May 23, 2015

Shoreline Artist Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd Holds One-Woman Art Show, Reception at Chester Village West Tonight

Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd in her in-residence studio at Chester Village West

Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd in her in-residence studio at Chester Village West

CHESTER — Accomplished artist Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd will hold a one-woman art show and reception on Friday, May 22, from 4 to 6 p.m. at Chester Village West, 317 W. Main St., Chester, CT 06412.

Free and open to the public, the art show and sale will include refreshments and live music.

Boyd’s art show will offer a retrospective sampling of her talents, including a mixture of portraiture, landscape, still life, abstract and collage in various media.

Boyd’s artistic training began at an early age. She has worked with American Impressionist painter and teacher Frank Vincent Dumond and abstract artist Theodore Roszak. A member of Connecticut Women Artists, Inc., for the past 35 years, she has been active as an organizer, juror and painter with art associations and centers in Guilford, Madison and Clinton.

She has had her work shown at the Sylvan Gallery in Clinton, Gallery One in in Old Saybrook, the Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme and the Wall Street Gallery in Madison.

For more information on the May 22 art show and reception, call 860.526.6800 or email chestervillagewest@lcsnet.com.

Conversations About Regionalization Continue at Deep River Elementary, May 26

REGION 4 — A series of informal conversation about Regionalization for parents at elementary schools will be held on the dates indicated below. Coffee and pastries will be provided.

Superintendent Dr. Levy, the school principal and board of education will be available at each location for informal discussions.

  • Tuesday, May 26, at Deep River Elementary Cafeteria from 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
  • Friday, May 29, at Essex Elementary Cafeteria from 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

World Renowned Singers Pittsinger, Schumann to Star in Ivoryton’s ‘South Pacific’

David Pittsinger

David Pittsinger

IVORYTON —  Ivoryton Playhouse announced yesterday that world renowned American bass-baritone David Pittsinger* will be revisiting the role of Emile deBecque – the role he played in the Lincoln Center production to great critical acclaim – in the July production of South Pacific at the Ivoryton Playhouse.

Peter Marks of the Washington Post wrote of his performance’ “That quadruple bassoon of a voice interpreting the Richard Rodgers melodies – among the most melting ever composed for the theater – is all the seduction that you or Nellie need. Somehow, the effortlessness of Pittsinger’s technique helps in the illusion that the great romance at the core of “South Pacific” truly is operatic in scope.

Mr. Pittsinger is a stage performer of the greatest distinction.  Having appeared on the world’s leading opera and concert stages in Vienna, Salzburg, Brussels, Paris, Tanglewood, Pesaro, New York, Santa Fe, Cincinnati, Los Angeles and San Francisco, he is equally at home in baroque through contemporary operas, as well as musical theater.

Patricia Schumann

Patricia Schumann

He will be joined by his wife, internationally celebrated soprano Patricia Schuman*, who will also be making her Ivoryton Playhouse debut, as Bloody Mary. A performer of great breadth, Ms. Schuman began her career with the great Mozart repertoire, performing Donna Elvira (Don Giovanni) and Contessa Almaviva (Le nozze di Figaro) at the Metropolitan Opera and has performed at most of the great opera houses throughout Europe and the United States.

David and Patricia made their home in Essex almost 20 years ago, and even though their work in the opera world has them travelling all over the world, they both feel a special connection to Connecticut shoreline. David, who grew up in Clinton and attended the University of Connecticut and Yale, is thrilled to be giving back to his community and the Playhouse is honored to welcome both of them to the historic Ivoryton stage.

South Pacific opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on July 1 and runs through July 26. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m.  Additional matinee performances are at 2 p.m. on Thursday, July 16, Saturday, July 18, and Saturday, July 25.  Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.  There is no performance on Saturday, July 4.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.)

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Area Legislators Applaud $7.5 Million Grant to Old Saybrook for Dredging North Cove

OLD SAYBROOK – Area legislators are applauding the State Bond Commission’s approval last Monday (May 11) of $7.5 million for the dredging of the North Cove, Connecticut River in Old Saybrook.

