponent in a primary due to her showing in her hometown of Old Saybrook.

In addition to the support at convention, Carney has received support from each town – which can be seen through his strong fundraising effort. He collected 95 donations from Old Saybrook, 57 from Old Lyme, 35 from Westbrook, and 18 from Lyme.

Carney stated, “The results at convention were a testament to the hard work I’ve put in these past few months and to the confidence the delegates have in me to win in November. I bring new, fresh ideas to the table and can’t wait to get up to Hartford to offer some much-needed common sense. I am not your typical politician, but rather a regular person just trying to fix our economy, get jobs back in Connecticut, and help rejuvenate the Republican Party in this state.”

He continued, “Most importantly, I believe the people of the 23rd District deserve a representative who understands the unique issues in each of the four towns. While I live in Old Saybrook, my family is from Westbrook, my mother lives in Lyme, and my longtime girlfriend lives in Old Lyme with her children. I have a personal stake in each town and will be a representative for all; the people of the 23rd deserve nothing less.”

For more information about Carney’s campaign, contact Melissa Bonner at carneyfor23pr@gmail.com.

Talking Transportation: America’s Interstate Highways

The 47,000 miles of highways that comprise America’s interstate highway system are nothing short of an engineering marvel, surpassed only by what China has built in the last few years.

We take them for granted, but when they were designed almost 60 years ago these super-highways presented both great opportunity and vast challenges. The US wasn’t the first with super-highways. Those bragging rights go to the Germans, whose Reichsautobahn saw cars zooming along at 100+ mph in the 1930′s.

Most credit President Eisenhower, whose troops rode the Autobahn in WWII, for seeing the military value of an American equivalent, though engineering such a complex across the US was far more difficult.

Of course, by 1940 the US already had the Pennsylvania Turnpike and, by 1954, the NY State Thruway, but private toll roads were just the beginning.

To build a road expected to last, in 1955 the federal government, AAA and automakers first built a $27 million seven mile test road near Ottawa, Illinois. Half was concrete, the other half asphalt. The 836 separate sections of highway had various sub-surfaces and 16 bridges. For two years army trucks drove night and day, seeing which road designs would hold up.

Weather and traffic dictated different designs: in desert areas the highways need be only a foot thick, while in Maine the tough winter and freeze-thaw cycles required that I-95 would be five feet thick.

Construction of the highways required moving 42 billion cubic feet of soil. To expedite construction of I-40 in California, there was even a plan to use nuclear bombs to vaporize part of the Bristol Mountain range.

As author Dan McNichol writes in his excellent book, “The Roads that Built America”, “VIP seating was even planned for the event. The (nuclear) bombing was to produce a cloud 12,000 feet high and a radioactive blast 133 times that of Hiroshima.” Needless to say, the mountains were moved using more conventional explosives.

Outside of Greenbelt, Md., another site tested the design of road signs … white lettering on a black background, white on blue (already adopted by the NY Thruway) or, what proved to be the winning model, white on green.

Just 5,200 of the original 41,000 miles of Interstates were to be built in urban areas, but those few miles accounted for almost half of the $425 billion total cost. By 1992 the system was deemed “completed”. Bragging rights for the longest of the interstates goes to I-90 running 3,020 miles from Boston to Seattle and our own beloved I-95, which runs 1,920 miles from the Canadian border to Miami, Fla.

As anyone who drives on I-95 in Connecticut knows, the interstates have far surpassed their expected traffic load and are in need of billions of repairs. Little did we know 60 years ago what our automotive future might bring.

Jim Cameron

Jim CameronJim Cameron has been a Darien resident for 22 years. He is the founder of the Commuter Action Group and also serves on the Darien RTM. The opinions expressed in this column are only his own. You can reach him at CommuterActionGroup@gmail.com

Local Companies Honored by Middlesex United Way

Jason Bohn, Paulette Swanson and Vin Capece accept an award for Middlesex Hospital at the Middlesex United Way Campaign Awards Breakfast. Capece served as chair of the 2013-14 Middlesex United Way Campaign for Middlesex County.

Jason Bohn, Paulette Swanson and Vin Capece accept an award for Middlesex Hospital at the Middlesex United Way Campaign Awards Breakfast. Capece served as chair of the 2013-14 Middlesex United Way Campaign for Middlesex County.

AREAWIDE – More than 75 companies, organizations, and individuals were honored May 6 for their contributions to raising $1.75 million for the 2013-14 Middlesex United Way Campaign.

Local companies recognized include: AAA Allied Group, Old Saybrook; AT&T, Inc., Essex and Old Saybrook; Child & Family Agency of Southeastern CT, Essex; Community Health Center, Old Saybrook; Essex Savings Bank, Essex; Godiva Chocolatier, Inc., Old Saybrook; Liberty Bank, Deep River, Essex and Old Saybrook; Mahoney Sabol & Company LLP, Essex; Middlesex Hospital, Essex; Stop & Shop SupermarketCo., Old Saybrook; and Tower Laboratories, Centerbrook.

The top honor, the Corporate Spirit Award, was presented to Standard-Knapp, of Portland. The Corporate Spirit Award is the highest honor a company can receive for running a United Way campaign.

Other distinguished honors were awarded to: East Hampton resident Meghan Slater, of the Middletown firm Wright-Pierce, who was named Coordinator of the Year for bringing enthusiasm and creativity to the workplace campaign; Carol P. Wallace, CEO of Cooper-Atkins Corp. in Middlefield, who earned the Leadership Award for exemplifying philanthropic leadership through support of the United Way campaign; and Kuhn Employment Opportunities in Middletown, named Funding Partner of the Year for achieving noteworthy results in employee giving and special events by a Middlesex United Way funding partner.

Special Achievement Awards for outstanding Middlesex United Way campaigns were presented to: Henkels & McCoy, of Portland; Lyman Farm, Inc. of Middlefield, Town of Durham; and Middlesex Hospital and Webster Bank, both with locations throughout Middlesex County.

Colebrook Financial in Middletown was awarded the Small Business Community Partnership Award for outstanding support by a small business.

2013-14 Campaign Chair Vincent G. Capece, Jr., of Middlesex Hospital, was honored for his leadership during the campaign, and Dr. Pat Charles, superintendent of Middletown Public Schools, was announced as the incoming 2014-15 Campaign Chair.

The funds raised by these companies through the Middlesex United Way campaign will be invested in strategies to advance education, income, health and housing in Middlesex County. Middlesex United Way is a locally based organization dedicated to strengthening lives, helping people, and improving community conditions in the fifteen towns in Middlesex County. Middlesex United Way serves the towns of Chester, Clinton, Cromwell, Deep River, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Killingworth, Middlefield, Middletown, Old Saybrook, Portland and Westbrook.

For a complete list of all 2013-14 Middlesex United Way Campaign Award winners, visit www.middlesexunitedway.org/news.

State Senate Candidate Emily Bjornberg Addresses Nominating Convention of Rep. Joe Courtney

From left: Emily Bjornberg, Rep. Joe Courtney and State Rep. Mae Flexer (D-Killingly) at Courtney's nominating convention earlier this week.

From left: Emily Bjornberg, Rep. Joe Courtney and State Rep. Mae Flexer (D-Killingly) at Courtney’s nominating convention earlier this week.

Emily Bjornberg of Lyme, Democratic candidate for the State Senate in the 33rd District, addressed the nominating convention of U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney (D-2nd) on Wednesday evening at Asnuntuck Community College in Enfield.

The 33rd District includes Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland and Westbrook.

“Joe Courtney has amassed a stellar record of fighting hard for education, defense, agriculture and small business. He holds true to the values that matter most to Eastern Connecticut, and we are proud to call him our representative,” said Bjornberg.

Courtney is seeking a fifth term in the U.S. House of Representatives.

“It has been an honor to serve the people of the second district of Connecticut for more than seven years, and I am looking forward to running again. I am grateful for the strong support displayed at our convention, which demonstrates the importance of the work we will continue to do in Connecticut and in Washington,” said Courtney in a prepared statement.

Lanier Reaches Goal to Qualify for Public Election Campaign Funds

Vicki Lanier (R) of Old Lyme has announced that in just six weeks of active fundraising, she significantly exceeded the required amount of funds and number of donors to qualify for public campaign funds to be used both in any

primary efforts and ultimately in her race against any Democratic candidate this November. Lanier’s donors have come from both statewide and the four towns with areas in the 23rd District, namely Old Saybrook, Old Lyme, Lyme and Westbrook.

Lanier commented, “I am excited by the level of support we have so quickly built for my campaign effort. My extensive experience of true civic service and real accomplishments as an elected official have prepared me for the demands of serving as an effective state assembly member. ”

She added, “With the close of the 2014 legislative session, I would also like to express my thanks to our distinguished retiring 23rd district state representative, Marilyn Giuliano. She has done an outstanding job of balancing leadership on issues with listening to constituents and advocating for their views.”

Vicki, a life-long resident of Old Lyme, was elected to the Regional District 18 Board of Education in 2009, where she served as treasurer. She holds a law degree from Quinnipiac University and practices family law. She is a contributing mentor to various women’s groups and active in community efforts supporting children and small businesses.

For additional information, contact vickilanier2014@gmail.com. Visit her page on Facebook at “Lanier2014″ and her website at www.lanier2014.com.

Deep River Congregational Church Flea Market and Rummage Sale – Aug 16-17

The Deep River Congregational Church is already preparing for its annual Flea Market and Rummage Sale which will be held on during the third weekend of August. The Flea Market is held on Marvin Field and on the grounds around the church. The 20 x 20 foot spaces are available for $30, and you can reserve yours by contacting the church office for a reservation form and map. (860-526-5045 or office.drcc@snet.net) or they can be downloaded from the church web site at www.deeprivercc.org .

The church will also hold its annual Rummage Sale on the same weekend. The committee will begin accepting donations at the church on weekdays from June 1st – August 13th, from 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Items being accepted include: household goods, decorative items, toys, sporting and camping goods, craft items, small furniture, seasonal decorations and art. We are collecting items for our Antiques and Collectibles “Boutique” as well. We cannot accept TV’s, computers, large appliances, baby car seats, cribs, large furniture, books, cassette tapes, VHS tapes, clothing or shoes. Anyone needing to donate SOONER than June 1st (or if you have antiques and collectible to donate), please contact Jane Moen at janemoen@comcast.net or the Church Office at office.drcc@snet.net for alternate arrangements! This year’s Rummage Sale will be a three-day event, so please watch for further details to be publicized soon.

Region 4 Superintendent Dr. Ruth Levy Wins TTYS Award

Dr. Ruth Levy

Dr. Ruth Levy

Tri-Town Youth Services recently presented its 2014 Generativity Award to Region 4 Superintendent of Schools, Ruth Levy. Dr. Levy has been with Region 4 Schools for eight years. During her initial three years, she served as Assistant Superintendent.

