September 5, 2015

Essex Land Trust Offers ‘Hike of the Month,’ Today

Fern_Ledge
ESSEX — The Essex Land trust hosts its September ‘Hike of the Month’ to Fern Ledge on Saturday, Sept. 5.  Meet at 9 a.m. next to the old Shoreline Clinic, off Rte. 153

With its steep terrain and high ledge overlooking a working farmer’s field, Fern Ledge has a unique place among the parks in Essex. Trails wind through woodlands and among old stonewalls, offering glimpses of Birch Mill Pond below. In winter, it affords distant, sweeping views of the surrounding countryside.

Note that the trail leading up to the ledge is steep.

The property sits astride the Essex-Westbrook town line. When the 10-acre parcel was purchased in 2005 from the estate of August Neidlinger and Catherine Doane, it had lain idle for many years.

The trail crosses one of the small streams feeding Birch Mill pond, vital habitat for turtles, salamanders and frogs along with ferns, Jack-in-the-Pulpit and skunk cabbage. Rare plants include Dwarf ginseng, May apple and wild leek. Look for a beaver dam in the pond.

The upper reaches at Fern Ledge are home to maple trees, oaks and birch along with mammals from fox to deer.

Former Illustrator Newton Debuts as Sculptor at CBSRZ Exhibition Opening Tomorrow

Richard Newton sculptureCHESTER — Richard Newton, formerly an illustrator nationally known for his iconic Time, Newsweek, Businessweek, National Wildlife and Fortune magazine covers, will make his sculpture debut at  Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek’s (CBSRZ) Art Gallery on Sunday, Sept 6, from 4 to 7 p.m.  The artist will speak at 5:30p.m. and take questions.

The Sept. 6 opening will feature a wine and cheese reception with live music.  There is no charge and all art lovers are welcome.

Newton has been a professional artist for over 35 years and has mounted advertising campaigns for the U.S. Postal Service, Sprint, General Electric and Pfizer Pharmaceutical.  His exhibit will continue through Nov. 15, and will be open and free to the public Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to  3 p.m.

The artist will make a generous contribution to CBSRZ for all work sold.

Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.  For more information call the CBSRZ office 860-526-8920

Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony Slated for Sept. 17 to Celebrate Ivoryton Village Streetscape Project

ESSEX — On Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015 at 5 p.m., the Town of Essex will celebrate the culmination of the Ivoryton Village Streetscape Project with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.

The ceremony will take place at the Ivoryton Village Green on Main Street in Ivoryton.

The project was funded through a $435,000 Main Street Investment Fund grant administered by the State of Connecticut – Department of Housing.

“These improvements create a sense of community” stated First Selectman Norman Needleman, “and the impressive results have come about through the efforts of many stakeholders, with special thanks to Selectman Stacia R. Libby and the members of the Ivoryton Alliance.”

The ceremony will include remarks from the First Selectman as well as other local government officials and will be followed by refreshments.  The event is open to the public.

For more information, visit www.essexct.gov,  or call the office at 860-767-4340 x112.

Chester/Deep River Boy Scout Peter Jones Attains Eagle Scout Rank

Chester/Deep River Boy Scout Troop 13 newest Eagle Scout Peter Jones. Photo by Michael Rutty.

Chester/Deep River Boy Scout Troop 13 newest Eagle Scout Peter Jones. Photo by Michael Rutty.

CHESTER & DEEP RIVER — Peter Jones of Deep River, a member of Chester/Deep River’s Troop 13, has earned Scouting’s highest rank and an Eagle Scout Court of Honor was held for him on Sunday Aug. 16, at the Deep River Town Hall Auditorium.

To become an Eagle Scout, Peter earned 38 merit badges and advanced through the seven scout ranks by learning Scout and Life skills while simultaneously providing leadership to his Troop and service to his community.  One of the final requirements for the Eagle Rank is to show leadership in and complete a service project that benefits the boy’s community, school, or religious institution.

Peter’s project was to reconstruct a 20 foot long stone wall to enhance the corner of The Deep River Congregational Church’s cemetery along Platt Ln. and Essex St.  The original wall had fallen into disrepair over the years from erosion.  The completed wall complements the existing front wall of the cemetery and new plantings were added to the accent and beautify the area.

Completing this project entailed meeting with the church to determine they stone they preferred, securing donations for supplies, designing and overseeing volunteers through the construction and installation of the wall and plantings.  The completed project provides an important service to the residents of Deep River and members of Deep River Congregational Church by improving the look of the area.

Congratulations, Peter!

Troop 13 Boy Scouts serves the boys ages 11-18 of Chester and Deep River. The purpose of the Boy Scouts of America is to help young men develop their character and life skills all while having fun.

There is much emphasis placed on assisting these young men to develop into strong healthy citizens who will lead our communities and country in the years ahead. The Boy Scout methods help to promote these ideals through the challenge of putting them into practice with the Troop Program. This is done in a way that is both challenging and fun.

To learn more information about joining Troop 13 please contact our Scoutmaster, Steven Merola @ 860-526-9262

River COG Announces ‘GrowSMART’ Project to Develop Lower CT River Valley’s Economic Growth Strategy

growsmart logo

AREAWIDE — Have you heard of RiverCOG?

It’s an acronym for the Lower Connecticut River Valley Council of Governments, which is an association of 17 towns with each represented by its chief elected official.  Its mission involves facilitating solutions and planning between the 17 towns, the State of Connecticut, federal agencies, and nonprofits for land use, transportation, agriculture, emergency management, conservation, and economic development.

One of its key goals is to encourage a safe and open venue to discuss shared regional options and projects.  Fulfilling this mission had led RiverCOG to launch a new and exciting project titled, GrowSMART.  The purpose of GrowSMART is to research how the region can collaborate to attract workers, and retain and grow businesses while also conserving the natural resources that are so vital to the region’s infrastructure, housing values, and tourism industry.

factory_signAs you drive, walk, or bike around the region in September and October, you will start to notice signs, posters and banners around town such as the one shown to the left or see an advertisements while reading a local newspaper or local online news.  The signs or advertisements may ask a question, such as:  “Why can’t you find qualified help?” or “Who is going to buy your house”?

Why is RiverCOG asking these questions?

