May 29, 2015

Gala Reception Tonight for Essex Art Association’s Elected Members’ June Show

'The Flying Bergdorfs' by Carol Young.

‘The Flying Bergdorfs’ by Carol Young.

Each year, at every individual summer exhibit, the Essex Art Association gives a special top prize to “the artist they would like to see more of.” The prize is an opportunity to have a solo exhibit in the Exit Gallery alongside the next year’s regular exhibits.

The honoree for June is Carol Young of Essex, who will present paintings, mixed media, sculptures and assemblages in her show titled, “Through Rose-Colored Glasses.”

Young’s work has been variously described as “curious, imaginative, colorful, quirky, sometimes naughty, but never calm.”  “The Flying Bergdorfs,” for example, are a group of acrobats that the artist saw inside a microscopic photograph of a basal teardrop. “Maude’s Disturbing Wallpaper” is a portrait of a clearly chaotic, easily-confused nanny that she had had to endure.

Young’s most important mentors were her inventive father and more than a thousand creative art class children who, for over 30 years, privately taught ‘Mrs. Young’ at her previous home in Westport, Conn.

A gala reception for the Elected Members’ June Show, “Calm and Chaotic” and for “Through Rose-Colored Glasses” in the Exit Gallery will be held on Friday evening, May 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Essex Art Association, 10 North Street, Essex.

The Gallery will continue to be open and free to the public every day of the week from 1 to 5 p.m. from May 30 to June 12, when the gallery will close for indoor renovations.

Essex’s New ‘Pocket Park’ to be Dedicated Sunday, All Welcome

ESSEX — All are welcome to attend the dedication of Morgana’s Place, May 31, at 1 p.m. on the corner of North Main St. and New City St. in Essex.

The unveiling of the statue of Morgana, Ina Bomze’s beloved companion, will take place.

Approximately a year ago, Ina Bomze purchased the property, removed the remnants of the building, replenished the grounds and deeded it for perpetuity to Essex Land Trust.

The Trust invites you to consider making donations for the ongoing care and maintenance of this new pocket park or as additional support to assist Essex Land Trust (P.O. Box 373, Essex) in keeping all of their properties vibrant and groomed for all to enjoy.http://essexlandtrust.org/

Contact Ed Tucker, MD at edtuckermd@aol.com or 860-767-2332 for further information.

Light refreshments will be available.  This event will be held rain or shine.

Maple & Main Celebrates its Sixth Anniversary with New Exhibition, Reception Saturday

'In a Yellow Vase' by Claudia van Nes is one of the signature paintings of the Anniversary Exhibition at Maple & Main Gallery in Chester.

‘In a Yellow Vase’ by Claudia van Nes is one of the signature paintings of the Anniversary Exhibition at Maple & Main Gallery in Chester.

CHESTER – Maple and Main Gallery’s Anniversary Exhibit opens Wednesday, May 27, with a gala celebration Saturday, May 30, from 5 to 8 p.m.

To mark the launch of its sixth year, Maple and Main will serve appetizer platters donated by both L&E and Good Elephant restaurants located across Main Street from the gallery. Cake, champagne and wine will also be offered.

The gallery will be filled with new paintings and sculptures by 38 Connecticut artists – the vast majority of which will be shown for the first time.

Maple and Main has come a long way since its start by a handful of artists, but it still adheres to the goal set six years ago: to show only original fine art in as wide a selection of styles and medium as possible.

The Anniversary Exhibit runs through July  19.

Maple and Main, at One Maple Street, is open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, call 860-526-6065, email mapleandmain@att.net. or visit the gallery’s Facebook page and/or on-line gallery and website at mapleandmaingallery.com.

Celebrated Pianist Dalia Lazar Plays Beethoven at CBSRZ Sunday

Pianist Dalia Lazar

Pianist Dalia Lazar will play Beethoven at CBSRZ.

CHESTER — The celebrated classical pianist Dalia Lazar returns to Chester May 31 at 5 p.m. at Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ). She will play a variety of Beethoven’s piano works, including the “Moonlight Sonata” and the “Pathetique.”

The first time she played for in Chester several years ago, the audience was wowed by her performance and her charm. The Music & More series didn’t expect to be able to lure her back so soon. But Miriam Gardner-Frum, producer of the program, revealed how this unexpected event came to be, and took form over the last few months.

“Dalia offered us a gift. She explained that she is starting an all-Beethoven program in Europe this fall and would love to perform it before a live audience at CBSRZ before going to Europe.  She noted the beautiful space and acoustics in our building in which she would love to play again. She offered to do this performance as benefit for the synagogue.”

Born in Croatia, Dalia began studying piano at an early age. Her first piano teacher recognized her uncommon talent and pianistic ability, and at the age of 16 she was admitted to Moscow’s P.I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory.  During her studies in Moscow, Lazar performed throughout Soviet Union. Immediately after her graduation at the Moscow Conservatory, Lazar decided to continue her career in New York and London where she studied with Karl Urlich Schnabel and Maria Curcio.

