October 25, 2014

33rd Senate Candidates Face Off at Final Debate in Clinton

CLINTON— The three candidates for the 33rd Senate District seat faced off in a final campaign debate at Morgan High School in Clinton Thursday, with the sharpest exchanges coming during the final minutes of the one hour session.

About 100 voters turned out for the debate that was organized by students in the school’s current issues class, with students posing questions and moderating the session. It is expected to be the final public debate between one-term incumbent Republican Sen. Art Linares of Westbrook, Democratic challenger Emily Bjornberg of Lyme, and Green Party nominee Colin Bennett of Westbrook.

The candidates stuck to familiar themes through most of the debate. Linares pledged to work to reduce state taxes on gasoline and phase out taxes on retirement benefits while touting his endorsement by the Connecticut Business and Industry Association. Bjornberg said Linares has “voted against the most vulnerable among us,” over the past two years while noting her endorsements from the Connecticut Working Families Party, unions representing teachers and college professors and various women’s and environmental groups.

Bennett, declaring he “will not pander,” occasionally used his time to raise issues that were not part of the initial question, including racial justices, police shootings of minority citizens, and the expense of incarceration for non-violent crimes. He called for a “maximum wage” rather than just increasing the minimum wage and higher tax rates for the wealthy.

Most of the exchanges were cordial in a formant that did not discourage applause and cheers from the audience. But the gloves came off in the final minutes after Bjornberg noted that Linares is “the only person on this stage who has proposed a tax increase,” as she pointed to Republican budget proposals backed by Linares that would eliminate the state’s earned income tax credit that provides limited cash rebates to low income workers. Bjornberg also criticized Linares votes on issues related to the environment and women’s rights.

Linares said the earned income tax credit is ” a tax credit for people who don’t pay taxes.” In his closing statement, Linares said Bjornberg “desperate and void of solutions, has begun a smear campaign against me in regards to women and the environment.”, before pointing to his support for funding for the Preserve land purchase and labeling of genetically modified foods.

Bennett used his closing statement to claim that some Bjornberg supporters have contacted him and urged him to withdraw from the race to avoid pulling liberal-leaning votes from Bjornberg. While confirming that he would “rather see Emily elected than Art,” Bennett said such efforts are “100 percent antithetical to democracy” and vowed to continue his campaign to the Nov. 4 vote

The 33rd District includes the towns of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Portland, Westbrook and portions of Old Saybrook.

Three Dogs Quarantined After Attack on Smaller Dog in Ivoryton

ESSEX— Three dogs are being held at the town dog pound after an morning incident on Oct. 14 where the dogs attacked and killed a smaller dog on Chord Lane in the Ivoryton section. The fatal attack was witnessed by neighborhood children waiting for school bus pick up.

Phil Beckman, of 16 Chord Lane, raised the issue at the Oct. 15 meeting of the board of selectmen. First Selectman Norman Needleman said the three dogs were brought to the town shelter by Animal Control Officer Jae Wolf, with the incident under investigation by town police.

The dogs, described as mixed Labradors, are owned by Pauline Budney of 23 Chord Lane. The dog that was killed, a Papillon, was owned by Robert and Mary Lizotte of 6 Chord Lane. The three dogs are expected to be held at the town shelter for 14 days, though Wolf could not be reached Friday for comment on the status of the dogs.

Letter: Road Tolls Not Simple Solution to Gas Tax Replacement

To the Editor:

I attended the debate between Representative Phil Miller and Challenger Bob Siegrist at the Valley High School. I enjoyed the policy debate over issues that face Connecticut. There was one comment that did catch my attention by Representative Miller when he said he wanted to get rid of the gas tax and replace it with tolls. I love a good research project and looked into this campaign idea.

When you combine both the gasoline taxes (gas tax and the gross receipts tax) it totals approx. $900M. One would say great, get rid of burdensome taxes. However, to replace that revenue one would have to litter CT with tolls. And remember that tolls cost money. For comparison, the New Jersey Turnpike Authority incurred approx. $470,000 in costs last year to run them. By the way, there is currently a Federal prohibition of tolls on all interstate highways in CT as they are currently configured (with few exceptions).

