July 27, 2017

Essex Democrats Endorse Candidates For Municipal Elections

Bipartisan Slate Of Proven Leaders Announced

Incumbent Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman and Selectman Stacia Rice-Libby have been endorsed again for those positions in the November 2017 election by the Essex DTC (File photo by Jerome Wilson)

ESSEX — On Wednesday, July 19, the Essex Democratic Town Committee (EDTC) endorsed 10 candidates for the November municipal elections.  The endorsed candidates included incumbents seeking reelection, new candidates and members of both major politic parties.

“Democrats in Essex endorsed the best candidates to serve our town irrespective of their political party.  What is important is that the candidates are proven leaders in our community and will work to retain the quality of life we all enjoy,” stated Brian Cournoyer, Chairman of the EDTC.

He continued, “By cross-endorsing candidates from the opposing party, the EDTC has rejected the vitriol and damaging rhetoric being played out on the national level,” 

Endorsed Candidates include:

First Selectman: Norm Needleman (D)

Selectwoman:  Stacia Rice-Libby (D)

Town Treasurer:  Jim Francis (D)

Tax Collector: Megan Haskins (D)

Town Clerk: Joel Marzi (R)

Essex Board Of Education: Loretta McCluskey (D)

Region 4 Board of Education: Kate Sandmann (D)

Board of Finance: Keith Crehan (R)

Board of Finance: Ethan Goller (D)

Board of Assessment Appeals: Mark Bombaci (D)

“We believe the endorsed slate of candidates brings the proven experience, knowledge, passion and dedication to best serve the town of Essex and look forward to a spirited and respectful campaign,” said Cournoyer.

Municipal elections will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 7.  Contact Brian Cournoyer at brian_cournoyer@hotmail.com or 781-483-2021 to learn how to become involved in the campaign.

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Senators Formica, Somers and Linares Applaud Governor’s Signing Tribal Casino Expansion Bill

Senator Paul Formica (left) and Art Linares (right). File photo

AREAWIDE — State Senators Paul Formica (R-East Lyme), Heather Somers (R-Groton) and Art Linares (R-Westbrook) applauded the Governor’s ceremonial signing of legislation that will allow for the expansion of southeastern Connecticut’s tribal casinos to support thousands of local jobs.

“I thank the governor for his support of this bill and the bipartisan efforts of many lawmakers. Supporting the tribes is an important piece of a long-term puzzle to enhance tourism, support our community, protect economic development and preserve all that the tribes have accomplished for our region thus far,” said Senator Paul Formica. 

“We have seen firsthand the impact of the tribes on the local economy and on the thousands of casino employees and their families who live in our Senate districts. I applaud the legislature for working together in bipartisanship to make this important piece of legislation a reality,” said Senator Heather Somers.

“From tourism to manufacturing, southeastern Connecticut has seen quality growth thanks to the enormous efforts of the Mohegans and Mashantucket Pequots and the impact of their destination casinos. That’s why it was so important that lawmakers and the governor come together this year to help the tribes protect the thousands of jobs they’ve created,” said Senator Art Linares.

Senator Paul Formica (R-20) represents the communities of Bozrah, East Lyme, a portion of Montville, New London, Old Lyme, a portion of Old Saybrook, Salem, and Waterford.

Senator Heather Somers (R-18) represents the communities of Griswold, Groton, North Stonington, Plainfield, Preston, Sterling, Stonington and Voluntown.

Senator Art Linares (R-33), represents the communities of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland and Westbrook.

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Essex Park & Rec. Host Summer Concert Series, ‘Long Island Sound Band’ Perform July 25

‘The Long Island Sound Band’ perform on Ivoryton Green, July 25.

ESSEX — Essex Park and Recreation is excited to be able to offer another great set of bands this year for their 2017 Summer Concert Series.  Hosted on alternating Tuesdays at The Ivoryton Green and Wednesdays at The Essex Main Street Park, concerts take place at 6:30 p.m. from June 27 through Aug. 16.

Admission is free to all. Note the location carefully as the venue changes each week.

The Long Island Sound Band offers an energized and dynamic performance that an audience can’t help but enjoy, when they rock the Ivoryton Green on July 25.

Chester natives, The Meadows Brothers are brothers with an American Folk and Rock ‘n Roll sound. They will perform on Aug. 2, at the Essex Main Street Green.

The following week, another great set of locals, U.H.F. will be making the best soulful Rock, Funk, Reggae and Blues music they can  make on Aug. 8 at the Ivoryton Town Green.

The concert series will conclude with a performance from Blues on the Rocks, bringing their dynamic and enthusiastic mix of Blues, R&B, Motown, and Rock sure to get you up and dancing to Essex Main Street Park on Aug. 16.

For more information on the Summer Concert Series or Park and Rec. programs, visit https://www.facebook.com/SXParkandRec. You may also contact Park & Rec. by email at recreation@essexct.gov or call the office at 860-767-4340 x148.

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Leif Nilsson Hosts ‘The Meadows Brothers’ at ‘Concert in the Garden,’ July 27

‘The Meadows Brothers’ will play a ‘Concert in the Garden’ on July 27 at Spring Street Gallery.

CHESTER — Leif Nilsson hosts a Thursday evening ‘Concert in the Garden,’ Thursday, July 27, from 7 to 9 p.m.,  featuring The Meadows Brothers at the Spring Street Studio and Gallery at 1 Spring St, Chester Center.  Arrowhead will open the show.

Ian and Dustin Meadows have been playing music together for most of their lives. In 2011, they made the decision to leave the band they were playing in, and strike out on their own as a duo. Their distinct brand of roots music draws inspiration from a huge list of influences; combining Folk, Blues, Country, and Rock n’ roll genres into what The Boston Globe calls “An engagingly twangy sibling sound all their own.”