The funding, which comes from the state’s Grants-In-Aid program, will go toward improvements to ports and marinas, including dredging and navigational direction.

“This is a smart investment for our town,” Rep. Devin Carney (R-23) said. “Dredging the North Cove will keep property values up and protect our natural resources. I was pleased to work with local and state officials to secure this grant for Old Saybrook. This is great news.”

“This dredging project will create construction-related jobs while providing a lasting benefit to our region,” Sen. Art Linares, who represents part of Old Saybrook, said.  “We are grateful to the governor and the bond commission for moving this project forward.”

“North Cove has been a port of call going back to the town’s early days,” Sen. Paul Formica, who represents part of Old Saybrook, said. “This project is really important.  We need to make sure the ecological balance remains and that dredging allows for safe recreational boating.”

“This is a critical project for our town,” said Carl P. Fortuna, Jr., First Selectman of the Town of Old Saybrook. “The dredging last done in 2009 insufficiently opened up North Cove. This project will greatly add to the recreational usage of North Cove, as well as restoring it fully as a harbor of refuge in storms. We are thankful for the support of the Governor and the State Bond Commission.”

The North Cove in Old Saybrook is a part of the southern boundary of the Gateway Conservation Zone. The Gateway Conservation Zone boundary only extends 50 feet inland from the mean high water line. The proposed dredging of the North Cove would alleviate siltation issues due to reduced tidal flushing, which occurs when the openings to the river have been reduced by man-made structures. This also creates a problem for some deeper draft sailing vessels that moor at the North Cove.

Essex’s New ‘Pocket Park’ to be Dedicated May 31, All Welcome

ESSEX — All are welcome to attend the dedication of Morgana’s Place, May 31, at 1 p.m. on the corner of North Main St. and New City St. in Essex.

The unveiling of the statue of Morgana, Ina Bomze’s beloved companion, will take place.

Approximately a year ago, Ina Bomze purchased the property, removed the remnants of the building, replenished the grounds and deeded it for perpetuity to Essex Land Trust.

The Trust invites you to consider making donations for the ongoing care and maintenance of this new pocket park or as additional support to assist Essex Land Trust (P.O. Box 373, Essex) in keeping all of their properties vibrant and groomed for all to enjoy.http://essexlandtrust.org/

Contact Ed Tucker, MD at edtuckermd@aol.com or 860-767-2332 for further information.

Light refreshments will be available.  This event will be held rain or shine.

Music & Memory Documentary Film Screening, Panel Discussion Scheduled at ‘The Kate’

An Alzheimer’s patient reacts to music of "The Beach Boys.” Photo courtesy of BOND360

An Alzheimer’s patient reacts to music of “The Beach Boys.” Photo courtesy of BOND360

OLD SAYBROOK – Community Music School, the Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter, and The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center present a screening of the award-winning documentary film “Alive Inside” on Tuesday, June 2, at 7 p.m. at The Kate, 300 Main Street, Old Saybrook. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased by phone at 860-767-0026 or in person at Community Music School, 90 Main Street, Centerbrook; or by visiting www.thekate.org.

“Alive Inside” follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he demonstrates music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short.

The documentary visits family members who have witnessed the miraculous effects of personalized music on their loved ones, and offers illuminating interviews with experts including renowned neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks and musician Bobby McFerrin. Many will remember the viral video “Henry Wakes Up!” – a clip from the film that shows a 92-year old nursing home resident enthusiastically responding to music.

The evening will include a brief performance by the New Horizons Band and post-screening panel discussion with experts in the field of memory loss. The New Horizons Band is a program of the Music School that offers active adults the opportunity to play music with their peers in a supportive environment.

This film is not rated, but is recommended for ages 13 and up.

For additional information, contact Community Music School at 860-767-0026.

Editor’s Notes: Community Music School offers innovative educational music programming and music therapy led by a board-certified music therapist for infants through adults, building on a 30 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.