The answer is that its Regional Strategic Economic Growth Committee is working with Ninigret Partners to create a regional economic growth strategy and is seeking your input.  RiverCOG invites you to visit the project website at www.GrowSMARTregion.org to learn about its travelling mobile workshop and note dates of the upcoming public forums to which all are welcome

There is also an opportunity at the www.GrowSMARTregion.org website to submit your ideas directly.

‘Shoreline Chefs’ to Offer Small Plates in ‘Estuary’ Afternoon Fundraiser

OLD SAYBROOK –   Shoreline Chefs, a fundraising event featuring local professional and home chefs and notable locals cooking up a storm in small plate tastings for fun and fun competition, will be held on Sunday, Sept. 20,  from 3 to 6 p.m. on the Old Saybrook Town Green. Tickets at $35 are available now at The Estuary Council of Seniors, which is sponsoring this first-time event.

Restauranteurs, caterers, gifted home cooks, and neighborhood notables are providing food and their cooking talent for an afternoon and evening of small plate tastings. Fun loving friends and patrons who purchase a ticket, will have the privilege of tasting delicious recipes. The event includes a silent auction and entertainment.

The list of Shoreline Chefs currently includes: Dagmar’s Desserts, Apple Rehab, The Estuary, The Town of Old Saybrook, Porky Pete’s BBQ, Old Saybrook Fire Department, The Tea Kettle, Guilford Savings Bank, Mirsina’s Restaurant, Homeworks, the Pursuit of Pastry and The Town of Old Lyme.

Join this event for an afternoon of food, fun and fundraising to support the services of the Estuary Council of Seniors. Throughout the nine town Estuary region, one out of every four individuals is now using one of the Estuary Council of Senior’s vital programs.

Last year, the Estuary provided 70,000 hot, nutritious meals to individuals in our nine town district.   The Estuary also provide medical outpatient transportation, social and educational programs and numerous trips and activities. The organization’s challenge is to keepup with the increased need and the cost of providing services.

If you are interested in being a Chef, or a sponsor of this event, call 860.388.1611 x 211

Chester Artists’ Raffle Benefits Chester Library Programs

“Sorbet with Sprinkles” quilt by Sally Murray

One of the items in Chester Library’s fundraising raffle is this “Sorbet with Sprinkles” quilt by Sally Murray

CHESTER — Chester is a town of many talented individuals, three of whom have donated their works to the Friends of the Chester Public Library for a fundraising raffle, culminating on Oct. 6.

“The Chief’s Daughter” basket by Sosse Baker.

“The Chief’s Daughter” basket by Sosse Baker.

Basketmaker Sosse Baker created “The Chief’s Daughter,” a storage basket in a Cherokee pattern, 20 inches high and 16 inches wide, in dyed and natural rattan.

Baker, the co-owner of Chester Gallery in Chester Center, has been a renowned basketmaker for several decades.

There’s also “Sorbet with Sprinkles,” a lively lap quilt made by Sally Murray.  At 61 x 72 inches, it’s large enough for a couchful.  It’s all-cotton construction, machine-pieced and -quilted, washer- and dryer-friendly, and bright enough to evoke a smile.

Murray is a resource in Chester Library’s Human Library; check her out to learn more about quilting.

“Midnight Passion” mohair stole by Lisa Tollefson

“Midnight Passion” mohair stole by Lisa Tollefson

You will love to drape yourself in Lisa Tollefson’s one-of-a-kind hand-knitted lace mohair-blend stole. This original Rivergirl design, named “Midnight Passion,” is a gorgeous blue and foldable/crushable, lightweight, and surprisingly warm.

Tickets are priced at $2 each and only 1,000 tickets are being sold. The three items are on display at the Chester Library. All proceeds from the raffle will directly benefit the Friends of the Library’s programs and purchases for the library.

The Friends fund DVD and CD purchases and a Netflix membership; passes to area museums and attractions; professionally facilitated Spring and Fall book discussion series; materials for children’s story and craft hours; and the summer reading program.

The raffle drawing will be at the Chester Library on Tuesday, Oct. 6, at 5:30 p.m. Winners need not be present to win.

 

Tickets on Sale for Chester Rotary’s 45th Annual Lobster Festival

Loving lobster! Happy LobsterFest-goers savor the feast in 2014.

Loving lobster! Happy LobsterFest-goers savor the 2014 feast.

CHESTER — The Rotary Club of Chester will host its 45th Annual Lobster Festival at the Chester Fairgrounds on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2015. Tickets are on sale now and going fast, so prompt purchase is encouraged.

The event is highlighted by classic double entree dinners featuring Twin Lobster, Twin Steak, or Surf and Turf and single entrée Lobster or Steak dinners. Traditional sides include corn on the cob, baked potato, coleslaw and rolls.

The gates will open at 4 p.m. for table decorating and general admission.  Dinners will be served from 5 p.m. and continue until 7 p.m.   Soft drinks, bottled water, draft beer and wine are available for sale throughout the night.

Live music for your dancing and listening pleasure will be provided by Four Barrel Billy with the Bottom of the Barrel Singers until closing at 10 p.m.

Admission tickets for twin lobster or twin steak or surf and turf dinner tickets are $40 in advance, $45 for remaining tickets at the gate. Single lobster or steak dinner tickets are $30 in advance and $35 at the gate.  Access to the Lobster Festival is restricted to dinner ticket holders. Seating is limited.

Visit http://www.ChesterRotary.org for more information and to purchase tickets on-line. Tickets can also be purchased at CENTURY 21 Heritage Company, Chester Package Store, Chester Package Store, Chrisholm Marina and Lark, from any Chester Rotarian, or call Susan Wright at (860) 526-3294.

Chester Rotarians are dedicated to providing funding and service to local, national and international charitable organizations. All proceeds from this event support these local and global humanitarian causes of Chester Rotary & Rotary International.

“The Preserve” Advocate Suellen Kozy McCuin Passes Away After Unexpected, Brief Illness

ESSEX — Suellen Kozey McCuin, 49, of Essex, beloved wife of J. Scott McCuin, passed away Friday, Aug. 21, with her family and friends at her side after an unexpected and brief illness.  Her obituary states, “She was an outstanding leader in the fight to protect the 1,000 acre forest now known as “The Preserve” located in her childhood town of Old Saybrook and her current home in Essex.”

Her obituary also notes, “She graduated from Old Saybrook High School and received her Bachelor’s Degree from Central Connecticut State University. She was a parishioner at Our Lady of Sorrows Church in Essex, CT.  Suellen enjoyed a successful career in government affairs and was most recently Executive Director for the Connecticut Council of Soil and Water Conservation Districts.”