While CT is discussing tolls in Southwestern CT along 95, it is part of a pilot program to strategically place tolls in a limited basis in the hopes of reducing traffic congestion, not to raise revenue. In fact, one of those exceptions to place tolls in CT includes all non-interstate highways. Rt. 9 is a non-interstate highway. Get ready for more traffic on Rt. 9 if tolls go up. Do we really need I95 traffic in our backyard?

I would only suggest that before you make any campaign suggestions as massive as this one that you do the research first. What we don’t need are more ways to raise revenue and more spending in a bloated budget. Let’s vote for a candidate who won’t raid the transportation fund and wants to fix our roads and highways, not create more traffic on them. I’m voting for Bob Siegrist on November 4th.

Sincerely,

Ashley Amaio
Chester

 

Letter: Linares has the Business Experience

To the Editor:
I just received the latest campaign mailer from Emily Bjornberg in which she repeats claims that she has made during her debates with Senator Linares regarding his use of “cheap Chinese products over American jobs” in his business.  This attack on Senator Linares is odd in that Emily also claims a great deal of experience working in her family’s small business, Reynolds Subaru, a company that has not sold an American brand car since the Studebaker in 1964.

The hypocrisy is not the real issue. The lack of understanding of the needs of small business and their need to compete in a real world based upon cost of goods sold and satisfying customers’ need is the real issue.

Obviously Emily’s family recognized the changing environment in the 1960’s for automobile purchasers and adapted to the new market realities by importing cars that meet consumer demands.  What she fails to understand, and why she is a bad candidate for representing small business, is that Senator Linares has had to deliver to his clients the product they want at a price that is competitive.

By the way, how many of us have products, for example televisions, or for that matter automobiles, that are entirely made from parts that are only made in the USA?  I suggest that not many can make that claim.

I will vote for Art Linares, a realist, with real business experience.  He knows how to deliver a product that his customers want, knows how to create jobs, and knows how to stimulate business.  Emily apparently does not have that real world knowledge.

Sincerely,

 

John Ackermann
Essex

Essex Corinthian Flo Wins the Tri Club Series

Toby Doyle and the crew of Flo race to honors in the2014 Tri Club River Race Series

Toby Doyle and the crew of Flo race to honors in the2014 Tri Club River Race Series

The yacht Flo skippered by Toby Doyle from the Essex Corinthian and Pettipaug Yacht Clubs, took overall honors in the 2014 Tri Club River Race Series.  The Tri Club series consists of three Connecticut River races sponsored each October by the Essex, Essex Corinthian, and Pettipaug Yacht Clubs.

Joined by crew members Bill Robinson, John Peterson, and Cindy Gibbs; Toby guided Flo to first place in the Thomas Willets Memorial Race, sponsored by the Essex Yacht Club on October 4th; and the Tom Clark Memorial Race sponsored by the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club on October 11th.

L to R:  Bill Robinson, Deb Sands, Toby Doyle, and Cindy Gibbs.  Not pictured:  John Peterson.

L to R: Bill Robinson, Deb Sands, Toby Doyle, and Cindy Gibbs. Not pictured: John Peterson.

Last year’s defender, Celebration, skipped by Jeff Going and Ed Birch, won the Charles Birch Memorial Race sponsored by the Pettipaug Yacht Club on October 18th.  Jeff and Ed are past commodores of both the Essex Corinthian and Pettipaug Yacht Clubs.

While each race presented unique challenges around wind, weather, current, and river navigation; every race provided crews fun sailing and camaraderie during and after racing.

The series traditionally ends at the Decommissioning Party of the Pettipaug Yacht Club where the Tri Club River Race trophy was presented to the winning crew.