Dr. Levy was chosen for this award because of her leadership of the schools in the tri-town area. Dr. Levy attributes much of the schools’ success to the extensive collaboration that takes place among educators, government, social services, prevention programming. She cites involvement with Whelan, law enforcement, Tri-Town, Camp Hazen and Boards of Selectmen, Boards of Finance and Boards of Education all coming together to benefit the children. As she says, “it’s a wonderful place for children to grow up.”

Tri-Town Youth Services supports and advances the families, youth and communities of Chester, Deep River and Essex. We coordinate and provide resources needed to make positive choices, reduce substance abuse, and strengthen the relationships that matter most. Discover programs and information for families, as well as opportunities for community collaboration at www.tritownys.org

 

Dates For Chester Sunday Market

CSM+LogoThe dates for the Chester Sunday Market for 2014 have been set!

They will be operating from June 15th to October 12th from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sunday mornings.  A vendor list and calendar for which bands are playing will be posted at chestersundaymarket.jimdo.com/.

Also, please like us on Facebook to get instant updates on what’s happening at the market.

Ten Shoreline FDs Collect 6,285 Pounds Food for Shoreline Soup Kitchens

The Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries is pleased to announce that the 2014 Firehouse Food Drive held on April 26, 2014 raised 6,285 pounds of food for local residents in need.  With the largest group of participating fire stations ever, volunteers and donors across the shoreline donned their raingear to lend a hand during the stormy Saturdaymorning.

The Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries (SSKP) is particularly grateful that this drive was a success, despite the rainy weather, because March and April are traditionally slow donation months.

This is the third year that area fire stations have participated in the drive. Ten towns joined in the effort, including Old Saybrook, Old Lyme, Westbrook, Essex, Killingworth, Chester, Deep River, North Madison, Clinton and Niantic. Firehouses provided staff and publicity, opened their doors as drop off locations and helped to deliver donations to the pantries. Many stations also set up tents and sorting stations, handed out grocery bags, posted social media announcements, distributed lists of most-needed foods, and collected food at other April fire house events.

In addition, the Clinton Shop Rite, Clinton Stop & Shop, Old Saybrook Stop & Shop, and Roberts Food Center of North Madison offered additional donation areas, manned by firehouse volunteers. This year the Old Saybrook firehouse brought in media sponsors, including Shore Publishing, who donated large advertisements in three newspapers. Radio stations Soft Rock 106.5 WBMW, Connecticut’s Hottest Jamz Jammin 107.7, and 94.9 News Now! helped get the word out with a live broadcast from the Old Saybrook firehouse, and AM stations WMRD 1150 and WLIS 1420 made many public service announcements.

“Every day the personnel of the our volunteer fire stations are available to help those effected by fire and emergencies—they never turn down a call for assistance and raise their hearts and hands to help those in need.  On April 26th, once again these amazing men and women gave of their precious time to answer the call of those most needy in our community.  On behalf of SSKP and those we serve, thank you so much for this amazing gift of time and help—not only to our many fire stations, but to all those who dropped off food—you made a real difference in the lives of your neighbors”, said Patty Dowling, SSKP Executive Director.

The need for donated food is on-going throughout the year, and SSKP urges other community groups to consider organizing food drives. The Shoreline Soup Kitchen’s five pantries distributed over 1 million pounds of food in 2013. Only 40% of this food is obtained through food banks; the remainder must be either purchased or donated. Call(860) 388-1988 or visit www.shorelinesoupkitchens.org for more information. All drives, no matter what the size, are greatly appreciated.

The Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries provides food and fellowship to people in need and educates the community about hunger and poverty, serving the Connecticut shoreline towns of Essex, Chester, Clinton, Madison, Old Saybrook, East Lyme, Lyme, Old Lyme, Killingworth, Westbrook and Deep River. Founded 25 years ago, in 1989, at the Baptist Church in Essex, the agency continues in its mission to feed the hungry in body and spirit. Last year with a small staff and over 900 dedicated volunteers, SSKP served enough food for over 908,000 meals to shoreline neighbors in need.

 

Essex Savings Bank Center for Financial Training Certificate Awards

ESSEX –  Essex Savings Bank is pleased to announce that several employees were honored at the 67th Annual Graduation and Awards Ceremony of the Center for Financial Training.  Brenda Kim, Assistant Branch Manager of the Old Lyme Branch, received her Professional Teller Certificate, Advanced Financial Services Diploma and First in Class Certificate for Real Estate Finance.  Isabel Roberge, Senior Teller at the Chester Branch, received her Professional Teller Certificate and Suzanne Schneider, Accounting Representative at the Corporate Office, received a First in Class Certificate for Law and Banking:  Applications, Introduction to Financial Services Certificate and Introduction to Financial Services Operations Certificate.

Essex Savings Bank is a FDIC insured, state chartered, mutual savings bank established in 1851.  The Bank serves the Connecticut River Valley and shoreline with six offices in Essex (2), Chester, Madison, Old Lyme and Old Saybrook.   Financial, estate, insurance and retirement planning are offered throughout the state by the Bank’s Trust Department and wholly-owned subsidiary, Essex Financial Services, Inc, Member FINRA, SIPC. Investments in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and annuities are not FDIC insured, may lose value and are not a deposit, have no Bank guarantee and are not insured by any Federal Government Agency.

Republican State Rep. Candidate Carney Reaches Fundraising Milestone

Devin Carney

Devin Carney

Republican candidate for State Representative, Devin Carney, has announced that he has raised $6,285 from 205 donors across the 23rd District, which includes Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, and Westbrook. His campaign will qualify for funding through the Citizen’s Clean Election Program, which requires ‘public support’ from 150 donors in the four towns represented by the 23rd District. $5,000 in small donations is also required in order receive the $27,850 grant, which comes primarily from the sale of abandoned property in the state’s custody.

“We are very excited to have reached our fundraising goals so quickly from such a diverse group of people in the district,” Lisa Knepshield, deputy treasurer for Carney 2014, said. “We have 95 donors from Old Saybrook, 57 from Old Lyme, 35 from Westbrook, and 18 from Lyme – from all across the political spectrum.”

Carney, a realtor and former political operative, said that surpassing the fundraising threshold so early will give him a chance to focus on the issues and meet more people. “I am happy that I can now talk to voters without having to worry about raising money and I can bring my message of common sense, fiscal responsibility, and improving our quality of life to good people of the 23rd.”

“People know my character, know my work ethic, and know my enthusiasm to bring logical solutions to Hartford” he said, “I’m not a traditional politician and I am running because we need to get businesses back to Connecticut, keep our talented younger population in the state, make the shoreline affordable to retirees and families and, overall, help rebuild our struggling economy.”

Carney is a lifelong resident of Old Saybrook and grandson of Art Carney of Hollywood and Westbrook fame. Representative Marilyn Giuliano, who has represented the district since 2003, currently holds the seat. The Old Saybrook Republican announced in February that she would not seek a 7th term. She has thrown her support behind Carney.

For more information, contact Melissa Bonner at carneyfor23pr@gmail.com.

Talking Transportation: Things Are Getting Better on Metro-North

Jim CameronI know it may be hard to believe, but I think things are getting better on Metro-North.

Last week I finally met Joseph Giulietti, the new President of Metro-North. I found him to be very smart, quite candid and equipped with a reasonable plan to bring this railroad back to its once-deserved world-class status.

On May 11th a new timetable will become effective, aimed at achieving two goals: safety and reliability. The timetable will mean running trains on-time but still allowing for track and catenary work to keep the railroad in a state of good repair.

At a Commuter Forum in Westport, Giulietti was the first to admit that the railroad was in bad shape, that trains are running slower and later, often with standees. But unlike GM’s Chairman explaining delays in safety recalls and blaming it on “the old GM”, Giulietti is taking ownership of the problems. That’s refreshing.

Yes, trains are not on time (just 76 percent in February), but that’s because after the last May’s Bridgeport derailment the FRA issued speed restrictions on bridges and curves. The current timetable is, as one commuter put it in our recent survey, “more of a suggestion” than anything else.

So for the past months the railroad has been analyzing the entire timetable, looking at the reasons for every late train and being open to revising everything. The new timetable will rationalize the current running times, adding 2-4 minutes for trains between New Haven and Stamford, but cutting two to four minutes for runs from Stamford to GCT.

That means that your 7:35 a.m. train to work, usually arriving this winter at 7:40 or 7:45, may be rescheduled to arrive at 7:40 and, probably, will. This means you can plan your life with reliability and not be wasting time on the platform peering down the track.

The problem of standees on trains will hopefully lessen when people return to a routine commuting cycle and extra railcars will be provided on trains where ridership shows the demand for more seats.

The good news is that with increased reliability, we may also see greater frequency of service … four trains an hour in the a.m. peak instead of three trains every half-hour off-peak. Yes, the run may take a bit longer, but you’ll have more options, always knowing the scheduled departure and arrival times will be achieved.

But is the railroad safe? Yes, insist both Giulietti and CDOT Commissioner Jim Redeker. But so too was airline safety / security after 9-11. And our bridges became safer after the collapse of the Mianus River Bridge 30 years ago. Even in the “land of steady habits,” we hopefully learn from our mistakes.

We’re now about half-way through Mr. Giulietti’s 100 day plan to get Metro-North back on track. I, for one, am hopeful he will achieve his goals. But on day 100, June 11th, I’ll be checking the scorecard and seeing what he’s achieved versus what was promised.

Jim Cameron


Jim Cameron has been a Darien resident for 22 years. He is the founder of the Commuter Action Group and also serves on the Darien RTM. The opinions expressed in this column are only his own. You can reach him at CommuterActionGroup@gmail.com

Two New Rebud Trees on South Main

2014-04-25 09.54.47In celebration of Arbor Day, the Essex Rotary Club and the Essex Garden Club each donated a redbud tree to the Essex Tree Committee. These trees were planted on Friday, April 25 on South Main Street (opposite Collins Street) by Augie Pampel, Essex Tree Warden and Chairman of the Tree Committee with the help of Fred Weber Tree and Landscape Experts. Richard Levene and Dr. Peter Pool from the Rotary Club and Linda Newberg from the Essex Garden Club, the Club’s President were on hand to add the final touches to the planting.

The Eastern redbud (cercis Canadensis) is one of the first trees to flower in the spring with large showy clusters of soft pink to magenta buds that pop out directly on the branches and trunk. After blooming, light green, heart shaped leaves appear. These darken to an emerald green and in the fall turn to a golden yellow. The disease resistant trees mature to a height of 20-30 feet.