As a finalist in New York Concert Artist Guild Competition, Lazar made her New York debut at Rubenstein Hall, followed by her Carnegie Recital Hall debut later that year. Since then she has performed a broad repertoire as a soloist in concerts and recitals worldwide, including the United States, Russia, Venezuela, Israel, Switzerland, Croatia, Mexico and Romania.

Her chamber music repertoire includes the works for violin and piano duo and piano trio, which she performed extensively with her late husband, violinist Lucian Lazar.  Her recent CD includes works by Schumann and Chopin.

Dalia’s playing has been well received by critics, who have characterized her performance as “such noble playing,” (Yediot Achronot, Tel Aviv),  “un sentimento profundo” (Panorama, Venezuela), “that rare combination of charisma, personality and terrific pianistic facility” (pianist Tzimon Barto), and “… an inspiring display of musical excellence”  (Daily Republic).

Tickets for the general public are $25 and children under 16 are admitted without charge (this is a great time to introduce children to the work of a world-class musician.) To order advance tickets, call the CBSRZ office at 860.526.8920, or buy tickets at the door.

CBSRZ is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.

Essex Corinthian YC Explores “Teaching Life Lessons & Character Through Sailing,” Sunday

arctic_tern_sailboat

ESSEX — For more than 100 years, the United States Coast Guard Academy (CGA) has consistently developed exceptional leaders of character who are Semper Paratus (Always Ready) to perform courageously in any conditions of the maritime environment.

Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Zeke Lyons, one of the Officers in Charge in the Coast Guard Academy’s Coastal Sailing Program, will visit the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club on Sunday, May 31, at 4 p.m. to reflect on three years of adventure and guiding experiential learning with CGA cadet crews during summer cruises throughout New England on board the Academy’s fleet of eight custom designed Leadership 44 sloops.

Lt. Cmdr Lyons is completing a three year assignment as a Company Officer on the Academy’s staff.  In addition to sailing each summer as part of the Coastal Sailing Program, he was also an Instructor of Organizational Behavior and Leadership in the Management Department.

Prior to his assignment at the Coast Guard Academy, he graduated from the Eisenhower Leadership Development Program at the United States Military Academy at West Point in conjunction with Columbia Teacher’s College in New York City.

Lt. Cmdr Lyons will combine humor and insights about the CGA experience to shed light on how the Academy develops leaders of character and his talk will highlight why, as Vice Admiral James Pine said, “The sea has, though the ages, been of all schools, the best for bringing out the qualities of leadership.”

This talk is open to the public but space is limited.   Contact the club’s office at 860-767-3239 or ecyc@essexcorithian.orgto reserve space.  There will be an informal reception following the talk.

The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 9 Novelty Lane in Essex.   For more information about the Club, visitwww.essexcorinthian.org

Tickets on Sale Now for Acclaimed British Comedy, ‘Calendar Girls’ at Ivoryton Playhouse

Jacqui Hubbard and Beverley Taylor.  Photo by Anne Hudson.

Jacqui Hubbard and Beverley Taylor. Photo by Anne Hudson.

IVORYTON – The summer season opens June 3 in Ivoryton with the US professional premier of one of the UK’s most popular shows, ‘Calendar Girls.’  Adapted by Tim Firth from his smash hit Miramax film of the same name, it is based on an inspiring true story that is both poignant and hilarious.

A group of extraordinary women, members of a very ordinary Yorkshire Women’s Institute, spark a global phenomenon by persuading one another to pose au natural for a charity calendar with a difference.  As interest snowballs, the ‘Calendar Girls’ find themselves revealing more than they’d ever planned …

Dazzlingly funny, shamelessly sentimental and utterly captivating, this is one of the best-selling shows in British theatre history. It will make you laugh, cry … and walk out singing Jerusalem!

The fundraising phenomenon of the Calendar Girls was inspired by the death of Angela Baker’s husband, John Richard Baker, an Assistant National Park Officer for the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority, who died from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma at the age of 54 in 1998.

During his illness Angela’s friends began to raise money, initially with the aim of purchasing a sofa for the visitors’ lounge in the hospital where John was treated. Nothing could have prepared them for the way their original calendar took off (selling 202,000 copies in its first year). To date they have raised over £3 million for Leukemia & Lymphoma Research, the UK’s leading blood cancer charity.

The Ivoryton Playhouse will also be using this opportunity to raise awareness for several cancer charities. Wednesday, June 3, at 7:30 p.m. is Cancer Survivor Night – half price adult ticket price for those individuals who have survived the challenge of cancer. Participating organizations include Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation, Little Wonder, Valley Shore YMCA – Hope is Power Program and Middlesex Hospital‘s Center for Survivorship and Integrative Medicine.