Letter: Linares Debate Response Misunderstood

To the Editor:

I attended the debate between State Senator Art Linares, Emily Bjornberg, and Colin Bennett on October 8th at Valley Regional High School. With regard to the letter from Sue Huybensz, who also attended the debate, I am certain that she misunderstood the discussion. In particular, she completely misinterpreted the response by Senator Linares regarding his stand on the SCOTUS Hobby Lobby decision. In no way did Senator Linares say that he is opposed to a woman’s right to choose. He pointed out that this issue is not germane to candidates running for the State Senate. If he were running for the United States Senate or were in line for consideration for a position on the Supreme Court, the issue of what methods of birth control must be paid for by a private enterprise would be a worthwhile topic for debate. At a debate for election to State Senator, the issue is a red herring. When Art shared that he was raised Catholic, he was pointing out that nobody’s personal and religious beliefs supersede the laws of our country. The aim of Senator Linares on the evening of October 8th was to bring the debate’s discussion back to issues that are germane to CT residents, issues that a state senator is empowered to do something about: returning prosperity and top-notch educational and  professional opportunity to the residents of our state.  As a CT woman, I plan to cast my vote for Senator Art Linares.

Sincerely,
Alice van Deursen
Essex

Friends of the Essex Library Donate $10,000 to the Library for New Front Doors

Friends Essex Library October 2014

Linda Levene, President of the Friends of the Essex Library presented Richard Conroy, Director of the Essex Library with a check for $10,000 at the Annual Meeting of the Library on Wednesday evening October 15.  The donation will be used to install new, easy to operate front doors on the Library’s Grove Street entrance.  Richard Conroy thanked the Friends for their gift, saying it would be “…appreciated by everyone each time they visit the Library.”

The Friends donation is the result of two very successful fundraising events this Fall:  “Our Library Rocks” in September and the annual Fall Book Sale in October.

New Guests on the Lawns of Essex, Deep River and Chester – Lawn Signs

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It started with the posting of just a few lawns signs on the lawns of Essex, Deep River and Chester. Among the first signs in view were those of Bob Siegrist, Republican candidate for State Representative, who is running against incumbent State Representative Phil Miller. Notably, the signs that Siegrist put up in Deep River were “extra large,” so that they could not be missed. Then, shortly thereafter, Siegrist’s lawn signs were then even exceeded in size by those of his Republican running mate, State Senator Art Linares, who is running for re-election.

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Where were the Democratic lawn signs one began to wonder?   They first appeared modestly along North Main Street in Essex.  Then individual lawn signs began poking into view, including the normal size signs of Emily Bjornberg, Democratic candidate for State Senate, who is running against Senator Linares, and signs for State Representative Phil Miller, who Siegrist is challenging.

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In the deluge of lawn signs that was ultimately upon us, the Republicans devoted front row positioning, in cluster after cluster, to the election of Anselmo Delia, the party’s candidate for Judge of Probate. The incumbent Judge of Probate, Terrance Lomme, then not only responded in kind with a splattering of lawns signs, he even went so far as to pay for a commercial billboard located  on Main Street coming into Deep River.

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Election Day is November 4 this year. Shortly thereafter the lawn signs will disappear, and our area’s laws will return to their normal condition.

University Professors Endorse Emily Bjornberg for State Senate

Democratic State Senate Candidate Emily Bjornberg

Democratic State Senate Candidate Emily Bjornberg

On Tuesday Democratic State Senate Candidate Emily Bjornberg announced the endorsement of her campaign by the Connecticut State University American Association of University Professors (CSU-AAUP) and the Congress of Connecticut Community Colleges (4C’s). The two organizations are only the latest of a number of groups representing educators who have endorsed Bjornberg and her vision for education in Connecticut.

“In these times, some kind of post-secondary education has become a practical necessity for middle class life. The cost of college is constantly increasing, whether you are aiming for a two-year or a four-year degree. Options for technical education in high-demand fields seem to be shrinking, rather than growing. We must widen the doors of opportunity for young people, and for others looking to boost their careers,” said Bjornberg.

In a letter of endorsement, Mary Ann Mahoy, Chair of the CSU-AAUP wrote that, “This endorsement is a result of careful consideration of your positions and our perception that you recognize the needs of public higher education in Connecticut. Your efforts to maintain and improve public higher education in the State of Connecticut will be most appreciated.”

The CSU-AAUP represents faculty at four state universities across Connecticut, including Central Connecticut State University in New Britain, Eastern Connecticut State University in Willimantic, Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, and Western Connecticut State University in Danbury.

The Congress of Connecticut Community Colleges (4C’s) represents full-time and part-time faculty and other professional employees at Connecticut’s 12 community colleges, including Middlesex Community College.