The brothers’ original songs; which they typically write together, have been praised for their emotive, relatable lyrics and memorable hooks. Several of their tunes have won awards, and been covered by international acts.

For more information about tThe Meadows Brothers, visit this link.

This monthly concert series highlights eclectic international singer/songwriter artists from cool jazz to blue grass.

Gates open half hour before the show — first come first seated. Seating is Bistro Style in the amphitheater. The concert will be moved indoors in the event of inclement weather.

A $20 donation is appreciated. The event is BYOB – pack a picnic and bring your own wine or beer or buy it across the street at the Chester Package Store.

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Essex Historical Society Expands Popular “Walking Weekend” Program, Offers Four Tours July 28-30

EHS’s Brien Reidell leads a walking tour up Main Street, Essex.  Courtesy of Essex Historical Society.

Community Foundation of Middlesex County Funds New Centerbrook Tour 

 

Combining the outdoors and history, Essex Historical Society (EHS) expands its popular outdoor program, “Walking Weekend,” on July 28, 29 and 30.  The event features four different walking tours within the Town of Essex as follows:

Friday, July 28, 2017, 7 p.m.; Saturday, July 29, 2017, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Sunday, July 30, 7 p.m.

Pratt House, 19 West Avenue, Essex (July 28)

Ivoryton Library, 106 Main Street, Ivoryton (July 29)

Essex Elementary School, 108 Main Street, Centerbrook (July 29)

Foot of Main Street, Essex, (July 30)

During the tours, attendees enjoy an easy stroll along the Town’s historic streets learning about the major industries, structures and personalities that shaped the area. Essex Historical Society’s trained, knowledgeable guides will lead an hour+ long tour over fairly level, paved terrain, covering three centuries of history.

For the first time, this year’s Walking Weekend will feature a guided walking tour of Centerbrook Village, led by renowned Essex historian Brenda Milkofsky.  The walk is funded in part through a grant from the Community Foundation of Middlesex County.   New guides are welcome to join us and learn the tour.

An early view of Connecticut Valley Manufacturing, now Centerbrook Architects.  Courtesy of Essex Historical Society.

On July 28  at 7 p.m., the first tour will meet at the Pratt House, 19 West Avenue, Essex, for a trip down West Ave. and Prospect Street to explore the histories behind the structures of “Pound Hill” including several 19th century churches, Hills Academy, the Old Firehouse and more.

On July 29, at 10 a.m., the second tour will meet at Ivoryton Library, 106 Main Street, Ivoryton, for an in-depth look at this historic village, from its beginnings as a company town surrounding the Comstock-Cheney Co., the stories of 19th century immigration, the striking examples of Victorian architecture and its unique cultural attractions that continue to this day.  The tour will be led by historian and author Chris Pagliuco.

On July 29, at 1 p.m., the third tour will meet at Essex Elementary School, 108 Main Street, Centerbrook, for our newest walk featuring Essex’s oldest village.  Learn about Centerbrook’s transition from its early farming days as “Center Saybrook” to its later manufacturing development powered by the Falls River.  This walk will be developed and led by Brenda Milkofsky.


All spiritual, social and business matters in early “Center Saybrook” revolved around the Centerbrook Meeting House.    Courtesy of Essex Historical Society

Interested in being a guide for later walks of Centerbrook?   Contact the EHS offices to learn more, 860-767-0681, or ehs@essexhistory.org.  No experience is necessary and all training is provided.

On July 30, at 7 p.m., the final tour will meet at the Foot of Main Street, Essex, for a trip down Main Street in Essex Village to capture the rich maritime history of 18th century “Potapaug,” its working waterfront and ship-building prominence in the early 19th century as well as its development as a beautiful visitor destination of today.  The tour will be led by EHS’s knowledgeable guides Brien Reidell and Mary Ann Pleva.

Each walk is a separate event and you are welcome to attend all four or select your favorites.

Essex Historical Society is committed to fulfilling its mission of engaging and inspiring the community in the three villages of Centerbrook, Essex and Ivoryton.  Each tour is $5 per person and is open to the general public; free to members of EHS.  Admission helps support the educational and cultural programming of Essex Historical Society.

Essex Historical Society expresses its gratitude to the Community Foundation of Middlesex County for funding the new Centerbrook tour.  For more information, visit www.essexhistory.org or call (860) 767-0681.

 

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Deep River Public Library Hosts a ‘Mad Hatter’s Garden Party,’ July 28

Will a hat like this win the contest?

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Public Library and the Deep River Garden Club would like to let you in on a secret … all the best people are simply MAD about Garden Parties! Join the fun on Friday, July 28, from 6 to 9 p.m. for the library’s third annual Mad Hatter Garden Party.

Tickets are on sale now at the library for $25 each. Join us for hors d’oeuvres, drink, live music, good conversation and a teacup raffle. Prizes will be awarded for the top two favorite hats. All funds benefit the beautification of the library garden and grounds.

Don’t be late for this very important date! Stop in the library and buy your ticket today.

For more information, visit http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 5 pm.

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Essex Art Association Hosts “Weather, Whether” Juried Show, Opening Reception is July 28

‘Cloud Formation’ by Pam Carlson.

ESSEX — “Weather, Whether” is the second juried show of the Essex Art Association’s (EAA) 2017 season. Gallery visitors will delight in the variety of high quality artwork in this exhibit, which will be juried for entry and awards. Monetary prizes totaling $1900 will be awarded in addition to the prestigious Exit Gallery Award which offers the winning artist a solo exhibit in the Art Association’s Exit Gallery during the next gallery season.