Jacqui Hubbard, Artistic/Executive Director, is directing the production and is also stepping on stage in the role of Annie. Beverley Taylor, Ivoryton Company Manager, will be joining her in the role of Chris.

“We are both Northern English lasses” says Hubbard, “I spent four years trying to get the rights to produce this wonderful play and, though directing and performing at the same time will be a challenge, I knew I had to do it. These women are in our bones and it will be a rare treat to get to step in front of the curtain for a change.”

Joining them on stage are Vickie Blake, Danielle Bonanno, Erik Bloomquist, Victoria Bundonis*, R. Bruce Connelly*, Lily Dorment*, David Edwards*, Katrina Ferguson*, Maggie McGlone Jennings, and Maria Silverman*.

Set design is by Tony Andrea, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Cully Long.

Calendar Girls opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on June 3, and runs through June 21. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.)

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Deep River Historical Society Hosts Cartoonist C.D. Batchelor Exhibit, Home Tour

Self portrait by C.D. Batchelor.

Self portrait by C.D. Batchelor.

DEEP RIVER  — Viewed by millions daily in The New York Daily News and syndicated in 1,000 newspapers across the country, the work of C.D. Batchelor was thought-provoking and challenged the reader to draw his own conclusions.

Batchelor was hired by The New York Daily News in 1931 and his strong, graphic cartoons filled the upper-right columns of the editorial page, seven days a week for the next 25 years. He was the first political cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and by 1947 his work was circulated to nearly three million readers.

Funded in part by a grant from the Connecticut Humanities, the Deep River Historical Society invites you to step into his world, view a collection of his work that spanned 40 of the most turbulent years in U.S. history.

The exhibit titled, “Draw Your Own Conclusions: The Political Cartoons of C.D. Batchelor,” will be open at the Stone House of the Deep River Historical Society at 245 Main Street, Deep River on Saturdays and Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. through the months of July and August.

One of C.D. Batchelor's famous cartoons.

One of C.D. Batchelor’s famous cartoons.

On June 6, a special opening day event will include the rare opportunity to tour the historic 18th century Deep River home of Batchelor.  Tickets for this event are $15 and are  limited given the capacity of the house.  Contact Rhonda Forristall via email at rcforristall@gmail.com or 860-526-5086 for more information about times and availability of tickets for this day.

Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives.

Dry Pants Model Yacht Club Hosts Successful 2015 New England Spring Regatta

Sail away!

Sail away!

DEEP RIVER — Plattwood Pond in Deep River was the home over the May 16-17 weekend to one of the most popular model sailing events in the Northeast: the 10th Annual  New England Spring Regatta  for  CR-914 model yachts.  Once again, it was a great success for both participants and curious onlookers.

Competitors were invited from all over the northeast. The top five sailors in order of finish were Kevin Dooley (USCG Academy sailing coach), Brain Jobson ( Essex), William James ( Worcester, Mass.), Brian Kerrigan( Essex), and John Skerry (Marblehead, Mass.) The top two sailors have previously won National CR-914 Championships.

Regatta winners proudly display their certificates.

Regatta winners proudly display their certificates.

The boats that were sailed are known as CR-914s, a nationally syndicated one-design class of boats that are 1/12 scale copies of America Cup racers. Over 5000 exist and can be found in every state of the nation. These radio-controlled boats are 36” long and can easily be carried in the trunk of most cars fully-rigged. They are fast, very competitive, and identical in every way-including weight. Winning and losing is totally dependent on the competence of the skippers.

Interested parties in the lower Connecticut River Valley can find club members sailing every Sunday at Plattwood Park in Deep River from 10:30 a.m. until noon as well as Thursday evenings until dark. Visitors are always welcome to try sailing these boats.

For more information, visit the Dry Pants Model Yacht Club’s website or call 860-767-5052.

Final Lecture in Audubon Society’s CT River Series Considers Estuary’s Role in Painting, Writing

painting

ESSEX — The Connecticut River Estuary Lecture Series hosted by the Connecticut Audubon Society continues Thursday, June 4, with a presentation titled, “Aesthetic Beauty of the Estuary: Vision of Artists and Writers,” at Essex Meadows starting at 4 p.m.    Jeffrey Cooley, founder and owner of The Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme. will give the lecture, which will look at the role of the estuary in painting and writing.

The first two lectures of the Connecticut River Estuary series have been terrific successes, with over 100 people attending each one.

Admission to the lecture is free but RSVP’s are required. To RSVP, contact Allison Bryant at the Connecticut Audubon Society at abryant@ctaudubon.org or 203 259-0416 x106. A reception follows each lecture.

For more information on the lecture series, visit www.ctaudubon.org/2015/04/connecticut-river-estuary-lecture-series/.

These lectures are one of the initial projects of a new regional board formed by the Connecticut Audubon Society to focus on the lower Connecticut River valley and southeastern Connecticut.

