July 1, 2016

Deep River Library Plans Full Calendar for Kids in July, Starting July 1

Deep River Library building at 150 Main Street, Deep River

Deep River Library building at 150 Main Street, Deep River

 Every Friday is FUN FRIDAY at the Deep River Public Library! The following story times and programs for the month of July will be offered:

July 1:  FUN FRIDAY Story time. This is a Preschool Power Hour with stories and songs in an interactive setting, followed by Open Play. Starts at 10:30 a.m.; open to all ages,

July 8: Special FUN FRIDAY GUEST! ABC Amigos returns. Starts at 10:30 a.m.; open to all ages. Preschool Power Hour with stories and songs in an interactive setting. Starts at 10:30 a.m.; open to all ages,

July 15: Special FUN FRIDAY GUESTS! Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center visits with some special animal friends!  Learn about animal movement in this interactive program with live animals, specifically tailored to the preschool set. Older children welcome are also welcome to attend. Free and open to all, no registration required. Starts at 10:30 a.m.

July 22: Special FUN FRIDAY GUEST! Yoga for Youngsters and their grownups with Jen from Earth Friends Discovery. Get fit and flexible with a free session of yoga. Bring a mat or towel. This program is geared toward preschoolers,  but older children are welcome to attend. Free and open to all, no registration required. Starts at 10:30 a.m.

July 29: The Deep River Drive-in Returns with “Dr. Seuss, Green Eggs and Ham,” a short film appropriate for preschools and served with popcorn, all in reserved box-car seating. Show time starts at 10:30 a.m.

Additional Children’s/Teen Programs:

July 6: Wednesday Family Night continues at the Deep River Public Library! Come at 6 p.m. for a Family Yoga night with Jen from Earth Friends Discovery. Get fit and flexible with a free session of yoga. Bring a mat or towel. This program is best suited for children ages 5 and up. Bring the whole family and give yoga a try on us! Free and open to all, no registration required.

July 13:  Zumba with Tracy starts at 6 p.m. Got energy to burn? Love moving to a beat? Come try out Zumba for kids. Get fit and have fun doing it with this high-energy workout to the latest dance tunes. This program is best suited for children ages 4 and up, but all are welcome to attend. Bring the whole family and give Zumba a try! Free and open to all, no registration required.

July 14: Brick Bunch meets from 3:45 to 4:45 p.m. for open Lego construction. This is a drop-in program. Large blocks for the younger kids are now available.

July 20: Drumming With Bob Bloom starts at 6 p.m. This is an interactive program appropriate and fun for all ages. Find your own rhythm, Open to all, no registration required.

July 27: Stamford Animal Museum returns with Animals in Motion at 6 p.m. Learn about the movers and shakers in the animal world in this interactive show. Open to all; no registration required.

For more information on any of these programs, please call 860-526-6039 or email drplchildrensdept@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 .

Share

First Friday, July 1, Celebrated in Chester Center

CHESTER – Start the July Fourth Weekend off with a bang! Come to First Friday in Chester Center.

On this first of Chester’s First Fridays, the evening of July 1st brings art gallery shows, a trunk show, live music, the opening of the doors of Chester’s newest shop, The French Hen, and more.

The town is buzzing with anticipation about The French Hen, which has just moved here from Essex. On its Facebook page, the shop is described as “a gift boutique where you will discover the beautiful, unique and the curious. Lush with product and creativity, the store will delight your senses.” The French Hen will be at 8 Main St.

Chester’s two other brand-new shops will also be open on First Friday. Strut Your Mutt at 29 Main St. will be hosting a “Yappy Hour” from 6 to 8 p.m. with wine for you and water for your dog. Homage Art Gallery and Café at 16 Main St. is having Teen Open Mic Night from 6 to 8 p.m.

Two pieces in Dina Varano’s new summer collection, “Ocean Dreams.”

ELLE Design Studio presents “Natural Occurrences,” paintings and works on paper, by Deborah Weiss during the month of July. The exhibit opens with an opening reception on July 1, from 5 to 8 p.m.  ELLE design is at 1 Main Street.

At Dina Varano Gallery, First Friday brings the opening of Dina’s jewelry collection for the summer, “Ocean Dreams.” The collection features white and light-hued gemstones with brushed sterling silver that is expertly and intuitively crafted into one-of-a-kind necklaces, earrings, and bracelets. The inspiration came from all things seen and felt at the beach: the light breezes, ocean waves, warm sunshine, and salty-fresh air.

Stop in and take a look at the newly refurbished, resized, refeathered Lark on First Friday, July 1st. Owner Suzie Woodward says, “We are renewed, restored and reinvigorated by the rearranging, readorning and rebrightening of one of Chester’s enchanting shops.  Along with our recelebration for our grand reopening, MaryAnne Delorenzo will be hosting a trunk show featuring beautiful, handmade lamp work and sterling.”

All this plus live music on the Pattaconk Patio, great shopping at the Lori Warner Gallery, and the “Downtown Chester” art show at the Maple & Main Gallery (see separate story and images here).

More details on Facebook.com/VisitChesterCT.

Share

Chester Library Says Goodbye to Linda Fox and Hello to Stephanie Romano; Reception on July 7

A reception for outgoing Library Director Linda Fox and incoming Director Stephanie Romano will be held at Chester Library on July 7. (Skip Hubbard photo)

A reception for outgoing Library Director Linda Fox and incoming Director Stephanie Romano will be held at Chester Library on July 7. (Skip Hubbard photo)

CHESTER – After 13-plus years of being the Director of Chester Public Library, Linda Fox is retiring from her position. Thursday, July 7, will be her last day. Stephanie Romano will be stepping into Linda’s position full-time on July 6.

A reception, open to the public, to say goodbye to Linda and to welcome Stephanie will be held on July 7 at the library from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Linda wrote the Library Board of Trustees in February, to tell them of her plan to leave the library this summer. She said, “Being a Public Library Director is a job that I never expected to love, but love it I have for more than a decade.  It has been challenging, rewarding and a great pleasure to work for and with you, the library staff, the Friends, and the people of Chester.  We’ve accomplished good things together, haven’t we?  The library is more technologically current, staff and service hours have been expanded, and the community is more engaged with the library, not to mention that we are closer than ever to creating an accessible, 21st-century library building for the community.  The thought of not being around for the opening of those doors brings with it a true sense of disappointment.”

Longtime Library Friends member Sally Murray said, “Linda has consistently given her all, and then some, for the people of Chester; her tireless efforts have brightened our town in ways most people will never recognize but which benefit all of us.”

Longtime Library Board of Trustees Chairman Terry Schreiber, who hired Linda in 2002 and Stephanie this spring, added, “We feel Stephanie will be a perfect match for our library. She is enthusiastic and willing to reach out to people to continue to make Chester Library a warm, friendly, welcoming place.  We will miss Linda very very much – she was the face of the library for so many years – but we wish her well and know she looks forward to new  adventures.”

Stephanie Romano comes to Chester from Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library, where she worked since May 2007, most recently as Access Services Manager (see separate article on LymeLine here). Describing herself, Stephanie wrote, “My path to being a librarian has not been a direct one! I worked at Research Books (a book distributor for corporate libraries) in Madison for about eight years before deciding to go back to school. The work I was involved in with Research Books involved interaction with librarians on all different levels and was the reason I chose to pursue a degree in Library Science.  I loved the fact that every librarian I spoke with, no matter which field they were in, loved their job.  I knew that I also wanted a job that I was going to love after 25 years.”

The Friends of the Chester Library, along with the Board of Trustees, are hosting the reception for Linda and Stephanie on July 7 and invite all residents to drop in to thank Linda for her many years of service and to greet Stephanie. Refreshments will be served.

Share

World Class Frisbee at Deep River Public Library, June 29

Todd Brodeur

Todd Brodeur

DEEP RIVER – Get ready for some high-flying fun when World Class Frisbee visits the Deep River Public Library on Wednesday, June 29, at 6 p.m.

Watch Free-Styling Frisbee Champion Todd Brodeur as he amazes us with some fabulous tricks. You might just learn a few skills to try out on your own! Free and open to all, no registration required.

This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Deep River Public Library.

For more information, go to website at http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, email the Children’s Department at drplchildrensdept@gmail.com or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 5 pm.

Share

Summer Co-op for Tri-Town Middle School Students Has Started!

2015 Co-oREGION 4 — Tri-Town Youth Services will kick off its three-week summer Co-op 2016 with “Water Week,” which will take place June 27-30.  Each day will start at 9 a.m. and end at 4 p.m. at Tri-Town Youth Services, 56 High Street, Deep River.  The week includes trips to Ocean Beach, Huck Finn, Brownstone and Lake Compounce.

Session II of the Summer Co-op runs July 5-7.  “Surf ‘n’ Turf” features trips to Empower Zip Lines, Hammonasset Beach and Six Flags.  Hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Session III, July 11-14, is “Equine Adventure,” which includes learning about horses, their care and riding lessons.  Hours are 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

These programs are open to students entering grades 7, 8 or 9 who live in Chester, Deep River or Essex.

For information and registration, call Tri-Town at 860-526-3600, or visit www.tritownys.org

Share

Essex Zoning Commission Approves New Restaurant in Centerbrook Section of Town

30 Main Street, Centerbrook

30 Main Street, Centerbrook

ESSEX — The zoning commission Monday approved a special permit for a new restaurant to be located on the first floor of a partially vacant commercial building at 30 Main St. in the Centerbrook section.

The application of ECC Realty and Colt Taylor was unanimously approved after a brief public hearing where several residents spoke in support of the plans. Taylor told the panel he was raised in Essex,  has been involved with restaurants in both New York and California,and wants to return to open a restaurant in his hometown.

The three-story building at 30 Main St. once housed a restaurant for a few years in the late 1980s, but has housed mostly office uses in recent years. The plans call for a 130-seat restaurant and bar.
In approving the permit, the commission specified that use of the second floor would be limited to a small office for the business and storage. Taylor said he hopes to open the restaurant, which would offer “progressive New England comfort food,” before the end of the year.
Share

Deep River Library Kicks Off Summer with Family Fun Night

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

DEEP RIVER – Summer Reading kicks off on June 22 with the Deep River Public Library’s Wednesday Family Fun Night! Come for a rocking good time with a DJ Dave Dance Party, starting at 6 p.m. Get the whole family moving and grooving! This program is free and open to all, no registration required.

Programs are sponsored by the Friends of the Deep River Public Library. For more information, go to http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar; email the Children’s Department at drplchildrensdept@gmail.com; or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8 .pm.; Tuesday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Share

Bozzuto’s Inc. Kicks Off ‘Reach for the Stars’ Campaign to Help Special Olympics Athletes Shine

special olympicsDEEP RIVER – This summer, until Aug. 13, grocery shoppers can visit their neighborhood IGA supermarket (such as Adams in Deep River) and make a donation to help Special Olympics athletes reach for the stars.

