October 24, 2014

Letter: An Open Letter to Republican Women

To the Editor:

I am a fellow Republican woman who always wanted to be married, but I wanted a career instead of children. Thankfully, when I headed off to college in 1974, I had access to birth control and thanks to Roe v. Wade I also had access to what could be a very excruciating choice. [Thankfully I never had to make that choice.] So it was time travel for me to hear Art Linares’ answer to this question at the debate held on October 8 at the Valley Regional High School: “Where do you stand on the SCOTUS Hobby Lobby decision?” Linares only stated that “he was raised Catholic and isn’t up for appointment as a Supreme Court Justice.” In other words, he is against a woman’s right to choose even birth control!

Haven’t we already dealt with this issue 40 years ago? This extremely right-wing view could have totally changed my life and taken my choice to have a career away from me. Also, I would note that extremist views such as Linares’ are not a fit with his own district’s constituency.

Birthing a child sometimes can be life-threatening. Linares doesn’t care: “No exceptions.” I have had a colleague who died from a brain hemorrhage while she was trying to have a child.

I may have wanted to hear more on Linares’ stances, but it seems he doesn’t like to show up to debates.

Please, if you value your choices as a woman, do not vote for Art Linares.

Sincerely,

Sue Huybensz,
Deep River

Gun Rights Supporters Voice Opposition to Requested Chester Shooting Ordinance

CHESTER— Gun enthusiasts packed the Chester Meeting House Tuesday to express opposition to a requested municipal ordinance that would prohibit target shooting and discharge of a firearm in residential neighborhoods.

But a smaller group of residents expressed support for an ordinance, or some other restrictions, that would regulate the shooting that is frequently occurring on a nine-acre Wig Hill Road parcel that is owned by a Deep River resident. More than 150 residents, including some non-residents, turned out for a public information meeting that was called by the board of selectmen in response to a petition submitted in August by more than a dozen residents living near the Wig Hill Road property. The board of selectmen has taken no position on the requested ordinance.

The undeveloped parcel, owned by Deep River resident Warren Elliot, contains a fixed trap target shoot area that neighbors contend is a heavily used rifle range. John Ratchford, whose 85 Wig Hill Road property abuts the Elliot parcel, said an ordinance would enhance public safety by clarifying what type of shooting is allowed in a residential neighborhood. His wife, Sally, said the frequent sound of gunfire from large rifles has driven her indoors on sunny days.  Marzena Adams said she is concerned for the safety of visitors and children in the neighborhood, noting “it only takes one bullet.” Cynthia Monahan said she is “all for guns but I’m not for shooting in may back yard.”

Other residents, including many gun owners and some who shoot on the Elliott property, said any town ordinance would be unnecessary and could not be tailored to the topographical conditions of Chester. Some said target shooting should be expected in a rural town like Chester, and one resident compared the request for a shooting ordinance to a  controversial 2012 request from one resident for a zoning regulation to prohibit hens and roosters in residential areas.

Jason LaMark, of 62-1 Wig Hill Road, said a small hill separates the shooting area from any nearby homes that he contends are nearly 500 feet away. LaMark said existing state laws already prohibit reckless discharge of a firearms, and noted conditions on the Eilliot property have been monitored by police. He added that no rural towns in Connecticut have a local shooting ordinance.

First Selectman Edmund Meehan, who has also inspected the Elliot property, said  he believes the shooting “is being conducted in a safe way,”  based on differences in elevation and distance to nearby homes. Meehan said the board would discuss the shooting issue further at a future meeting, while also noting that any possible ordinance would require approval from voters at a town meeting.

Based on the volume of applause for speakers on both side of the issue at Tuesday’s meeting, a shooting ordinance would be unlikely to win voter approval at a town meeting. But resident Joe Cohen, speaking at a selectmen’s meeting that followed the public information meeting, said the shooting activity on Wig Hill Road is a land use issue. Cohen said selectmen should have investigated regulating the activity through that avenue before calling an information meeting on an ordinance.

Chester Historical Society Presents 11th Antiques & Jewelry Appraisal Program

On Saturday, Nov. 8, the Chester Historical Society is presenting its 11th Antiques & Jewelry Appraisal program, with 11 experts appraising art works, furniture, books, ephemera, jewelry, clocks and watches, coins and currency, stamps, glass, textiles, and much more.  It will be at St. Joseph’s Parish Center at 48 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 154) in Chester from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon.

Paul Indorf, of Connecticut Jewelry Appraisers, and Gay Sherman Weintz will appraise gemstones and fine jewelry and vintage costume jewelry. Garry Craig, of The Timekeeper in Wallingford (not shown), appraises watches and antique clocks.

Paul Indorf, of Connecticut Jewelry Appraisers, and Gay Sherman Weintz will appraise gemstones and fine jewelry and vintage costume jewelry. Garry Craig, of The Timekeeper in Wallingford (not shown), appraises watches and antique clocks.