These new trees are just two of many that were added to the Essex landscape this year thanks also to the Essex Land Trust and the Dept. of Park and Recreation. To see any of the new trees take a walk across the Town Hall campus, stroll into Cross Lots, check out the new trees at the Essex Elementary School and the Ivoryton Green.

Once again the Essex community enhances the beauty to our streets and parks! If you or your organization would like to fund/donate a tree, please contact Augie Pampel at augiepampel@att.net.

IFoundFitness Weight Loss Challenge Helps Feeds the Hungry

Left to right: Claire Bellerjeau of SSKP, Donna Scott, Owner of IFoundFitness, Jeff Prindle, Store Manager of the Deep River Adams Super Food Store, and the top three winners of the challenge: first place, Sarina Garofalo, second place, “Santa” Dave Puffer, and third place, Deb Garofalo, pictured with the food donation.

Left to right: Claire Bellerjeau of SSKP, Donna Scott, Owner of IFoundFitness, Jeff Prindle, Store Manager of the Deep River Adams Super Food Store, and the top three winners of the challenge: first place, Sarina Garofalo, second place, “Santa” Dave Puffer, and third place, Deb Garofalo, pictured with the food donation.

DEEP RIVER — The 2014 IFoundFitness “Winter River Valley Slim Down” challenge included over 30 people competing for $2,300 in prizes. In addition, the competition raised $478 to purchase a food donation for The Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries. The winner, Sarina Garofalo, lost 21% of her body weight in 12 weeks through the challenge.

The total weight of the food donated was equally impressive, resulting in 339 pounds of food for SSKP’s Westbrook Pantry, which distributes over 15,000 pounds of food every month to hundreds of local families in need. When the funds were brought to the Deep River Adams Supermarket, manager Jeff Prindle sold the food “at cost”, making every penny count for the pantry.

Donna Scott, owner of IFoundFitness, repeats this special challenge several times per year. “Getting people of all ages fit, through regular exercise and healthy eating, and then giving back to the community is what it’s about!”, she said.

“On behalf of those we serve, who experience a community that cares deeply each time they attend a pantry, I thank IFoundFitness and all the challenge participants for remembering those in need on the shoreline,” said Patty Dowling, executive director of SSKP.

The Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries provides food and fellowship to people in need and educates the community about hunger and poverty, serving the Connecticut shoreline towns of Essex, Chester, Clinton, Madison, Old Saybrook, East Lyme, Lyme, Old Lyme, Killingworth, Westbrook and Deep River. Founded 25 years ago, in 1989, at the Baptist Church in Essex, the agency continues in its mission to feed the hungry in body and spirit. Last year with a small staff and over 900 dedicated volunteers, SSKP served over 908,000 meals worth of food to shoreline neighbors in need.

 

Senator Linares Endorses McKinney for Governor

John McKinney

John McKinney

State Senator Art Linares (R-Westbrook) today endorsed State Senate Republican Leader John McKinney to be the next governor of the state of Connecticut.

“Republicans have a great opportunity in this election to take back the governor’s office and win a number of new seats in the legislature, but we will not be successful unless we have a strong candidate at the top of our ticket, Senator John McKinney is that candidate,” Linares said. “Senator McKinney is a dynamic leader capable of taking our Party and our state in a positive new direction.”

Senator Linares represents the 35th State Senate District in the Connecticut General Assembly, which encompasses the towns of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland, and his hometown of Westbrook. He is ranking member on the Banks Committee. In his private life, Linares, 25, is cofounder of a successful, Middletown-based, commercial solar energy company.

Linares is of Cuban-American descent. His grandparents fled communist Cuba in the 1960’s to start over in America where his father started his own business. Linares, who volunteered for U.S. Senator Marco Rubio before running for office himself, has made it a priority to improve Republican outreach to Latino communities.

“Senator McKinney, can relate Republican values to young voters, female voters and Latino voters – constituencies we must rally to build a strong foundation for the future of our Party,” Linares said.

McKinney thanked Linares for his endorsement. “Senator Linares represents the future of our Party. I marvel at what this young man has accomplished in such a short period of time and what the future may hold for him. I am grateful for his support and for what he has taught me about the issues important to his constituents in southeastern Connecticut.”

University of New Haven and Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts Reach Historic Agreement

OLD LYME – The governing bodies of both the University of New Haven and Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts have unanimously approved a proposal for Lyme Academy College to become the university’s sixth college.

“The affiliation of these two outstanding institutions is an exciting and historic event,” said University of New Haven President Steven H. Kaplan. “This will raise the stature of fine arts education in the Northeast and expand the benefits, services and opportunities that the university and Lyme Academy College provide to students, faculty, alumni and all Connecticut residents.”

Robert W. Pratt Jr., chairman of the Board of Trustees of Lyme Academy College, agreed, adding, “The cultural, educational and civic resources of both institutions will become stronger, more exciting and increasingly available to a larger constituency.”

The Board of Trustees of Lyme Academy College and the Board of Governors of the University of New Haven both provided their approvals in early April. The Connecticut Office of Higher Education and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges also approved the affiliation.

“I am grateful for the bold decision of both boards,” Kaplan said. “We will work closely with Lyme Academy College to support and enhance what already is a top-tier fine arts education program that is one of the cultural and educational jewels of the Northeast.”

The affiliation presents many advantages to both institutions. Lyme Academy College will benefit from the operational breadth and depth of the University of New Haven, gaining access to an expanded range of liberal arts courses and complementary UNH art programs, such as design and digital media. The University of New Haven also offers study-abroad opportunities at its campus outside Florence, Italy, where Lyme Academy College students can attend classes. Lyme Academy College students also will gain access to the university’s growing portfolio of new and exciting learning opportunities.

“Very little will change as regards the student experience,” said Lyme Academy College President Scott Colley. “We will retain the acclaimed essence of the college – the small size of our classes, the hands-on experiences and the opportunity to become immersed in representational art. But we will gain access to an expanded reservoir of courses, technologies and academic initiatives that will strengthen the educational experience. Additionally, the opportunity to study abroad in Italy is particularly appealing to our students.

“After 20 years as an academy and almost another 20 as a fully accredited independent college, this affiliation represents a wonderful opportunity for Lyme Academy College to take the next step in its evolution as it becomes part of a much larger university, while retaining all the attributes of a small institution,” Colley continued.

The University of New Haven will add Lyme Academy College’s high-quality Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) program to its curriculum, making it possible for UNH students to study painting, sculpting, drawing and illustration. The university does not currently offer a B.F.A.

“Our university is known for the unique experiential programs it offers to students. The program at Lyme Academy College fits in well with our rapidly expanding offerings at our main campus in West Haven, our new campus in Orange, and our international program in Italy,” Kaplan said.

“We are determined to protect and preserve the mission of Lyme Academy College, retaining the unique qualities that appeal to students seeking an arts degree in an idyllic, rural setting in Old Lyme, Conn., that nurtures creativity,” he added.

The University of New Haven is a private, top-tier comprehensive institution recognized as a national leader in experiential education. The university has 80 degree programs at the bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels. Founded in 1920, the university enrolls approximately 1,800graduate students and more than 4,600 undergraduates.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts continues the academic tradition of figurative and representational fine art while preparing students for a lifetime of contemporary creative practice. The college offers the bachelor of fine arts degree in drawing, illustration, painting, and sculpture (full- and part-time study); certificates in painting and sculpture; a post-baccalaureate program; continuing education for adults; and a pre-college program for students aged 15-18. The college is located at 84 Lyme St. in Old Lyme.

Very Rare Sturgeon Found on Bank of Connecticut River in Lyme

sturgeon

These youngsters stand by the sturgeon found yesterday at the end of Elys Ferry Rd.

This very rare sturgeon (pictured above) was found Saturday on the banks of the Connecticut River near the end of Elys Ferry Road in Lyme.  It was about five feet long.

Labelled an endangered species by the Connecticut DEEP, the sea-run population of sturgeon in the Connecticut River is concentrated along the lower part of the River.  There is a landlocked population surviving above dams in the upper watershed of the river.

For more information on sturgeon in Connecticut, visit the DEEP website at http://www.ct.gov/deEP/cwp/view.asp?a=2723&q=326092&deepNav_GID=1655

Obituary: Gary William Lamothe – April 13, 2014

ESSEX – Gary William Lamothe, 56, died Sunday, April 13, 2014, at Yale New Haven Hospital.

He was born in Meriden May 23, 1957. He lived in Essex and will be missed by his friend, Marsha Pond, and his dogs Ty, Cooper and Phoebe. Gary had struggled with many medical conditions in the past years but he always embraced his spirituality.

He is survived by a brother, Bruce Lamothe, of Ogunquit, Maine; a sister, Janet Gura, of Meriden; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his life partner, Spirit T. X.; his mother and father, Marlene and Richard Lamothe; his brother, Richard Jr.; and sisters, Carol and Diane.

A memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, May 3, at 1:15 p.m. at St. Lawrence Parish, 121 Camp St, Meriden, Ct.

Friends may make donations to: Maryheart Crusaders at 338 Coe Ave., Meriden, CT 06451 and Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals – SPCA, 359 Spring Hill Road, Monroe, CT 06468-2100.

The Spa of Essex Celebrates Anniversary with a New Addition

ESSEX — The Spa of Essex is celebrating its anniversary!  2014 marks 8 years of providing luxury & wellness services to clients from near and far. This spring they are also excited to unveil the new Sauna & Steam Lounge.

Clients of The Spa of Essex are now able to experience the benefits of both a sauna and a steam (visit http://www.thespaofessex.com/spa-blog/  to read about the benefits of sauna and steam).   “We asked our clients what additional services they would like and we are thrilled to be able to fulfill their requests. We believe that it is all about your experience!” said Joyce Cosenza, owner of the spa.

The Spa of Essex, located at 65 South Main St., Essex, CT, is an elegant day spa & boutique with a serene and sophisticated environment designed for even the most discriminating of clientele. With a menu offering all that is essential to relax, renew and achieve your desired results, you may choose from more than 100 treatments & experiences that are completely customized to meet your needs.

Gov. Malloy Announces Plan to Seek State Funding to Protect The Preserve

 

map

Hartford — Governor Dannel P. Malloy announced today a plan for the state to play a major role in purchasing and protecting as open space a 1,000-acre parcel along Long Island Sound known as The Preserve, which is located in the towns of Old Saybrook, Essex and Westbrook.

“We will take action to make funds available for the state’s participation in the purchase of the property and to address issues concerning joint ownership and stewardship of the land with the Town of Old Saybrook, which will also be making a significant financial contribution,” said Governor Malloy.  “The permanent protection of The Preserve has been a goal of the land conservation community across our state for more than 15 years and it’s time to act to achieve this important goal.”