Bozzuto’s Inc. and The IGA Hometown Foundation invite their customers and the community to join them in supporting local Special Olympics athletes by participating in their annual ‘Reach for the Stars’ campaign by making a donation of $1, $2, $5 or more at checkout. In recognition of each contribution, a “star” with the donor’s name (if desired) will be displayed in the store for the duration of the campaign.

The ‘Reach for the Stars’ campaign aims to help share the joy of sport and encourage inclusion and respect for people of all abilities – on and off the playing field. Since 2008, the hang tag promotion has been conducted to assist Special Olympics in providing year-round sports training and competition opportunities for thousands of athletes, statewide.

All proceeds from this effort will go to the local Law Enforcement Torch Run Program, which encompasses a variety of events supporting Special Olympics that include the annual Torch Run, and Cop-on-Top and Tip-A-Cop fundraising events, all hosted and run by volunteer law enforcement officers.

Bozzuto’s, Inc., is a family-owned, full service, wholesale food distribution company headquartered in Cheshire, Connecticut, that serves over 1,500 supermarket retailers in 10 states.  Bozzuto’s is a proud supporter of IGA and is a five-time winner of IGA’s highest honor, The President’s Cup.

The Hometown Foundation is a non-profit, charitable foundation dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for individuals and their families in hometowns and surrounding communities where it operates. The Hometown Foundation honors and assists five key areas of interest: Children, Cancer, Diabetes, Military, and Emergency Response Personnel.

Special Olympics Connecticut (www.soct.org) provides year-round sports training and competitions for close to 13,000 athletes of all ages with intellectual disabilities and Unified Sports® partners – their teammates without disabilities. Through the joy of sport, the Special Olympics movement transforms lives and communities throughout the state and in 170 countries around the world by promoting good health and fitness and inspiring inclusion and respect for all people, on and off the playing field.

Share

Essex Zoning Commission Approves 52-Unit Apartment Complex on Plains Rd.

The Plains Road property where the Iron Chef restaurant has been long empty has been approved for apartments.

The Plains Road property where the Iron Chef restaurant has been vacant for many years has been approved for the Essex Station apartments.

 

ESSEX — The zoning commission Monday approved plans for a three-building 52-unit apartment complex with an affordable housing component at a 3.7-acre parcel on Plains Road that includes the long-vacant former Iron Chef restaurant property.

The special permit for the Essex Station apartments at 21, 27 and 29 Plains Road was approved o a 4-1 vote, with commission Chairman Larry Shipman and members Alvin Wolfgram, Jim Hill and Susan Uihlein  voting to approve the permit and member William Reichenbach opposed. The application from Signature Contracting Group LLC was submitted under state statute 8-30g, a law intended to promote additional affordable housing in Connecticut.

The statute limits the jurisdiction of municipal land use commissions to issues of public health and safety, while requiring that at least 30 percent of the dwelling units in a development be designated affordable housing and reserved for people or families with incomes at or less than 80 percent of the median income for the municipality. At least 16 of the Essex Station units would be designated as moderate income housing with monthly rents expected to be about $1,800.

The plans were presented at a series of public hearings that began in February, and appeared to generate increasing objections from some residents as the review process continued. Many of the objections focused on the proximity of the site to the Valley Railroad tourist excursion line.

In more than 90 minutes of discussion Monday, the panel considered two draft motions prepared by longtime commission counsel Peter Sipples, one to approve the permit with conditions, and another to deny the application. In the end, the motion of approval included several conditions, most of which had been accepted by the applicant during the public hearing process.

The major conditions include a strict prohibition on any expansion or condominium conversion of the units, construction of a six-foot high security fence around the perimeter of the property,  installing sound barriers if needed between the residential units and the railroad, and construction of a walking-bicycle path on Plains Rd. that would extend east to connect with existing sidewalks on Rte. 154. There would also be a requirement for elevators in the buildings, particularly the single three-story building, and a provision in future leases that would note the proximity to other uses, including the tourist railroad and a nearby wood-processing facility. The development site is located in a business and industrial zone.

During the discussion, Shipman noted the apartments would be a better residential use near the railroad than owned condominiums, and suggested the requirements of the affordable housing statute limited the panel’s ability to control some aspects of the project, including density and building height. The sewage disposal system for the three building complex must be approved by the state Department of Public Health.
Share

Hike the Pond Meadow Preserve with Essex Land Trust, Saturday

Pond Meadow2

IVORYTON – Since Pond Meadow was acquired in 2014, much has been accomplished to transform this unique Land Trust destination in Ivoryton. The property has three distinguishing aspects: an abundance of old trees; a swamp traversed by a 450-foot elevated walkway/bog-walk; and, when the trees are leafed out, a double canopy not unlike a rain forest. The property comprises 18 acres and includes a bridge over a stream that flows into the Falls River, built by Eagle Scout Dan Ryan and his Boy Scout Troop 12.

The Essex Land Trust will lead a Pond Meadow hike on Saturday, June 25, beginning at 9 a.m. at Comstock Park in Ivoryton. Hikers should wear appropriate footwear for wet soil conditions. Access and parking are at the end of Park Road, Ivoryton, across from Comstock Park. Bad weather cancels.

Share

Cello Recital by Eva Ribchinsky at Essex Library

Eva Ribchinsky

Eva Ribchinsky

ESSEX – A cello recital by local resident Eva Ribchinsky will be held on Saturday, June 25, at 4 p.m. at Essex Library.

Ribchinsky has just graduated from the Cleveland Institute of Music and is headed to Carnegie Mellon University this fall to pursue a master’s degree in music. She will play works by Bocherini, J.S. Bach and Gaspar Cassado.

Admission to this program is free and open to the public. Please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 to register or for more information. The library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex.

Share

Author Richard Friswell Discusses His Book of Essays at Essex Library, Saturday

friswellESSEX – Author and cultural historian Richard Friswell is on the faculty of Wesleyan University’s Lifelong Learning Institute. He is also the editor and publisher of ARTES, an international fine arts, architecture and design e-magazine.

He is an elected member of the Association Internationale des Critiques d’Art (one of only 450 individuals in the United States), and an award-winning writer, with two national medals from Folio:Magazine for his editorial contributions in the field of art journalism. He writes and lectures on topics related to modernism.

He will speak at the Essex Library about his book of autobiographical essays, “Balancing Act,” on Saturday, June 25 at 2:30 p.m. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing.

Admission to this program is free and open to the public. Please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 to register or for more information. The library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex.

 

Share

Fifth Annual ‘Run for Chris’ 5K Takes Place in Essex: Registration Open Through Race Day

Run for Chris 5K (VNN file photo)

Run for Chris 5K (VNN file photo)

ESSEX — The 5th Annual ‘Run for Chris’ 5K will be held Saturday, June 25, at Essex Town Hall. It is both a memorial and charitable event, the primary purpose of which is to raise money for educational endeavors in the schools of the Lower Valley of Middlesex County.

Chris Belfoure greatly appreciated the opportunities afforded to him that introduced him to new places, peoples and cultures, such as his time spent studying and working in China. (He had participated in the trips abroad while at Valley Regional High School.) He felt that every young person should have similar opportunities to expand their horizons, since his experiences had so profoundly impacted him and his worldview.

Thus, to honor his memory and perpetuate his ideals, the Chris Belfoure Memorial Fund has been established at the Community Foundation of Middlesex County. The proceeds from the ‘Run for Chris’ go directly to these causes.

To preregister for the race, go to aratrace.com, and click on ‘Run For Chris.’ (Race day registration starts at 7 a.m.) Overall and age-group awards will be given, and all participants will receive a free, tech t-shirt. Fun Run for Kids 6 and under starts at 8:15 a.m. along with the CB4 Mile Run for ages 7-14. The 5K and 2 mile walk start at 8:45 a.m. The run through beautiful Essex is USATF Certified. There will be great raffle items and a face painter to add to the fun.

Registration link: http://www.chrisbel4mf.com/run-for-chris-5k.html

 

Share

Hear the Best Youth Music Around at ‘LymeStock 2016’ Today at Ashlawn Farm

The Brazen Youth will be headlining Lymestock 2016 at Ashlawn Farm on Sunday

The Brazen Youth will be headlining Lymestock 2016 at Ashlawn Farm on Sunday

MusicNow Foundation, Inc. is hosting the 3rd Annual Lymestock 2016 Father’s Day concert and picnic at Ashlawn Farm in Lyme on Sunday, June 19, from 12 to 7 p.m.  The festival will present New England’s award-winning young artists with local, aspiring youth opening the performances.  Gates open at 11:30 a.m.  Children are welcome.

Highlights this year will be a performance by Rumblecat, who received the 2016 New England Music Award for ‘Best in the State of Vermont’, and Brazen Youth, recipients of ‘New England’s Radar Music Award 2015.’ Additionally, performances by Joe Holt of Brooklyn, New York and ‘Radar Music Winner’ James MacPherson and the Bonzai Trees will highlight the day of music.

Joe Holt is another big name that will be performing on Sunday at Lymestock 2016.

Joe Holt is another big name that will be performing on Sunday at Lymestock 2016.

Opening performances by local emerging artists, Sophia Griswold and Connected, Drew Cathcart and Blind Fool, The Modern Riffs, and Julia Russo will take the stage for a day of music, food and fun on the farm for Father’s Day.

Hamburgers and hot dogs along with lunches, desserts and summer refreshments will be available for sale or guests can pack their own.

Lymestock 2016 will benefit Youth in Music mission initiatives of the MusicNow Foundation, Inc.
(www.musicnowfoundation.org) serving southeastern Connecticut and beyond.  The concert picnic is
presented in collaboration with Ashlawn Farm, Pavoh.org and sponsored in part by LymeLine.com, the Bee and Thistle Inn, and iCRV Radio — among others.

MusicNow Foundation, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to the support of live music to engage, educate and enrich young artists through performance opportunities, enrichment workshops, and collaborative mentorships / internships to nurture creative and artistic development.

Advance tickets can be purchased in advance at Nightingale’s Acoustic Café at 68 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, Conn. or by calling (860) 434-1961. Advance tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students.  Gate tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students.

For more information, call (860) 434-1961 or email info@musicnowfoundation.org

Share

Valley Regional Celebrates Class of 2016 With Memories, Music and Merriment

In the distance on the bleachers, the Valley Regional High School Class of 2016. All photos by Laura Matesky of lauramateskyphotography.com

In the distance, the Valley Regional High School Class of 2016 stands on the bleachers. All photos by Laura Matesky of lauramateskyphotography.com

A clear blue sky accompanied by 75° weather and a gentle breeze created the perfect ambience for the Valley Regional High School’s (VRHS) 151 students of the Class of 2016 to graduate this past Wednesday, June 15.