Emily Bjornberg has also been endorsed by Connecticut’s public school teachers. Both the Connecticut Education Association (CEA) and the Connecticut affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) have voted to endorse Bjornberg for the November 4th General Election. The organizations collectively represent all of Connecticut’s public school teachers.

“Education is the tried and true path to a brighter future. As mother with two children in the Lyme public schools, I will work tirelessly to ensure that in our community, your opportunities in life are limited only by your work ethic and determination,” said Emily Bjornberg.

Bjornberg added, “At present our small towns are not getting their fair share of education aid from the state, which puts upward pressure on all of our property taxes. We need a stronger advocate in Hartford who can deliver results for our communities.”

More than 2,100 CEA and AFT Connecticut members live in the towns of the 33rd State Senate District, which includes the communities of: Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland and Westbrook.

 

Letter: An Open Letter to Republican Women

To the Editor:

I am a fellow Republican woman who always wanted to be married, but I wanted a career instead of children. Thankfully, when I headed off to college in 1974, I had access to birth control and thanks to Roe v. Wade I also had access to what could be a very excruciating choice. [Thankfully I never had to make that choice.] So it was time travel for me to hear Art Linares’ answer to this question at the debate held on October 8 at the Valley Regional High School: “Where do you stand on the SCOTUS Hobby Lobby decision?” Linares only stated that “he was raised Catholic and isn’t up for appointment as a Supreme Court Justice.” In other words, he is against a woman’s right to choose even birth control!

Haven’t we already dealt with this issue 40 years ago? This extremely right-wing view could have totally changed my life and taken my choice to have a career away from me. Also, I would note that extremist views such as Linares’ are not a fit with his own district’s constituency.

Birthing a child sometimes can be life-threatening. Linares doesn’t care: “No exceptions.” I have had a colleague who died from a brain hemorrhage while she was trying to have a child.

I may have wanted to hear more on Linares’ stances, but it seems he doesn’t like to show up to debates.

Please, if you value your choices as a woman, do not vote for Art Linares.

Sincerely,

Sue Huybensz,
Deep River

Gun Rights Supporters Voice Opposition to Requested Chester Shooting Ordinance

CHESTER— Gun enthusiasts packed the Chester Meeting House Tuesday to express opposition to a requested municipal ordinance that would prohibit target shooting and discharge of a firearm in residential neighborhoods.

But a smaller group of residents expressed support for an ordinance, or some other restrictions, that would regulate the shooting that is frequently occurring on a nine-acre Wig Hill Road parcel that is owned by a Deep River resident. More than 150 residents, including some non-residents, turned out for a public information meeting that was called by the board of selectmen in response to a petition submitted in August by more than a dozen residents living near the Wig Hill Road property. The board of selectmen has taken no position on the requested ordinance.

The undeveloped parcel, owned by Deep River resident Warren Elliot, contains a fixed trap target shoot area that neighbors contend is a heavily used rifle range. John Ratchford, whose 85 Wig Hill Road property abuts the Elliot parcel, said an ordinance would enhance public safety by clarifying what type of shooting is allowed in a residential neighborhood. His wife, Sally, said the frequent sound of gunfire from large rifles has driven her indoors on sunny days.  Marzena Adams said she is concerned for the safety of visitors and children in the neighborhood, noting “it only takes one bullet.” Cynthia Monahan said she is “all for guns but I’m not for shooting in may back yard.”

Other residents, including many gun owners and some who shoot on the Elliott property, said any town ordinance would be unnecessary and could not be tailored to the topographical conditions of Chester. Some said target shooting should be expected in a rural town like Chester, and one resident compared the request for a shooting ordinance to a  controversial 2012 request from one resident for a zoning regulation to prohibit hens and roosters in residential areas.

Jason LaMark, of 62-1 Wig Hill Road, said a small hill separates the shooting area from any nearby homes that he contends are nearly 500 feet away. LaMark said existing state laws already prohibit reckless discharge of a firearms, and noted conditions on the Eilliot property have been monitored by police. He added that no rural towns in Connecticut have a local shooting ordinance.

First Selectman Edmund Meehan, who has also inspected the Elliot property, said  he believes the shooting “is being conducted in a safe way,”  based on differences in elevation and distance to nearby homes. Meehan said the board would discuss the shooting issue further at a future meeting, while also noting that any possible ordinance would require approval from voters at a town meeting.