The new board will work in conjunction with Connecticut Audubon Society staff and state Board of Directors to provide direction and support to the organization’s conservation and education work in Old Lyme, Lyme, Essex, Old Saybrook, and other communities in southeastern Connecticut.

The board’s other seminal projects include the introduction of Connecticut Audubon’s award-winning Science in Nature outdoor education program at Essex Elementary School and an effort to expand Osprey Nation, Connecticut Audubon’s citizen science Osprey monitoring program.

For decades Connecticut Audubon Society has maintained nature sanctuaries in Montville, Haddam, East Haddam, Stonington and Middletown. In addition to being a key component of the region’s native habitat, the sanctuaries serve as portals of opportunity into nature for children and families in the region.

The chair of the new Regional Board is Herman Blanke of Old Lyme. Other members are Patsy McCook (secretary) of Old Lyme; Emily Bjornberg of Lyme; Elsie Childs of Old Lyme; Jim Denham of Essex; Margarita Emerson of Niantic; Eleanor Robinson of Old Lyme; Dr. Ted Vanitallie of Old Lyme; and Claudia Weicker of Old Lyme.

Herman Blanke and Jim Denham are also members of Connecticut Audubon Society’s Board of Directors.

In addition, Old Lyme resident John Forbis and Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder have provided essential support to this effort.

“Having had the fortune to live in Essex for 15 years, I have always appreciated the values of the Connecticut River; its incredible aesthetic beauty, its ecological contributions, and its great historical legacy to the people of this nation., said Alexander Brash, president of Connecticut Audubon Society.

He continued, “In keeping with the great tradition of conservationists of the area, we are looking to work with its citizens and school children in order to highlight and protect the area’s birds, unique biodiversity and habitats, and leverage such interactions for greater awareness of conservation issues across the state.”

“There is a great conservation tradition to uphold in this region,” said Herman Blanke. “Roger Tory Peterson of Old Lyme helped make birding the popular pastime that it is and also drew the connection between birds and conservation. A century ago, the painters of Old Lyme turned this beautiful landscape into art. We view it as our goal and our responsibility to carry on that tradition of conservation and appreciation for the beauty of the natural world.”

Jim Denham said, “From its inception, Connecticut Audubon Society has made conservation education the foundation of its work. Each generation is responsible for helping the next generation understand how the natural world works and why conservation is important, and for making sure the wonders of nature don’t get lost amid all the distractions of the modern world. That’s what we are trying to accomplish at Essex Elementary School, and we intend for it to be a stepping stone to collaborations with other schools as well.”

Science in Nature, which provides curriculum-based outdoor science education to students in elementary and high schools, recently completed its first session at Essex Elementary, with a field trip to Chatfield Hollow State Park in Killingworth. The second session is set for May 28 at Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison.

Science in Nature teaches the principles of conservation science in local outdoor settings, focusing on climate and weather, rocks and soils, ecological adaptations, and wetland ecology. The goal is to increase environmental literacy among elementary, middle and high school students so they will understand basic environmental science principles and be more likely to participate in finding solutions to environmental issues within their communities.

In October it was named the best outdoor conservation program in the region by the New England Environmental Education Alliance. Schools from almost 50 communities in Connecticut have participated in Science in Nature, although Essex Elementary is the first in southeastern Connecticut to take part.

Osprey Nation uses volunteer citizen scientists, working under the direction of Connecticut Audubon’s conservation staff, to find and monitor nests of the state’s resurgent Osprey population.

More than 400 Osprey nests have been identified and plotted on a map. The greatest concentration in the state is on Great Island in Old Lyme. Connecticut Audubon is hoping that increased awareness of the project will propt more local residents to volunteer to as Osprey stewards in Old Lyme and elsewhere throughout the southeastern part of the state.

Founded in 1898, Connecticut Audubon Society is the state’s original and still independent Audubon Society. The Society manages four nature centers, two museums, and 19 sanctuaries across the state. It uses the charismatic nature of birds to inspire the next generation of conservationists, and to work with the current generation to protect and improve the state’s natural habitats for the betterment of state residents, birds and other wildlife.

Connecticut Audubon Society’s headquarters are at Birdcraft Sanctuary in Fairfield. It has regional centers and associated boards in Fairfield, Pomfret, Glastonbury and Milford.

Historic Waterfront Tours Scheduled in Deep River During Summer Months

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town's waterfront during walking tours this summer.

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town’s waterfront during walking tours this summer.

DEEP RIVER — Deep River’s commercial connection to the rest of the world started at the end of Kirtland and River Streets in the early 1800’s. What is now known as the Town Landing, was a shipyard and dock, which collectively, were the linchpin to Deep River’s mercantile success. The shipbuilding provided the vessels and the dock provided the point of delivery of raw materials and the shipment of end products, that made Deep River an economic success.