The girls of the Class of 2016 filed into the stadium.

The girls of the Class of 2016 file into the stadium.

Teacher Kevin Woods (wearing sunglasses) filed in with the faculty.

Teacher and boy’s varsity basketball coach Kevin Woods (wearing sunglasses) files in with the faculty.

Valley Regional Principal Michael Barile hugs this year's VRHS Hall of Fame inductee.

Valley Regional Principal Michael Barile hugs this year’s VRHS Hall of Fame inductee.

Valedictorian Christina Mitchel.

Valedictorian Christina Mitchel (above) and Salutatorian Acacia Bowden (below delivered heartfelt and inspirational speeches that led the graduates to reflect on the past, the present, and the future.

Honor Essayist Mary Proteau (below) completed the triumvirate with an equally compelling speech.

Honor Essayist Mary Proteau.

 

While the students gave their speeches, the dignitaries listened attentively.

Principal ?? beamed as he listened to the speeches.

Michael Barile, VRHS Pricipal, smiles broadly as he listens to the speeches.

Several students in the graduating class lightened the mood with two musical numbers.
The bright Scottish tune, “Loch Lomond” was sung by Valley’s senior ensemble choir, including sopranos Angelina Annino, Miranda Holland, Carly Zuppe, Emma Colby, Eme Carlson, Avery Carlson, and Erica Vaccaro; altos Cassidy French, Leslie Clapp, Jordan Adams­Sack, Joy Molyneux, Amanda Hull, Caitlin Glance, and Rachel Breault; tenor Dilan Rojas; and basses John Cappezzone, Brooks Robinson, Riley Sullivan, and Will Elliot. This song showcased seniors Dilan Rojas, Emma Colby, Carly Zuppe, and Eme Carlson.

Valley Regional's Senior Ensemble sang 'Loch Lomond' and "I lived' during the event.

Valley Regional’s Senior Ensemble sang ‘Loch Lomond’ and “I lived’ during the event.

The second musical song, a cover of “I Lived”, by One Republic, was performed by singers Dilan Rojas, Carly Zuppe, and John Cappezzone, supported by Tyler Atkinson on the guitar and Brooks Robinson on drums.

Senior Class Treasurer Julia Hammond and Secretary Katie Amara presented the Class Gift.

Senior Class Treasurer Julia Hammond and Secretary Katie Amara presented the Class gift of benches for the art hallway during the ceremony as well.

The presentation of diplomas began ...

The presentation of diplomas began …

Girl_receives_diploma

… and continued … with Region 4 Superintendent Dr. Ruth Levy shaking each graduate’s hand …

... and ended!

… and ended!

 

Hat_toss

The evening culminated when the class tossed their caps high into the air, symbolizing their level of energy and high ambition for the next chapter of their lives.

When the ceremony was complete, all that remained were fond memories ... and a handful of hats on the ground.

When the ceremony was complete, all that remained were fond memories … and a handful of hats scattered on the ground.

Share

Deep River Church Plans August Flea Market & Rummage Sale, Aug. 19 & 20

Deep River Congregational ChurchDEEP RIVER – The Deep River Congregational Church will hold its Annual Rummage Sale on Friday, Aug. 19, and Saturday, Aug. 20. Its Annual Flea Market will be on Saturday, Aug. 20, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Reservations for spaces at the Flea Market are now being accepted. The spaces, which are about 20 ft. x 20 ft. on Marvin Field and all around the church building, sell for $30 each.  More than half the spaces have already been sold, so please act quickly if you would like to have a spot.   Registration forms and maps can be downloaded from the church web site, www.deeprivercc.org. or call the church office for further information:  860-526-5045 or office.drcc@snet.net.

Donations for the Rummage Sale may be left in the church hall in front of the Nellie Prann Room on the lower level. (Not by the offices!)  Please note that the following items are not accepted:  large furniture, TVs, large appliances, car seats, cribs, books, clothing, shoes, VHS tapes or items that are in disrepair. Contact Cathy Smith at 860-526-1875 or smithcathleen@sbcglobal.net or the Church Office at 860-526-5045 or office.drcc@snet.net with questions.

The church is located at 1 Church Street (off Rte. 154), in Deep River.

 

Share

Sunshine to Sing at Inaugural Osprey Festival Saturday in Sound View, Old Lyme

Standing by one of the osprey nests being used to promote this Saturday's Osprey Festival are board members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce (from left to right) Mark Griswold, Jan Ayer Cushing, Doug Lo Presti and Joann Lishing.

Standing by one of the osprey nests being used to promote this Saturday’s Osprey Festival are board members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce (from left to right) Mark Griswold, Jan Ayer Cushing, Doug Lo Presti and Joann Reis Lishing.

Family-Oriented Event Features ‘The Voice’ Finalist Braiden Sunshine, Art Lectures, Kid Contests, Vendors Galore  … and More

The Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce is hosting a new ‘Osprey Festival’ at Sound View this coming Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.  This is an exciting, family-oriented seaside festival that honors the majestic osprey and celebrates many of the great aspects of Lyme and Old Lyme.

The Chamber is partnering with the Connecticut Audubon Society’s Osprey Nation, the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center, Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the University of New Haven, and the MusicNow Foundation to bring together art, music, nature and events.

Osprey_Festival_logo_cropped

This inaugural annual event is designed to kick-off the summer season and attract residents from our two towns as well as the surrounding communities. Mark your calendars now for what promises to be an enjoyable, entertaining and educational event.

A portion of Hartford Ave. in Sound View will be closed off for the festival.  The morning and early afternoon will be focused on young families with free carousel rides, kid’s competitions, school bands, and young local musicians. At the same time, a great variety of vendors will be selling their wares on Hartford Ave.

The afternoon will be geared towards the older population in Lyme and Old Lyme with lectures from world-renowned speakers on art and nature including artist Michael DiGiogio giving a field demonstration and talk at 12 p.m., and ornithological expert Dr. Paul Spitzer speaking at 2:15 p.m. on ospreys in the Lower Connecticut River.

The afternoon’s activities will also feature a bocce contest – sign up your team by emailing info@ospreyfestival.com – and sandcastle-building competition.  The bocce tournament winning team receives $250 in prizes from Black Hall Outfitters.

Old Lyme's own Braiden Sunshine will perform in the evening at the Osprey Festival.

Old Lyme’s own Braiden Sunshine will perform in the evening at the Osprey Festival.

As the evening rolls in, the tone will change to create a night for all ages with some top- notch local bands, and some special games in the street. Old Lyme’s own Braiden Sunshine – a finalist in the most recent popular TV series of “The Voice” – will present a concert at 7 p.m.

Other musical groups that will be featured include the United States Coast Guard Band at 3:45 p.m., Java Grove at 6 p.m., Ramblin’ Dan and the Mellowmen at 5 p.m., Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Jazz Catz at 3:10 p.m., MusicNow Foundation’s Youth Showcase at 1:10 p.m., and some special guests from Charles Music School’s Adult Rock Band at 11:15 a.m.

Platinum sponsors of the Festival include ASP Productions LLC, Black Hall Outfitters, Connecticut Rental Center, iCRV Radio and Shoreline Web News LLC – publisher of LymeLine.com and ValleyNewsNow.com.  Host sponsors include the Connecticut Audubon Society, Nightingale’s Acoustic Café and Lyme Academy College of FineArts.

For more information, visit www.ospreyfestival.com or email info@ospreyfestival.com.

Share

Ann Carl Receives “Making A Difference” Award from Essex Congregational Church

1465749022551

The First Congregational Church in Essex presented its “Making A Difference” Award to Valley Regional High School graduated senior Ann E. Carl of Chester (front row center) at a recent ceremony at the church. Family and members of the church’s Justice and Witness Committee who gathered for the award announcement are: (front row L-R) committee member Delcie McGrath of Essex, parents Elizabeth Carl and Joseph Carl of Chester; committee member Mary-Lawrence Bickford of Essex; (back L-R) church pastor Rev. Ken Peterkin, and committee members Emily Williams of Essex, Sharyn Nelson of Ivoryton and Mike Hennessy of East Lyme.

ESSEX – The First Congregational Church of Essex, UCC has presented its “Making A Difference” Award to Ann E. Carl, a graduated senior from Valley Regional High School.

Sponsored by the Justice and Witness Committee of the church, the $1,000 “Making A Difference” award is given to a senior at Valley Regional High School whose actions continue to challenge those ideas and practices that result in the exclusion of others. These can be small actions: an effort to connect groups or individuals with different ideas and different experiences, acts of inclusiveness, a community project or school activity that unites people in a positive cause or attempts to seek out individuals needing support.

The daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Carl of Chester, award recipient Annie is taking a “Gap Year” to travel and work in Ecuador, the Western United States and South Africa. The “Making A Difference” Award will go towards her fundraising for those efforts.

During her years at VRHS, Annie was a member of the National Honor Society and was active in soccer, track, the Interact Club and the Steering Committee. She has helped to raise funds for “Sharing To Learn,” a non-profit to help the village of Makuleke, South Africa; “CT Brain Freeze,” a polar plunge held by the National Brain Tumor Society; and a soccer game to promote awareness of pediatric cancer.

Other projects that Annie was involved in during her student career include “Tap Is Back Campaign/Chester Cares Initiative” to promote reusable water bottles; “Simply Smiles” Mission Trip to South Dakota to work on the Cheyenne Sioux Reservation; ICVR Radio, promoting accomplishments of local high school students; and a Hiking Sunday to encourage teens to exercise outdoors.

 

 

Share

Essex Rotary Recognizes Scholarship Recipients at Annual Awards Dinner

Essex Rotary Scholarship winners (left to right) Claire Halloran, Annie Brown, Kaleigh Caulfield, Scott Nelson, Tina Mitchell, Emily LeBlanc and Morgan Hines. Photo by Dick Levene)

Essex Rotary Scholarship winners (left to right) Claire Halloran, Annie Brown, Kaleigh Caulfield, Rotarian Scott Nelson, Tina Mitchell, Emily LeBlanc and Morgan Hines. Photo by Dick Levene

ESSEX – Each year Rotarians gather at the Essex Yacht Club under the leadership of current club President Jordan Welles and Essex Rotary Scholarship Foundation Chairman Scott Nelson to meet and honor our scholars both past and present.  The Rotary Club of Essex has been supporting the college dreams of Essex residents for the past 49 years, having awarded the first scholarship back in 1966.  The club has a legacy that began with stellar Rotarians including Dr. Donald Buebendorf, Doug Jones, Chet Kitchings and Dr. Peter Pool.  That legacy continues under the leadership of a second generation of Rotarians including Don’s son Jeff Buebendorf.  Two of the 2016 recipients share that legacy.