Based on the volume of applause for speakers on both side of the issue at Tuesday’s meeting, a shooting ordinance would be unlikely to win voter approval at a town meeting. But resident Joe Cohen, speaking at a selectmen’s meeting that followed the public information meeting, said the shooting activity on Wig Hill Road is a land use issue. Cohen said selectmen should have investigated regulating the activity through that avenue before calling an information meeting on an ordinance.

“A Letter From Paris” is Back! Amidst Economic Depression, Two Nobel Prizes for France Lift the Communal Spirit

Nicole Prévost Logan

Nicole Prévost Logan

We are delighted to welcome back Nicole Logan, who has returned to Paris for the winter from her summer home in Essex.  She writes our weekly, “Letter from Paris,” which gives a unique insight into France and the French.  Today she writes about the depressing state of the French economy and contrasts it to the tremendous excitement that winning two Nobel Prizes has brought to the country.

It is the time of year when financial laws are voted on and budgets submitted.  The 2015 budget represents a triple hurdle for France since the country is under scrutiny from the European Union (EU) Commission in Brussels headed now by Jean Claude Yuncker from Luxemburg; the Eurogroup (made up of the ministers of finances from the 18 members of the euro zone) and led by Jeroen Dijsselbloem from the Netherlands; and finally by the European Council, presided over by Herman Van Rompuy from Belgium.

Will France meet the criteria set in the 1992 Maestrich Treaty, namely an annual deficit of less than 3 percent and a public debt no more than 60 percent of that GDP?   It is most unlikely, since the latest figures stand at a 4.3 percent deficit.  François Hollande is criticized for not having used the two years respite, granted in 2013, to undertake structural reforms.  Instead, he has limited his action to carry out an austerity program by steadily increasing taxes on the most vulnerable individuals like retirees, wage earners or small entrepreneurs.

So to-day the French government is scrambling for ways to reduce its expenses by 21 billion Euros.  Three sudden measures have shocked public opinion:  closing of the Val de Grace hospital, an historical institution in Paris, the military base of Chalon, and the oldest air base of France in Dijon.  More savings are on the table but promise to provoke violent confrontation since they are all considered as untouchable taboos.

Given the fact France’s economy is the second of Europe, the widespread opinion is that it cannot be allowed to fail.  Imposing sanctions of 0.02 percent would make it even more impossible for the country to pull out of a recession with dire consequences for the rest of the continent.  Behind the scenes, the new French Minister of Economy Emmanuel Macron and his German counterpart are at work on the elaboration of a common investment policy.

Two Nobel prizes have just been awarded to French nationals. This unexpected news has definitely lifted the spirits here.

Patrick Modiano

Patrick Modiano

Patrick Modiano received the prize for Literature, following in the footsteps of Camus, Sartre and Gide.  Several of his many novels take place during the German Occupation of France. One of them inspired Louis Malle for his outstanding 1974 film Lacombe Lucien.

The Nobel prize for Economics is particularly interesting because it rewards  not only an individual, but also an institution.  Jean Tirone, born in 1953 and a graduate of the Ecole Polytechnique, holds a PhD from MIT.  In 2007, he founded  the Toulouse School of Economics (note that this name is in English), inspired  from an American model.  It is today one of the world’s 10 most important centers for economic research.

Tirone belongs to the school of economists using a rigorous scientific and mathematical approach.  His research is centered on the regulation of free market economy.  Tirone’s nomination follows the phenomenal success of Thomas Piketty ‘s ” Capital in the Twenty First Century” published in 2013.

 

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About the author:  Nicole Prévost Logan divides her time between Essex and Paris, spending summers in the former and winters in the latter.  She will write a regular column for us from her Paris home where her topics will include politics, economy, social unrest — mostly in France — but also in other European countries.  She also will cover a variety of art exhibits and the performing arts in Europe.  Logan is the author of ‘Forever on the Road: A Franco-American Family’s Thirty Years in the Foreign Service,’ an autobiography of her life as the wife of an overseas diplomat, who lived in 10 foreign countries on three continents.  Her experiences during her foreign service life included being in Lebanon when civil war erupted, excavating a medieval city in Moscow and spending a week under house arrest in Guinea.