Alzheimer’s disease affects more than 70,000 people in Connecticut. The Alzheimer‘s Association provides services to those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias; advocates for policy change and research funding; and advances research toward prevention, treatment and a cure. The Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter’s main office is in Southington, with regional offices throughout the state in Hamden, New Milford, Norwich, and Norwalk. To learn more contact the Connecticut Chapter at 800-272-3900www.alz.org/ct

Space Reservations Open for Annual August Flea Market at Deep River Congregational Church 

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Congregational Church is already preparing for its annual Flea Market and Rummage Sale which will be held on during the third weekend of August.   The Aug. 15 Flea Market is held on Marvin Field and on the grounds around the church.

The 20 x 20 foot spaces are available for $30, and you can reserve yours by contacting the church office for a reservation form and map. (860-526-5045 or office.drcc@snet.net) or forms can be downloaded from the church web site at www.deeprivercc.org

Letter to the Editor: A Note of Thanks From Essex Garden Club

To the Editor:

On Saturday May 9th in Town Park the Essex Garden Club held its 63rd May Market.  The Silent Auction Committee of May Market would like to thank our area merchants, friends and artists for the incredible generosity they showed in supporting this year’s Silent Auction.

As May Market is the Club’s only fund-raiser, we depend on its proceeds to support our civic projects in Essex Village, Centerbrook and Ivoryton.  These range from helping to maintain the town parks, to providing scholarships to college students and camperships to elementary students, planting trees in town, organizing horticultural activities with elementary and junior high school students and decorating throughout town with greens for the holidays.

The Essex Garden Club would like to thank the following merchants, friends and artists most sincerely for their wonderful donations to the Silent Auction:

Acer Gardens, Aegean Treasures, Ashleigh’s Garden, Bartlett Tree Experts, Bob’s Centerbrook Package Store, The Cheese Shop of Centerbrook, The Copper Beech Inn, Cottage Whimsey, De Paula Jewelers, English Accents Antiques, Essex Winter Series, Goodspeed Musicals, Haystacks, Hortus Perennials, The Ivoryton Playhouse, Marily MacKinnon Interior Design, John & Wendy Madsen, Mimi Merton, Charlotte Meyer Designs, Musical Masterworks, New Earth Acupuncture, One North Main, Augie Pampel, A Pocketful of Posies, Pough Interiors, Mark Pratt, Saybrook Country Barn, Eileen Taylor, That’s the Spirit, Walker-Loden, Weekend Kitchen, and Weltner’s Antiques and Art.

With thanks.

Sincerely,

Dawn Boulanger, Alyson Danyliw, Genie Devine, Marily MacKinnon

The Essex Garden Club
May Market Silent Auction Committee

Memory Care Community at Saybrook at Haddam Dedicated to Helen Shulz

The family of Helen Shultz of Old Saybrook gathered at The Saybrook at Haddam for the unveiling of the personalized plaque to commemorate her position as Safe Harbor’s first memory care resident.  Pictured here next to the plaque, left to right, are: Dan Sullivan, Richard Shultz, Judy Sullivan, Peter Sullivan, Bob Shultz, and Matthew Shultz. Two of Helen’s sons, John Schultz of Staten Island, N.Y., and Mark Shultz of Mequon, Wis., were unable to attend.

The family of Helen Shultz of Old Saybrook gathered at The Saybrook at Haddam for the unveiling of the personalized plaque to commemorate her position as Safe Harbor’s first memory care resident.  Pictured here next to the plaque, left to right, are: Dan Sullivan, Richard Shultz, Judy Sullivan, Peter Sullivan, Bob Shultz, and Matthew Shultz. Two of Helen’s sons, John Schultz of Staten Island, N.Y., and Mark Shultz of Mequon, Wis., were unable to attend.

HADDAM – The Saybrook at Haddam has dedicated its Safe Harbor neighborhood to its very first memory care resident, Helen Shultz of Old Saybrook, who lived at the specialized community throughout its inaugural year.  Members of the Shultz family joined the retirement community at a brief ceremony on May 6 to unveil a personalized plaque placed in Safe Harbor in honor of Helen’s memory.