Rotarian Dr. Bill McCann’s granddaughter Annie Brown enters the University of Vermont this fall where she plans to major in education and environmental studies.  Annie is the recipient of the 2016 Dr. Donald M. Buebendorf Scholarship.  Annie plans to spend her summer working with children at the Valley Shore YMCA and at Bushy Hill Nature Center where she hopes to help children connect with each other and with nature.

Tina Mitchell has been awarded a new and unique scholarship this year honoring the club’s 60th anniversary.  Tina will study Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Cornell following a gap year abroad in Hungary as part of the Rotary International Youth Exchange Program.  Tina’s grandfather was an active Rotarian and inventor of the famed shad bake coffee brewer lovingly known as the rocket.

The third 2016 recipient is Kaleigh Caulfield.  Kaleigh is entering the pre-teaching program at UConn Avery Point and eventually plans to work in the field of special education.  This scholarship is a collaborative partnership between the Rotary Club of Essex and the trustees of the Riverview Cemetery.  Board members Peter Decker, Dick Mather and Hank McInerney were on hand for the presentation.

Also in attendance were past recipients from 2013-15.  Emily Le Grand is a finance major at the University of Maryland.  Emily has a strong interest in the non-profit sector and has interned at United Way as well as volunteered with a hunger and homeless project in the DC area this past semester.  Harrison Taylor continues his studies at Connecticut College and has discovered a passion for working with immigrants in the New London area providing education and support navigating the immigration process.  Claire Halloran finished her freshman year at the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU studying film and television production.  Claire’s early projects have already garnered awards and her studies confirm her dedication to this industry and a newfound interest in post-production sound.  Morgan Hines just finished a semester in Prague and now returns to Georgetown for her final year majoring in history and journalism.  Morgan is interning with the Hartford Courant this summer and starts the process of applying to graduate schools in the fall.

Mason King was unable to attend, but continues his studies at Union College.  Allyson Clark was also unable to attend but sent a written update, which Scott Nelson shared with the audience.  Allyson has been working with NFP programs in Brazil including BRAYCE and has also embarked on an entrepreneurial venture to educate tourists on the negative impact that tourism has on poverty-stricken areas such as Rio.  Allyson made the critical decision to transfer to Rhine-Waal University in Germany this past year and has successfully integrated her studies and her tourism project into this new culture.  She is enjoying the diversity and the challenges of cultural immersion and has gained a unique understanding of international migration.

For more information about the Rotary Club of Essex, please visit  www.rotaryclubofessex.com.
Share

Deep River Resident Recognized for Excellence by Progressive Grocer

Silvana Baxter

Silvana Baxter

DEEP RIVER – Progressive Grocer, a leading retail food industry trade publication, has named Silvana Baxter of Deep River, a Stop & Shop Asset Protection Associate, as a 2016 Top Women in the grocery industry, which honors outstanding female leaders in the retailer and supplier community sectors.  

“Stop & Shop is very proud of the many accomplishments achieved by these dedicated associates who have gone above and beyond their positions within our company and have made many contributions within the communities they serve,” said Robert Spinella, Vice President of Human Resources, Stop & Shop NY Metro Division. “Congratulations to our honorees who serve as true role models for the future of their fellow colleagues.”  

Covering the retail food industry, Progressive Grocer’s core target audience includes top management and key decision makers from chain supermarkets, regional and local independent grocers, supercenters, wholesaler distributors, manufacturers and other supply chain training partners.

The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company LLC employs over 61,000 associates and operates 419 stores throughout Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey.

Share

Roto Frank of America Helps Connecticut’s Veterans

roto frankCHESTER – Supporting Connecticut’s veterans is an issue that is close to the hearts of Roto Frank of America employees. So it wasn’t surprising that when it came time to select a charitable organization for 2016, Roto Frank employees voted overwhelming for Connecticut Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Each year, employees of Roto Frank of America, Inc. select among five local charities on which to focus their fundraising activities, which include voluntary payroll deductions by employees, food sales, and fifty-fifty raffles. “We’re proud to support Department of Veterans’ Affairs in their efforts to improve the lives of Connecticut veterans and their families,“ said Sue LeMire, Roto Frank of America’s HR/General Accounting Manager.

Based in Rocky Hill, the Connecticut Department of Veterans’ Affairs has provided care for veterans and their dependents for over 140 years. This includes a health care facility with approximately 180 beds that provides extended health care to veterans, and a domicile with approximately 483 beds available that provides residents with a continuum of rehabilitation care. Veterans also receive substance abuse treatment, educational and vocational rehabilitation, job skills development, self-enhancement workshops, employment assistance and transitional living opportunities.

Founded in 1979, Roto Frank of America, Inc. is a Chester-based manufacturer of window and door hardware. Roto Frank of America is a wholly owned subsidiary of Roto AG, a global company headquartered in Germany, with 13 production plants and 40 subsidiaries worldwide. Roto Frank of America offers solutions for North American and European hardware applications, has an extensive product line including its renowned X-DRIVE™ casement and awning window systems, sash locks, window-opening-control-devices, sliding patio door systems, and European window and door hardware, among others.

For more information, visit www.rotohardware.com

Share

Cappella Cantorum Presents Annual Men’s Chorus Concert at ‘The Kate,’ July 8

cappella-cantorum-for-webOLD SAYBROOK –  Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus presents its annual concert at The Kate, at 300 Main St. in Old Saybrook, Friday, July 8, at 8 p.m.

The music will include “For the Beauty of the Earth,” “Rutter,” selections from “Guys & Dolls,” “Lullaby of Broadway,” “Men of Harlech,” “Ride the Chariot,” “Va Pensiero” and “When the Saints Go Marching In.”

Tickets for the Guilford concert are $20 (age 18 and under are free) and can be purchased at the door or through CappellaCantorum.org. Tickets for The Kate concert are available only through the box office, 877-503-1286, or at www.thekate.org. Contact Barry at 860-388-2871 for more information.

 

Share

Letter to the Editor from New Essex Library Friends President

The Friends of Essex Library new Board for 2016 (L-R): Genie Devine, Secretary; Linda Levene, Past President; Jo Kelly, President; Judy Taylor, Catharine Wagner, Susan Hosack (not shown), Members at Large; Pat Mather, Treasurer; Judy Fish, Ivoryton Library Liaison; Peggy Tuttle, Book Sales Coordinator.

The Friends of Essex Library new Board for 2016 (L-R): Genie Devine, Secretary; Linda Levene, Past President; Jo Kelly, President; Judy Taylor, Catharine Wagner, Susan Hosack (not shown), Members at Large; Pat Mather, Treasurer; Judy Fish, Ivoryton Library Liaison; Peggy Tuttle, Book Sales Coordinator.

 

To the Editor:

I am very pleased to be on the Board of the Friends of the Essex Library as their new President.  I look forward to working with my new Board, the Essex Library Association board, and the Essex community.

Libraries across the country are going through a transformation.  The library many of you, as well as myself, grew up with no longer exists.  Essex Library is becoming an ever expanding multimedia community resource hub; striving to meet the needs and requirements of a changing community.

My goals are to aid and support Essex Library Association in its efforts to meet the challenges of a changing community.  And, with your community involvement in our library system, we will accomplish and surpass these goals.

Thank you for your continued support and involvement.

 Jo Kelly

 

Share

Letter to the Editor: Thanks for Essex Library Garden Tour

To the Editor:

“Spectacular gardens!”  “Wonderful day!” were some of the comments heard throughout Essex Village as hundreds of visitors participated in the first Friends of the Essex Library Garden Tour held Saturday June 4. To those who came to walk the gardens and enjoy the beauty of Essex Village, we say, “Thank you!”

To make such an event possible took the involvement of many people, including those who planned the event, the hostesses at each garden, Master Gardeners, plein air painters, ticket takers and traffic managers.  Your help made the event run smoothly and for this we extend heartfelt thanks.  We especially thank Rhode VanGessel for her patience and tireless effort in making the publicity both eye-catching and beautiful.

Lastly, and most importantly, we wish to recognize the garden owners who worked tirelessly creating their works of art.  Those who attended saw the enormous effort that went into preparing for the event and it was gratifying to see your efforts appreciated by so many people.   All the Friends of the Essex Library say, “Thank You.”

Linda Levene and Daphne Nielsen, co-chairman

Share

Essex Garden Club Donates $500 to The Farm at John Winthrop

Untitled

Pictured are the advisors, Mark Gostkeiwicz and John Woitovich, along with Elizabeth Bartlett from Essex Garden Club.

The Essex Garden Club recently donated $500 to the Farm at John Winthrop School.   Their after-school program  has grown fruits and vegetables to support classroom learning such as cooking and propagation. The produce is also made available to the Shoreline Soup Kitchens.

 

Share

Broken Arrow Nursery Manager Presents “Spectacular Native Plants” at Essex Library

Andy Brand

ESSEX — The forests, fields and wetlands of the Northeast are filled with an amazing array of beautiful plants that are frequently overlooked when we design our landscapes. On Tuesday, June 14, at 7 p.m. at the Essex Library, Andy Brand will take attendees on a journey through the year highlighting the many exceptional plants that grow right in our own backyards. Both herbaceous and woody plants will be discussed along with their cultivars.

An employee of Broken Arrow Nursery for over two decades, Brand now manages the nursery. He received his BS and MS from the University of Connecticut in Horticulture and Plant Tissue Culture. He was the past president of the American Rhododendron Society, past president of the Connecticut Butterfly Association, and past President of Connecticut Nursery and Landscape Association.

This program is free and open to the public. Call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 to register or for more information. The Essex Library is located at 33 West Ave. in Essex.

Share

Discover the “Art of Growing Food” with Celebrated Author Ellen Ecker Ogden, Friday; Benefits Child & Family

Ellen Ecker Ogden will speak at Child & Family's Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon on June 17 at Old Lyme Country Club.

Ellen Ecker Ogden will speak at Child & Family’s ‘Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon’ on June 17 at Old Lyme Country Club.

Are you tired of tasteless tomatoes, half-ripe honeydews, or limp lettuce? Do you worry what else might be on the produce you purchase at grocery stores?  If you’ve considered growing your own food so it will be fresh, natural, and ready when you want it (without a trip to the store!), then spend an afternoon with acclaimed food and garden writer Ellen Ecker Ogden, who will present “The Art of Growing Food” as the featured speaker at Child & Family Agency’s Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon.