To quote the originators of the show’s theme:  “Weather, whether it’s sunny or cloudy, hot or cold, raining or snowing, windy or calm, there is beauty to be found. Cover your brush with your weather paint and just have fun putting it on your canvas where it will last forever…but do it quickly before it changes.”

The exhibit’s opening reception is Friday, July 28, from 6 to 8 p.m. The show runs July 29  through Aug. 19. The EAA Gallery is located at 10 North Main Street, Essex, CT. Gallery hours: 1-5 pm daily, closed Tuesdays. For more information visit essexartassociation.com or call 860-767-8996.

‘Wave Action’ by Pam Carlson is an acrylic painting on display in the Exit Gallery “Forever” show.

The Exit Gallery show, “Forever,” showcases paintings by Pam Carlson, who was born and raised in Darien, Conn., where she loved art and participated in local school art shows. While attending college she utilized her Art Major skills by working each summer in N.Y. in commercial art within the advertising world. Teaching won her heart and she finished college with a degree in both Fine Art and Education.

Carlson taught in public schools in Connecticut, New York, and Pennsylvania, before becoming a full-time mother, dress designer, and bringing her craft back into her own home studio. She has exhibited her work in local galleries and ‘town green’ art shows up and down the east coast for over twenty years. She is now concentrating on gallery shows.

Carlson is the Vice President of the Essex Art Association. She developed and participates annually in the October invitational exhibit at the EAA gallery, ‘Five Women Painting,” and is a charter member of the Maple and Main Gallery in Chester. Sherecently completed a One Woman Show at Maple and Main’s Stone Gallery, which raised thousands of dollars for the Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter. In addition to several recent commissions, five of her paintings depicting Connecticut’s Farm animals are hanging in the Congressional Office Building in Washington DC.  www.artmajeur.com/en/artist/pastelpam

Exhibition juror, Lenny Moskowitz, is a Connecticut landscape painter who lives in New Haven with his wife. He graduated with his B.F.A from the Philadelphia College of Art and received his M.F.A. from Michigan’s Cranbrook Academy. He has participated in both group and solo shows at numerous galleries throughout the U.S. and has taught classes and workshops in Connecticut, Block Island, and Nantucket. Presently, he teaches at Quinnipiac University and several community art schools.

Moskowitz has been awarded several artist residencies, including at the Anderson Center in Michigan and at the NISDA Foundation on Nantucket, Mass. In the summer of 2011, he was awarded a residency at Weir Farm in Wilton, Conn.  He makes yearly painting trips to Maine, Nantucket, and frequent sojourns to the surrounding the Connecticut woods to paint the landscapes.

For more information, visit www.lennymoskowitzart.com

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Old Lyme’s Midsummer Festival 2017 Highlights Art, Culture in Annual Celebration, July 28-29

Flowers at the Festival: the Florence Griswold Museum hosts a number variety fresh flower, fruit and vegetable vendors.

OLD LYME– A “quintessential New England” weekend, this year’s Old Lyme Midsummer Festival kicks off July 28, with a toe-tapping Friday night concert on the lawn of the Florence Griswold Museum, and continues Saturday, July 29, up and down Lyme Street with new offerings and old favorites throughout the day.

This year’s 31st annual festival again takes place in the heart of Old Lyme’s historic district. The mission of the festival partners is to celebrate the cultural heritage of Old Lyme, with art, music, food and family fun.

Nick and the Shady Creek band will entertain in a free concert on Friday evening, July 28.

The festivities kick-off Friday night featuring the bluegrass sounds of Nick and the Shady Creek with a lawn concert beginning at 7 p.m. This free concert is sponsored by All Pro Automotive and the Graybill Family.  Before the concert the Florence Griswold Museum will host an open house, with free admission to the special exhibition Flora/Fauna: The Naturalist Impulse in American Art from 5 to 7 p.m.

The Saturday Festival continues with arts exhibitions, kid’s activities, music, food and specialty shopping at locations along historic Lyme Street. Many locations also include “hands on” arts activities.

The bulls at the Lyme Art Association are alway a major draw at the Festival.

Shuttle buses will be available for the length of the festival, and take participants from designated parking lots to stops along Lyme Street. Parking lots will be open at the high school campus on Lyme Street, as well as the Old Lyme Marketplace on Halls Road.

Partner activities and events on Saturday include the following (from the north end to south end of Lyme Street):

Old Lyme Lions Club: Annual Antique Car Show, held at the Bee & Thistle. The Lions will also serve hamburgers and hot dogs.

Florence Griswold Museum: a new Bohemian Street Fair, Hands-on/Minds-on Activities, Parading Paws Dog Show, food trucks, Folk Musician Dave Fry, The Shop Super Sale, and reduced admission to historic house and exhibitions

Lyme Art Association: Art sales and exhibitions, savory pies, LAA’s famous Ice Tea and Lemonade, and a fun and interactive “Masterpiece Photo Op”

Old Lyme Inn: Live music and refreshments under the tent, air-conditioned table service inside the historic inn

The “Fence Artists” will be back at the Old Lyme Inn this year.

Fence Artists Show: Now at the Old Lyme Inn, this group of local artists will sell artwork and provide art demonstrations throughout the day.

Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts: Art demonstrations, student/alumni exhibition, live music and refreshments

Chamber of Commerce: A Vendor Fair and youth music tent

The 2017 Summer Sculpture Showcase features exhibits from more than 15 guest sculptors as well as some 80 pieces by owner and sculptor Gil Boro.

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds: Summer Sculpture Showcase, fashion show, dance performance, live music and artist talk

Patricia Spratt for the Home: The always-anticipated warehouse sale of specialty linens

Lymes Youth Services Bureau: The Midsummer 5K

See a selection of historic looms in action at the old Lyme Historical Society’s presentation in the former Grange building on Lyme St.