Three of the appraisers are generalists, meaning they deal with the full range of antiques. With decades of experience as professional appraisers, they’ve seen it all. They are: Norman and Linda Legassie of Stepping Stones Antiques LLC in Old Saybrook, and Tom Perry of One of a Kind Antiques (www.OneOfaKindAntiques.com).

Tom Perry, of One of a Kind Antiques, is a longtime antiques expert and appraiser

Tom Perry, of One of a Kind Antiques, is a longtime antiques expert and appraiser

The other eight appraisers have specialties. They are: Garry Craig of The Timekeeper (watches and clocks); Orville Haberman of CT River Books (books and ephemera); Paul Indorf of Connecticut Jewelry Appraisers (fine jewelry and gemstones); Steve Lutar and Dave Passamano of Guilford Coin Exchange (coins, currency, and stamps); Tom Medlin of Essex (American furniture of the 18th and 19th centuries, American paintings, and base metals, especially brass candlesticks); John Newman of Deep River (American-made glass and Aladdin oil and electric lamps); and Gay Sherman Weintz (vintage and antique costume jewelry).

Orville Haberman, of Connecticut River Books in Deep River, appraises all types of books and ephemera.

Orville Haberman, of Connecticut River Books in Deep River, appraises all types of books and ephemera.

 

Each attendee may bring up to three separate items to be appraised. If the item is too large to carry, bring photographs (if it’s a table or dresser, bring in a drawer too). Verbal appraisals will cost $10 for the first item; $20 for 2 items; or $25 for 3 items. All proceeds will benefit the nonprofit Chester Historical Society and the Chester Museum at The Mill.

John Newman is an American glassware expert. If he doesn’t have the answers you need, generalist appraisers Norman and Linda Legassie and Tom Perry will.

John Newman is an American glassware expert. If he doesn’t have the answers you need, generalist appraisers Norman and Linda Legassie and Tom Perry will.

St. Joseph’s Parish Center is near the intersection of Main Street and Rte. 154 (Middlesex Avenue) in Chester. There is ample parking and handicapped access. More information, including directions to the event, is on the website, ChesterHistoricalSociety.org, or email your questions to chestercthistoricalsociety@gmail.com or call 860-558-4701.

Letter: Old Saybrook Causeway Litter is Eyesore and Safety Issue

To the Editor:

Walking the causeway in Old Saybrook is more of an obstacle course than relaxing.  The condition of the causeway is an absolute disgrace.  There are mothers with baby strollers walking in the roadway to avoid the mess and stench on the sidewalk left by fishermen.

The blood stains, fish parts, plastic bags, fishing hooks, fishing line, broken nets, beer and liquor bottles are trashing one of Old Saybrook’s most scenic areas.  This litter is not just an eyesore and safety issue, but also has a major impact on our wildlife.

Others who walk the causeway see the same mess and they have gone to express their concerns to the First Selectman’s Office who in turn told them he has written letters to the DEEP, and all to no avail was his response.

Fishing is permitted year round here.  Unsafe habits of the fishermen will continue to destroy our beautiful Sound and endanger our wildlife.  Just as the town beach is regulated, the causeway needs to be too.  Perhaps charges need to be set per fishing pole/net to offset cleanup costs and deter such behavior.  Maybe your readers will have other thoughts how this abuse can be stopped.

Sincerely,

Christina LaVaughn,
Local resident

Essex Selectmen Schedule Nov. 5 Public Information Meeting on Ivoryton Main Street Project

ESSEX— The board of selectmen has scheduled a Nov. 5 public information meeting on a grant-funded improvement project for a section of Main Street in the Ivoryton village. The session will begin at 7 p.m. in the auditorium at town hall.
The project, which includes four new raised crosswalks, new curbing and sidewalks and some new lighting, is to be funded by a $435,000 grant awarded last year from the state’s Main Streets Investment Fund program. The town has hiredAnchor Engineering Services of Glastonbury to prepare design plans for the improvements.

Selectwoman Stacia Libby, who been coordinating the project said at Wednesday’s board meeting that project engineers would be at the Nov. 5 meeting to review the plans with residents and answer questions. Libby said the plans have been reviewed by the parks and recreation and planning commissions, and had received a favorable response at a recent meeting with members of the Ivoryton Alliance, a group comprised of business and property owners in Ivoryton Village. The preliminary design plans will also be on display at the Ivoryton Library before the Nov. 5 meeting

The plans also include removal of a paved island at the intersection of Main and Summit streets that was constructed in the early 1970s. The removal would create a wider T-shaped intersection that would be safer and more convenient for winter snow plows and fire trucks from the Ivoryton Firehouse on Summit Street. Selectmen are hoping to put the project out to bid by May 2015 for construction next year.