Ecker Ogden is the Vermont-based author of The Complete Kitchen Garden, The Vermont Country Store Cookbook, and The Vermont Cheese Book, among others.  She is also co-founder of The Cook’s Garden seed catalog, a small family seed business dedicated to finding the best-tasting European and American heirloom vegetables, herbs, and flowers, and she lectures widely on kitchen garden design. Her articles and designs have been featured in such national publications as Better Homes & Gardens, Martha Stewart Living, and the New York Times.

Child & Family Agency’s Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon takes place on June 17, 2016, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Old Lyme Country Club (I-95, exit 70).  The event begins with a book signing by Ogden at 11:30 a.m., followed by lunch at noon; Ogden will then give her talk, in which she will outline her six steps for successful garden design, based on classic garden design principles.

At the end of her presentation, Ogden will raffle off a one-and-a-half-hour vegetable garden consultation. Tickets are $50, and may be obtained by mailing a check to P.O. Box 324, Old Lyme, CT  06371 (include name, address, phone, email), or by visiting www.childandfamilyagency.org.  Questions? Call 860-443-2896 or email CFA.LOLAuxiliary@gmail.com. Seating is limited.

The Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon is presented by the Lyme/Old Lyme Auxiliary of Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut, who bring you the Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour every other year. (The next Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour will take place next year, in June 2017.) Meanwhile, with this year’s Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon, you can satisfy your garden cravings and help children and families at the same time!

Proceeds from the Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon benefit the programs and capital projects of Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping at-risk children in the context of their families. With a staff of more than 190 dedicated professionals and a service area covering 79 towns in New London, Middlesex, and New Haven counties, Child & Family Agency is the largest private, nonprofit children’s service provider in southeastern Connecticut. In 2015 more than 18,000 children and their families received services from Child & Family Agency. Find out more at www.childandfamilyagency.org or call 860.443.2896.

Share

Cappella Cantorum Present Men’s Chorus Concert in Old Lyme, June 26

Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus drawing inspired in St. Paul Lutheran  Church in a 2005 concert, drawn by Madeleine Favre of Deep River.

Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus drawing inspired in St. Paul Lutheran
Church in a 2005 concert, drawn by Madeleine Favre of Deep River.

Cappella Cantorum presents a Men’s Chorus Concert, Sunday, June 26, at 7:30 pm, the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme at 2 Ferry Rd. Old Lyme, CT 06371.

The music will include When the Saints Go Marching In, Guys & Dolls Selections Order My Steps, Men of Harlech, Ride the Chariot, For the Beauty of the Earth, Barbershop Favorites and Va Pensiero.

Tickets are $20 at the door or online at CappellaCantorum.org. Ages 18 and under are free.  

For more information, contact Barry at 860-388-2871 or barrybasch@gmail.com.

Share

Deep River Presents Annual Strawberry Social, June 12

strawberry photo

Marian Staye (left) and Gail Gallagher serve up fresh strawberries and homemade whipped cream in Deep River.

DEEP RIVER – The Deep River Historical Society is holding its annual Strawberry Social on Sunday, June 12, from 2 to 4 p.m. Yes, you can expect fresh strawberries and homemade whipped cream! Tickets are $10 for adults and $3 for children 5 years and under. The event will include other surprises for the guests.

The event is held in the Carriage House on the grounds of the Deep River Historical Society at 245 Main Street (Rte. 154), Deep River.

 

Share

Kayak Trip and Concert Kick Off Summer in Essex

Bring your kayak or canoe to Main Street Park for an afternoon in Middle and South Coves.

Bring your kayak or canoe to Main Street Park for an afternoon in Middle Cove.

ESSEX — The Essex Land Trust is hosting a combined Kayak/Canoe Trip and summer Concert/Picnic to be held at Essex’s Main Street Park on Sunday afternoon, June 12.

Canoers/kayakers should meet at 2:30 p.m. for a planned departure by 3 p.m. Explore Essex’s beautiful Middle and South Coves with guided commentary by naturalist Phil Miller. Kayak/canoe participants should arrive in time to register and sign waivers.  A safety boat will accompany.

Gather at 5:30 p.m. for a BYO picnic and concert by the Essex Corinthian Jazz Band. Bring your own chairs or picnic blankets.

The event is free. All are welcome. Bad weather cancels. Parking is available on Main Street and behind the Essex Post Office.

Essex Corinthian Jazz Band will play in Main Street Park on June 12. Bring your own picnic.

Essex Corinthian Jazz Band will play in Main Street Park on June 12. Bring your own picnic.

Share

See ‘Blooms with a View’ at Florence Griswold Museum This Weekend, ‘En Plein Air’ Impressionist Painting Demo Today

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme hosts a celebration of the site’s historic gardens featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests.

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme hosts a celebration of the site’s historic gardens featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests.

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme hosts a celebration of the site’s historic gardens featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests.

A favorite event during GardenFest is Blooms with a View: A Display of Art & Flower. From June 10 through 12, visitors can enjoy a display of stunning arrangements created by 15 talented floral artists that interpret works of art in the special exhibitions, The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement. These floral interpretations play off the colors, line, shapes, and subject matter of the artwork in masterful ways. Blooms with a View is included with Museum admission.

On Sunday, June 12, from 1 to 4 p.m., watch Connecticut Impressionist Dmitri Wright create an Impressionistic painting in the gardens of the Museum. Working “en plein air,” Wright will demonstrate the steps involved in going from blank canvas to a garden rendered in color and light. These events are included with Museum admission.

The seventh annual GardenFest at the Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme is a 10-day celebration of the site’s historic gardens, featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests. Most events are included with Museum admission. Children 12 and under are always free.

This year’s exhibition provides the perfect accompaniment to the Museum’s historic landscape, gardens, and the activities surrounding GardenFest. The Florence Griswold Museum is the only New England venue for the exhibition, The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement, 1887–1920. Organized by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, The Artist’s Garden tells the story of American Impressionists and the growing popularity of gardening as a leisure pursuit at the turn of the 20th century.

After enjoying the exhibition, visitors can walk the Museum’s 13 acres and through the restored 1910 garden. “Miss Florence’s” lovingly tended garden was a favorite subject for many of the artists of the Lyme Art Colony who stayed at her boardinghouse. One of the paintings on view in the exhibition, William Chadwick’s On the Piazza, ca. 1908 shows a female model posing on the side porch of the boardinghouse. A walk to the Lieutenant River provides further examples of vistas painted by the nature-loving artists.

Talented floral artists display stunning arrangements created to interpret works of art in the special exhibitions, The Artist's Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement. June 10 through June 12 at the Florence Griswold Museum.
Talented floral artists display stunning arrangements created to interpret works of art in the special exhibitions, The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement. June 10 through June 12 at the Florence Griswold Museum.

GardenFest includes a variety of activities for families. In addition to the weekly Discovery Sunday activities, when visitors are given supplies and invited to paint in the gardens or down by the river and then pick a project from the Art Cart for further fun and exploration, during GardenFest visitors of all ages can enjoy fun garden-themed events.

Other events include:

Lecture: Producing Pictures without Brushes: American Artists and Their Gardens

Anna O. Marley, Curator of Historic American Art, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and Exhibition

Sunday, June 5, 2pm

$7 (members $5)

Join Marley, the curator of the original version of the exhibition, for a discussion of the role American artists played in both the stylistic development of this American version of Impressionism as well as their impact on the Garden Movement.


Hands-On Photography Workshop

Craig Norton, Photographer and Master Teaching Artist

Tuesday, June 7, 6pm-9pm

$12 (members $10)

Join photographer and master teaching artist Craig Norton for a digital camera photographic workshop focusing on the gardens. Working in the golden light of pre-twilight, participants will learn the basics for mastering images of the garden before taking their own images for constructive critiques. Come learn all your camera can do. Light refreshments included. Participants should bring their own digital camera.


Presentation: Herbs for Hearth and Health

Leslie Evans, Historian and Museum Director, Avery-Copp House Museum, Groton, CT

Wednesday, June 8, 10:30am-2:30pm; presentations at 11am and 1pm

Cost to attend: Included with Museum admission

Join historian Leslie Evans for a presentation on the historic importance of herbs in cooking and medicine as well as how they can be used today. Participants in the presentations will learn the historic uses for both common as well as lesser-known herbs before creating their own herbal vinegar and fragrant sachet. Herbal infused snacks and beverages will be available for tasting. Between presentations, Evans will be available to answer questions and offer additional information.


Lecture: Gardening with Kids: Opening Eyes and Doors

Karen Bussolini, Garden Coach, Writer, and Photographer

Thursday, June 9, 2pm

$7 (members $5)

Our yards – gardens, landscaping, and wild places – offer boundless opportunities for learning through the senses. At a time when so many children – and adults too – suffer from “nature deficit disorder,” obesity, ADHD, and other problems, connecting with nature is more important than ever. Typical suburban landscapes don’t supply the needs of either wildlife or children and can be downright toxic to both. In this talk Bussolini shows – and gets people to think about – easy ways to make the whole yard a safe place rich with sensory stimulation, with rich opportunities for imaginative play, discovery and just plain fun.

Garden lovers are invited to enjoy Café Flo Tuesdays and Saturdays from 11:30am-2:30pm and from 1-3:30pm on Sundays. Menu items are garden-fresh and family friendly. Dine on the veranda overlooking the Lieutenant River or pick up a basket and blanket and picnic along the river.

GardenFest celebrates the Museum’s historic gardens and orchard that are the subject of so many paintings by the Lyme Art Colony artists. Landscape Historian Sheila Wertheimer guided the Museum in the restoration of the gardens and site to its appearance circa 1910. Miss Florence’s garden can be characterized by what is referred to today as a “grandmother’s garden” in which masses of flowers were informally arranged in bordered beds close to home. Varieties of hollyhock, iris, foxglove, heliotrope, phlox, cranesbill, and day lilies were among the many perennials that made up her garden.

The Museum is located on a 13-acre site in the historic village of Old Lyme at 96 Lyme Street, exit 70 off I-95. Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $8 students, and free to children 12 and under. For more information, visit FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org or call 860-434-5542 x 111.

An additional garden event…

Connecticut’s Historic Gardens announces the 12th annual Connecticut’s Historic Garden Day, Sunday, June 26. These 15 delightful places, scattered throughout Connecticut, offer visitors an opportunity to explore many types of gardens while their historic homes further delight and educate. A variety of special events and activities are planned for the day. Hours, activities, and prices vary by location.

At the Florence Griswold Museum, besides strolling the historic landscape and gardens, visitors are invited to pick up supplies to paint in Miss Florence’s garden or down by the Lieutenant River. The can also enjoy the Museum’s Art Cart, filled with outdoor activities that encourage exploration of the historic landscape. Outdoor activities are free from 12 to 4pm. Museum admission applies to House and Gallery, $10 adults, $9 seniors, $8 students and children 12 and under are free. The House and Gallery are open from 1 to 5pm.