Helen’s children attended the ceremony with their families.  Her daughter, Judy Sullivan, who is executive director of the Old Saybrook Chamber of Commerce, was joined by husband, Dan, and son, Peter; Bob Shultz of Hudson, New Hampshire, attended with his son Matthew from Avon, Conn.; and Richard Shultz came from Norwich, Conn.

During the celebration, Helen’s children expressed their appreciation for the care she received at The Saybrook at Haddam – and for the tremendous support the community offered their own families.

“When a loved one suffers from a memory illness, the family is forced into quite a learning curve,” Judy Sullivan said.  “The entire team at The Saybrook at Haddam walked us through that process, helping us understand Mom’s new ‘world,’ how to have patience, and most importantly how to continue enjoying each moment we had with her.  We are indebted to this community for their care, kindness and expertise and are so honored to have Mom forever be a part of Safe Harbor.”

Helen actually moved into The Saybrook at Haddam in 2011 a few weeks before Safe Harbor was completed.  As soon as the doors officially opened, she moved over to Safe Harbor.  During this time, The Saybrook at Haddam was working to build awareness of its unique and personalized approach to helping those suffering from Alzheimer’s, dementia and other memory-related illnesses, and the Shultz family was the first to put its faith and trust into this new community.

“We owe a debt to the Shultz’s as well, as they were the first to recognize and trust in our approach to memory care,” Kathy Ryan, executive director of The Saybrook at Haddam, said.  “Of course, since Helen was our only resident for a short time, she essentially had one-on-one care and really stole the hearts of our entire community. I like to say she was ‘holding court,’ because she always had a group around her listening to stories, sharing meals, and meeting her every need with lightning speed.  Although we have grown tremendously since those days, Helen helped shape the quality and personality of the community we have become.”

Staff members who cared for Helen also shared warm memories of their premier resident, talking with fondness and laughter about their experiences with her.  They enjoyed her “no-nonsense” style, which likely was a result of the 40 years Helen worked as owner of the successful Shultz Appliance and TV retail shop in Old Saybrook.
Staff appreciated her real sense of family and knew they had made an impact when Helen began treating Safe Harbor like her home.  This was considered a milestone since Helen’s home in Old Saybrook was immensely important to her as the epi-center of very large family holidays, gatherings and memories.
“Safe Harbor really did become her home, and for us that was the true blessing,” Sullivan said.  “If there was a silver lining in Mom’s illness, it was getting to know everyone at The Saybrook at Haddam.  This plaque forever memorialized our connection to this community, and reinforces our hopes that other families find solace and reassurance here as they navigate through the difficult maze of memory loss.”
Editor’s Note: The Saybrook at Haddam (www.thesaybrookathaddam.com) is one of the region’s premier assisted living, retirement, and memory care communities; it offers 106 apartments for individuals or couples.  The manor is located in Haddam, Conn., with proximity to major highways, medical services, restaurants and entertainment venues.  Private tours are being scheduled, and applications for residence are available by calling 860-345-3779.

RiverFare 2015 Returns for 22nd Year of Fun on Essex Waterfront 

Kick off Summer on the shoreline with some of the best culinary delights the River Valley has to offer. Join Allen G. Ciastho (The Tea Kettle Restaurant), Brian Checko & David Schumacher (Red House), David G. Caistho (Impressive Catering Services), Norm Needleman (Tower Labs.) Chris Dobbs (Executive Director, Connecticut River Museum)  Rob Peterson (C Sherman Johnson Co., Inc.) Anna Lathrop (Gourmet Galley Catering) Frett Marsha (Catering by Selene) & Earl Swain (Cloud Nine Catering) for the 22nd annual RiverFare.