State Representative Philip Miller (D-36th) described her passing as, “A loss for everyone.  One of the very best people I have ever known.”

He continued, “Of all of us who helped save the thousand acres, she is the only one of us who was indispensable.  We could have never succeeded without her.  Over the years, we had hundreds of phone calls and dozens of coffee conversations.”

Miller added, “She was an original, a deeply genuine, kind hearted person of great dignity.  My heart aches for her family, especially Scott, Maddy, and little Owen.  So many of us will miss our dear friend.  She walks in the spirit world now.  Gone but never to be forgotten.”

Calling hours for celebrating Ms. Kozey McCuin and her life will be at the Swan Funeral Home, 1224 Boston Post Rd., Old Saybrook on Friday, Aug. 28 from 6 to 9 p.m.  A mass service and reception will be held on Saturday, Aug. 29, at 10 a.m. in the Church of Our Lady of Sorrows, 14 Prospect St., Essex.  In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the Kozey McCuin Children Education Fund, c/o Essex Savings Bank, PO Box 950, Essex, CT 06426, or The Old Saybrook Land Trust.

 

Essex Historical Society Offers Self-Guided Stroll of Five Dickinson Houses

Pat Thompson, Event Chairman for An Afternoon Stroll Through Dickinson History, walks past the former Dickinson family home, one of five private properties that will be opened for public touring on September 13 to benefit the Essex Historical Society.

Pat Thompson, Event Chairman for An Afternoon Stroll Through Dickinson History, walks past the former Dickinson family home, one of five private properties that will be opened for public touring on Sept. 13 to benefit the Essex Historical Society.

ESSEX – On Sunday, Sept. 13, the Essex Historical Society’s 60th anniversary celebration continues with An Afternoon Stroll Through Dickinson History, a self-guided tour through five private properties formerly owned by members of the Dickinson family, founders and manufacturer’s of E.E. Dickinson Witch Hazel. The benefit event will provide a peek into the Dickinson past and will take place from 4 to 7 p.m. along the North Main and Prospect Street section of Essex village.

The White House in Essex.

The White House in Essex.

On view will be the iconic family home, the stately, columned “White House” located at 21 North Main Street; the Dickinson office building at 31 North Main now home to Wells Fargo Advisors; the adjacent Dickinson carriage house; the 1750’s Samuel Lay homestead located at 17 North Main St., which was the former home of the top sales executive for Dickinson Witch Hazel; and the once cow barn now private home just a few steps south. Dickinson family members will be onsite to lend a personal perspective.

The Carriage House

The Carriage House

Stroll guests can enjoy drinks and hors d’oeuvres and a quiet respite in Dickinson Park, a small swath of grassy green across from the main home. Period cars will also be on display and each attendee will receive a commemorative book documenting the Dickinson legacy.

Office building

The Dickinson office building at 31 North Main now home to Wells Fargo Advisors.

According to event chairperson Pat Thompson, “This is a house tour like no other, so steeped in history and one family’s impact on a community. We are very grateful for the current owners’ willingness to open up their homes and for the Dickinson family members who have graciously shared their memories to help us celebrate Essex’s rich heritage.”

Dickinson Stroll_CowBarn_web

The once cow barn now private home just a few steps south of 17 North Main St.

Tickets for An Afternoon Stroll Through Dickinson History are $60 per person, with children under the age of 18 admitted at no charge. All proceeds will benefit the Essex Historical Society.

The Samuel Lay House.

The Samuel Lay House.

Parking is available along North Main St. and Prospect St., at Hills Academy and Our Lady of Sorrows located at 21 Prospect St., and at Essex Town Hall. Handicap parking can be found at the Welcome Tent to be located at Wells Fargo Advisors, 31 North Main Street.

Tickets can be purchased in advance online at essexhistory.org or by calling 860-767-0681, or at the Welcome Tent on the day of the event.

Legal News You Can Use: Know Your Rights When Unexpected Injury Occurs

Car_accidentAn unexpected injury can be frightening and disorienting, whether from an automobile accident, slip-and-fall, or a “freak” accident. It is helpful to know your rights, and consider in advance the important steps you should take in these situations.

#1. Seek Emergency Medical Care

This may seem obvious, but take a minute to be sure you’re alright! If you are able to do so, check on any passengers in your vehicle, or on others who may have been injured in a motor vehicle accident. Once you have taken precautions for your safety, move your vehicle out of the lane of travel, if possible. Then, call 911.

If you refuse treatment at the scene, go directly to your doctor or the local emergency clinic to be checked out, even if you think your injuries are minor. Often times it is well after the adrenaline wears off that we start to experience pain.

#2. Inform Authorities and Get Copies of Reports

Wait for the police to arrive on the scene, and, respectfully ask that the other driver do the same. If you have been injured in an accident on the premises of a business, notify the manager or supervisor immediately, or, inform the homeowner if you have been injured on residential property. Always remain calm during the course of any conversations with the police, authorities, business representatives, or other parties involved. Remember to ask for copies of any accident reports that are generated.

#3. Exchange Insurance Information and Take Photos

Try to get the names and contact information for any witnesses to the accident. If you have been in a motor vehicle accident, you should exchange insurance information with the other driver. If you were injured on residential or commercial premises, ask for contact information for the appropriate insurance company. Take photos of any visible injuries and damage to your vehicle or property.

#4. Don’t Ignore Follow-up Medical Treatment, and Keep Good Records

Don’t skip follow-up appointments, and be sure to obey the recommendations of any medical professionals who are treating you. Not keeping your medical appointments or failing to follow your doctors’ advice may hinder the healing process, and can also have an impact on any compensation to which you may be entitled. Insurance companies often try to reduce compensation for failing to do these things, calling it “failure to mitigate damages”. Your medical records will provide documentation in the event that the insurance company asks for it. Save copies of doctors’ notes, time off from work, and receipts from any expenses incurred.

#5. Seek Legal Counsel

It’s important to understand your rights after an accident. It usually takes time to assess the full nature of your claim, including your injuries, property damage, loss of wages, out-of-pocket expenses associated with the claim, etc. Do NOT sign any documents, releases or checks from the insurance company without first consulting with an attorney.