Share

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds Hosts Summer Sculpture Showcase 2016 Through Sept. 13

Mega-Dandelion by Gints Grinsberg is the signature piece of Summer Sculpture Showcase at Studio 80 +Sculpture Grounds, which has an Opening Reception Friday, June 10 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Mega-Dandelion by Gints Grinsberg is the signature piece of Summer Sculpture Showcase at Studio 80 +Sculpture Grounds, which has an Opening Reception Friday, June 10 from 5 to 7 p.m.

OLD LYME — Gilbert Boro, owner and sculptor at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme, will host an Opening Reception for Summer Sculpture Showcase 2016 this coming Friday, June 10, from 5 to 7 p.m.  All are welcome to attend the outdoor reception at which light refreshments will be served. Guests will be free to explore the expansive sculpture gardens and view the more than 100 sculptures on display during the event.

This juried exhibition follows on naturally from last year’s extremely successful Summer Sculpture Showcase 2015, which drew large crowds and had to be extended into October to meet public demand. This new exhibition on the grounds adjoining Boro’s studio and inside the Emily Seward Boro (ESB) Gallery on the property features works created by 17 widely acclaimed sculptors interspersed amongst Boro’s own sculptures, along with works by 13 other contributing artists.  More than 30 sculptors from across the country responded to the Call for Entries submitting some 60 works.

Boro’s Sculpture Gardens are located on 4.5 acres of his residence on historic Lyme Street in the heart of Old Lyme, Conn.  The beautifully landscaped grounds slope down toward the Lieutenant River offering a unique plein air experience for the exhibition, which combines both large- and small-scale contemporary sculptures. Many of the works, which are in a variety of media, are for sale.

The sculptors, whose 25 pieces of work are included in the Showcase, are:
Mark Attebery, Diane Barcelo, Ashby Carlisle, Bryan Gorneau, Gints Grinbergs, Lannie Hart, Jay Hoagland, Deborah Hornbake, Conrad Levenson, Elaine Lorenz, David Madasci, Liza Masalimova, Sui Park, Chris Plaisted,
Bill Vollers, Martha Walker and Melanie Zibit.

The signature piece of the exhibition is “Mega-Dandelion” by Gints Grinbergs.  It is a large — 144” in height, 56” in diameter — yet delicate structure that evokes the intricate design of lace in its welded and stainless steel structure.  Grinbergs explains in his artist’s statement that he looks to nature for inspiration with “interests [that] range from the macroscopic to the microscopic – from flowers and their structure to bacteria and viruses – from the giants of outer space to sub atomic particles.”  He continues, “I build sculptures derived from the universal forms of nature.
All of the sculptures in this series are built from recycled materials … I attempt to transform, up-cycle, these manmade materials into the infinitely more complex forms designed by nature.”

Grinbergs’ work has been featured at various museums and galleries and is included in private and corporate collections throughout North America.

'Water Courses' by Elaine Lorenz is another featured piece in the Showcase.

‘Water Courses’ by Elaine Lorenz is another featured piece in the Showcase.

Created out of cement, fiberglass and paint, Elaine Lorenz’s intriguing “Water Course” comprises three pieces. She states that she has made “sculpture in such diverse materials as wood, metal, concrete, encaustic over a wire armature and ceramic, while maintaining an overall view of nature as a dominant source of energy and influence on her work.”  Lorenz explains her approach in creating art as, “abstract, only alluding to things, relationships or emotions and leaving room for the viewer’s interpretation.”

Lorenz has exhibited her work in numerous group exhibitions and sculpture sites throughout the US and her sculptures are in private, public and corporate collections in numerous states including Alabama, California, Florida, New Jersey and Texas. She has been the Vice President of Exhibitions for the Sculptors Guild since 2011.

Jay Hoagland charming ‘Mephisto’s Waltz’ features a viola made out of steel and copper with a kinetic element.  When the integral weathervane at the head of the instrument catches the wind, the bow travels across the strings playing an eerie melody. Hoagland explains the motivation behind his sculpture thus, “I work because the sheer joy of seeing thought turned into material is rejuvenating but my approach is more and more obviously the result of where and who I’ve been.”

'Mephisto's Waltz'is an intriguing piece of kinetic sculpture.

‘Mephisto’s Waltz’is an intriguing piece of kinetic sculpture.

He continues, “I’m inspired by natural science with an injection of humor and contradiction. Inspiration also comes from the minutae of life, the shape of a stone, the footprints of giants like da Vinci, Calder, Giacometti, Gabo, Hepworth, Moore, and Noguchi. Hoagland concludes, “I see my work as a catalyst to understand, and a lens to clarify, my place in the world.”

The jurors for the exhibition were acclaimed sculptors Gilbert V. Boro and Lisa Simonds, and painter Julia Pavone.

Boro has enjoyed an extraordinary and distinguished more than 50-year-career as a successful architect, sought-after international design consultant and an inspiring educator.  With a BFA from Duke University and post-graduate degrees from Columbia University, NYC, his work explores the interplay of space, place and scale in a wide range of media including steel, stone, wood, metal, aluminum and fiberglass.

Sculptor Gilbert V. Boro in his studio.

Sculptor Gilbert V. Boro in his studio.

Working in sculpture has been a compulsion rather than a possibility for Gil.  While mastering the rigors of technical competence, he developed a deep-seated passion for three-dimensional art, which continues to be the influential force behind his creations. He is both inspired and motivated by the creative freedom of sculpting, finding that abstract work is the means to fulfill his vision.  Boro’s sculptures can be found in art centers and public art venues across the US and throughout Europe; they have also been purchased by private collectors, corporations and foundations in both the US and internationally.

"Nest' is one of Gil Boro's most recent pieces.

“Nest’ is one of Gil Boro’s most recent pieces.

Simonds is a visual artist with a BFA in Sculpture from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts in Old Lyme, Conn.  She is currently employed as the Exhibitions Coordinator at Lyme Academy and previously worked as an Independent Exhibitions Installer at Lyman Allyn Art Museum in New London, Conn., for eight years.

Pavone is the co-founder of the Alexey von Schlippe Gallery of Art at the University of Connecticut’s Avery Point Campus, and has served as its Curator/Director for the past 24 years.  During her 29-year career, Pavone, who has a BFA from Long Island University in Westbury, N.Y., and an MEd from Lesley College in Cambridge, Mass., has continued her own work as a painter, while variously serving as a teacher, and guest lecturer, juror and curator for numerous exhibitions.

This Summer Sculpture Showcase offers a unique opportunity for established sculptors to exhibit their work in a different location, while also effectively creating a new exhibition within the Sculpture Gardens.  Boro comments, “I’m delighted to be able to open my grounds to these exceptional sculptors whose work intrigues me.  Each one offers original creative thinking resulting in a combination of contrasting conceptual designs in a variety of media.  I think any visitor to the exhibition is going to be thoroughly engaged by what he or she sees – including children.”

Boro is somewhat unusual as a professional sculptor in that he loves to see folk of all ages directly interacting with his sculptures, noting that he has a strong aversion to exhibitions, “… where people can’t touch my work.”  Apart from attracting visitors to see the works on his grounds, Boro is thoroughly invested in the vibrant Old Lyme arts scene and hopes this exhibition will help cement the town as a summer destination for art-loving visitors from near and far, especially during the town’s Midsummer Festival which this year is on Friday, July 29, and Saturday, July 30.

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds are located at 80-1 Lyme St., less than a minute from Exit 70 on I-95, the Sculpture Grounds are open 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.  Admission is free.  Children, field trips and group visits are all welcome.

For further information, contact 860-434-5957, visit www.sculpturegrounds.com or email studio80sculpturegrounds@gmail.com

Share

“Stuff-the-Ambulance” in Shoreline Soup Kitchens Food Drive, June 11

Ambulance20162

AREAWIDE – On Saturday, June 11 local ambulance companies across the shoreline are hosting an areawide food drive to collect non-perishable food for local residents in need. Between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., participating ambulance companies will be at:

Adams Hometown Market in Deep River (Deep River and Chester Ambulance)

Colonial Market in Essex (Essex Ambulance)

Roberts Food Center in Madison (Madison Ambulance)

Stop & Shop in Clinton (Clinton Ambulance)

The donations will go to local food pantries run by the Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries (SSKP). In the summer there are typically fewer food drives, so this food will go a long way to help restock the pantries and ensure that everyone in our communities will have a place at the table.

“We are so grateful to all the town ambulance companies who are generously volunteering their time,” said Patty Dowling, Executive Director of SSKP. “Every day they provide life-saving medical care – and now they are giving of themselves to help fill our pantry shelves through the summer months. Many families that are struggling will have healthy food to eat because of their efforts, and our neighbors in need will know that they are part of a community that really cares.”

“It’s just another way we can work together to help the people in need,” said Steve Olsen with the Essex Ambulance Association.

For more information call (860) 388-1988 or visit www.shorelinesoupkitchens.org.

Share

Thanks for Successful Essex Shad Bake at River Museum

(L to R) Stephen Brinkmann, Lisa LaMonte from Guilford Savings Bank, Christopher Dobbs, and Joseph Shea watch shad roasting around the bonfire. Shad are held onto the planks with strips of salt pork, adding to their smoky flavor.

(L to R) Stephen Brinkmann, Lisa LaMonte from Guilford Savings Bank, Christopher Dobbs, and Joseph Shea watch shad roasting around the bonfire. Shad are held onto the planks with strips of salt pork, adding to their smoky flavor.

ESSEX – On June 4, the Rotary Club of Essex held its annual Essex Shad Bake at the Connecticut River Museum. For 59 years running, the Rotarians have kept this traditional culinary event alive and well, and the success of this year’s bake is a testament to their dedication. Hundreds of visitors came to the museum on a beautiful Saturday to eat roasted shad and learn about the history of this once crucial fishery through talks, displays, and demonstrations.

The Rotary Club of Essex and the Connecticut River Museum would like to thank the lead sponsors for the Shad Bake – AJ Shea Construction Co., Gowrie Group, and Guilford Savings Bank – as well as all the other sponsors, volunteers, and organizations who made the afternoon such a success.
Share

Celebrate Haiti’s New Library at Party Tonight

image1

Sister Cities Essex Haiti board members Mary-Beth Harrigan, Jenifer Grant and Connie Connor plan food details with Claudia Odekerken from Marley’s Café.

ESSEX – Sister Cities Essex Haiti will be celebrating the opening of the Deschapelles Community Library in Haiti with a party on Thursday, June 9, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., at Brewer Essex Island Marini. The event will feature food by Marley’s Café, drinks and music by the Tangerine Trio. The public is invited.