Old Lyme Historical Society: Handweavers’ demonstration and community loom, troubadour Jim Lampos, Historical Society publications for sale.

Lyme-Old Lyme Schools: Learn more about the extracurricular activities of the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools including the High School Crew Team and musical opportunities.

Town of Old Lyme/Senior Center: Music & Movement yoga for families, Magician “Mr. Magic,” caricature drawings, King Arthur Flour Cookie Truck

Old Lyme-PGN Library: Phoebe’s BookCellar Midsummer Sale, hourly story times, Young Adult’s screenprinting, History Press authors, hands-on learning on e-books and more

Most locations will have food options available.

A detailed listing of events and activities is available at www.OldLymeMidsummerFestival.com.

Key sponsors of the Festival include Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, Pasta Vita, LymeLine.com/ValleyNewsNow.com, and The Day Publishing. Additional financial support comes from Paul Burdick Oil Company, Old Lyme Marketplace, Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, Florence Griswold Museum, Zelek Electric, and Caliber Computing.

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Theater Along the River Returns with ‘The Tempest,’ July 29

2. Flock Theatre will bring Shakespeare to life on the Connecticut River Museum lawn with their performance of The Tempest.

ESSEX — New London’s Flock Theatre Company returns to the Connecticut River Museum on Saturday, July 29, this time bringing their production of Shakespeare’s classic play The Tempest.  This evening of outdoor theater is made possible through the generous support of the Essex Wellness Center.

The Tempest is an exciting story set on a remote island, where the sorcerer Prospero, rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful place using illusion and skillful manipulation.  A tempest, shipwreck, marooning, and redemption are all twisted into this classically inspired storyline.

According to director Derron Wood, “We are pleased to return for a fourth year to the Connecticut River Museum.  It offers a spellbinding backdrop for outdoor theater and allows us to reach a new audience.”

The Tempest, a story of shipwreck and magic, is one of Shakespeare’s most musical plays and will be the featured performance for Theater Along the River this July 29 at the Connecticut River Museum. Art by Flock Theatre.

The Connecticut River Museum’s executive director, Christopher Dobbs, said that “Flock Theatre is a master of Shakespeare.  We feel fortunate to offer this level of entertainment at the Museum and hope that the audience enjoys the production and its backdrop – the River.”  Dobbs was quick to note that the Museum is only able to host this event and keep the ticket prices reasonable for all ages to enjoy through the “generosity of the Essex Wellness Center.”

The Museum’s grounds will open at 6 PM for picnickers to layout blankets and chairs.  Museum staff encourage the audience to make the picnic part of the experience.  In fact, there will be a special prize awarded to the “best” picnic arrangement.

Tickets are $18 for the general public, $12 for museum members, and $10 for children (12 and under).  A cash bar serving beer and wine will be available for theatergoers.  No carry-in alcohol is permitted.

Tickets may be bought at www.ctrivermuseum.org or at the door starting at 6 PM the night of the performance. Curtain opens at 7 PM.

Flock Theatre is a professional, not-for-profit theatre company founded in 1989. The theater company is dedicated to creating original, collaborative and educational theater. Perhaps best known for their long-standing summer Shakespeare in the Arboretum, Flock Theatre performs year-round in a variety of venues, including their winter “nest” at the First Congregational Church, on the New London Pier, at the historic Shaw Mansion Museum and throughout New England.

Essex Wellness Center offers a range of holistic-minded health services, including, Fitness on the Water, a beautiful, private workout studio. The Essex Wellness Center experience is focused solely on you and the achievement of your goals, physically, mentally and emotionally.

For more information on the program, contact the Connecticut River Museum at 860.767.8269 or visit the website, ctrivermuseum.org.  The Connecticut River Museum is dedicated to the study, preservation and celebration of the cultural and natural heritage of the Connecticut River and its Valley.  Explore the three floors of exhibits, take a sail on the Onrust or rent a canoe, kayak or SUP to paddle the coves of Essex when you visit.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.

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See Heartwrenching ‘West Side Story’ at Ivoryton Playhouse Through July 31

Arianne Meneses (Consuelo) and Jason Daniel Rath* (Pepe) rehearse a scene from West Side Story.

IVORYTON – Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet is transported to modern-day New York City in the breathtaking musical, West Side Story, which opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on July 5. With book by Arthur Laurents, music by Leonard Bernstein, and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, the original 1957 Broadway production ran for over 700 performances before going on tour, and garnered six Tony nominations.

Mia Pinero makes her debut at Ivoryton as Maria in ‘West Side Story.’

The story is set in the Upper West Side of New York City in the mid-1950s and explores the rivalry between the Jets and the Sharks, two teenage street gangs of different ethnic backgrounds. When, Tony, a Jet, falls in love with Maria, a Shark, the young lovers struggle to keep their love alive in a world of hate, violence and prejudice.

The dark theme, sophisticated music, extended dance scenes, and focus on social problems marked a turning point in American musical theatre when it was first produced; West Side Story remains one of the most innovative, heart-wrenching and relevant musical dramas of our time.

The film version starring Natalie Wood, Russ Tamblyn, Richard Beymer and Rita Moreno won 10 Academy Awards and in 2009, Karen Olivo won a Tony for her portrayal of Anita in the Broadway revival.

Stephen Mir* plays Tony in the Ivoryton Playhouse production of ‘West Side Story’ opening July 5.

Stephen Mir* returns to Ivoryton to play the role of Tony and Mia Pinero* makes her Ivoryton debut in the role of Maria.