Kick off Summer on the shoreline with some of the best culinary delights the River Valley has to offer. Join Allen G. Ciastho (The Tea Kettle Restaurant), Brian Checko & David Schumacher (Red House), David G. Caistho (Impressive Catering Services), Norm Needleman (Tower Labs.) Chris Dobbs (Executive Director, Connecticut River Museum)  Rob Peterson (C Sherman Johnson Co., Inc.) Anna Lathrop (Gourmet Galley Catering) Frett Marsha (Catering by Selene) & Earl Swain (Cloud Nine Catering) for the 22nd annual RiverFare.

ESSEX — On Thursday, May 28, from 6 to 9 p.m., the waterfront lawn of the Connecticut River Museum will come to life again as the scenic setting for RiverFare 2015.

Known as the unofficial kick off of summer on the shoreline, RiverFare, the area’s most popular tasting event, will feature gourmet food, wine, micro brews and silent auction all on the museum grounds overlooking the beautiful Essex Harbor.  Like a kid in a candy store, move from table to table sampling the best culinary delights the Connecticut River Valley has to offer.

This year’s lineup of Connecticut’s leading restaurants and food purveyors includes RiverFare newcomers Impressive Catering, The Tea Kettle Restaurant, Coastal Cooking Company and Big Nanny’s Soft Biscotti, and back by popular demand are Red House, Fromage Fine Foods, Deep River Snacks, Gourmet Galley Catering, Griswold Inn, Essex Coffee & Tea, Catering by Selene, The Cheese Shop of Centerbrook, The Ivory Restaurant, Cloud Nine Catering and others.

RiverFarers will also have the opportunity to join in the fun of bidding in the silent auction which features a diverse array of fine gifts, services, and entertainment experiences.  Items include a refurbished ’76 Sunfish Sailboat and Trailer, a private kayak tour, a 2 night stay in Cooperstown, NY plus tickets to the Baseball Hall of Fame and a seasonal Mooring on the Connecticut River.  Check out additional auction items at ctrivermuseum.org.

Major Support for RiverFare is provided by Tower Labs and C. Sherman Johnson Co.  Addition support is provided by, Bogaert Construction, Centerbrook Architect and Planners, Clark Group, Edidio Assante Wealth Management, iCRVRadio.com, Middlesex Hospital, Reynolds’ Garage & Marine, Inc. Bob’s Discount Furniture, Sapia Construction, Wells Fargo Advisors, blp Enterprises, Carr Douglas & Cline, Caulfield & Ridgway, Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, Treasure Hill Farm and Trowbridge Stone Masonry.

Additional in-kind support is provided by Bob’s Centerbrook Package Store, Rhode VanGessel Design, Essex Printing, Guilford Savings Bank, Connecticut Rental Center and Apparel Plus.

Media support is provided by Valley Courier.

RiverFare admission is $60 per person in advance and $65 on the day of the event.  Patron tickets may be purchased for $150 and include a premium bar and $100 tax deduction.  Net proceeds will help support the Connecticut River Museum’s mission to increase public awareness and access to the heritage, culture, and natural beauty of New England’s Great River.

For more information or to make advance reservations, go to www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860.767.8269.    The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street in Essex.

 

 

Chester Synagogue to Host Rare Discussion of Jewish Organizations Response to Palestinian BDS Movement

CHESTER — Since 2005, Palestinian organizations have increasingly called for worldwide support for a movement to boycott, divest from and sanction (BDS) Israel.  Although this movement has gained some support in the United States, particularly on university campuses, it has also engendered sharp responses from American Jewish organizations – so sharp that they have consistently refused to appear on the same program as Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP), an organization which supports the BDS movement, to avoid providing any air of legitimacy to JVP and the BDS discussion.

On Saturday, May 30, from 1 to 4 p.m., Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ) in Chester will host representatives of two American Jewish organizations with opposing views on BDS – J Street and Jewish Voice for Peace.  In a forum titled “Can We Talk – BDS, the Jewish Response and Anti-Semitism,” the role of BDS in the Middle East peace process will be explored.

Speaking in favor of the BDS movement will be Robert Gelbach, co-chair of the New Haven chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace, co-convener of the Connecticut BDS coalition, and retired professor of political science from Southern Connecticut State University.  Learn more about JVP at jewishvoiceforpeace.org.