The Preserve is considered to be the last, large unprotected coastal forest between New York and Boston.  The property is rich in natural resources, wildlife, and habitat areas and will offer hiking and other passive outdoor recreational opportunities.  The Preserve, which also provides an important coastal buffer against storm waters, connects to 500 acres of existing parklands in adjoining towns and miles of hiking trails. (Download map of The Preserve)

The Trust for Public Land (TPL), a leader in the effort to protect The Preserve, reached an agreement with River Sound Development LLC to purchase the property in July 2013. Since that time, it has been working to secure funds needed to finalize the purchase, which is now set at $8.09 million.

“The Preserve is one of Connecticut’s special places and this support from the state will allow us to move forward and forever protect from development this land,” said Alicia Sullivan, Connecticut State Director of TPL.  “Our mission is to protect land for people, and I can’t think of a better example of protecting land for all the people who live in Connecticut, and visit here.”

Governor Malloy said that under the agreement, the State of Connecticut would be an owner of The Preserve and intends to contribute $3.3 million toward its purchase and management, consisting of $1.4 million from federal funds for open space acquisition and $1.9 million for acquisition and management pending approval by the State Bond Commission.

Additional funds for the purchase are expected from the Town of Old Saybrook, which plans to contribute $3 million, and from TPL, which will bring private funding in the range of $2 to $3 million for acquisition and management.

“The Town of Old Saybrook is grateful for the state’s support as we move forward to protect The Preserve.  We now have a chance to put to rest once and for all the question of what will happen with The Preserve,” said Old Saybrook First Selectman Carl P. Fortuna, Jr.  “I look forward to launching a public process in Old Saybrook that will conclude with a referendum to approve the town’s financial support for this important land acquisition.”

State funding may increase through a grant to the Essex Land Trust, an applicant for matching funds for the acquisition and protection of 71 acres of The Preserve that is located within the Town of Essex.  This application is pending under the Open Space and Watershed Land Acquisition program administered by the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP).  In addition, the Town of Westbrook is discussing options to facilitate the preservation and public use of The Preserve.

Governor Malloy said that he is asking the General Assembly to take action this session to authorize an agreement with TPL that will transfer a vast majority of The Preserve to the state and the Town of Old Saybrook for joint ownership and management of these critical lands.

“We appreciate the strong interest that the residents of Old Saybrook have in protecting this property and the willingness of the town to make funds available to help us accomplish this goal,” Governor Malloy said.  “The agreement we envision will allow for a positive and productive partnership between the state and the town that will provide lasting benefits for everyone.”

Other parties that strongly supported the purchase and protection of The Preserve include the Old Saybrook Land Trust, the Connecticut Fund for the Environment/Save the Sound, The Alliance for Sound Area Planning, Audubon Connecticut, and The Nature Conservancy.

Support for Acquisition of The Preserve

“The purchase of The Preserve will ensure that these unique and environmentally valuable and sensitive lands will be protected in perpetuity,” said DEEP Commissioner Robert Klee.  “Connecticut is fortunate to have an active and effective land conservation community that has played a key role in preserving thousands of acres across our state and paved the way for action on The Preserve.”

“For years, this fight was a long and lonely one, a seeming endless uphill battle for citizen activists dedicated to preserving this true treasure,” Senator Richard Blumenthal said.  “Governor Malloy is demonstrating a strong commitment to protecting pristine, environmentally significant land in Connecticut.  I have fought development of The Preserve for many years and commend the state’s aggressive action to permanently stop any development of this unique asset.”

“While walking along The Preserve land yesterday with members of the Old Saybrook community, it couldn’t have been more clear that this breathtaking open space needs to be protected for our future generations,” said Senator Chris Murphy.  “This forest land is the idea place to spend an afternoon hiking, exploring, and observing Connecticut’s natural beauty. I’ve been committed to open space protection issues since my days as a state official and I know how committed the land preservation community has been to protecting The Preserve. Today’s announcement is a huge win for the Old Saybrook community, and I commend all those who worked to make this possible.”

Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro, Co-Chair of the Long Island Sound Caucus, said, “The Long Island Sound is a regional and a national treasure and protecting The Preserve will ensure this pristine and vibrant ecosystem is available for future Americans to enjoy.  I applaud the Town of Old Saybrook and Governor Malloy for prioritizing the future of this beautiful area.”

Attorney General George Jepsen said, “Open space preservation not only conserves critical habitat and environmental features, it also contributes to the character of our state.  The Preserve is an important and unique area of our state, and I commend Governor Malloy and all the partners involved for crafting a proposal to protect it for future generations.”

“After a long battle to protect The Preserve, it’s heartening to see the pieces falling into place to finally conserve this extraordinary resource once and for all,” said Don Strait, President of Connecticut Fund for the Environment.  “An opportunity like this comes along once in a generation.  This state funding will join with support from citizens who value The Preserve’s miles of woodland trail and the habitats it provides to bobcats, hawks, and rare amphibians.  It’s an amazing example of what ordinary people can do when they band together to protect the land they love.”

Bill Arnold, President of the Kent Land Trust, said, “I thank Governor Malloy and commend him for his commitment to protecting The Preserve.  As the Governor well knows, this is a unique natural area with a long list of features which are important to conserve.  Acquiring it for public benefit will help protect habitat and water quality as well as provide excellent outdoor recreation opportunities for all Connecticut residents.”

Background on The Preserve

The Preserve consists of approximately 1,000 acres of land along Long Island Sound in three towns: 926 acres in Old Saybrook; 71 acres in Essex; and four acres in Westbrook.

The Preserve was the subject of development proposals dating back to 1998, including plans to build more than 200 homes and an 18-hole golf course. These plans met with strong opposition and lawsuits from conservation groups and residents. Over the years, multiple attempts were made to acquire the land for conservation, but an agreement was never reached and efforts to develop the property continued.

The Preserve includes 38 vernal pools, 114 acres of wetlands, more than 3,100 linear feet of watercourses, high quality coastal forest, and an Atlantic White Cedar swamp.  The dense canopy of forest and the Pequot Swamp Pond act as a critical refueling stop for many migratory birds, and the many freshwater seeps on the property are home to amphibian species such as the northern dusky salamander, spotted turtles, and box turtles. In all, more than 100 species of amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds thrive on this property, some of which are state-listed species of special concern and others of which are declining in other areas of the state.

In addition to its recreational and habitat resources, The Preserve provides important water quality benefits to residents.  Surface waters on the property drain to three different watersheds: the Oyster River, Mud River and Trout Brook, as they make their way to Long Island Sound.  The protection of The Preserve will ensure that stormwater on the site is recharged to local aquifers.  An aquifer protection area is located just east of the Preserve and supplies an average of 200,000 gallons per day of drinking water to Old Saybrook and surrounding communities.

The Preserve also offers benefits for coastal resiliency in the face of climate change, and conservation of it will ensure lessened stormwater impacts from hurricanes and other intense storms.  It is located in the area designated by FEMA’s Hurricane Sandy Impact Analysis as having experienced “high impact” from Superstorm Sandy.  The Preserve acts act as a sponge for stormwater, releasing it slowly into the tributaries and rivers that lead to the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound, protecting downstream property owners from flooding.

Essex Savings Bank Supports Essex Garden Club Project

2014-04-24 15.13.10

The Essex Savings Bank’s grant of $700 has generously supported the Essex Garden Club’s special project of purchasing and planting two Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum “Bloodgood”.  These trees were planted in front of the Town Hall to enhance its appearance with the graceful round shape and colorful foliage of the Japanese Maple. Though separate from the Town Campus project, these trees will complement the overall changes.

As it matures the Acer palmatum ‘Bloodgood’ grows to a height and spread of 20 feet.  The picturesque, multiple grey sub-trucks are particularly showy on a snowy, wintery day.  The foliage displays a red crimson canopy throughout the summer and fall and the bright red samaras (seed pods) add to the ornamental value of the tree.  Palmatum is descriptive of the leaves which are palm like, bearing lobes that fan out from the center.

Greg Shook, President of the Essex Savings Bank told the Essex Garden Club that the Bank was very pleased and fortunate to support its mission of beautifying Essex and specifically the placement of these very special trees.

Essex Savings Bank Announces Community Investment Program Balloting Results

ESSEX - Results of the recent voting by Essex Savings Bank customers who participated in the Bank’s Community Investment Program were announced at a meeting of employees, directors and trustees at the Bank’s Plains Road Office on Thursday, April 17, 2014.

The Top Ten Winners in attendance received special recognition.

The customer balloting portion of Essex Savings Bank’s 2014 Community Investment Program began on February 1 and concluded on March 15.  During the first phase of the program, the Bank’s customers were asked to select from a list of 85 qualified non-profit organizations that made application to the Bank.

Gregory R. Shook, President and Chief Executive Officer of Essex Savings Bank stated, “At Essex Savings Bank, we believe the way to move the world forward is by giving back.  Our Community Investment Program is designed to provide vital financial support to those organizations that enhance the quality of life in our communities.”

Each year the Bank donates 10% of its after tax net income to non-profit organizations within the immediate market area consisting of Chester, Deep River, Essex, Lyme, Madison, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and Westbrook.   According to Thomas Lindner, Vice President and Community Relations Officer for Essex Savings Bank, 8,481 votes were cast this year.  Mr. Lindner stated that $67,013 is to be disbursed during the month of April based on ballot results.  The remaining $156,360 will be distributed over the year by the Directors, Senior Management, Branch Managers and Essex Financial Services.  By year end 2014, $223,373 will have been allocated to over 200 organizations bringing the total distribution since the inception of the program in 1996 to $3,896,917.

Essex Savings Bank is a FDIC insured, state chartered, mutual savings bank established in 1851.  The Bank serves the Connecticut River Valley and Shoreline with six offices in Essex (2), Chester, Madison, Old Lyme and Old Saybrook.  Financial, estate, insurance and retirement planning are offered throughout the state by the Bank’s Trust Department and subsidiary Essex Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA, SIPC.  Investments in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and annuities are not FDIC insured, may lose value, are not a deposit, have no Bank guarantee and are not insured by any Federal Government Agency.