Chester Historical Society Presents 11th Antiques & Jewelry Appraisal Program

On Saturday, Nov. 8, the Chester Historical Society is presenting its 11th Antiques & Jewelry Appraisal program, with 11 experts appraising art works, furniture, books, ephemera, jewelry, clocks and watches, coins and currency, stamps, glass, textiles, and much more.  It will be at St. Joseph’s Parish Center at 48 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 154) in Chester from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon.

Paul Indorf, of Connecticut Jewelry Appraisers, and Gay Sherman Weintz will appraise gemstones and fine jewelry and vintage costume jewelry. Garry Craig, of The Timekeeper in Wallingford (not shown), appraises watches and antique clocks.

Paul Indorf, of Connecticut Jewelry Appraisers, and Gay Sherman Weintz will appraise gemstones and fine jewelry and vintage costume jewelry. Garry Craig, of The Timekeeper in Wallingford (not shown), appraises watches and antique clocks.

Three of the appraisers are generalists, meaning they deal with the full range of antiques. With decades of experience as professional appraisers, they’ve seen it all. They are: Norman and Linda Legassie of Stepping Stones Antiques LLC in Old Saybrook, and Tom Perry of One of a Kind Antiques (www.OneOfaKindAntiques.com).

Tom Perry, of One of a Kind Antiques, is a longtime antiques expert and appraiser

Tom Perry, of One of a Kind Antiques, is a longtime antiques expert and appraiser

The other eight appraisers have specialties. They are: Garry Craig of The Timekeeper (watches and clocks); Orville Haberman of CT River Books (books and ephemera); Paul Indorf of Connecticut Jewelry Appraisers (fine jewelry and gemstones); Steve Lutar and Dave Passamano of Guilford Coin Exchange (coins, currency, and stamps); Tom Medlin of Essex (American furniture of the 18th and 19th centuries, American paintings, and base metals, especially brass candlesticks); John Newman of Deep River (American-made glass and Aladdin oil and electric lamps); and Gay Sherman Weintz (vintage and antique costume jewelry).

Orville Haberman, of Connecticut River Books in Deep River, appraises all types of books and ephemera.

Orville Haberman, of Connecticut River Books in Deep River, appraises all types of books and ephemera.

 

Each attendee may bring up to three separate items to be appraised. If the item is too large to carry, bring photographs (if it’s a table or dresser, bring in a drawer too). Verbal appraisals will cost $10 for the first item; $20 for 2 items; or $25 for 3 items. All proceeds will benefit the nonprofit Chester Historical Society and the Chester Museum at The Mill.

John Newman is an American glassware expert. If he doesn’t have the answers you need, generalist appraisers Norman and Linda Legassie and Tom Perry will.

John Newman is an American glassware expert. If he doesn’t have the answers you need, generalist appraisers Norman and Linda Legassie and Tom Perry will.

St. Joseph’s Parish Center is near the intersection of Main Street and Rte. 154 (Middlesex Avenue) in Chester. There is ample parking and handicapped access. More information, including directions to the event, is on the website, ChesterHistoricalSociety.org, or email your questions to chestercthistoricalsociety@gmail.com or call 860-558-4701.

Pagliugos Win Ivoryton Library’s 5K Road/Trail Race

Meghan Pagliuco

Meghan Pagliuco

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Christopher Pagliuco

Christopher Pagliuco and Meghan Pagliuco were the overall winners in the Ivoryton Library’s Run Local Read Local 5K Road Trail on Saturday, October 18. Beating 150 other competitors, Christopher was the first to cross the finish line at 19:17 minutes and Meghan finished first in the women’s group at 21:43 minutes.

Second place overall winners in the men’s and women’s groups were Paul Mezick and Nikki Bauman. Third place overall winners were Nick Klomp and Anna Iacovella.

The winners of all age groups as well as the times for all participants can be found on the website of RAT RACE Timing: www.aratrace.com.

The morning’s competition began with the Pumpkin Run for children 8 and under. Directed by the Library’s “Queen of Hearts”, the children’s librarian, Elizabeth Bartlett, the race ended with pumpkin decorating and storytelling for the 20 children participating.