Speaking against the BDS movement will be Shaina Wasserman, New England Regional Director for J Street, a Jewish organization which describes itself as “the political home for pro-Israel, pro-peace Americans.”  Learn more about J Street at jstreet.org.

Audience questions will be highlighted, and there will be time for audience opinions as well.

Andy Schatz, chair of the Social Action Committee of CBSRZ, which is sponsoring the forum, stressed the significance of this discussion not only because of what it may clarify about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but also for what it says about the Jewish community in the U.S.  “We think it is critical for Jewish communities and organizations to discuss openly these tough and uncomfortable issues to reach better solutions, and we are grateful for J Street for being willing to discuss the issue directly with JVP, which the other organizations we invited continued to refuse.”

He continues, “This discussion is another in the CBSRZ’ series of forums ‘celebrating diversity,’ as we think diversity of opinion within the American Jewish community is critical not only to reach those better solutions but to make clear American Jews are not some monolithic body but millions of people with oft-divergent views on issues large and small.”

Schatz noted that some of the topics likely to be discussed include:

  • Is boycott, divestment or sanction ever appropriate against democratic countries, and is any different standard appropriate as to Israel?
  • Can the BDS movement play a legitimate or positive role in the peace process in the Middle East?
  • Is the BDS movement inconsistent with support for Israel, a Jewish state, or a two-state solution?
  • Are boycotts, divestments or sanctions, which impact people and not just governments, inconsistent with religious values?
  • Is anti-Semitism increased by the BDS movement and/or by the refusal of most Jewish organizations to address it?
  • What should be the role of the American Jewish community and organizations in the debate over Israel’s future?

CBSRZ is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.  There is no charge for this event, but to ensure adequate seating, register by sending an email to the CBSRZ office (bethshalom@snet.net) or calling 860-526-8920.   Light refreshments will be provided.

Essex Celebrates “Burning of the Ships,” A Major American Defeat in the War of 1812

The “Sailing Masters of 1812” of Essex lead the parade.

The “Sailing Masters of 1812” of Essex lead the parade.  All photos by Jerome Wilson.

ESSEX — In the darkness of 3 a.m. on the morning of April 8, 1814, British troops attacked and burned 27 American ships in Essex, both on land and in the harbor.

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman was on hand early in the parade.

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman was on hand early in the parade.

Essex at the time was a major builder of ships, which the British apparently knew, when they planned their attack.

A color guard on parade.

A color guard on parade.

The British attack on the Town of Essex caught Essex residents totally by surprise, to the degree that not a single Essex resident fired a shot as the British burned their ships.

Beating drums and playing fifes.

Beating drums and playing fifes.

However, when daylight came, as the British ship burners were making their way back down the Connecticut River, Americans started firing at the British from the the shore of the river, and at least two of the attackers were killed.

This fife and drum corps dates its ancestry back to 1787.

This fife and drum corps dates its ancestry back to 1787.

Fast forward to modern times and for the past 48 years, the Sailing Masters of 1812 have commemorated the “Burning of the Ships” with a parade down Essex’s Main Street. True to form, they were at it again this year last Saturday, May 9.

Some wore light blue ...

Some wore light blue …

Over 15 marching fife and drum corps participated in this year’s “Burning of the Ships” parade.

... while others went barefoot!

… while others went barefoot!

It must be noted, however, that some in Essex, who take the liberty of adding more than a grain of truth, call the event the “Loser’s Day” parade.

There were also some women marching in the parade.

There were also some women marching in the parade.

On and on the fife and drum corps came ...

On and on the fife and drum corps came …

This little boy’s “Mama” was playing in the band ahead of him in the parade.

This little boy’s “Mama” was playing in the band ahead of him.

This band of bagpipers added a Scottish element  to the parade.

This band of bagpipers added a Scottish element to the parade.

On and came the marchers in the (almost) never-ending parade!

On and came the marchers in the (almost) never-ending parade!