 

Organization # Votes $Amount
1 The Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries 801  $       6,329
2 Forgotten Felines, Inc. 437           3,453
3 Valley Shore Animal Welfare League 294           2,323
4 High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc. 287           2,268
5 Tait’s Every Animal Matters (TEAM) 287           2,268
6 Estuary Council of Seniors, Inc. – Meals on Wheels 281           2,220
7 Old Saybrook Fire Company Number One, Inc. 261           2,062
8 Pet Connections, Inc. 217           1,715
9 Dog Days Adoption Events, Inc. 210           1,659
10 Essex Fire Engine Company #1 210           1,659
11 Camp Hazen YMCA 191           1,509
12 Bikes for Kids, Inc. 189           1,493
13 Essex Library Association 166           1,312
14 Essex Ambulance Association, Inc. 164           1,296
15 Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley, Inc. (VNLV) 158           1,248
16 Ivoryton Playhouse Foundation, Inc. 155           1,225
17 Lyme Ambulance Association, Inc. 151           1,193
18 Bushy Hill Nature Center 148           1,169
19 The Lyme Fire Company, Inc. 145           1,146
20 Graduation Night, Inc. – Old Saybrook 128           1,011
21 Valley-Shore YMCA 128           1,011
22 Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library Association 115              909
23 Lyme Land Conservation Trust, Inc. 112              885
24 Old Saybrook Land Trust, Inc. 108              853
25 The Deep River Fire Department 102              806
26 Friends of the Acton Public Library 96              759
27 Literacy Volunteers – Valley Shore, CT, Inc. 93              735
28 Chester Historical Society 91              719
29 Community Music School 87              687
30 The Connecticut River Museum at Steamboat Dock 87              687
31 Tri-Town Youth Services Bureau, Inc. 85              672
32 Old Saybrook Historical Society 83              656
33 Deep River Ambulance Association, Inc. 82              648
34 Lyme-Old Lyme Education Foundation 79              624
35 Common Good Gardens, Inc. 77              608
36 Friends of Hammonasset, Inc. 76              601
37 The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, Inc. 76              601
38 Essex Elementary School Foundation, Inc. 73              577
39 Essex Community Fund, Inc. 72              569
40 Old Saybrook Education Foundation 72              569
41 The Region 4 Education Foundation, Inc. (R4EF) 72              569
42 Florence Griswold Museum 69              545
43 Lyme Public Library, Inc. 69              545
44 Valley Baseball-Softball Booster Club, Inc. 67              529
45 Lyme Art Association, Inc. 66              521
46 Lyme-Old Lyme Safe Graduation Party, Inc. 64              506
47 Essex Historical Society, Inc. 62              490

 

Organization # Votes $Amount
48 Madison Community Services, Inc. 60              474
49 Old Lyme Historical Society, Inc. 60              474
50 Westbrook Youth and Family Services, Inc. 59              466
51 Old Lyme Children’s Learning Center, Inc. 58              458
52 Chester Land Trust, Inc. 56              442
53 Lyme Public Hall Association, Inc. 54              427
54 Friends of the Chester Public Library, Inc. 51              403
55 Deep River Historical Society, Inc. 49              387
56 Sister Cities Essex Haiti, Inc. 47              371
57 Scranton Library, Madison (aka E.C. Scranton Memorial Library) 45              356
58 CDE (Chester, Deep River, Essex) Cooperative Nursery School 44              348
59 Westbrook Project Graduation, Inc. 43              340
60 Friends In Service Here (F.I.S.H.) 42              332
61 Vista Vocational & Life Skills Center, Inc. 41              324
62 The Country School, Inc. 40              316
63 Deep River Junior Ancient Fife & Drum Corps, Inc. 39              308
64 Madison Ambulance Association, Inc. 38              300
65 Act II Thrift Shop, Inc. 35              277
66 Essex Elementary School Parent-Teacher Organization, Inc. 35              277
67 Maritime Education Network, Inc. 35              277
68 Brazilian and American Youth Cultural Exchange (BRAYCE) 34              269
69 Lymes’ Elderly Housing, Inc. (Lymewood) 34              269
70 Camp Claire, Inc. 30              237
71 Hope Partnership, Inc. 30              237
72 Deep River Land Trust, Inc. 27              213
73 The Madison ABC Program, Incorporated (aka Madison A Better Chance, Inc.) 27              213
74 The Touchdown Club, Inc. (Valley Regional High School/    Old Lyme High School Football) 26              205
75 Madison Land Conservation Trust, Inc. 24              190
76 Deep River Elementary PTO, Inc. 23              182
77 Essex Winter Series, Inc. 23              182
78 The Essex Art Association, Incorporated 22              174
79 Musical Masterworks, Inc. 21              166
80 Potapaug Audubon Society 19              150
81 The Woman’s Exchange of Old Lyme 16              126
82 Tracy Art Center, Inc. 15              119
83 The Madison Foundation, Inc. 14              111
84 Madison Historical Society, Inc. 13              103
85 The Deacon John Grave Foundation 9                71

John W. Rafal Ranked 12th in Barron’s Special Report on the Top 100 Financial Advisors

John Rafal, long term resident of Old Lyme and the Founder and current Vice Chair of Essex Financial Services, has been ranked 12th in Barron’s special report of the nation’s Top 100 Financial Advisors.

John Rafal, long term resident of Old Lyme and the Founder and current Vice Chair of Essex Financial Services, has been ranked 12th in Barron’s special report of the nation’s Top 100 Financial Advisors.

Essex – Barron’s, the acclaimed financial and investment newsweekly, has published the 2014 list of America’s Top 100 Financial Advisors, and John W. Rafal of Essex, Connecticut, is ranked number 12. Very few independent advisors, such as John Rafal, were included in the list, which is mostly composed of advisors from the major wire house firms.

Mr. Rafal is the Founder and current Vice Chair of Essex Financial Services, which is owned by Essex Savings Bank. The ranking appears in the April 21 edition of Barron’s
(www.barrons.com).

In the story accompanying the list, Barron’s noted that John Rafal was among a small group of financial advisors who have appeared on the top 100 list every year since inception in 2004.

“I am gratified to Barron’s for the recognition and accept the honor on behalf of the entire team at Essex Financial Services,” said John Rafal. “I want to express my sincere thanks to our clients, many of whom we have represented for over 30 years. It’s a privilege to earn and retain your trust.”

Doug Paul, Chairman of the Board of Essex Savings Bank, which also owns Essex Financial Services, stated, “The Barron’s ranking is a testament to John Rafal and the entire team at Essex Financial Services. On behalf of the entire board and management team, I want to offer our congratulations to John Rafal.”

Essex Financial Services, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Essex Savings Bank, is one of the leading independent financial advisory firms in the country

I Ought To be In Pictures At The Ivoryton Playhouse

Mike Boland and Jeanie Rapp (Photo by Anne Hudson)

Mike Boland and Jeanie Rapp (Photo by Anne Hudson)

Ivoryton: What’s a daughter to do when she wants to get in touch with her father who she hasn’t seen in 16 years and who lives 3,000 miles away? Well, if you’re Libby Tucker you hitch hike and bus your way across the country with nothing but a backpack full of dreams and spare socks. Libby travels from Brooklyn to Los Angeles ostensibly to break into movies but mostly because she needs to find out why her dad and left, and does he still love her.

I Ought To Be in Pictures opened in New York in April 1980, and in 1982 was turned into a movie starring Walter Matthau and Ann-Margret. This is Neil Simon at his best – poignant and funny. For dads and daughters everywhere, this will be a memory to treasure.

I Ought To Be In Pictures opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on April 23and runs through May 11. Directed by Ivoryton favorite, R. Bruce Connelly, the cast includes Mike Boland* as Herb, whose Broadway credits include An Enemy of the People at Manhattan Theater Club and the national tours of Twelve Angry Men and West Side Story; Siobhan Fitzgerald*, making her Ivoryton debut as Libby and Jeanie Rapp*, founder and artistic director of Margreta Stage who was last seen in Ivoryton in Love, Loss & What I Wore*, as Steffy.

The set design is by William Stark, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costumes by Kari Crowther.

Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2pm. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30pm, Fridayand Saturday at 8pm. Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website atwww.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Deep River Ambulance Offers Emergency Medical Technician Certification Class

Deep River Ambulance is pleased to offering an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Certification Class.

Classes will be held Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:00 – 10:00pm, beginning June 6 and running through August 21 at Deep River Ambulance Headquarters, 284 West Elm Street.  The cost for the course is $795, which includes tuition, CPR certification, textbook, class uniform shirt and stethoscope.

If you’ve ever wanted to become medically certified and join your local Emergency Medical Services (either ambulance or fire department), now is the time! No previous medical training is necessary.

For more information and registration form, please contact the course instructor, Emily Masters, at (860) 526-3275.

The River Valley Slimdown: Winter Winners and New Summer Challenge

Deep River, CT- Participants of the most recent IFoundFitness River Valley Slimdown laughed in the face of the “Polar Vortex” and showed those dreaded winter pounds who’s boss! With a jackpot higher than ever before, the dedicated group of health-seekers brought in cash, prizes, and a generous donation to the Shoreline Soup Kitchen!

The River Valley Slimdown is a fitness challenge regularly held at IFoundFitness in Deep River, CT. Participants contribute towards a jackpot, paying up for pounds gained or weigh-ins missed. They work closely with fitness expert Donna Scott, taking part in group fitness & nutrition classes, while bonding with their weight-loss companions!

Twenty participants saw the challenge through the end this brutal winter, bringing the jackpot total to $2,392. Almost $500 of this went to Shoreline Soup Kitchen, the charity selected by the group. The winner of the challenge, Sarina, lost 21.04% of her body weight! While she takes home 60% of the jackpot, ESSENCE of Old Saybrook will also be treating her to a makeup and hair makeover to match her healthy new glow.

Second place went to “Santa Dave.” This, jolly, bearded fellow dropped his stereotypical belly by losing 35 pounds! Dave takes home 60% of the jackpot and a massage by True of Clinton, CT but the most incredible reward was bringing his Type 2 Diabetes under control.

“This has been an absolutely amazing challenge!” says Donna. “In the face of one of our worst winters, these guys just would not give in! Even those that didn’t finish in the top 3 experienced incredible transformations. They’re STILL not ready to give up!”

Many participants are ready to go for round two already! Registration for the Summer River Valley Slimdown is open now, with the challenge launching on April 26th.  Signing on for the new challenge means participants will have a chance to shed the winter pounds justin time to trade those bulky winter coats for sleek swimsuits!

Registration is currently open for the Summer 2014 River Valley Slimdown. Email Donna at donna@ifoundfitness.com for complete rules and registration forms.

For more information on the River Valley Slimdown, please visit: http://ifoundfitness.com/rv-slim-down/

Sen. Linares Hosts Workshop to Help Seniors Learn New Technologies

LinaresApr4OldSaybrookseniors

Sen. Art Linares and AT&T Connecticut representatives hosted an April 4 event in Old Saybrook to help seniors learn how to use their cell phones and other new technologies to stay connected with family and friends. The free workshop at the Estuary Council of Seniors was attended by more than 25 seniors. “These new technologies are exciting and they can help seniors stay connected to family and friends like never before,” said Sen. Linares. “But sometimes learning about a new technology can be difficult, and that’s why this event was aimed at helping demonstrate new technologies and answering questions about how to use them. I thank area seniors for stopping by.” Those who could not attend the workshop may contact Sen. Linares at 800 842 1421 or at Art.Linares@cga.ct.gov .