Of the several costume awards, the best group costume prize went to Jerry and Louisa Ketron for their Ocktoberfest costumes.

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This was the Library’s 5th annual race and was sponsored in kind by the Essex Land Trust, Essex Park and Recreation, Essex Police Department, Essex Fire Department, the Ivoryton Congregational Church,  The Order of Ancient Weeders, Riverside Press, Olsen Sanitation, CL &P, Carl Echtman, Essex Boy Scouts (Troop 12), the Village of Ivoryton and the Town of Essex.  Scott’s Essex Farm Market provided the pumpkins for the children.

The fabulous food donations were generously provided by the Blue Hound Cookery, The Ivoryton Tavern, Panera Bread of Waterford, Adams Market, Colonial Market, Stop and Shop of Old Saybrook, Big Y, and Dunkin’ Donuts of Deep River.

The Library is grateful to the many volunteers who worked tirelessly for months up to and including Saturday morning to make this fun, family-friendly event the success that it was.

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Deep River Republican Town Committee Endorses Linares, Siegrist

The Deep River Republican Town Committee takes great pride in endorsing Art Linares for a second term as State Senator of the 33rd District and Bob Siegrist for his first term as State Representative of the 36th District, along with the other well qualified Republican candidates running this year.  Art and Bob representing us in Hartford will help attract more business, resulting in lower taxes.

Art Linares, seated State Senator for the 33rd Senate District, encompasses the towns of Chester, Clinton, Colchester, Deep River, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland, and Westbrook.  Senator Linares is a second generation American and resides in Westbrook.  Sen. Linares attended Westbrook public schools and graduated from the Sykes College of Business at the University of Tampa in Florida, where he majored in entrepreneurship, developing his own company as he earned a college degree. Senator Linares co-founded Greenskies, a successful, Middletown-based, commercial solar energy company.

Sen. Linares is Ranking Member of the Connecticut General Assembly’s Banks Committee and Ranking Member of the Select Committee on Children. Linares also serves on the Commerce and Education Committees. Senator Linares has a solid voting record – from protecting people’s rights as stated in the state constitution to understanding that jobs and business growth is the way to balance budgets, not tax increases. He has stood up for children and families, while also protecting the rights of seniors and the environment.    Senator Linares has been endorsed by the National Federation of Independent Businesses and the Connecticut REALTORS, who fully evaluate candidates in determining who may best ensure there is a positive environment for living in or transferring property in Connecticut.  Real estate is essential to economic recovery and stability in the state and the nation and helps to build communities.

Bob Siegrist is the challenger for the 36th Representative District. His main focus as State Representative is all about the economy. A combination of lower taxes with more and better paying jobs is what Connecticut needs to improve our economy and with Bob as State Representative, he will vote against any budget that includes another tax hike for Connecticut’s residents.

Art Linares and Bob Siegrist will form a powerful team in Hartford to reverse ever-increasing State spending, hold the line on any new taxes, and encourage new business growth.   Be sure to vote on Tuesday November 4th and we encourage you to vote for Art, Bob and the Republican team.

Pursuit Athletic Performance Announces Grand Opening in Chester

pursuitCHESTER — Pursuit Athletic Performance, an industry leader in gait analysis, athletic training, and sports medicine, is pleased to announce its grand opening and open house on Wednesday, November 12 from 6pm to 8pm at its new state-of-the-art facility. All are invited to meet the staff and tour the 7,000 square-foot space, located at 8 Inspiration Lane in Chester, Conn.

“We are very excited about our expansion, which allows us the opportunity to bring kids’ injury prevention boot-camp classes, adult fitness classes, yoga, strength and conditioning, and our unique advanced gait analysis process, to the entire Middlesex county region,” said Coach Al Lyman, co-owner of Pursuit Athletic Performance. “Our grand opening and open house will allow us to show the public what we have to offer, and we can’t wait.” The business was previously located in a smaller space in Old Saybrook, Conn.

Speaking about the youth boot camps, Coach Graham Rider (Ticks youth lacrosse and Valley Regional High School lacrosse) said: “These programs have been great for our athletes. I’ve already seen improvements in quickness and agility, and there’s no question in my mind that this work will reduce the number of injuries we see. I absolutely recommend the classes to any parent who’s serious about keeping their kids healthy or helping them get to the next level, and I can tell you that my own kids are having a blast.”