A lecture and tour of Deep River’s Historic Waterfront will be offered every second and fourth Saturday morning, this June, July, August and September. Tours are sponsored by the Deep River Historical  Society. The tour will start at the home of sea captain and ship builder, Calvin Williams, at 131 Kirtland Street, (immediately left of the Mt. Saint John entrance pillars), starting at 10 a.m. SHARP, each tour day. Each tour is expected to be about 1 1/2 hour duration and will start punctually at 10 a.m.

Reservations are recommended and tickets may be acquired at the door, or in advance, from the program’s director: James Hogan, by calling 860-391-2354, or at two convenient store locations: Celebrations, 161 Main Street, Deep River and Old Saybrook Antiques Center, 756 Middlesex Turnpike, Old Saybrook.

The costs for tickets is $20 per family; $10 adults; $5 students and senior citizens. 100% of all donations will benefit the Deep River Historical Society. All donations are tax deductable. Program is “rain or shine”.

For more information, call James J. Hogan III  at: 860-391-2354

Tour Dates are:
June: 13 and 27
July: 11 and 25
August: 8 and 22
September: 12 and 26

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds to Host Summer Sculpture Showcase

The signature piece of Gil Boro's Summer Sculpture Showcase, "Queen Anne's Lace" by Gints Grinsberg.

The signature piece of Gil Boro’s Summer Sculpture Showcase, “Queen Anne’s Lace” by Gints Grinsberg.

OLD LYME — Gilbert Boro, owner and sculptor at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme, has announced an exciting new exhibition on the grounds of his studio featuring examples of his own contemporary work accompanied by a selection of works created by a number of other widely acclaimed sculptors working in contrasting media.  This Summer Sculpture Showcase will be on view from Monday, June 8, through Sunday, Sept. 13, and feature an Opening Reception on Friday, June 19, from 5 to 7 p.m.  All are welcome to attend the reception at which light refreshments will be served.

Nine sculptors will be exhibiting in Boro’s expansive Sculpture Gardens located on the 4.5 acres of his residence on historic Lyme Street in the heart of Old Lyme, Conn.  Their works will be interspersed amongst Boro’s own sculptures along with works by 13 other contributing artists on the beautifully landscaped grounds offering a unique plein air experience combining both large- and small-scale contemporary sculptures, many of which are for sale.  The sculptors whose work – and in some cases, more than one piece – was selected for the Showcase are:

Diane Barcelo
Ashby Carlisle
Fay Chin
Gints Grinsberg
Lannie Hart
Deborah Hornbake
Elizabeth Knowles
David Millen
Elizabeth Miller McCue
William Thielen

The signature piece of the exhibition is “Queen Anne’s Lace” by Gints Grinsbergs.  It is a large — 144” in height, 56” in diameter — yet delicate structure that evokes the intricate design of lace in its welded and stainless steel structure.  Grinsbergs’ work has been featured at various museums and galleries and is Included in private and corporate collections throughout North America.

'Waves' by Fay Chin.

‘Waves’ by Fay Chin.

Fay Chin’s abstract aluminum sculpture in the exhibition titled, “Waves,” explores pyramidal relationships in a large, ground-based structure.  A sculptor and painter, she has exhibited stone and metal sculptures nationally and internationally in museums, galleries, and public spaces with larger installations.

“Modern Dance,” a multi-colored sculpture utilizing wire fencing wrapped in vinyl surveying tape, is a collaborative work by Elizabeth Knowles and William Thielen.  Natural patterns inspire the work of Knowles and Thielen, who live and work respectively in New York City and Carbondale, Ill.  Both have an extensive body of individual work and have received numerous awards, grants and residencies.

'Pipehenge' by Gil Boro.

‘Pipehenge’ by Gil Boro.

Boro has enjoyed a distinguished career as a sculptor, architect, educator and international design consultant.  He explores the interplay of space, place and scale in a wide range of media including stone, wood, metal and fiberglass.  His vast body of work has been exhibited in numerous galleries throughout the US and internationally, and has also been purchased by collectors, corporations and foundations in both the US and Europe.  Boro currently has several works being exhibited at off-site locations including the South Carolina-based Art League of Hiltonhead’s Biennale (where he was recently awarded second place in their 24th National Juried Exhibition), the New England Sculptor’s Association’s exhibition in Portsmouth, N.H., and Ramey Fine Art in Palm Desert, Calif.

This inaugural Summer Sculpture Showcase offers a unique opportunity for established sculptors to exhibit their work in a different location, while also effectively creating a new exhibition within the Sculpture Gardens.  Boro comments, “I’m delighted to be able to open my grounds to these exceptional sculptors whose work intrigues me.  Each one offers original creative thinking resulting in a fascinating combination of contrasting conceptual designs in a variety of media.  I think any visitor to the exhibition is going to be thoroughly engaged by what he or she sees – including children.”