Essex Tree Warden Rules on Mares Hill Road Tree Removal

Mares 2In an effort to promote greater collaboration within the community, Augie Pampel, Essex Tree Warden, called a public hearing on March 19, 2014 in accordance with Chapter 451, Section 23-59 of the Connecticut General Statutes and in response to public complaints about the planned removal/pruning of approximately 40 trees on Town owned land adjacent to Mares Hill Road, Ivoryton Ct., between #5 and #72 address locations. CL&P requested the removal of these trees to satisfy the trimming/removal specifications they follow on the road.

The hearing gave members of the public a chance to voice their concerns and CL&P a chance to provide an understanding of the specifications that are used for “Enhanced Tree Trimming (“ETT”). ETT is a severe form of trimming calling for an eight foot clearance zone on either side of the conductors and ground to sky.

Susan Stotts, the CL&P representative, presented slides of the various trees under consideration, indicating those she thought should be removed and those that could remain.

Augie Pampel reported at the hearing that he was authorized to make a decision about the trees within three days following the hearing, considering the public’s input and after a walk-through of the trees with Susan Stotts. His decision would be based on the health of the trees including diseases as well as structural issues. He initially estimated that 20-25 of the trees might stay but each tree would need to be examined to make the final determination. He noted that the Town owns 20 feet on both sides of the road and that all the trees designated for removal are on Town property.

People raised concerns about the ground to sky regulation which was considered extreme and worried that the result would be the same as on route 153. Also some expressed concern about the impact of tree removal on the soil environment, water runoff and possible flooding if the soil becomes less absorbent. Other questions about a plan to plant new trees and the payment of the tree removal were raised.

Augie noted that the Town tries to replace as much as is possible and that CL&P pays for the tree work, leaving the wood for people to collect. The contractor for CL&P will follow CL&P specifications. Nonetheless, Augie and Susan Stotts will consider the residents’ wishes to maintain the country road appearance when examining the trees. Augie clarified that the tree work done on Melody Lane and Hickory Lane was done on private property with the consent of the property owners.

Augie informed the public that there are no other Essex streets being considered for tree removal at this time. CL&P looks at streets with 40 or more customers and considers liability issues.

The general consensus at the hearing was that as many trees as possible should be preserved to maintain the country road affect while keeping in mind the necessity to avoid power loss and maintain access due to fallen trees.

Since the hearing, Augie Pampel, as Tree Warden examined the trees and posted the final decision on March 21, 2014, regarding the tree removal on Mares Hill Road. Based on a review of all trees posted for removal, 17 will stay. The remaining trees will be removed because “they either have defects sufficient to warrant removal, or the CL&P ETT specification requires that they be removed.” Augie will issue a removal permit to the CL&P contractor with this decision detail.

Mares 5

Though this is the final decision of the Essex Tree Warden, it should be noted that Chapter 451, Section 23-59 of the Connecticut General Statutes states ‘…the Tree Warden shall render his decision granting or denying the application, and the party aggrieved by such a decision may, within ten days, appeal therefrom to the superior court or the judicial district within which such town or borough is located.’”

The Essex residents, and especially those on Mares Hills Road will still enjoy a full canopy of trees despite the loss of 23 trees. That 17 were saved is a testament to the efforts of citizens, CL&P and the Tree Warden to work together to come to the best resolution.

If anyone has further concerns or questions about this decision or wishes to contact Augie Pampel about other concerns related to town trees (trees not on state roads), please contact him at augiepampel@att.net. When possible, Augie will provide advance notice to the public through the media of future CL&P requests for tree trimming and removal.

 

Talking Transportation: Eight Little Known Facts About Flying

We may never know what happened to that Malaysia Airlines 777, but there’s plenty more we should know about flying, even domestically.  Here are some little-known truths of aviation as shared by pilots and flight attendants:

Lavatory Doors Don’t Really Lock:  They can be opened from the outside by just sliding the “occupied” sign to one side.  This isn’t so attendants can catch “mile high club” wannabies, but so they can be sure the lavs are empty on take-off and landing.  And those ashtrays in the lavs?  Even though smoking has been banned for decades, the FAA still requires them. 

Oxygen Masks Can Save Your Life:  But only if you get them on fast!  In a rapid decompression at 35,000 feet, the oxygen is sucked from your lungs and you have 15 – 30 seconds to get that mask on or die.  And the on-board oxygen is only good for 15 minutes, so expect an express ride down to safer altitudes.

Airlines Are Suffering from a Pilot Shortage:  New regulations for increased rest time and more experience aviators are making it tough for airlines to keep their cockpits filled.  Boeing alone estimates that aviation growth worldwide will create demand for a half-million new pilots.  And just like Metro-North, airlines are now losing their most experienced crews to retirement.

Your Pilot May Be Asleep:  Actually, that’s a good thing during most of the flight, which can be pretty boring as the auto-pilot runs the plane.  And a good nap should make your pilot refreshed for landing.  But the FAA is also proposing to test ‘heavy’ pilots for potential sleep disorders so they don’t nod off at a crucial moment.

Keep Your Seatbelt On:   Otherwise, unexpected turbulence will see you bounce off the luggage racks like a ping-pong ball.  In an incident like that the hysterical screaming is bad enough, so stay belted.

Flight Attendants Aren’t In It for the Glamour: .They don’t get paid when they arrive at the airport or when they greet you boarding the plane.  For most, their pay starts ticking only at take-off.  They travel for a living and have to endure endless abuse for things that are not their fault.  For all that, median salary for flight attendants is about $37,000.  Food stamps they have to apply for separately.

Planes Are Germ Factories: Most older jets recycle cabin air to conserve fuel, so if one passenger sneezes, everyone’s susceptible to a cold.  The air is also dry and the blankets and pillows (if you get them) haven’t been cleaned since the previous use.  The same is true of the headphones they pass out.  And your seatback tray table?  Just imagine whose baby diaper was seated there where you lay out your in-flight snack.  Moral to the story:  BYO sanitizer!

Don’t Drink the Water:      Unless it comes from a bottle, water on planes comes from onboard tanks that are rarely cleaned.  At least when they use it to make coffee it’s heated.  Again, BYO.

Overall, based on passenger miles, flying is the safest form of transportation in the world.  But it’s not without its risks, some of which you can help minimize using common sense.

 JIM CAMERON has been a Darien resident for 22 years.  He is the founder of the Commuter Action Group and also serves on the Darien RTM.  The opinions expressed in this column are only his own.  You can reach him at CommuterActionGroup@gmail.com  

Mobile Dental Services returning to Goodwin Elementary, Old Saybrook

The Community Health Center, Inc. (CHC) has recently announced that its Mobile Dental program will be returning to Old Saybrook Public Schools, specifically Goodwin Elementary, once again after a three year hiatus. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, early childhood cavities are the most common chronic disease in children and although noteworthy improvements have been made in the past decade, oral health significance is still being overlooked. One major way CHC has helped increase children’s access to oral health services is through the mobile dental program which brings dental services directly to over 170 Connecticut Schools. Founded in 2002, the Mobile Dental Program currently serves over 7,000 patients throughout the state. CHC also has a dental office located on Main Street in Old Saybrook which would operate as a referral site for mobile dental.

“Our Mobile Dental Program comes directly into the child’s school, providing dental cleanings, sealants and in some cases, restorative services. The Program allows parents to stay at work, and the kids to stay in school,” stated Justin Gooley, the program manager for the statewide Mobile Dental program. “Often parents will not have the time to take off from work to bring their children to the dentist. We bring dental care to the child in a setting where they are most comfortable. We work hand in hand with the onsite Dentists,” mentioned Gooley. Mobile Dental services have been funded through different Connecticut Health Foundation grants which work to support the integration of oral health at every point where children and their families intersect with health care, human service and education systems.

Mobile dental is part of the School-based health services that are offered through The Community Health Center, Inc. These services are a proven strategy for reducing school absences, improving performance, and reducing health disparities in prevention and chronic diseases in children and adolescents. “If the child has regular dental visits with one of our Mobile Dental Hygienists, it will significantly lower the amount of decay in their mouth and decrease the number of days they are absent from school,” said Justin Gooley.

The first step is sending out enrollment forms to the elementary school and spreading the word about these services for Goodwin Elementary students. The goal is to operate within the Middle and High school in Old Saybrook within the next few years. Mobile dental care coordinators have been working with the schools, town social workers, the nursing supervisor for the town and parent representatives to help market these services and encourage registration. For more information about the Mobile Dental Program at CHC please call (860)224-3642 ext. 5163 or email GooleyJ@chc1.com .

About Community Health Center, Inc.

Since 1972, Community Health Center, Inc. has been one of the leading healthcare providers in the state of Connecticut, building a world-class primary health care system committed to caring for uninsured and underserved populations. CHC is focused on improving health outcomes for its more than 130,000 patients as well as building healthy communities. Recognized as both a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home by the National Committee for Quality Assurance and a Primary Care Medical Home by The Joint Commission, CHC delivers service in more than 200 locations statewide, offering primary care in medical, dental and behavioral health services. For more information, visit www.chc1.com.

 

Lyme Democrats Endorse Bjornberg, Stone

Emily Bjornberg

Emily Bjornberg

In addition to endorsing those democratic incumbent state office holders who have announced their intent to run for reelection, the Lyme Democratic Caucus endorsed two newcomers to the State scene: Mary Stone for State Representative, and Emily Bjornberg for State Senate.

The chairman of the Caucus, Steven Mattson, commented, “We are extremely pleased to endorse state legislative candidates as well qualified as Mary and Emily,”

Emily Bjornberg is a Lyme resident and is running for the seat once held by Eileen Dailey. “Emily is an exceptionally strong candidate, and we are confident she will be a superior Senator for the 33rd Senate District,” according to Mattson. The 33rd district covers Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland and Westbrook. The seat is currently held by Republican Art Linares.

Mary Stone is an Old Lyme resident, who is running for the 23rd Assembly District consisting of Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and part of Westbrook. This is an open seat, due to the decision of Marilyn Giuliani not to seek reelection.

“Mary is the perfect candidate for this district,” according to Claire Sauer, who represented much of this district when she represented the 36th Assembly District.

Stone currently serves on the Old Lyme Zoning Board of Appeals and is a former member of the Region 18 Board of Education.