Beware of insurance companies who are quick to offer you cash after you have been injured. Often, accepting a cash payout from an insurance company shortly after the incident means signing a written promise that you will not bring a claim or a lawsuit against the insurance company or the party they insure. If you discover additional injuries or property damage after you have made this promise, you may inadvertently waive future recovery to which you may be entitled.

#6. Claims

Many, but not all, motor vehicle collisions have a two-year statute of limitations. This means that you have the right to bring a lawsuit claiming damages arising out of the collision up to two years after the date on which it happened. On the other hand, in some situations, if you fail to notify certain parties within as little as 60 to 90 days that you intend to bring a claim, you may forfeit certain legal rights. The time limits prescribed by Connecticut law vary depending on the type of accident and if the responsible party is an individual, business, municipality, or other entity; where the accident occurred, and other factors.

It is wise to consult with a competent attorney who can advise you as to the statute of limitations that applies to your particular situation. It’s important to understand your rights after an accident. Many people mistakenly assume that if they file a lawsuit, they will be required to go through the stress and anxiety of a court trial. However, the majority of lawsuits that are filed settle before reaching the point of a trial. Following the important steps above will help make the road to physical, emotional and financial recovery much smoother.

jcollinsnew_square_headshot

Attorney John A. Collins III

Editor’s Note: Suisman Shapiro Attorneys at Law is the largest law firm in eastern Connecticut, serving the community for over 70 years with a wide range of legal services. John A. Collins III is the Managing Partner of the firm and a Director/Shareholder who concentrates in the areas of Personal Injury Law and Civil Litigation. For more information, visit www.suismanshapiro.com or call (860)442-4416.

Suisman Shapiro is located at 2 Union Plaza, P.O. Box 1591, New London, CT 06320

Join an Intimate Evening with Artist, Hollywood Director George Gallo at Nilsson Studio

George Gallo painting on location. Photo courtesy of George Gallo.

George Gallo painting on location. Photo courtesy of George Gallo.

CHESTER — Leif Nilsson is hosting an evening with George Gallo on Wednesday, Sept. 23, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. (doors open at 5:30 p.m) in the garden of the Spring Street Studio and Gallery at 1 Spring St., Chester.  The event will be held inside the gallery in case of inclement weather.  A $50 donation includes wine, beverages, hors d’oeuvres, desserts and coffee.

Gallo is an American Master Impressionist painter, screenwriter, director, producer, and musician. His films include Midnight Run, Bad Boys, and Middle Men. He also wrote and directed Local Color, a semi-autobiographical film based on the painting experiences of his youth.

He has had several one-man shows and his work can be found in prominent collections around the world including the private collections of Robert DeNiro, Meg Ryan, Bruce Hornsby, Gary Sinise, Armin Mueller-Stahl and Mel Gibson.

Come enjoy a conversation with Hollywood’s original Renaissance Man in an intimate garden setting with artist Leif Nilsson, photographer Caryn B. Davis and pastel artist Claudia Post.

Gallo will share his experiences with the audience where something magical is bound to happen …

Send a check by Sept. 16 to reserve your space to Claudia Post, 19 Hickory Hill Dr., Chester, CT 06412.

For more information, call 860-510-2056 or email claudiapost1@hotmail.com or visit http://www.nilssonstudio.com

Zuckerbraun Joins Essex Savings Bank as VP, Trust Officer

David Zuckerbraun

David Zuckerbraun

ESSEX — Essex Savings Bank has announced the addition of David Zuckerbraun as a Vice President and Trust Officer.

“We are delighted that Mr. Zuckerbraun has joined us as Vice President & Trust Officer and will be working under the leadership of Ms. Moira Martin, Senior Vice President, Senior Trust Officer. His reputation, depth of experience and involvement in the community will be an asset for our Trust Department and will expand our strong focus on exceptional levels of client service,” stated Gregory R. Shook, President & CEO of Essex Savings Bank.

Zuckerbraun joins the Essex Savings Bank Trust Department after 21 years of service with The Washington Trust Company, most recently as Vice President, Senior Fiduciary Officer. His responsibilities included managing large and complex trust relationships, the settlements of complex estates, the management of departmental risk through document review, litigation oversight and assistance in the development of fiduciary policies and procedures carried out and followed by trust administration staff.

Prior to his time at Washington Trust, he was a practicing attorney for more than 10 years.

Zuckerbraun received his B.A. from Union College and his J.D. from the Syracuse University College of Law. He is the past president of both the Rhode Island Estate Planning Council and the Estate Planning Council of Southeastern Connecticut. He has also served as chairman of the James and Mary Shea Foundation, president of the Lyman Allyn Art Museum, treasurer of the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut, treasurer of the Eastern Connecticut Symphony Orchestra, and Vice President of the Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center.

Essex Savings Bank offers a full complement of trust services including trust and wealth management, estate administration and settlement, charitable trusts and private foundations, and custodian and escrow services. Trust officers are always available to meet for a no-obligation consultation.

Essex Savings Bank is a FDIC insured, state chartered, mutual savings bank established in 1851. The Bank serves the Connecticut River Valley and shoreline with six offices in Essex (2), Chester, Madison, Old Lyme and Old Saybrook providing a full complement of personal and business banking. Financial, estate, insurance and retirement planning are offered throughout the state by the Bank’s Trust Dep

Essex Civic Campus Project Recognized as First STEAP Grant Success Story

Photos of the Essex Civic Campus reproduced from the Office and Policy of Management page on the State of CT website.

Photos of the Essex Civic Campus reproduced from the Office of Policy and Management page on the State of CT website at www.ct.gov/opm.

ESSEX — The Department of Economic and Community Development (DECD) has announced that its first STEAP Grant Success Story is the Town of Essex Civic Campus Enhancement Project.

Essex was awarded a Small Town Economic Assistance Program (STEAP) in the amount of $471,500 in 2013 for the Essex Civic Campus Enhancement Project which funded the expansion, repair, and improvements to the “Essex Civic Campus” located at 29 West Ave.  The Civic Campus is a gateway to Essex and a center of municipal activity, including the Town Hall, Police Station, Essex Community Library, and Grove Street Park.

The project included the installation and replacement of the Grove Street Park Playscape to improve compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act standards; the renovation and expansion of the Town Hall parking area; renovations to the Town tennis courts, and improved pedestrian connectivity between the Town Hall and Library.