Ticket purchases and reservations can be made until May 31 by email to: info@sistercitiesessexhaiti.org  or by calling 860-227-0848.

More info at http://www.sistercitiesessexhaiti.org/.

haiti celeb

Share

Buy Tickets Now for Essex Community Fund’s Evening at Ivoryton Playhouse

Essex Community Fund event in 2015.

Essex Community Fund event in 2015.

ESSEX – Tickets are selling quickly for the Essex Community Fund’s Evening at the Ivoryton Playhouse on Thursday, Sept. 8. Featuring one of the world’s most popular musicals, The Man of La Mancha,  ECF’s Evening at the Playhouse stars Connecticut’s own David Pittsinger.

Inspired by Cervantes’ Don Quixote, considered by many to be “the best literary work ever written,” The Man of La Mancha features the antics of Don Quixote and his faithful sidekick Sancho Panza. Come hear songs like “The Impossible Dream” and “I, Don Quixote” and many others.

Pre-show reception and festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. under the tent with a post-show “Meet the Cast” dessert and coffee. All proceeds go to support ECF’s ongoing mission to enhance the quality of life for the residents of our three villages. For tickets ($75) or to make a donation, contact a board member or visit www.essexcommunityfund.org.

The Essex Community Fund began over 65 years ago with the same goal – helping local non-profits provide much needed services for the residents of our three villages. Its mission is to enhance the quality of life of residents in Essex, Centerbrook and Ivoryton. This is accomplished by identifying community needs, providing financial support, and forging partnerships with local non-profit organizations. Some recent initiatives include Compassion Counts: Exploring Mental Wellness, Teen Hunger Initiative, and The Bridge Fund, as well as continuing involvement with the Fuel Assistance Program, The Shoreline Soup Kitchen, Essex Park and Recreation, and the Essex Board of Trade programs and events. For more information or to make a donation, please visit www.essexcommunityfund.org.

Share

Comment Period on Draft NE Regional Ocean Plan Open Through July 26

Screen Shot 2016-06-08 at 7.00.37 AM
AREAWIDE — The Northeast Regional Planning Body (RPB) has released the draft Northeast Regional Ocean Plan for public review and comment. The only public comment meeting in Connecticut was held June 8 in Old Lyme, but other meetings in northeastern states are scheduled as detailed in this link.

Several years of public engagement, scientific study and data analysis, and collaboration have led to this draft, and the RPB looks forward to hearing the feedback of everyone who is interested in the future of New England’s ocean and its resources.

The RPB is seeking feedback on this draft Plan. The public comment deadline is July 25, 2016, and you can comment on each chapter electronically at each chapter landing page, in-person at any of the upcoming public comment meetings, through the comment form below, or by submitting written comments to:

Betsy Nicholson, NE RPB Federal Co-lead
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Regional Office
55 Great Republic Drive
Gloucester, MA 01930-2276.

You may also provide comments by sending an e-mail to:
comment@neoceanplanning.org.

Share

Essex Economic Development Commission Hosts Public Forum This Evening

ESSEX — The Economic Development Commission of Essex invites the public to attend their next Economic Development Forum on Wednesday, June 8, at 7 p. m. in the Essex Town Hall Auditorium.

Commission members are actively engaged in finding better ways of communicating with residents and businesses and would like to hear what they can do to help maintain, build, and grow our strong business community in Essex.

All are welcome.

Share

‘Theater Along the River’ Presents ‘Taming of the Shrew,’ Aug. 5

ESSEX – On Friday, Aug. 5, the Connecticut River Museum’s Theater Along the River continues it summer season with the Flock Theatre production of William Shakespeare’s popular comedy, The Taming of the Shrew.  This year’s summertime series is once again made possible through the generous support of the Essex Wellness Center.

According to director Derron Wood, “We are pleased to return for a third year to the Connecticut River Museum.  It offers a spellbinding backdrop for outdoor theater and allows us to reach a new audience.”

The Connecticut River Museum’s executive director, Christopher Dobbs, said, “Flock Theatre is a master of Shakespeare.  We feel fortunate to offer this level of entertainment at the museum and hope that the audience enjoys the production and its backdrop – the river.”  Dobbs was quick to note that the museum is only able to host this event and keep the ticket prices reasonable for all ages to enjoy through the “generosity of lead sponsor, the Essex Wellness Center.” Essex Wellness Center offers a range of holistic-minded health services, including Fitness on the Water, a beautiful, private workout studio.

The museum’s grounds will open at 6 p.m. for picnickers to lay out blankets and chairs.  Museum staff encourage the audience to make the picnic part of the experience.  In fact, there will be a special prize awarded to the “best” picnic arrangement.

Tickets are $18 for the general public and $10 for children (12 and under) and $12 for Connecticut River Museum members.  A cash bar serving beer and wine will be available for theatergoers.  No carry-in alcohol is permitted.  Tickets may be bought at www.ctrivermuseum.org or at the door starting at 6 p.m. the night of the performance. Curtain opens at 7 p.m., with a raindate of June 19.

Flock Theatre is a professional, not-for-profit theater company founded in 1989. The company is dedicated to creating original, collaborative and educational theater. Perhaps best known for the long-standing summer Shakespeare in the Arboretum, Flock Theatre performs year-round in a variety of venues, including their winter “nest” at the First Congregational Church, on the New London Pier, at the historic Shaw Mansion Museum and throughout New England.

For more information on the programs, please contact the Connecticut River Museum at 860-767-8269 or visit the website, ctrivermuseum.org.  The museum is located at 67 Main St., Essex. 

Share

Hambor’s School-to-Career Program at VRHS Celebrates 10 Successful Years

The 10th Annual Partnership Celebration brought interns and their mentors together to enjoy food and farewells.

The 10th Annual Partnership Celebration brought interns and their mentors together for food and farewells.

AREAWIDE — Ten years ago Valley Regional High School (VRHS) School-to-Career Consultant Mary Hambor started a program for students at the school interested in finding out more about jobs in the real world with five internships.  On May 26 this year, at the 10th Annual Partnership Celebration, she described how during the 2015-16 academic year, she had placed 95 seniors and seven juniors in a total of 102 internships.

Poster boards listed all the businesses and organizations which had taken interns during the 2015-16 academic year.

Poster boards listed all the businesses and organizations which had taken interns during the 2015-16 academic year.

Describing the success of the program as “very rewarding,” a delighted Hambor noted that she felt its “goal [had been] achieved” in that it had now become, “a comprehensive internship program … offering invaluable hands-on experience.”  She expressed her appreciation to all those who had taken on interns during the year and the VRHS administration saying, “I continually feel blessed to be part of such a supportive community.”

Dr. Dave Scruggs of Deep River Animal Hospital stands with Mary Hambor, VRHS School-to-Career Cordinator.

Dr. Dave Scruggs of Deep River Animal Hospital stands with Mary Hambor, VRHS School-to-Career Cordinator.

Many of the student interns spoke about their experiences during the celebration.  Katie Amara and Maddy Ball described how at Deep River Animal Hospital, they had “everyday learned something new,” including “holding a few snakes” and “how to draw blood,” summing up the internship as one in which they, “had learned a lot more than we expected.”

Anastasia Cusack-Mercedez explained that as a direct result of her internship with Integrated Refugee and Immigration Services (IRIS) in New Haven she now knew that she “would like to work for a non-profit.”

Sevigny Fortin said he had been, “very fortunate” to work in the State Prosecutor’s office at New London Superior Court with Attorney Paul Narducci and had even been involved with work on a murder trial. He believed he had benefited from “an opportunity not many high schoolers have,” noting, “I have been very fortunate to work with a mentor so passionate and helpful.”

Mary Hambor (right) stands with Ibby Carothers of iCRV Radio and the students who interned at the radio station.

Mary Hambor (right) stands with Ibby Carothers of iCRV Radio and the students who interned at the radio station.

Hannah Halsey spoke about the experience that she and several of her peers had enjoyed interning at iCRV Radio in Chester and then Ivoryton. She said it was, “a really great learning experience during which she and her friends had “learned about marketing” and acquired many new skills, such as “how to operate a database.”  The interns had actually hosted a radio show at one point!

Sometimes the students explained that the internships had caused them to experience a change in their planned careers.  Tina Mitchell, who had worked at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford, had gone into her internship believing she was “interested in politics,” but during her time working with a policy analyst in the House Speaker’s office, determined that she had “found a home in policy.”

Other students like Elizabeth Forsythe freely declared, “I had no idea what I wanted to do with the rest of my life,” but went on to say that her internship at Aaron Manor with Karyn Cotrona had taught her “what HR is all about.”  She thanked her mentors for giving her “the experience to explore what she wanted to do.”

Our very own wonderful ValleyNewsNow.com intern, Maggie Klin.

Our very own ValleyNewsNow.com wonderful intern, Maggie Klin!

Several of the mentors took the opportunity to say publicly how the internship had gone from their angle.  Rebecca Foley from IRIS said, “Anastasia did an incredible job” and noted that she had gone far beyond the call of her internship and raised $827 for the organization in her own time.

Dr. Dave Scruggs of Deep River Animal Hospital commented that when he had first been asked to take an intern, he just said, “No.”  Then he met with the students and was “so impressed” to the extent that — speaking of this year’s interns — , “I would hire both of these young ladies today,” adding in words that seemed to sum up the universal experience of the mentors, “Every student from this high school has achieved the bar … and gone beyond it.”

Share

Still Irritated by Those Gypsy Moth Caterpillars? Advice from Essex Tree Warden

Gypsy moth caterpillars - photo by Peter Trenchard, CAES

Gypsy moth caterpillars – photo by Peter Trenchard, CAES

AREAWIDE – The potential for gypsy moth outbreak exists every year in our area.  For this reason, Essex Tree Warden Augie Pampel sent in this release, encouraging Essex residents to keep a vigil for the gypsy moth caterpillar, which can defoliate many trees, thus impacting the trees’ ability to thrive. But Valley News Now wants to spread this warning to the entire area, as the gypsy moth is in all our towns.

Dr. Kirby Stafford III, head of the Department of Entomology at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, has written a fact sheet on the gypsy moth available on the CAES website (click here).  The following information is from this fact sheet.

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, was introduced into the US (Massachusetts) by Etienne Leopold Trouvelot in about 1860.  The escaped larvae led to small outbreaks in the area in 1882, increasing rapidly.  It was first detected in Connecticut in 1905.  By 1952, it had spread to 169 towns.  In 1981, 1.5 million acres were defoliated in Connecticut.  During the outbreak of 1989, CAES scientists discovered that an entomopathogenic fungus, Entomophaga maimaiga, was killing the caterpillars.  Since then the fungus has been the most important agent suppressing gypsy moth activity.