Valley Shore YMCA Marlins Compete in New England Championships

The Valley Shore YMCA Marlins swim team enjoyed a busy and successful championship season. Twelve athletes qualified to swim in the New England YMCA Championships held at MIT in Cambridge, MA held March 15-16 and 22-23. Top accolades go to Jessica Lee of Old Lyme for her 1st place finish in the girls 15 and over 50 yard freestyle event and 7th in the 100 yard freestyle. Other notable finishes include Kyle Wisialowski of Old Saybrook finishing 4th in the boys 9-10 year old 50 yard fly, 4th in 100 yard fly, and 6th in 100 yard individual medley; Kaeleigh O’Donnell of Essex earning 4th in the girls 9-10 year old 100 yard breast stroke and 6th in the 50 yard breastroke; Helen Day of Old Saybrook earning 4th place in girls 9-10 year old 100 yard individual medley and 8th in the 100 yard backstroke; Mike Healey of Madison finishing 5th in boys 13-14 200 yard individual medley; and Kayla Mendonca of Madison finishing 8th in girls 11-12 year old 100 yard butterfly.

Accolades also go to the ten Marlin swimmers who qualified to compete in the US Swimming Connecticut Age Group Championships which include top swimmers from all regions of the state. Daniel Chen, Kayla Mendonca, Michael Healey of Madison; Nick Husted, Christopher Thomson, Kyle Wisialowski of Old Saybrook; Peter Fuchs, Jessica Lee of Old Lyme; Kaeleigh O’Donnell of Essex; and Robert May of Guilford qualified for this short course season championship event.

Four of the team’s senior athletes, Nick Husted, Christopher Thomson, Jessica Lee and Peter Fuchs, qualified for the Connecticut Senior Championships.

The Valley Shore YMCA Long Course season (competing in 50 meter pools) starts in mid-April and the team welcomes aspiring swimmers to come by the Y, located in Westbrook, to try out and learn more about our program. For more information, please visit our website at www.vsymarlins.org or call 860-399-9622

 

Chester and Old Saybrook Receive $5K Energy Efficiency Grants

 L-R: Commissioner Robert Klee, Department of Energy and Environmental Protection; Richard Holloway from the Chester Conservation Commission; Chester First Selectman Edward Meehan and Tilak Subrahmanian, Vice President of Energy Efficiency at Northeast Utilities.

L-R: Commissioner Robert Klee, Department of Energy and Environmental Protection; Richard Holloway from the Chester Conservation Commission; Chester First Selectman Edward Meehan and Tilak Subrahmanian, Vice President of Energy Efficiency at Northeast Utilities.

Chester and Old Saybrook were among twenty-three Connecticut municipalities who were recognized during a ceremony Tuesday at the State Capitol for their participation in the statewide Clean Energy Communities program, an Energize Connecticut initiative that incentivizes cities and towns to support energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Municipal leaders from the communities were joined by their state senators and representatives to celebrate their city or town earning its first “Bright Idea Grant” through the program. These communities earned the grants based on the level of community participation in Energize CT programs. Bright Idea Grants awarded range from $5,000 to $15,000 and can be used toward a community selected energy saving project.

Together these cities and towns have collectively saved more than 277 million kilowatt-hours of electricity and 2.8 million Ccf (one Ccf = 100 cubic feet) of natural gas through their energy efficiency efforts. Those savings are equivalent to the amount of power 33,000 homes would typically consume in one year, and result in avoided emissions of approximately 152,500 tons of CO2, which is the equivalent of taking 26,500 cars off Connecticut’s roads for a year.

“These cities and towns prove that energy efficiency can benefit an entire community, and we hope they encourage every municipality across Connecticut to join this valuable program,” said Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner Robert Klee. “Not only have these communities lowered energy use and costs overall, but have now earned money toward future projects that will help them use energy more efficiently.”

Under the Clean Energy Communities program, municipalities sign a pledge to reduce municipal building energy consumption by 20 percent by 2018, and to attain 20 percent of municipal electricity from renewable sources by 2018. Through community-wide participation in energy-saving and renewable energy programs, including resident and business participation, the community receives points toward rewards. For every 100 points earned through participation in energy efficiency programs, a community is eligible to receive a Bright Idea Grant. Similarly, for every 100 points earned through participation in renewable initiatives, a community can receive a renewable energy system equivalent to a one kilowatt solar photovoltaic system.

The nationally recognized Clean Energy Communities program expanded in 2012 to include energy efficiency. To date, 93 Connecticut cities and towns have signed the new pledge to support both renewable and energy efficiency initiatives.

Following the signing of the pledge, Clean Energy Communities program administrators work with municipalities to establish a local Clean Energy Task Force and aid them in developing a plan of action to reduce overall energy consumption, support renewable energy, and earn rewards for their efforts. Program administrators often host workshops at local public libraries and other municipal buildings to educate residents and businesses on available energy-saving and renewable energy programs that can help them earn points for their community.

The following Connecticut municipalities were recognized for earning a Bright Idea Grant during the March 24, 2014 ceremony at the State Capitol in Hartford:

$5,000

Ashford, Bridgewater, Chester, Coventry, Derby, Goshen, Litchfield, Old Saybrook, Sharon and Thomaston

$10,000

Brookfield, Cheshire, Rocky Hill, Suffield, Watertown, Windham and Wolcott

$15,000

Bristol, New Britain, New Haven, Shelton, Waterbury and West Haven

For more information on the Clean Energy Communities program, visit EnergizeCT.com/communities.

About Energize Connecticut

Energize Connecticut helps you save money and use clean energy. It is an initiative of the Energy Efficiency Fund, the Clean Energy Finance & Investment Authority, the State, and your local electric and gas utilities, with funding from a charge on customer energy bills. Information on energy-saving programs can be found at EnergizeCT.com or by calling 1.877.WISE.USE.

Talking Transportation: The Feds Deep Dive into Metro-North

Jim CameronIt was worse than we’d ever known. Metro-North was almost an accident waiting to happen.

That summarizes the Federal Railway Administration’s “Operation Deep Dive” report issued last week, following 60 days of probing into every aspect of the railroad’s operations. All of this comes on the heels of collisions and derailments in the past year that have taken the lives of four commuters and two railroad workers.

The 28-page report confirms that what was wrong at Metro-North was not just old equipment but a failure of management with very misplaced priorities. “On-time performance” was what mattered most, even at the expense of safety.

Among the report’s findings…

• Half of the personnel who dispatch and monitor the trains have less than three years’ experience, are not properly trained and are so tired they make mistakes

• The railroad’s “safety culture” was “poor”. Safety meetings went unattended.

• Fatigue by train engineers, track workers and dispatchers may have affected performance.

• The trains themselves are in good shape, but the tracks are not.

I’ve been following Metro-North for more than 20 years, so much of this is not news to me but just a substantiation of my worst fears. Still, the report makes for interesting reading because it cites many examples as proof-points for these findings:

Metro-North has known for a decade that they were facing a “retirement cliff” with 20% of its employees, those with the most experience, reaching their 30th anniversary of employment to retire on fat pensions. But the railroad was clearly inadequate in hiring and training their replacements.

Fatigue becomes a factor because soon-to-retire veterans grab all the overtime they can in their final year to increase their income and their railroad pensions. They are among the oldest employees and least resilient.

Metro-North’s management wasn’t even enforcing its own rules. The report says employees were “confused” about cell phone use on the job. Any teenager studying for his driver’s license knows not to use a cell phone while driving, but track workers at Metro-North got away with it.

Additional funding for staff and infrastructure are important and must be found. But turning around a culture of lax enforcement and lip-service to safety is going to take more than money.

Only a month on the job, espousing “safety is our top priority” at every turn, the new President of Metro-North, Joseph Giulietti, recently saw the first fatal accident on his watch: a track worker, 8 years on the job, was struck by a train just outside the Park Avenue tunnel. Why?

There are no quick fixes to this mess. It took years of invisible neglect for Metro-North to slide into this abyss, and it will take years to rebuild the railroad and regain riders’ trust.

JIM CAMERON has been a Darien resident for 22 years. He is the founder of the Commuter Action Group and also serves on the Darien RTM. The opinions expressed in this column are only his own. You can reach him at CommuterActionGroup@gmail.com

 

The Tri-Town Parent Survey: A Win-Win Proposition

surveyAre you a parent or guardian of a Pre-K to 12th grade student in the tri-town area? The Tri-Town Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition invites you to participate in a brief, anonymous and confidential survey that asks about your experiences, perceptions and challenges in raising children in Chester, Deep River and Essex. Located on the Tri-Town Youth Services website (www.tritownys.org) from March 28 through April 30, the survey will help the Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition better understand what information, resources and services parents actually need to keep our young people healthy, happy and substance free. Tri-Town has designed the survey process to be a win-win proposition. Parents who take the survey—a win for our community—are then invited to enter Tri-Town’s drawing to win one $100 gift card, or one of four $25 gift cards. The Coalition thanks parents in advance for contributing to the well-being of our tri-town youth and families!

Tri-Town Youth Services supports and advances the families, youth and communities of Chester, Deep River and Essex.  We coordinate and provide resources needed to make positive choices, reduce substance abuse, and strengthen the relationships that matter most.  Discover programs and information for families, as well as opportunities for community collaboration at www.tritownys.org

Death Announced of Jean Washburn Hernandez: Essex Resident, Dedicated Volunteer

Jean Washburn Hernandez

Jean Washburn Hernandez

Jean Washburn Hernandez died peacefully on Saturday, March 1, 2014 at her home in Essex Meadows in Essex, Connecticut. She was 93 years old.

Jean was born on September 20, 1920, in Brooklyn, NY, to Lawrence and Margaret Washburn and was the oldest of three sisters. Raised in Montreal, Canada and Scarsdale, New York, she was the 4th generation of women in her family to graduate from Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn Heights, NY. After a childhood bout of polio, she attended Mt. Holyoke College where she contracted tuberculosis. After recuperating in upstate NY and Arizona, she resumed her studies at the University of Arizona.

At the start of WWII Jean enlisted in the American Red Cross and served at an Army Air Force Base in Arizona, at Camp Edwards in Massachusetts, Otis Field on Cape Cod, and at Washington DC’s St. Elizabeth Hospital. In all locations she tended the returning wounded, particularly those impacted by psychological trauma.

Before the war she met her future husband, Silvio E. Hernandez in Havana, Cuba while staying with family friends. She married him in 1946, when he returned from wartime service with the U.S. Army in Europe. They first resided in New York but shortly after the births of their two children were sent by Westinghouse Electric to Madrid, Spain where they remained for 8 years. From there they moved to Havana, her husband’s birthplace, a year before the Cuban Revolution. After being witness to the tumultuous changes brought on by Castro’s policies, they fled in 1960, settling in Essex CT so as to be near Jean’s parents who had retired there. She remained a resident of Essex for 54 years as an active and contributing member of the community.

Jean was a homemaker and dedicated volunteer. She was on the Board of the Florence Griswold Museum, in Old Lyme, CT, where as a volunteer, she initiated and ran a successful travel program for the members of the Museum. She was President of the Essex Garden Club, on the Board of the Essex Library Association, and active with St. John’s Episcopal Church in Essex, the Child and Family Agency of SE CT, and many other charitable and community organizations. Jean and her husband loved to travel and together they enjoyed taking extended trips throughout the world.