Essex First Selectman, Norman Needleman

Essex First Selectman, Norman Needleman

This grant provided much-needed improvements to ensure that the Essex Civic Campus is a vibrant and welcoming center of community activity, whether for recreation, public meetings, conducting business, or visiting the library.

A delighted Essex First Selectman Norm Needleman commented, “The people of the Town of Essex are deeply grateful to Governor Malloy, Senator Linares, Representative Miller, and our partners at DECD, for the investments that the state has made, via STEAP grants, in our community. The Town continually strives to be a friendlier and more welcoming place to live, work, learn, and play. The State’s investment of STEAP funds helps us get to that next level.”

Essex Historical Society Celebrates 60th Anniversary with Series of Events in 2015-16

The Pratt House in Essex is the town’s only historic house museum.

The Pratt House is home to the Essex Historical Society.

ESSEX — The Essex Historical Society (EHS), a private, non-profit organization boasting 250 members and dedicated volunteer corps, is celebrating its 60th anniversary year throughout 2015 and early 2016 with a variety of special events and programs.  Of special note is the Dickinson Initiative aimed at increasing awareness of the impact of the E. E. Dickinson Witch Hazel business on Essex.

The E. E. Dickinson Witch Hazel Company was an important part of Essex for much of the 20th century.  The EHS and the Valley Railroad Company have partnered to refurbish the original Birch Mill /Yellow Label building that sits on the southern end of the railroad depot property.  As part of the project, EHS will refurbish the Yellow Label signs and install Dickinson exhibit panels in the newly repaired space.

A pre-construction kick-off took place on May 15, 2015.  The dedication and unveiling of the refurbished building is targeted for one year later on May 15, 2016.

Upcoming Events 

An Afternoon Stroll Through Dickinson History 

Sunday, Sept. 13 from 4 to 7 p.m.  A self-guided tour of private properties along North Main Street in Essex village and formerly owned by members of the Dickinson family. Tickets are $60 per person with proceeds to benefit the Essex Historical Society. Includes a commemorative book and refreshments.

Essex Historical Society Antique Car Rally 

Sunday, Oct. 18 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  The 5th Annual Fall Foliage Antique Auto Show and Tour with a Purpose:  Dickinson business and family sites. Co-sponsored with the Belltown Antique Car Club.

EHS Program 

A special program Creating the E. E. Dickinson National Brand will be presented by EHS and held at 31 North Main St., Essex, the Dickinson corporate office, now the Wells Fargo office building.

Yellow Label Building Dedication 

Sunday, May 15, 2016. Dedication of the refurbished Yellow Label Building and tour of the Dickinson Witch Hazel Plant.  Co-sponsored with the Valley Railroad Company.  Details to be announced at a later date.

Essex Historical Society: Three Villages, Two Rivers, One History 

The EHS strives to be the center of excellence for collecting and sharing historic resources for Essex and the surrounding area, and to be the facilitator among other organizations focused on the history of the area, so that we may inspire future generations.  Our mission statement reflects this vision: Engaging and Inspiring the Community. Essex.  Ivoryton.  Centerbrook.

History of the Essex Historical Society

The Essex Historical Society was formed and incorporated in 1955. According to news reports at the time, the Town of Essex was about to announce its intention to sell Hills Academy located on Prospect Street. It was no longer useful to the Town for classroom space and had been rented to various tenants for many years.

A concerned group sprung into action and the first unofficial meeting of the Board of Directors was held at Essex Town Hall on Friday, Dec. 10, 1954. The newly formed Essex Historical Society purchased the Hills Academy building from the Town for one dollar.

From 1955 to 1985, Hills Academy served as the Society’s meeting house, as home to its growing collection of Essex memorabilia, and as exhibit space depicting the story of Essex history. Then in 1985, the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (known then as S.P.N.E.A. and now renamed Historic New England) deeded the Pratt House Museum on West Avenue to the Society and the focus of activity shifted to the Pratt family narrative.

Today, Pratt House continues to interpret 18th century farm life in Essex and the nine generations of Pratt Smithies, many of whom lived in the house. The barn houses a set of panels depicting a time line of Essex history and an early loom that is worked on by an award-winning group of weavers.

The beautiful meadow to the rear of the property is the site of the Community Garden and often the scene of antique car shows and old fashioned summer fairs. Hills Academy provides additional meeting and exhibit space on the first floor and storage and office space on the second floor for the collection and archival files.

The EHS serves the three villages of Essex — Centerbrook, Essex and Ivoryton.

Registration Open for Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation’s 10th Anniversary Walk Across SE Connecticut

Participants take to the streets in the 2014 Walk Across SE CT.

Participants take to the streets in the 2014 Walk Across SE CT.

AREAWIDE — The Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation (TBBCF) is celebrating the 10th anniversary of its Walk Across Southeastern Connecticut on Saturday, Oct. 3, having funded over $3M in breast cancer research (30 grants of $100,000 each), while raising funds, hopes and dreams for a breast cancer-free future.

TBBCF_walk_logo_203The TBBCF is a local non-profit dedicated to providing critical funding to breast cancer research. Their pledge is that 100 percent of gross fundraising dollars goes directly to breast cancer research in the scientific pursuit of medicines and techniques that mitigate cancer treatment and promote disease eradication. Administrative costs are sponsor-supported or volunteer-provided.

The organization’s name was chosen to honor the beautiful life and fighting spirit of Terri Brodeur, a local Old Saybrook mother of three young children and victim of breast cancer. The Foundation was established by two friends, Norma Logan and Sandy Maniscalco, who realized the need for a new kind of fundraising organization. After a two-year battle with breast cancer, Brodeur succumbed to the disease in 2005, as did Logan six months later.

It is estimated that there will be more than 3,000 cases of breast cancer diagnosed in Connecticut in 2015 and that almost 500 will die from the disease. By walking in the 10th Anniversary Walk Across Southeastern Connecticut you will increase funding of breast cancer research with hopes for earlier detection, better treatments and ultimately prevention of this disease.

Friends often form a team in the walk Across SE CT.

Friends often form a team in the TBBCF’s Walk Across SE CT.

The 10th Anniversary Walk provides a marathon option to suit everyone’s level of ability. Registration is now open and the time to start training for your chosen marathon walk is approaching.

Walks include a seven-mile super quarter marathon, a 13.1 mile half marathon and our signature 26.2 mile full marathon. The full marathon walk begins with 6:30 a.m. opening ceremonies at Saybrook Point, Old Saybrook, with feet on the pavement at 7 a.m.