Boro is somewhat unusual as a professional sculptor in that he loves to see folk of all ages directly interacting with his sculptures, noting that he has a strong aversion to exhibitions, “… where people can’t touch my work.”   Apart from attracting visitors to see the works on his grounds, Boro is thoroughly invested in the vibrant Old Lyme arts scene and hopes this exhibition will help cement the town as a summer destination for art-loving visitors from near and far, especially during the town’s Midsummer Festival on Friday, July 24, and Saturday, July 25.

Located at 80-1 Lyme St., less than a minute from Exit 70 on I-95, the Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds are open 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.  Admission is free.  Children, field trips and group visits are all welcome. The Studio is open by appointment. 

For further information, contact 860-434-5957, visit www.sculpturegrounds.com or email studio80sculpturegrounds@gmail.com

Essex Garden Club Announces 2015 Scholarships

ESSEX — The Essex Garden Club has announced the winners of its 2015 scholarships.

Scholarships of $1,000 each were awarded to Mackenzie Goller of Ivoryton, and Sarah Watson and Elsbeth Kane, both of Essex.

Goller, a 2013 graduate of The Williams School has just completed his freshman year at Wheaton College in Massachusetts.  He is pursuing an independent major in agriculture, called Food and Environmental Studies.

Watson is a junior at Gettysburg College.  Her major is  Environmental Studies with a concentration in Sustainable Development.  This past semester, she was in Denmark with the Danish Institute for Study Abroad continuing her studies in sustainability of various issues such as sustainable chocolate production and urban gardens.

Kane is a sophomore at Columbia University majoring in Environmental Biology.   She has also studied abroad, spending last summer in Sao Paolo, Brazil, in an Ecosystems Experience Program at a reforestation site within the Atlantic Forest.

Additionally, 15 camperships at $125 each were given to Essex Park and Recreation Summer Session to educate younger children on the beauty and wonder of nature.  The Club also supports the Bushy Hill Nature Center in Ivoryton by offering four camperships of $520 each.

The Garden Club wishes to thank all those who supported the club’s annual May Market, the proceeds from which enable the club to make such donations.

Letter to the Editor: Thanks for Book Sale Help from Friends of Essex Library

National Honor Society volunteer Essex Public Library booksale workers from Valley Regional High School

National Honor Society students from Valley Regional High School volunteered as workers at Essex Library’s recent book sale.

To the Editor:

The Board of the Friends of the Essex Library would like to thank all who contributed to the success of our recent book sale.  A successful  sale requires significant work by many volunteers including those who  work during the day-and-a-half event and  those who sort, repair, price and store books in preparation for the sale, help set-up for the sale by arranging tables, chairs and books by category, and who put everything away afterwards.

Many people contribute hours to this event.  We are especially grateful to six Valley Regional National Honor Society students who assisted in our clean-up effort by lifting and stowing heavy boxes of unsold books, many of which will be given to a variety of non-profit organizations.  Kristen Kilby, Neve Flynn, Hannah Halsey, Tina Mitchel, Leah Harger and Julia Hammond, thank you!  We also thank the library staff for their support, with a special thank you to Anna Cierocki for being with us both days.

We would be remiss in not thanking those who contributed, and those who purchased, books, CDs and DVDs.   Your support of the library is deeply appreciated.

Our next sale is October 3-4 and we hope to see you there!

The Friends of the Essex Library

Nilsson’s Paintings on Show in CT DEEP Commissioner’s Office During Summer

Yellow Flag Iris on Seldens Creek by Leif Nilsson

Yellow Flag Iris on Selden’s Creek by Leif Nilsson, oil, 48″ x 36″, spring 2014 ©

CHESTER — Thirty paintings of Selden’s Creek in Lyme, Conn., done by Chester artist Leif Nilsson over the past 10 years from his boat will be hanging in the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner’s office for the summer months as part of the ‘Arts in the Parks’ series.

An opening reception will be held on Wednesday, May 27, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at 79 Elm Street, Hartford, CT 06106-5127.
Call 860-424-3000 for hours and to RSVP for the opening.
To see a preview of the works, visit http://nilssonstudio.com/deep/

Essex Resident DeLeeuw Named CT Middle School Principal of the Year

Judy DeLeeuw, Principal of East Lyme Middles School and CT Middle School Principal of the Year.

Judy DeLeeuw, Principal of East Lyme Middles School and CT Middle School Principal of the Year.

ESSEX — Dr. Judy DeLeeuw, Essex resident and principal of East Lyme Middle School (ELMS), has been named the 2015 Connecticut Association of Schools (CAS) Middle School Principal of the Year. Described by former East Lyme First Selectman and current State Senator Paul Formica as an “inspirational and collaborative leader,” DeLeeuw was selected for her intrepid leadership, her commitment to educational equity, and her what’s-best-for-kids approach to school administration.

She has worked with a broad network of stakeholders to build and sustain a student-centered, engaging, inclusive and academically rigorous school where student achievement is abounding; teachers are challenged and supported; and parents are vital partners in their children’s education.