Jean was preceded in death by her loving husband of 55 years and more recently by her gentle companion, George (Bud) Lethbridge. She is survived by her daughter Margaret (Maggie) Hernandez of Key Biscayne, FL, son Robert (Laurie) Hernandez of Essex, CT and their sons Alexander and Christopher.

A memorial service will be held May 2, 2014 at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Essex, CT at 10 a.m.

Memorial donations can be made to the Florence Griswold Museum, 96 Lyme St, Old Lyme, CT, 06371

Essex Resident to be Honored at New CT Bar Association Awards Celebration

Attorney Christina M. Storm, Recipient of Connecticut Bar Association Citizen of the Law Award

Attorney Christina M. Storm, Recipient of the Connecticut Bar Association’s Citizen of the Law Award

The Connecticut Bar Association (CBA) is proud to announce Attorney Christina M. Storm as the recipient of this year’s Citizen of the Law Award.

Christina Storm has been a practicing trial lawyer for the last 35 years and is currently a partner at Byrne & Storm PC in Hartford. Her longtime litigation experience covers a wide spectrum of practice areas, including civil and criminal, matrimonial, employment discrimination, and alternative dispute resolution.

As an active member of the CBA throughout the years, Attorney Storm has held membership in the Human Rights and Responsibilities Executive Committee, Pro Bono Committee, Family Law Section, and General Practice Section, and has chaired the International Law Section. She is currently a member of the Alternative Dispute Resolution Section.

In 2000, in a quest to channel more time into pro bono and to provide lawyers around the world the opportunity to do the same, she founded Lawyers Without Borders, an international nonprofit organization with chapters in New Haven, London, and Nairobi, Kenya. Lawyers Without Borders is dedicated to the promotion of the rule of law. The organization, which maintains a commitment to practical, concrete programming that has observable and measurable impact and results, has won the recognition from the United Nations and has placed volunteer lawyers in various countries around the world to help promote the rule of law. She currently serves as the organization’s Executive Director.

The Citizen of the Law Award will be presented to Storm at the CBA’s new annual awards celebration, “Celebrate with the Stars,” on April 3 at Cascade in Hamden sponsored by Geraghty & Bonnano LLC, Attorneys at Law and Kronholm Insurance Services.

For decades, the association has honored leaders in the legal profession for their professional accomplishments and community service as part of the CBA Annual Meeting. This year, a separate event is being dedicated to recognizing Connecticut’s top judges and lawyers who make a difference through their work by demonstrating allegiance, dedication, conscientious service, commitment, and mentorship.

“Celebrate with the Stars” is an exciting occasion where professionals and supporters of the legal industry can mix and mingle with their peers in a lively, celebratory evening out. Other awards to be presented at “Celebrate with the Stars” include: John Eldred Shields Distinguished Professional Service Award, the Henry J. Naruk Judiciary Award, the Charles J. Parker Legal Services Award, the Tapping Reeve Legal Educator Award, and The Anthony V. DeMayo Pro Bono Award.

The recipient of the Citizen of the Law Award must meet the following criteria: be a judge, attorney, or paralegal member of the CBA who has made a significant contribution to a charitable or public service cause that does not involve professional legal skills, but provides inspiration and contributes to the needy, the good of society, the environment, or our way of life. These activities should have been undertaken on a nonprofessional, charitable basis with little or no personal economic reward, and some personal sacrifice.

Attorney Storm was selected based on nominations submitted to the CBA Awards Committee.

The Connecticut Bar Association is a professional association committed to the advancement of justice, the practice of law, the image of the profession, and public understanding of the law. For more information, please visit www.ctbar.org.

Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About a ‘Passive House’

Doug McDonald is a proponent of a ‘Passive House.’

Doug McDonald is a proponent of a ‘Passive House.’

Can you heat a home with a hair dryer? You will find the answer at a free-to-the-public program hosted by the Shoreline League of Democratic Women (SLDW) on Sunday, March 30. Their special guest speaker Douglas Mcdonald of MyCodePlus.com is a Passive House expert and developer, and builds Code Plus homes.

The event will be held at 1:30 p.m., at the Guilford Free Library, 67 Park Street, on the green in Guilford, CT. Mcdonald’s presentation, “What’s So Special about a Passive House?” will cover the core concepts of a passive house, which is extremely insulated and virtually airtight. The design of these homes results in a 90 percent reduction of energy use and minimal bills.

Mcdonald created and lives in one of the first retrofitted passive house in the country, but there are many newly built passive houses in the United States and overseas. There will be a Q & A session at the end of the program.

Developed by Germany’s Passivhaus Institute, the Passive House standard has the most rigorous requirements for green building construction. Mcdonald will share his unique perspective of someone who actually lives in a 3,800-square-foot Passive House. His home was originally built in 1936 by Frank Lloyd Wright protege Barry Bryne, then transformed by Mcdonald into a super energy-efficient dwelling in 2010.

His projects have appeared on the cover of the New York Times Real Estate and selected for the Fine Homebuilding Reader Choice Award. Mcdonald has made guest appearances on The History Channel, where many of his innovative renovation ideas have been featured. With his team of LEED architects and engineers, he applies his unique and world class approach to creating iconic country homes utilizing the best building standards from around the world, including the Passive House standard, at a price comparable to conventional construction.

The Shoreline League of Democratic Women (http://www.sldw.org) is a chapter of the Connecticut Federation of Democratic Women (CFDW), which is a chapter of the National Federation of Democratic Women. The Shoreline League of Democratic Women continues to seek membership from women who live in Clinton, Madison, Guilford, Branford, Killingworth, Old Saybrook, Essex, Westbrook, Chester, Deep River, Old Lyme, and Lyme. SLDW Meetings are held monthly from September through May.

The Shoreline League of Democratic Women is dedicated to educating its members about political and social issues important to women of all ages in Connecticut’s Second District. Women in the local district are encouraged to join the SLDW and participate in the organization’s valuable work in the community. Members can be involved in any capacity, whether it is 30 minutes a month, or 30 minutes a year.

As a part of the SLDW educational charter, members will be notified of important pending state and national legislation. For more information on the Shoreline League of Democratic Women, send email to sldworg@gmail.com or contact Kathleen Skoczen at 860-669-7034 or Belinda Jones at 860-399-1147. Visit their web site at http://www.sldw.org.

Essex Park and Recreation Summer Programs…

It’s almost  that time of year again – Summer!!! Are you and your children ready for Tons of Summer Fun?

Join Essex Park and Recreations as we host a variety of Great Summer Camps. Complete program information including registration, times, dates & fees can be found on our web site: www.essexct.gov. Choose the Department tab then choose Park and Recreation. For More information contact 860-767-4340 x110.

Slamma Jamma Basketball Camp – Join the Valley Regional High School Players & Coaches. The camp is built on individual instruction and fundamentals. The goal of the camps is to provide instruction that will help your child become a better basketball player. As the saying goes “Basketball players are made during the summer and perform in the winter.” Every camper gets a Slamma-Jamma T-shirt, Basketball, and Certificate.

Running Rams Track & Field Camp – Instruction in most of the track and field events from some of the area’s best coaches, eight in all, at one of the finest venues in Connecticut…Valley Regional HS in Deep River, CT. Campers will enjoy plenty of instruction, plenty of snacks, juice, water, plenty of breaks and awards at the conclusion of Friday’s final session.

Summer Tennis Clinics at Valley Regional High School Courts- Tennis Pro Coach Gary Ribchinsky will be teaching the fundamentals of tennis: ground-strokes, volley, serve, and game play in the clinics designed for ages 5 – 15.

Girls LAX Clinic – Join Coach Greg Ruel, along with a coaching staff of USL certified coaches, club coaches & college and high school Players. No prior LAX experience required. Girls will be taught the fundamental and technical skills that will help them to become stronger all—around players. The girls will be put in to different game environments where they will gain confidence and field mobility while increasing their comfort level on the field. Enjoy great coaching, gear food & Fun!! Clinic includes—t-shirt, reversible game pinnie, light food each night, raffle prized and more!! (There will be no goalie play of goalie training at this clinic)

We offer several other great summer programs such as Summer Day Camp with some really great themed activities, field trips and games. Mini Hawk Sports Camp a great way to introduce kids ages 3 -7 to a variety of different sports. Baseball & Softball Camp with “Between the Lines”, Skyhawk’s Multi Sport & Golf is also being offered. Also this summer join the Staff at Shoreline Gymnastics for another great camp designed to teach basic gymnastics skills, while increasing confidence. Coach Mesite & Konstan will once again offer the “Made in the Summer” Girls Basketball Camp. New this summer is our Field Hockey Camp with JWMS teacher & Coach Rebecca Suntheimer, with the popularity of our Fall Clinic this is sure to be a great addition to our summer programming. Again for more information visit our web site www.essexct.gov or contact Park and Recreation 860-767-4340 x110.

Time for another British Invasion! SHOUT! The Mod Musical – Ivoryton Playhouse

Tamala Baldwin*, Mikah Horn, Monica Bradley*, Jennifer Lorae* and Bethany Fitzgerald* * Denotes member of AEA

Tamala Baldwin*, Mikah Horn, Monica Bradley*, Jennifer Lorae* and Bethany Fitzgerald*
* Denotes member of AEA

Ivoryton: The last British raid on Essex was 200 years ago and 27 ships were burned. This year, they are coming back! Not burning ships this time, but definitely shaking up the town with the fab music of London in the 60s and 70s.

SHOUT! is the mod musical magazine that brings back the beautiful birds and smashing sounds that made England swing in the 60′s. Created by Phillip George and David Lowenstein, SHOUT! features terrific new arrangements of such classic tunes as “To Sir With Love,” “Downtown,” “Son of a Preacher Man,” and “Goldfinger.”

SHOUT! travels in time from 1960 to 1970 chronicling the dawning liberation of women. Just as Dusty Springfield, Petula Clark, and Cilla Black were independent women with major careers, English and American women were redefining themselves in the face of changing attitudes about gender. SHOUT! (and its all-female cast) reflects that through the unforgettable music of the time. With a shimmy and shake, the songs are tied together by hilarious sound bites from the period — from 60′s advertisements to letters answered by an advice columnist who thinks every problem can be solved with a “fetching new hair style and a new shade of lipstick.”

The songs in this delightful musical resonate with a timeless quality which appeals to every generation.

The show is directed by Jacqueline Hubbard, musical director is Kyle Norris and choreographer is Cait Collazzo. Set designed by Dan Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costumes by Kari Crowther.

SHOUT! The Mod Musical opens in Ivoryton on March 19th and runs through April 6th. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2pm. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30pm, Friday and Saturday at 8pm. Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.