The production is directed and choreographed by Todd Underwood and musical directed by Mike Morris, with set design by Dan Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Elizabeth Cipollina. Executive Producers are Michael A. Dattilo and Frank Perrotti

Tonight, Tonight, won’t be just any night!  Don’t miss the experience of this show live on stage at the Ivoryton Playhouse.

West Side Story opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on Wednesday, July 5, and runs through Sunday, July 30. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $50 for adults; $45 for seniors; $22 for students and $17 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org

Pictures by Ivoryton Playhouse

Group rates are available by calling the box office for information. The Playhouse is located at 103 Main St. in Ivoryton.

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Ride the Riverboat, Fend Off the Pirates in an Evening of Swashbucklin’ Fun, Aug 2 & 3

Yo-ho-ho, where’s that bottle of rum?!

ESSEX — Yo-ho-ho, thar’ be pirates on that thar’ Riverboat!

Will Captain Paul be able to save the passengers on the Becky Thatcher Riverboat from the nefarious band of pirates known as the Saybrook Swashbucklers?

Join the Essex Steam Train folk for an exciting journey on the “high seas” of the Connecticut River on Aug. 2 and 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. to find out!

Your family won’t want to miss this plunderous adventure– packed with pirates, scallywags and sprogs, lads and lassies in distress, sea shanties, gold doubloons, and one heroic captain, who it is to be hoped can save the day … and there’ll be plenty o’grog to be sure for sale at the bar for the grown-ups.

Seats are limited so brush up on your pirate speak and order your tickets today!

X marks the spot at www.essexsteamtrain.com or call 860-767-0103.

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CT River Museum Hosts ‘Conquer the Current’ Regatta, Aug. 13; Benefits Museum’s Scholarship Fund

Calling all paddlers! Conquer the Current challenges you to row from Haddam to Essex in support of education scholarship programs at the Connecticut River Museum. Photo by Tom Walsh, Shoreline Aerial Photography, Connecticut River Museum Collection.

ESSEX — The Connecticut River Museum’s first downriver paddle regatta to benefit the Museum’s education scholarship fund will take place on Aug. 13, from 8 to 3 p.m.  The Regatta is open to all paddle craft- canoes, kayaks, stand up paddleboards and rowboats.

The nine-mile race will start at Eagle Landing State Park in Haddam and finish in front of the Connecticut River Museum in Essex. Paddlers will haul out at the Essex town boat launch and transportation will be provided back up to Eagle Landing State Park.

There will also be activities on the Museum lawn throughout the day, including stand-up paddle board demonstrations by Paddleworks of Clinton and a family fun paddle parade in Essex Harbor at 12 p.m. Refreshments will be available from Porky Pete’s, Deep River Snacks, and Cannoli’s on the Run.

Pre-registration is $30 per paddler with an additional $70 fundraising goal or $110 registration fee day of event. Prizes will be awarded for race winners and top individual and team fundraisers. All proceeds from the event will go directly toward supporting the Museum’s education scholarship fund.  

Connecticut River Museum’s first annual ‘Conquer the Current’ Regatta takes place Aug. 13.

During the 2016/17 school year, 4,000 school children from across the state of Connecticut received invaluable hands-on history and environmentally-based programs at the Museum and in their classrooms.  The scholarship program allowed for nearly 1,000 of these students to receive free or reduced admission, creating invaluable opportunities for students who might not otherwise have this experience.   

For more information about this program, visit the website at ctrivermuseum.org or contact the Connecticut River Museum at 860.767.8269 or via email at esistare@ctrivermuseum.org. The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, $7 for seniors, $5 for children age 6-12, free for children under 6.  This year a recreation of Adriaen Block’s the ONRUST is at the Museum’s docks and providing special programs and public cruises.

Conquer the Current is generously sponsored by: Denali, Essex Marine Group, Family Legacy Partners, Ivory Wealth Management, Lawrence & Memorial Hospital, The Sound Runner and Deep River Chips.

Photos:

Photo 1 – Paddlers:  The Connecticut River Museum’s first annual Conquer the Current Regatta takes place Aug. 13.

Photo 2 –  Aerial Photo:  Calling all paddlers! Conquer the Current challenges you to row from Haddam to Essex in support of education scholarship programs at the Connecticut River Museum. Photo by Tom Walsh, Shoreline Aerial Photography, Connecticut River Museum Collection.

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Chester Village West Employee’s Type O Donations Have Saved 48 Lives; Facility Hosts Blood Drive, Aug. 18

CHESTER – Chester Village West, an independent senior living community, will host a Red Cross Blood Drive on Friday, Aug. 18 from 1:30 to 6:30 p.m.  Chester Village West is located at 317 W. Main St., Chester, Conn. 06412.

To schedule your appointment, call 1-800-RED-CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Chester Village West employees regularly participate in the blood drive. Old Saybrook resident Richard Mulvihill, one of the community’s security guards, has donated more than two gallons (16 units) of blood over the past 18 years. According to the American Red Cross, Mulvihill’s blood donations have helped to save the lives of more than 48 people. A donor since age 18, Richard has been giving valuable ‘double red cell’ donations three times per year since 1999, when he joined the Old Saybrook Fire Department as a volunteer fireman.

“I feel great about helping people this way,” said Mulvihill, who is Type O Positive. According to the American Red Cross, double red cell donations from Type O donors and donors with Rh-negative blood types play a very important role in maintaining blood supply levels. Double red cell donation is done with the help of an apheresis machine, which collects the red cells but returns most of the plasma and platelets to the donor. “Because I get my platelets and plasma back, I don’t feel as drained afterwards,” he added.