Reacting to the announcement of her selection, DeLeeuw remarked, “I am extremely honored and humbled to receive this award from CAS. I will celebrate this accolade with those who inspire me to lead each day; the teachers and the students.”

During her eight years as ELMS principal, DeLeeuw has distinguished herself as an industrious and reform-minded leader who cares deeply about the well-being of all members of the school community. According to ELMS Assistant Principal Jason Bitgood, who nominated DeLeeuw for the award, “As a leader committed to change, Dr.
DeLeeuw faces challenges with passion, perseverance and compassion.”

Language Arts teacher Audrone Venduras adds, “A sign at the entrance to ELMS reads, ‘Welcome to Your School.’ This is not an empty slogan but a philosophy which Judy embraces by successfully fostering a sense of ownership and collaboration among students, parents and staff to make ELMS the educational powerhouse that it is.”

Selected as the CAS Middle School of the Year in 2012, ELMS is a dynamic, creative, student-centered middle school where innovation and excellence flourish. The energy and vitality that permeate the school building are a direct result of DeLeeuw’s passion for educational excellence.

The 900-student school facility is divided into Kivas, or “gathering places,” which serve as small, personalized learning communities for students and teachers. This unique design concept supports differentiated learning and interdisciplinary instruction, which facilitate the development of 21st-century skills critical for success in the recently implemented Connecticut Core assessments.

Noted one member of the CAS School of the Year Selection Committee: “ELMS is a cutting edge school. Its interdisciplinary units are far-reaching and promote authentic learning; and, its eighth grade Capstone projects are the equivalent of research at the college level.”

DeLeeuw works tirelessly to maintain a vibrant, caring, student-centered culture which allows all children to grow socially and emotionally as well as academically. A constant presence in the corridors and classrooms, she uses every available opportunity to interact with and build relationships with her students.

Says Venduras, “Walk down the hallway, stop by the cafeteria, or observe bus dismissal and you will see a constant stream of children greeting their principal, for Judy has a remarkable relationship with her kids. She is accessible and genuinely interested in what they have to say.”

Recalls ELMS sixth grader Jack Derry, “During our end-of-the-year assembly, Dr. DeLeeuw joined the staff in a flash mob dance to the song ‘Happy.’ She was laughing and just having fun with everyone. My friends and I appreciate that she truly understands and relates to kids our age.”

One of DeLeeuw’s greatest achievements was her successful transformation of ELMS’ instructional services for special education students. She led her staff in transitioning from special education pullout classes to general education inclusion classes, increasing the amount of time students with disabilities spend with non-disabled peers from 56 to 90 percent. ELMS is now a place where all students learn together in the same well-supported classrooms with the values of tolerance, acceptance and sensitivity as cornerstones for success.

The Principal of the Year Program, sponsored annually by the Connecticut Association of Schools, was established in 1984 to bring recognition to the principalship and to spotlight the important role of the principal in shaping the educational environment and experiences of children. The program recognizes outstanding school principals who have succeeded in providing high quality learning opportunities for students. These administrators have demonstrated excellent leadership, commitment to staff and students, service to their communities, and contributions to the overall profession of
educational leadership.

Each year nominations are solicited for an Elementary, Middle and High School Principal of the Year. The winners are chosen by a selection committee consisting of active and retired principals and assistant principals. State principals of the year must demonstrate success in the areas of collaborative leadership; personal excellence;
curriculum, instruction, and assessment; and personalization.

DeLeeuw will be honored by CAS at the “Celebration of Distinguished Administrators” to be held on Oct. 22, 2015.

Red Cross Launches Campaign to Reduce Deaths, Injuries Caused by Home Fires

AREAWIDE — The American Red Cross has launched a campaign to reduce deaths and injuries caused by home fires by 25 percent in five years. There are two actions you can take to substantially reduce the risk of death or injury in a home fire.

Install smoke alarms: Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in a fire in half. Install smoke alarms on every level of your home inside bedrooms and sleeping areas. The Red Cross offers a program to install FREE smoke alarms in your home and provide additional fire safety information. Call 1-877-287-3327 and press option one to request a home fire safety visit or register for a visit at http://www.redcross.org/ct/schedule-a-visit.

Practice fire drills at home: Fire experts agree that you may have as little as 2 minutes to escape a burning home before it’s too late to get out. Use this Home Fire Escape Plan worksheet to plan your evacuation and practice it at least twice a year as a family.

Learn more about the Red Cross home fire prevention campaign.

Fire takes everything. It takes security. It takes safety, dignity and routine. Help the Red Cross give back what fire takes – the items that provide safety and comfort.

Chester’s Essex Savings Bank Hosts Free Shredding Event Saturday

CHESTER — Essex Savings Bank is sponsoring a Free Shredding Event on Saturday, May 30, from 9- to 12 p.m.at its Chester Branch, located next to the Chester Town Hall. Everyone is invited to bring two boxes of paperwork to be shredded for free by Shredding Source.