This walk follows a scenic route along the shoreline through Old Saybrook, Old Lyme, East Lyme and Waterford. The half marathon walk starts at Capitol Drive, East Lyme at 10 a.m. and the super quarter marathon walk starts at the Niantic Baptist Church, Niantic at 1 p.m. All walks end at the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, Waterford with closing ceremonies.

The Walk goal is to raise funds for research through walker fundraising commitments. Youth walkers must raise $100 to walk any marathon option. Adult walkers must raise $200 for a super quarter marathon, $250 for a half marathon and $500 for a full marathon.

Team-up with friends, family or co-workers to walk in honor or memory of someone special. Enjoy the benefits of working as a team to meet the fundraising commitment. There are Youth Walk Team options for 12 to 18-year-olds.

Gather five or more youth with a Youth Walk Coach and the coach only pays registration with no fundraising requirement. Walkers are provided with training and fundraising support.

To register to walk or volunteer, or to contribute to a registered walker, visit www.tbbcf.org, call 860-437-1400 or email info@tbbcf.org.

Funding has assisted researchers at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Yale Cancer Center, the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, and NYU School of Medicine.

Carolyn Linn is Republican Nominee for Chester First Selectman Through Ballot Petition

Republican Carolyn Linn will face Democrat Lister in the Nov. 3 election for  Chester First Selectman.

Republican Carolyn Linn will face Democrat Lauren Gister in the Nov. 3 election for Chester First Selectman.

CHESTER — There will be a contest for first selectman in the Nov. 3 election after all as Carolyn Linn claims the Republican nomination for first selectman with a ballot petition submitted to the town clerk Tuesday. Fifty-five-year-old Linn will face Democratic nominee Lauren Gister, aged 57, for the position left open with the retirement of two-term Democratic First Selectman Edmund Meehan.

Republicans came up empty on the first selectman nomination at the July 27 party caucus that nominated incumbent Republican Selectman Tom Englert for a fourth term, along with a handful of other candidates for positions on the local ballot. Gister a lawyer and former Marine, had been nominated at the Democratic caucus on July 21, with Charlene Janecek as the running-mate for board of selectmen. Democratic Selectman Larry Sypher is not seeking a new term.

But in the succeeding days, Linn, a 26-year resident and certified veterinary assistant who runs a local pet services business, emerged as a candidate. Town Clerk Debra Calamari said Linn submitted a petition signed by 47 town Republicans late Tuesday, one day before Wednesday’s deadline for primary petitions.

State election law allows a position left open by the party nominating caucus to be filled by a primary petition that must be submitted by an Aug. 12 deadline. The petition must be signed by a least five percent of the town’s 453 registered Republicans. With no other candidate, there is no primary and the new candidate claims to Republican line through the petition.

Linn, in a statement issued Thursday, said her goals include “preserving our historic personality while responsibly developing local opportunities” that would enable the town to prosper. She cited taxes and economic development as concerns, and suggested her “entrepreneurial and volunteer spirit” would benefit the town.

Linn said she was a volunteer EMT with the Chester Volunteer Ambulance Service after arriving in town in the early 1990s, and has also been involved with the Chester Winter Carnivale and the Shoreline Soup Kitchens. She is the mother of two children, both of whom graduated from Region 4 schools.

Linn is the first Republican nominated for first selectman since 2009, when former First Selectman Tom Marsh was re-elected for a third term. Marsh resigned in August 2011 to take a town manager job in Vermont. Republicans did not nominate a candidate for first selectman in 2011, when Meehan was easily elected over a challenger nominated by the Chester Common Ground Party. Meehan was uncontested for a second term in 2013, a year when there were no contests for any positions on the town lengthy ballot.

Along with a contest, this year’s nominations ensure the town’s next first selectman will be a woman, either Gister or Linn. The first, and only, woman to serve as Chester First Selectman is Bettie Perreault, a Republican who served from 1989-1993.

From Blues to Classical Guitar: Four Collomore Concerts at Chester Meeting House This Fall 

Robbie Collomore SeriesCHESTER — For its 42nd season, the Robbie Collomore Music Series will offer all four of its concerts in the fall, between Sept. 27 and Nov. 29. As always, the Collomore Committee, chaired by Martin Nadel, has chosen a mix of music genres for the season. All four concerts will be on Sundays at 5 p.m. in the Chester Meeting House.

Beginning the season, on Sept. 27, is the Barbara and Edmund Delaney Young Artists Concert. Cellist Julia Bruskin debuted with the Boston Symphony at age 17 and now performs as a member of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra and internationally as a soloist. She will perform in Chester with her husband, Aaron Wunsch, an internationally known pianist and a member of the Juilliard piano faculty.

Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton takes center stage on Oct. 18.  According to the Wall Street Journal, Paxton, age 26, is “virtually the only music-maker of his generation—playing guitar, banjo, piano and violin, among other implements—to fully assimilate the blues idiom of the 1920s and ‘30s.”

The Hot Club of Detroit, a jazz ensemble specializing in the Gypsy jazz sound made famous by guitarist Django Reinhardt, performs on Nov. 8, followed on Nov. 29 by classical guitarist Jorge Caballero. He is the youngest musician and the only guitarist to win the Naumburg International Competition, one of the most prestigious and coveted awards given to performers of any instrument.

Buy a season subscription and save money, plus you’ll be certain you will have a seat even when the concert is sold out. A subscription to all four concerts is just $72 (that’s four concerts for the price of three). Individual concert tickets cost $24. For students from elementary through graduate school, a subscription is $15. A student ticket for just one concert is $5. Tickets can be purchased online at www.collomoreconcerts.org using PayPal. All ticket-holders are invited to stay for a reception after the concert to meet the performers. For more information, check the website or call 860-526-5162.

Photo: Check your calendars and order your season subscription for this year’s Collomore Concerts! All the info is on the website.

Registration for Valley Shore YMCA Afterschool Programs Now Open

AREAWIDE — To help motivate and inspire kids to discover their potential, the Valley Shore YMCA is offering afterschool programs to school-aged children throughout Westbrook, Chester, Clinton, Deep River, Essex and Old Saybrook schools.  The Y’s afterschool program combines academics with play and offers a caring and safe environment where youth can achieve, feel a sense of belonging, build relationships and explore new interests.  