Other Chester Village West employees who regularly donate blood include Marketing Director and Westbrook resident Sara Philpott, Director of Operations and Deep River resident Jim Jake, Marketing Assistant and Deep River resident Brenda Kollmer, Transportation Coordinator and Killingworth resident Priscilla Soucy and Debra Millspaugh, Accounting Manager and Deep River resident.

“My father’s life was saved by a blood transfusion,” Philpott said. “Most of us don’t think about the importance of maintaining the blood bank until we have a personal crisis. Our blood banks are always in need of more donors. It’s such a small thing to do that can literally save the life of another. It makes me feel good to know that my donation can help someone when they need it most.”

Editor’s Note: Located in historic Chester, Connecticut, Chester Village West gives independent-minded people a new way to experience retirement and live their lives to the fullest. Since the community was founded more than 25 years ago, Chester Village West residents have directed and embraced active learning. Within a small community of private residences that offer convenience, companionship, service and security, Chester Village West enriches lives with a comprehensive program that enhances fitness, nutrition, active life, health and well-being. Find out more atchestervillagewestlcs.com; visit the community on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ChesterVillageWest.

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A La Carte: Bring on the Bountiful Blueberries! Must be Time for a Sour Cream Cake

Blueberry sour cream cake

What would make me think that if I go from one farmer’s market to another, I will find tomatoes at one and not on another? The nice people at Whittle’s told me their tomatoes would not be available until the end of July, but that their sweet corn would be ready in about 10 days.

So I went to Becky’s, in Waterford, and found out that their tomatoes would not be ready for another couple of weeks. Corn? I asked. Not yet, she said.

I looked at the beautiful strawberries/ Are they yours, I wondered? No, they have been gone for a couple of weeks, but the blueberries are just picked, she said. So I got a quart of blueberries, even though I really like the teeny little Maine blueberries rather than the big local cultivated ones.

Just in case the people were wrong at Whittles, I stopped by two days later, a week after I’d stopped before. There was the big sign: Corn. I bought half a dozen, since I am making a corn salad for tomorrow. I peered at the baskets of tomatoes? Yours? I asked. I am sure she recognized me. No, soon, she said.

Feeling like a dweeb, I bought some of the middle Connecticut tomatoes. Truth is, they are delicious, too. As for the corn, just gorgeous.

So this afternoon, I made a recipe given to me by Edie Freeman for the blueberries I got at Becky’s. This recipe is sort of a cake, but also a little like a cheesecake. It calls for a little butter, but sour cream instead of cream. Her family calls it blueberry orgasm. It is really delicious.

Blueberry Sour Cream Cake

From Edie Friedman, cadged from Bon Appetit, sometime in the 80s

Yield: 8 to 12 servings

Butter an 8- or 9-inch springform pan; heat oven to 350 degrees with oven rack in the center

For the cake:

One half cup butter, softened (1 stick)
One-half cup sugar
1 egg
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
One and one-half cups all-purpose flour
One and one-half teaspoon baking powder
1 quart fresh blueberries, washed and picked over for stems

For the custard:

2 cups sour cream
2 egg yolks
one-half cup sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the cake: In an electric mixer, cream butter and sugar together for about 1 minute. Add egg and vanilla extract. In a separate bowl, whisk flour and baking powder, then add to the mixed ingredients and stir together. Pour batter into prepared springform pan and level the batter. Evenly toss blueberries onto the batter and set aside.

For the custard: Mix well sour cream, egg yolks, sugar and vanilla and pour custard over the blueberries.

Place cake on the rack in the preheated oven and bake about 1 hour or until custard is set. Cool cake in springform pan on a rack on the counter. When cool, run a thin knife around the cake, then open the springform pan. Serve somewhat cool or refrigerate.

While Edie’s recipe says to bring cake to room temperature before serving, I like it colder.

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Essex Foundation Provides Support For Essex Place Furnishings

Bruce Glowac. President of The Essex Foundation, Inc. presents a check to Janice Atkeson, President of Essex Elderly and Affordable Housing, Inc. outside Essex Place, the newly constructed affordable senior housing complex on Main Street in Centerbrook.

Foundation underwrites cost of common area furniture in newly constructed senior housing 

ESSEX — Two weeks before the grand opening of Essex Place, a 22-unit, affordable senior rental housing complex developed by Essex Elderly & Affordable Housing, Inc. and the Women’s Institute of Housing & Economic Development, The Essex Foundation was called upon to help cover the cost of furniture for the common area spaces.

Last minute adjustments to the overall project budget left no available resources for completing the already constructed community room, game room, office, and kitchen.  After a thoughtful presentation by Janice Atkeson and Yolanda Lowe, both representing Essex Elderly & Affordable Housing, Inc., members of The Essex Foundation Board of Directors approved the request for financial assistance.

Funds from The Essex Foundation were used to cover the cost of upholstered furniture, dining tables, game tables, occasional tables, stacking chairs, office furniture, and miscellaneous kitchen items.  Essex Place is located at 26 Main Street in the Centerbrook section of Essex, adjacent to the Essex Court senior apartments.

The common areas are accessible to all residents of Essex Place and Essex Court, and will also be used for general meetings and as a designated emergency shelter. Community members who would like to donate to the project can send a check made out to The Essex Foundation, PO Box 64, Essex, CT 06426, indicating that it is for the Essex Place community room.

The Essex Foundation was founded in 1970. It is a non profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to making a difference in the lives of Essex residents. The foundation is funded through donations from the community and strives to fill needs not met by other organizations or sources. In general, funds are granted for special purposes, including buildings, equipment, land, and programs, but not to recurring expenses. More information can be found at www.theessexfoundation.org.