The event is being held in conjunction with the Chester Branch’s food drive to help aid in stocking the Chester Food Pantry.

Essex Savings Bank is a FDIC insured, state chartered, mutual savings bank established in 1851. The Bank serves the Connecticut River Valley and shoreline with six offices in Essex (2), Chester, Madison, Old Lyme and Old Saybrook. Financial, estate, insurance and retirement planning are offered throughout the state by the Bank’s Trust Department and wholly-owned subsidiary, Essex Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA, SIPC.

Investments in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and annuities are not FDIC insured, may lose value and are not a deposit, have no Bank guarantee and are not insured by any Federal Government Agency.

Popular Essex Shad Bake to be Held Again at CT River Museum

1.Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

1. Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the
traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

ESSEX — Fifty-seven years ago, the Rotary Club of Essex introduced the quintessential New England shoreline tradition; a dining experience known as a shad bake.  Yankee Magazine has called it one of the “Top 20 Summer Events”.

The Essex Shad Bake returns to the Connecticut River Museum on Saturday, June 6, from 3 to 6:30 p.m.  This year, the bake is made possible through the generous support of Admiral Sponsor Gowrie Group, along with Fishermen Sponsors Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, and Guilford Savings Bank.

The museum’s executive director, Christopher Dobbs says, “We are once again pleased to host and partner with the Rotary Club of Essex on this iconic event that celebrates part of the River’s heritage and that supports the many worthwhile projects of the Rotary.” This volunteer-run event has been organized by the Rotary Club of Essex and is now coordinated by Bake Master Joseph Shea.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones  from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones
from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Shea states, “We offer one of the most unique culinary traditions in New England; at one of the most historic sites along the River. . . it is a winning combination!”  You might find one of your favorite doctors or dentists at the de-nailing table where they take the shad off the oak planks or enjoy a freshly shucked clam or oyster from a local banker.

Join seasoned Shad Bake pioneers for a story from shad bakes of yesteryear including the year of the big flood.  The Shad Museum in Haddam, the Connecticut River Museum, and the Connecticut River Watershed Council will also offer programs during the day on the history and traditions of the shad fishery.

Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

For shad lovers, the lure is the secret ingredients and the authentic method of preparation and cooking handed down from Connecticut natives.  Done in front of the fire, the fish picks up the smoky flavor of the fire with the seasoned oak boards on which it is cooked.  Add to this delicacy homemade potato salad, tossed green salad, and scrumptious pies from Lyman Orchards and you have yourself a gourmet meal.

Don’t care for shad?  The event also offers BBQ chicken and hot dogs.

Share a piece of Connecticut and Essex history with your friends and family.  In addition to the food, participants will enjoy live music and touring the museum which will be open until 6 p.m.  The atmosphere is vibrant with antique cars, picnickers, and the delicious smell of shad roasting around the open fire.

To whet your appetite, on Wednesday, June 3 at 7:30 p.m., the Connecticut River Museum will host a shad fishing excursion on board RiverQuest.  Participants will get a chance to hear about traditional shad fishing, see related artifacts, and go on a boat ride to view shad fisherman ply their trade on the water.  The boat ride will include dessert and non-alcoholic beverages.  Beer and wine will be available for purchase.

Buy your tickets today to the Shad Bake.  The $30 adult and $10 child (10 and under) ticket include the full meal and admission to the museum.  Beverages (soda, beer and wine) will be available at an additional price.  No carry-in alcohol will be permitted.

To purchase tickets, visit www.rotaryclubofessex.com or buy them in person at the Centerbrook Package Store and the Connecticut River Museum.  For additional information on the Shad Fishing Excursion, visit the Connecticut River Museum’s website.

Onsite and street parking at the Connecticut River Museum is limited.  On the day of the event, an Essex Meadows shuttle will be running between the museum and several key parking locations that include the Essex Town Hall parking lot and Pratt House field (29 West Ave.).  The free shuttle service will start at 3 p.m. and run until 7:30 p.m. with pick-ups and drop-offs every 15 minutes.

 

The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street and is open 10 am to 5 pm, closed Mondays until Memorial Day. The Museum, located in the historic Steamboat Dock building, offers exhibits and programs about the history and environment of the Connecticut River. For a full listing of Museum programs and events, go to www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

 

The Rotary Club of Essex is the local chapter of Rotary International that is made up of service minded professionals.  The club and its members are committed to improving the community, connecting with other professionals, sharing their time and experience with the young, supporting global causes, and using their skills to help others.  For more information about the Shad Bake and Rotary Club visit http://www.rotaryclubofessex.com.

 

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Photo Captions:

 

  1. Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the

traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

 

  1. Baking Shad – Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

 

  1. Boning Demonstration – Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones

from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.