One in four U.S. children is left unsupervised at the end of school day, according to the Afterschool Alliance, a nonprofit public awareness advocacy organization. With the start of the new school year, the Valley Shore YMCA encourages parents/caregivers to make sure that children are involved in safe, educational experiences after school hours.

“Research shows that afterschool programs can help children perform better in school, practice healthy habits and engage in positive lifestyle behaviors. If left unsupervised at the end of the school day, students miss out on positive influences that encourage achievement and deter risk-taking activities,” said Kathy Scholl, School Age Program Director, Valley Shore YMCA. 

She continues, “The Y’s afterschool programs promote a love for learning, social and emotional development, healthy choices, and provide children with an extra support system through positive role models and caring adults.”

The Y is a leading nonprofit committed to nurturing the potential of every child and through afterschool programming, supporting their social-emotional, cognitive, and physical development from birth to career. In the Valley Shore YMCA’s afterschool program youth receive homework help and attention to healthy eating during snack time and can also explore arts and crafts and physical activity all under the guidance of our enthusiastic Y staff. 

Financial assistance is available to those in need, to ensure every child has the opportunity to learn and grow at the Y.

For more information about the Valley Shore YMCA’s afterschool program, contact Kathy School, School Age Program Director, at 860.399.9622 ext 118, vsymca@vsymca.org or visit vsymca.org.

Democratic First Selectman Richard Smith to Run Unopposed for Record 14th Term

Deep River First Selectman Dick Smith takes a break at his desk.  Photo by Jerome Wilson.

A smiling Deep River First Selectman Richard Smith takes a break from his work for our photographer.  Photo by Jerome Wilson.

DEEP RIVER — Democratic First Selectman Richard Smith has been nominated for a record 14th term, and will again run unopposed on the Nov.3 town election ballot. Two-term incumbent Selectman Angus McDonald Jr. has been nominated for a new term as Smith’s running-mate, with Republican Selectman David Oliveria nominated for a fourth term on the three member board.

Slates nominated by the two parties appear to set up contested races for two seats on the board of finance, and one spot on the Region 4 Board of Education. Democrats have nominated incumbents George Eckenroth and Carmella Balducci for board of finance, with Republicans nominating Mark Grabowski and John Wichtowski for finance board.

Democrats nominated Susan Hollister for a two-year vacancy on the Region 4 board, with Republicans nominating appointed incumbent Lauri Wichtowski for the vacancy term. Republicans nominated incumbent James Olson for a full six-year term on the Region 4 board.

Smith, at 64 one of the longest serving municipal elected officials in Connecticut, said Tuesday he never considered stepping aside this year, “I love what I do, it’s like my extended family.” Smith noted, “Keeping taxes down as much as we can,” and a firehouse renovation and expansion project are priorities for the next two years.

Smith’s last challenge for the top job came in 2007 from the now defunct Deep River Independent Party. He was uncontested for re-election in 2009, 2001, and 2013. Town Republicans have not nominated a candidate for first selectman since 2005.

Three incumbent town office holders are uncontested for new terms, including Republican Town Clerk Amy Macmillian Winchell, first elected in 2009, Democratic Tax Collector Lisa Bbibbiani, also first elected in 2009, and long-time Republican Town Treasurer Tom Lindner.

Democrats nominated Tadria Cialgo, Tracy Dickson. and incumbent Miriam Morrissey for the local board of education Republicans nominated Imran Munawar, Paula Weglarz, and incumbent James Olson for the local school board.

Democrats nominated incumbent Leigh Balducci for board of assessment appeals, with Republicans nominating Thomas Alexa for board of assessment appeals.

Democrats nominated incumbents Alice Procter and Mary Maraschiello for library board of trustees, along with Linda Hall, a former member and chairwoman of the Region 4 school board.

Essex First Selectman Needleman Faces Election Challenge from Selectman Glowac

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman (file photo)

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman (file photo)

ESSEX — Democratic First Selectman Norman Needleman’s bid for a third term will face an election challenge from Republican Selectman Bruce Glowac, a former first selectman who returned to the board in the town’s uncontested election of 2013.

Needleman and Glowac were nominated for the Nov. 3 ballot at party nominating sessions Wednesday. Needleman will be running with two-term incumbent Democratic Selectwoman Stacia Libby.

Glowac is running with selectman candidate Phil Beckman, a former U.S. Navy officer who retired from the service last year.

Needleman, 63, is a local businessman who served four terms on the board of selectmen from 2003-2011 with former Democratic First Selectman, now State Representative Phil Miller. Needleman won the top job in 2011, defeating Republican nominee Bruce MacMillian on a 1,415-993 vote. He was unopposed by town Republicans for a second term in 2013.

Selectman Bruce Glowac

Selectman Bruce Glowac. Photo by Jerome Wilson.

But the uncontested election of 2013 also brought Glowac back to the board as the minority Republican selectman. Glowac, also 63 and a lifelong resident, had served as first selectman from 1991-1995, later assuming the job of director of facilities for Region 4 schools. Glowac, addressing about 25 Republicans at the caucus, said one key reason he is running is to give town voters a choice on the ballot, avoiding the uncontested town elections that occurred in 2013 and also in 2007. “It’s a special time and it is important to give our residents a choice on the ballot,” he said, adding that uncontested elections for top policy-making positions, “… are unhealthy to the process and do a disservice to our community.”

Glowac said the role of town government is to “direct and control change, adding, “It needs to be done with extreme care so we don’t lose the qualities that we love in Essex.” Glowac said he would retire from the Region 4 job at year’s end if he is elected first selectman,

Needleman said he is proud of the Democratic record over the last 12 years, and “loves” the job of first selectman. “It allows you to touch people’s lives and make a real difference,” he said. Both nominees promised a positive campaign, and each praised their rival. Needleman said Glowac is “a terrific guy and a huge help on the board of selectmen,” adding the current board “is a terrific working board and I’ll do what I have to do to make that continue.” Glowac said he respects Needleman and has tried to work with he and Libby over the past two years.

Democrats nominated incumbents Fred Vollono and Donald Mesite for new terms on the board of finance. Mesite was appointed to the board in December 2013 after the former board chairman, Democrat Jim Francis was elected town treasurer. Republicans nominated Geri MacMillian and former Selectman Vince Pacileo for the finance board. Pacileo, who works as director of administrative services for the Town of Stonington, served on the board of selectmen from 2003-2009, and was the unsuccessful Republican nominee for 33rd Senate in 2008 and 36th House in 2012.