 

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PHOTO CAPTION: Bruce Glowac. President of The Essex Foundation, Inc. presents a check to Janice Atkeson, President of Essex Elderly and Affordable Housing, Inc. outside Essex Place, the newly constructed affordable senior housing complex on Main Street in Centerbrook.

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Deep River Congregational Church Hosts Annual August Flea Market & Rummage Sale, Aug. 19

All the fun of the Flea Market can be enjoyed Aug 19.

 

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Congregational Church, 1 Church St., Deep River, has been preparing for its Annual Flea Market and Rummage Sale which will be held on Aug. 19.  
The Flea Market, which is held on Marvin Field and on the grounds around the church, runs from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. with over 80 vendors, who bring a wide variety of items to sell, from antiques to hand crafted pieces.  There will be a variety of fresh baked goods for sale, prepared by church members and friends.  
Refreshments may also be purchased throughout the day: coffee and doughnuts in the morning and hamburgers, hotdogs, and side dishes throughout the day. There are only a few 20 x 20 foot spaces available for $30, and you can reserve yours by contacting the church office for a reservation form and map.
 
The Rummage Sale Committee has been collecting items since June for our Rummage Sale during the same weekend as our Flea Market.  It will be a two-day event running from Aug. 18 through Aug. 19.   All are invited to a Rummage Pre-Sale on Friday, Aug. 18, from 6 to 8 p.m. for a $5 admission fee.  The Main Rummage Sale will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 19. 
For further information, contact the church office at (860-526-5045or office.drcc@snet.net) or check out our church web site at www.deeprivercc.org.
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CT River Conservancy Launches Source to Sea Jump-In Journey, Celebrating 65 Years of Success

AREAWIDE – To celebrate its 65th anniversary, the Connecticut River Conservancy (CRC), formerly Connecticut River Watershed Council, is traveling the length of the Connecticut River this month to celebrate the many successes that have significantly improved the health of New England’s great river. Just as importantly, this Journey will lay out the work still to be done to meet the legal requirements and public expectations to make our rivers truly clean and full of life.

The Source to Sea Jump-In Journey begins at the source of the Connecticut River near the Canadian border on July 15 and ends at the Long Island Sound on July 30. The Source to Sea Jump-In Journey is an opportunity for everyone who loves our rivers to join CRC in speaking up for our rivers.

The public is invited to join the Source to Sea Jump-In Journey at events celebrating the many ways people use, enjoy, and take sustenance from their rivers. These events include opportunities to directly engage with important issues as well as have fun and celebrate. Opportunities include boating events as well as joining Splash Mobs, ‘flash mob’ style events where groups of river fans will jump in the river to publicly show support for their rivers. To learn more or follow the Journey online, visit www.ctriver.org/s2sjourney.

“Our rivers have come a long way,” says CRC Executive Director Andrew Fisk. “This Journey is retracing a trip taken by one of our trustees in 1959. Back then, they wore gas masks and scooped sludge from the river to highlight pollution problems. On this Journey, we have the pleasure of highlighting how clean our rivers have become and all the awesome ways people use our rivers for recreation. But our rivers still face challenges every single day. Our job is to find environmental problems and help solve them.”

The important work that remains to be done includes:

  • Removing deadbeat dams and making flood ready culverts to connect habitat and protect infrastructure
  • Restoring migratory fish populations so that millions of fish return each year
  • Fighting roll-backs of environmental regulations that protect our rivers, streams and lakes
  • Investing in aging and outdated water and wastewater infrastructure

CRC Executive Director Andrew Fisk and his wife Karen will make the trip down the Connecticut River.

The two most local events on the itinerary are as follows:

Saturday, July 29
What: 43rd Connecticut River Raft Race & Splash Mob
Where: Portland, CT
Details: 10am – 2pm, 43rd Annual Connecticut River Raft Race, Race begins at Gildersleeve Island and ends at the Portland Riverside Marina
Large community event with very creative rafts being raced.

What: Bass Fishing
Where: Salmon River boat launch E. Haddam, CT (Rt 149, E Haddam Moodus Road)
Details:  4:00 – 8:00 pm

Sunday, July 30
What: Onrust Cruise with CT River Museum
Where: Connecticut River Museum, Essex, CT
Details: 4 – 8pm, Join Connecticut River Museum and Connecticut River Conservancy to celebrate the completion of the Source to Sea Jump In Journey, food & drinks provided.
Sunset sail to the Sound on the historic Onrust, a replica of Dutch explorer Adriaen Block’s 1614 vessel, the first European ship to sail up the Connecticut River

What: Kayak the Salmon River & Pizza Party, Splash Mob
Where: Haddam, CT
Details: Paddle 10am – 12pm, Pizza Party 12 – 2pm

The remainder of the itinerary is as follows:

Sunday, July 16
What: Hike to the source of the Connecticut River, 4th Connecticut Lake to launch the journey
Where: Pittsburg, NH

Monday, July 17 to Wednesday, July 19
What: Paddle the upper reaches
Where: Canaan, VT to Guildhall, NH

Thursday, July 20
What: Pontoon Boat trip & Splash Mob
Where: Hanover, NH

Friday, July 21
What: River Parade & Community Paddle, Splash Mob
Where: Lyme, NH / Thetford, VT
Details: Launch from Orford, NH boat ramp, Paddle 1:30-3:30pm, Celebration at 599 River Road Lyme, NH 3:30-4:30pm. Lyme Town Band will perform on boats on river joined by flotilla of paddling friends.

Saturday, July 22
What: Reception & Community Conversation
Where: Windsor Welcome Center, 3 Railroad Ave., Windsor, VT
4-6pm, Walking tours of Windsor river recreation projects.

What: Float with the Kennetticut River Pigs & Splash Mob
Where: Cornish to Claremont, NH
Details: Paddle Launch at11am, near the Cornish-Windsor covered bridge.