About Pursuit Athletic Performance: Pursuit Athletic Performance is a company created by athletes for athletes. Its mission is to provide cutting-edge fitness and injury prevention classes and personal training that help and support athletes of any age, ability level and sport to be injury resistant, stronger, faster, and better.

For more information about the grand opening and new space, visit the facility’s website at: http://pursuittrainingcenter.com,

For more information and images about the grand opening and recent “Team Pursuit” open house, visit the company’s blog at: http://pursuitathleticperformance.com/2014/pursuit-athletic-performance-announces-grand-opening-and-open-house/

For more information about the company’s unique gait analysis process and “Team Pursuit Athletic Performance”, visit http://pursuitathleticperformance.com, or follow the company on Twitter: @PursuitAthlete.

 

Test Results Place Country School Math Students at the Top – Worldwide

TIMSS FINALIn an international math assessment, Madison Country School 4th Graders placed in the highest band possible—alongside students in Singapore and Chinese Taipei.

Last year, when they were in 4th Grade, members of The Country School’s Class of 2018 participated in a math assessment known as the Connecticut Independent School Test of Mathematics. Given through the Connecticut Association of Independent Schools, the test is a replica assessment drawn from previous administrations of the international math test, Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). By participating in the test, Connecticut independent schools are given a benchmark, allowing them to compare Connecticut students to relative students in 26 countries in the TIMSS sample.

The results, announced recently by the Connecticut Association of Independent Schools, include some great news for The Country School: The score of the average Country School math student falls in the highest band possible. In fact, the score of the average TCS student “places the school at or above the achievement level of the countries in the top decile of performance (Singapore and Chinese Taipei),” according to an announcement from Doug Lyons, Executive Director of the Connecticut Association of Independent Schools. “You and the faculty at The Country School should be proud of this result,” Dr. Lyons said. “Bravo!”

John Fixx, Head of School at The Country School, said the school is immensely proud of the results—and of students and teachers. “For almost 60 years, The Country School has reviewed and adopted best practices in education,” he said. “I am so proud of our faculty for wholly embracing curricular advances and for their deep commitment to our students. Likewise, I am proud of our students for being such eager and enthusiastic learners.”

Mr. Fixx also thanked the community for its commitment to teacher professional development. “To prepare our graduates for the finest secondary schools and high schools in the United States requires a perpetual commitment to the professional development of our faculty,” he said. “It is both exciting and rewarding to see The Country School community come together to support our students, who show they are among the best in the world.”

Founded in 1955, The Country School is a coeducational, independent day school serving students in PreSchool through Grade 8. At The Country School, a rigorous academic program is accompanied by a commitment to hands-on learning, a dynamic STEAM curriculum (integrated science, technology, engineering, arts, and math), and a focus on the whole child. The Country School prepares students to meet the future with confidence, encouraging them to reach their highest, both in school and in life. Learn more at www.thecountryschool.org.

Letter: Old Saybrook Causeway Litter is Eyesore and Safety Issue

To the Editor:

Walking the causeway in Old Saybrook is more of an obstacle course than relaxing.  The condition of the causeway is an absolute disgrace.  There are mothers with baby strollers walking in the roadway to avoid the mess and stench on the sidewalk left by fishermen.

The blood stains, fish parts, plastic bags, fishing hooks, fishing line, broken nets, beer and liquor bottles are trashing one of Old Saybrook’s most scenic areas.  This litter is not just an eyesore and safety issue, but also has a major impact on our wildlife.

Others who walk the causeway see the same mess and they have gone to express their concerns to the First Selectman’s Office who in turn told them he has written letters to the DEEP, and all to no avail was his response.

Fishing is permitted year round here.  Unsafe habits of the fishermen will continue to destroy our beautiful Sound and endanger our wildlife.  Just as the town beach is regulated, the causeway needs to be too.  Perhaps charges need to be set per fishing pole/net to offset cleanup costs and deter such behavior.  Maybe your readers will have other thoughts how this abuse can be stopped.

Sincerely,

Christina LaVaughn,
Local resident