Democrats nominated incumbent Jennifer Clark for a new six-year term on the Region 4 Board of Education. Republicans nominated Mary Louise Till, a retired teacher who is also a practicing attorney, for the Region 4 seat. Democrats nominated incumbent board Chairman Lon Seidman for the local board of education, with Republicans nominating incumbent D.G. Fitton for the local board, where elections are uncontested.

Democrats nominated Mark Bombaci and former member Richard Helmecki for board of assessment appeals. Republicans nominated Bruce MacMillian and Keith Russell for board of assessment appeals.

Needleman States Priorities for Possible Third Term as Essex First Selectman

Selectman Stacia Libby stands with First Selectman Norman Needleman.

Selectman Stacia Libby stands with First Selectman Norman Needleman.

ESSEX — At his July 22 announcement of his intention to run for a third, two-year-term as First Selectman of Essex, Norman Needleman noted two priorities that he would address, if re-elected.  The first is the completion of the new public works projects presently underway in Essex and the second is to establish a new, more accountable way for delivering public services to the residents of Essex by the various town agencies.

New Public Works in Essex: Several Projects Already Complete …

With regard to the first electoral priority — completing new public works in Essex — that one is well underway. The old tennis courts behind Essex Town Hall have been brought up to “tournament play” condition.

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman holds his treasured grandson.

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman holds his treasured grandson.

The parking lots, also behind the town hall, have  been completely regraded with a new playground installed that has proved to be very popular with both young and old alike. Also, Essex Town’s Hall’s frontage has been refreshed with a new lawn and improved signage, along with a general upgrade.

… Others Still on the Agenda

Needleman has ahead of him, should he be re-elected, the completion of the total refashioning of the Ivoryton section of the Town of Essex. Extensive new streets have already been put in place and the final touches of the new streetscape improvements in Ivoryton would likely extend well into a possible Needleman third term.

Also, contemplated by Needleman are upgrades in the Centerbrook section of Essex, but these are still on the drawing boards.

Screen Shot 2015-07-24 at 1.36.58 AMImproved Coordination of Services to Residents by Essex Town Employees  

In addition to these superstructure improvements on Needleman’s re-election roster is a determination to tackle the manner in which Essex Town Departments and workers deliver services to Essex residents. Such an initiative would review the degrees of coordination among Town agencies.

It is Needleman’s view that there is presently a serious lack of coordination among Town agencies in the delivery of services to the town and, if re-elected, he intends to change this.

Chester Democrats Nominate Lauren Gister for First Selectman, Charlene Janececk for Selectman

Atty. Lauren Gister

Atty. Lauren Gister

CHESTER — Democrats Tuesday nominated Laruen Gister for the open first selectman position, with Charlene Janecek, the party registrar of voters, as the running-mate for board of selectmen.

Both seats on the three-member board, controlled by Democrats since 2011, were open after the incumbents declined to seek new terms in the Nov. 3 vote.

Two-term Democratic First Selectman Edmund Meehan formally advised the Democratic Town Committee in June that he would not seek a new term. Selectman Lawrence Sypher, first elected in 2009, also declined to run again.

Gister, a local attorney and 25-year member of the U.S. Marine Corps, and Janececk, were nominated on a unanimous voice vote from the approximately 70 Democrats that turned out for the caucus held at the Chester Meeting House. Gister had been endorsed by the Chester Democratic Town Committee earlier this month. But comments made in the nominating speech for the position indicated there had been some questions and possible objections to Gister’s nomination.

In nominating Gister, David Fitzgibbons claimed there had been an effort to “swiftboat,” her possible candidacy in the days preceding the caucus. The term is a reference to Republican backed attacks on Democratic nominee John Kerry in the 2004 presidential campaign. He claimed the actions were damaging to the party and the town while praising Gister’s experience as a Marine and ability to “lead us forward with compassion.”

Fitzgibbons was clearly referring to a letter published in a local weekly from Joe Cohen, a town committee member. In the letter published last week, Cohen contends that Gister lacks government and managerial experience, does not own property in Chester, and has not voted in recent elections. Cohen, a public relations consultant and former newspaper reporter, was rumored to be planning a caucus challenge to Gister’s nomination. But Cohen, who was present Tuesday, did not put his name in nomination at the caucus.

Gister said after the nomination that she was expecting a challenger from Cohen. She said “ugly statements” before the caucus had referred to personal problems she faced and overcame in recent years, including a divorce and subsequent foreclosure on her property in town.

Gister, 56, is a mother of four children, ages 14-31 Gister said she was born in California, but moved to Connecticut at age 14 and graduated from Hall High School in West Hartford.. A 19-year resident who maintains a law practice in town, Gister said she was approached by town committee members about a possible candidacy earlier this month.

Cohen said after the caucus that he is hoping other candidates emerge for the first selectman position over the next two weeks to provide town voters with a contest. Cohen said he is “pondering” a position run as a petition candidate, but is unlikely to challenge Gister’s nomination in a Democratic primary. He offered no apologies for his letter to the editor about Gister. “Telling the truth and raising concerns about legitimate issues is not in any way character assassination.” he said.

Democrats also nominated a slate of mostly incumbents for other positions on the municipal election ballot. Lori Ann Clymas, currently serving on the board of finance, was nominated for a six-year term on the Region 4 Board of Education. Incumbent Jennifer Rannestad was nominated for a new term on the board of finance.

Incumbents Errol Horner and Keith Scherber were nominated for new full terms on the planning and zoning commission, with incumbent Peter Zanardi nominated for a two-year term on the commission. New candidate Jacqueline Stack was nominated for planning and zoning commission alternate. Incumbents Maria Scherber and David Fitzgibbons were nominated for local board of education, along with new candidates John Stack and John Ropiak.

Incumbent Mark Borton was nominated for a new term on the zoning board of appeals, incumbent Kim Senay was nominated for a new term on the inland wetlands commission, and incumbent James Pease was nominated for a new term on the water pollution control authority. Incumbent Sandy Senior-Dauer and Karin Badger were nominated for library board of trustees.

Republicans hold their nominating caucus Monday. No candidates have announced for the Republican nomination for first selectman. Cohen, or any other possible challengers, face an Aug. 5 deadline to submit signatures to run as a petition candidate.

Aug. 12 is the deadline for primary petitions.