Sunday, July 23
What: Riverboat Cruise with Tribal Leaders
Where: Northfield Mtn Recreation Facility, 99 Millers Falls Rd, Northfield, MA
Details: 12:45 – 3pm, Cruise departs from Riverview picnic area dock.
David Brule from Nolumbeka Project (MA), Roger Longtoe Sheehan Chief of Elnu Abenaki tribe (VT), and Rich Holschuh of VT Commission for Native American Affairs will speak about the Native American history of the river and their vision for its future.
What: Scuba Diving & Splash Mob
Where: Brattleboro, VT

Monday, July 24
What: Honor David Deen’s Retirement with CRC
Where: Whetstone Station, Brattleboro, VT
Details: 4-7pm, Recognize David Deen’s retirement after 19 years as River Steward with CRC and welcome new River Steward, Kathy Urffer.

Tuesday, July 25
What: Waterskiing at the Oxbow & Splash Mob
Where: Easthampton, MA

Wednesday, July 26
What: Watch a Dragon Boat Race & Splash Mob
Where: Northampton Community Rowing & Connecticut River Greenway Park, 80 Damon Road,Northampton, MA
Details: Approx 5:30 – 7pm, Watch a dragon boat challenge race with the Paradise City Dragon boat team and several of our local officials and community members. Learn relationship to Cancer Connection.

Thursday, July 27
What: Rowing Flotilla & Splash Mob
Where: Holyoke to Springfield, MA
Details: Time TBD, Rowing activities start at Holyoke Rows, 25 Jones Ferry Rd in Holyoke, and finish at Pioneer Valley Riverfront Club at the North Riverfront Park, 121 West Street, Springfield, MA. 

Friday, July 28
What: E. Windsor American Heritage River Commission Paddle & Picnic
Where: East Windsor, CT
Details: Approx. 2 – 6pm, Launch at Kings Island boat ramp in Enfield, CT. End paddle & picnic at Volunteer Park in E. Windsor, CT.
Paddle with an active group of local citizens who have worked to maintain the legacy of the American Heritage River designation of the CT River

What: Air-boating with Conte Refuge
Where: Enfield & Hartford, CT

 

Since 1952, Connecticut River Conservancy has been the voice for the Connecticut River watershed, from source to sea. We collaborate with partners across four states to protect and advocate for your rivers and educate and engage communities. We bring people together to prevent pollution, improve habitat, and promote enjoyment of your river and its tributary streams. Healthy rivers support healthy economies. To learn more about CRC, or to make a contribution to help protect the Connecticut River, visit www.ctriver.org.

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Big Band Event at Brewers Essex Island Marina Benefits Local Charities, Aug 20

Bob Hughes plays his saxophone on the dock at Brewers Essex Island Marina.

ESSEX — Saxophonist and band leader Bob Hughes is inspired by views of the Connecticut River at Brewers Essex Island Marina, where he and his 16-piece orchestra, “The Bob Hughes Big Band,” are scheduled to perform on Sunday, Aug. 20.  Billed as an “Island Swing,” the fundraising event is sponsored by the Essex Council of the Knights of Columbus of Our Lady of Sorrows Church.

The Bob Hughes Big Band will present a fundraising ‘Island Swing,’ Aug. 20.

Hughes, a resident of Essex, has had a lifelong love affair with big band and swing music.  In addition to the rare and vintage saxophone that has accompanied him for more than 70 years on his musical journey, Hughes is proud of his library of arrangements that he has used to educate himself in the styles of such greats as Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Artie Shaw and his personal favorite, Stan Kenton.

View from Brewers Essex Island Marina, where the Bob Hughes Big Band will give a concert, Aug. 20.

Hughes has led his Essex-based band for 15 years and is extremely proud of the exceptional local musicians that have bonded under his leadership.  Together, they are helping to keep top-level swing music alive in this part of New England.

In addition to outstanding music and dancing, attendees of the Aug. 20 “Island Swing” event, which will run from 5 to 8 p.m., will enjoy an evening of hot and cold hors d’oeuvres supplemented by a buffet, wine, beer and soft drinks.  Tickets are $50.  All proceeds will support local charities.

For tickets or more information, call Ed McCaffrey at 860-575-4694 or visit http://www.olos-sxorg/2017_knightsofcolumbus_islandswing.pdf

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Deep River Historical Society’s ‘Stone House’ Now Open Saturdays & Sundays

Stone House, owner by the Deep River Historical Society, opens July 1.

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Historical Society presents an opportunity to step back in time. This house and property is considered the crown jewel at 245 Main St., Deep River. The Stone  House was built in the 1840’s by Deacon Ezra Southworth for his bride. Three generations of the Southworth family have lived here and left their mark on Deep River.

Ada Southworth Munson bequeathed the family home to the Deep River Historical Society in 1946. It has since been used by them to highlight the town’s history along with offering events and community interaction.

There are many exhibits that showcase the lives of the family; sea faring stories to the Industrial Revolution, lace and textiles and of course the history of ivory in the area.

There is a World War I exhibit that tells of the Deep River “boys” in the Great War, which dates back 100 years.  The small settlement of Winthrop (in the northwest corner of Deep River) and is featured also with recent research updated.

Come and stop in for a free visit throughout the summer, Saturday and Sunday afternoons from 2 to 4 p.m., starting Saturday July 1st.  Greeters will be available to help with making the self-guided tour a learning experience.

Visit the Deep River Historical Society at their website at  http://www.deepriverhistoricalsociety.org or their Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/deepriverhistoricalsociety/

Call the DRHS at 860-526-1449 or the curator Rhonda Forristall, at 860-526-5086.

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