The fungus, however, cannot prevent all outbreaks and hotspots have been reported in some areas, in 2005-06 and again in 2015.

The life cycle of the gypsy moth is one generation a year.  Caterpillars hatch from buff-colored egg masses in late April to early May.  An egg mass may contain 100 to more than 1000 eggs and are laid in several layers.  The caterpillars (larvae) hatch a few days later and ascend the host trees and begin to feed on new leaves.  The young caterpillars, buff to black-colored, lay down silk safety lines as they crawl and, as they drop from branches on these threads, they may be picked up on the wind and spread.

There are 4 or 5 larval stages (instars) each lasting 4-10 days.  Instars 1-3 remain in the trees.  The fourth instar caterpillars, with distinctive double rows of blue and red spots, crawl up and down the tree trunks feeding mainly at night.  They seek cool, shaded protective sites during the day, often on the ground.  If the outbreak is dense, caterpillars may feed continuously and crawl at any time.

With the feeding completed late June to early July, caterpillars seek a protected place to pupate and transform into a moth in about 10-14 days.  Male moths are brown and fly.  Female moths are white and cannot fly despite having wings.  They do not feed and live for only 6-10 days.  After mating, the female will lay a single egg mass and die.  The egg masses can be laid anywhere: trees, fence posts, brick/rock walls, outdoor furniture, cars, recreational vehicles, firewood.  The egg masses are hard.  The eggs will survive the winter and larvae hatch the following spring during late April through early May.

The impact of the gypsy moth can be extensive since the caterpillar will feed on a wide diversity of trees and shrubs.  Oak trees are their preferred food.  Other favored tree species include apple, birch, poplar and willow.  If the infestation is heavy, they will also attack certain conifers and other less favored species.  The feeding causes extensive defoliation.

Healthy trees can generally withstand one or two partial to one complete defoliation.  Trees will regrow leaves before the end of the summer.  Nonetheless, there can be die-back of branches.  Older trees may become more vulnerable to stress after defoliation.  Weakened trees can also be attacked by other organisms or lack energy reserves for winter dormancy and growth during the following spring.  Three years of heavy defoliation may result in high oak mortality.

The gypsy moth caterpillars drop leaf fragments and frass (droppings) while feeding creating a mess for decks, patios, outdoor furniture, cars and driveways.  Crawling caterpillars can be a nuisance and their hairs irritating.  The egg masses can be transported by vehicles to areas where the moth is not yet established.  Under state quarantine laws, the CAES inspects certain plant shipments destined to areas free of the gypsy moth, particularly for egg masses.

There are several ways to manage the gypsy moth: biological, physical and chemical.

Biologically, the major gypsy moth control agent has been the fungus E. maimaiga.  This fungus can provide complete control of the gypsy moth but is dependent on early season moisture from rains in May and June to achieve effective infection rates and propagation of the fungus to other caterpillars.  The dry spring of 2015 resulted in little or no apparent fungal inoculation or spread until it killed late-stage caterpillars in some areas of the state, after most defoliation.

Infected caterpillars hang vertically from the tree trunk, head down.  Some die in an upside down “V” position, a characteristic of caterpillars killed by the less common gypsy moth nucleopolyhedrosis virus (NPV).  This was not detected in caterpillars examined in 2015.

Physical controls include removing and destroying egg masses, which can be drowned in a soapy water and disposed of.  Another method is to use burlap refuge/barrier bands wrapped around tree trunks so that migrating caterpillars will crawl into or under the folded burlap or be trapped by the sticky band.

There are a number of crop protection chemicals labeled for the control of gypsy moth on ornamental trees and shrubs. There are treatments for egg masses, larvae and adult moths.  Detailed information about these chemical treatments is available in the CAES factsheet.

For complete information about the gypsy moth and its management, please go to the CAES website (www.ct.gov/caes) and look for the fact sheet on gypsy moth.  You may also contact Augie Pampel by email: augiepampel@att.net with questions and concerns.

 

Share

Deep River Historical Society Receives Humanities Grant; Rep. Joe Courtney Visits Stone House

Rep. Joe Courtney talks to Deep River Historical Society curator, Rhonda Forristall. in Stone House on June 1.

Rep. Joe Courtney talks to Deep River Historical Society curator, Rhonda Forristall. in Stone House on June 1.

DEEP RIVER – U.S. Congressman Joe Courtney, 2nd District, visited the Deep River Historical Society’s Stone House at 245 Main Street, on June 1.

The Society recently received a matching grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) in the amount of $1,500.

The Society applied for the grant following its first year of involvement with the StEPs-program, offered through Connecticut Humanities. According to their website (CTHumanities.org), the organization “helps local museums and historical societies build professionalism and ensure their programs and collections remain vibrant community resources through StEPs-CT – a two-year program created with the Connecticut League of History Organizations, and run in partnership with the Connecticut Historical Society, that guides them towards excellence in six areas of organizational practice.”

Rhonda Forristall, Deep River Historical Society curator, said, “We chose to write a grant for upgrading our technology. Currently DRHS has a single phone line coming into the building with no Internet connection. We have one computer with only XP capabilities (which was an upgrade from the computer with 3-inch disks that was there when I arrived), and a printer, so we can write letters and input data but really can’t get any data out. This $1500 matching grant will allow us to connect to the Internet and purchase a new laptop computer with Word and Excel programs, external storage unit and extenders so that we can have WiFi in the Carriage House to make us more appealing to renters. The grant also allows for an improvement to our website, which will be accessible to mobile devices.

“The outcome we are looking for,” said Rhonda, “will be to grow awareness of our mission at DRHS, to grow our membership and interact with a younger and more mobile generation who only communicate through their phones. We have talked to Valley Regional about having students access information and research online once we get things up and running. The potential is huge for us and we are excited to begin.

“As part of the grant funding, we are asked to thank our congressmen for their support of the Humanities and Joe responded to his letter by saying he wanted to visit. We had a great visit with him, showing off our collection and thanking him for his support and telling him what it means to us as an all-volunteer organization.”

For more information about the Deep River Historical Society, go to www.deepriverhistoricalsociety.org.

Share

Courcy Assumes Leadership of Pettipaug Sailing Academy from the Late Paul Risseeuw

Ann Courcy, Director, Pettipaug Sailing Academy, in front of club house.

Ann Courcy, Director, Pettipaug Sailing Academy, in front of club house.

Ann Courcy, the new Director of the Pettipaug Sailing Academy, has now officially taken the place of the long serving Paul Risseeuw, who passed away last fall. In taking the helm of the Pettipaug Sailing Academy, Courcy will be in full charge of the club’s 2016 sailing program for young sailors.

As is the custom, the Pettipaug Sailing Academy this summer will have two sessions. The first session will run from June 27 to July 15, and the second from July 25 to Aug. 12. Each session will also have morning and afternoon programs for differing age groups.

In assuming the leadership of the Pettipaug Sailing Academy, Courcy emphasized that she could not do the job without the help of the half dozen sailing instructors, who will assist her. Courcy also promised that she was, “going to build a team that would keep in place the sailing instruction practices, as when Paul was in charge.”

Courcy also pointed out that, “Learning to sail can have a positive impact on the lives of young sailors.” Furthermore, she said that it is her intention to know the names of each of the young sailors, who are attending this year’s sessions at the Academy.

As for the boats that will be used this year at the Pettipaug Sailing Academy, they will include a new 12 foot Bauer sloop, as well as traditional 420s, Blue Jays, Optis and windsurfers. Added this year as well will be Opti rowboats.

STEM Education Series to Be Taught

Courcy also said that students at the Academy will receive guidance from the   U.S. Science Technology and Engineering Math materials, which she said were, “very much in line with those of Paul’s in the blending of instructors with the playing by the kids.”

Importantly, Courcy also noted that even in this modern world of communication, Academy students cannot take their “I phones” during instruction periods, while sailing on the waters off the Pettipaug Yacht Club. (This may cause withdrawal systems for some of the Academy students.)

A special event at this year’s Sailing Academy season will be the, “Paul Risseeuw Memorial Race.” Also, there will be movie nights for sailors and their families during the Sailing Academy season at the clubhouse. Then, finally when the sailing season ends for the young sailors, there will be a final grand picnic on a downriver island in the Connecticut River for all of the Pettipaug Sailing Academy student sailors to attend.

Share

New Exhibit Opens in Stone Gallery in Chester

"Blue Forest," Ishita

“Blue Forest,” Ishita Bandyo

 

“Expressions,” an exhibit of abstract and exploratory art, will be featured in the Stone Gallery at Maple and Main Gallery in Chester Center during June.

The experimental but confident paintings are by two artists who’ve been with the gallery since its inception almost seven years ago: Carole Johnson of Haddam Neck and Ishita Bandyo of Branford.  Ishita was born in India and Carole in Connecticut, worlds apart and in very different circumstances, but art has sustained both women through the years and brought them to the same place – the use of layering and collage to produce their distinctive work.

Ishita came from a comfortable upbringing in India and had a master’s degree in Economics before moving to this country where, as a foreigner, she found herself suffering from loneliness and social alienation. Art therapy helped her cope during this difficult period of her life and she became determined to make a career in art, obtaining a BFA from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts in Old Lyme.

Though Ishita is an accomplished academic painter, she made a break from traditional art and started experimenting with various methods including assemblage and installation art. In the body of work in “Expressions,” she explores color, texture and symbolism, using motifs of tree, roots, birds, etc. to represent the inner workings of the mind.  Ishita is married and has a daughter.

Carole’s childhood was fraught: foster homes and a Catholic orphanage in New Haven, where she discovered the world of pencils, clay, shapes and colors. Many years later, her love of art helped her weather a first marriage to a violent alcoholic.  Divorce found her raising two sons and returning to college for a marketing degree with a minor in art that led to a partnership in a very successful graphic design firm.

Always a student of the nature of reality, Carole was a frequent seminar speaker and guest on a local TV show, “Ancient Wisdom for Today.” This love of understanding how reality is created set the stage for the evolution of her art. Her original work features people photographed in many other countries, including Colombia, Tanzania, Egypt and China. More and more the abstracted backgrounds became dominant until now much of Carole’s work is non-objective abstract expressionism.

Maple and Main is at the corner of Maple Street and Main Street in the heart of Chester Center. More information at www.mapleandmaingallery.com.

"Freedom Bird. Carole

“Freedom Bird,” Carole Johnson

 

 

 

Share

Senator Formica Honored by AARP for Protecting Seniors

formica pic

Left to right: AARP State Advocacy Director John Erlingheuser, Sen. Formica, and AARP Volunteer Joanne Davis of Waterford.

On May 20 at the East Lyme Senior Center, Sen. Paul Formica was presented with a Legislative Achievement Award from the Connecticut AARP.  The award recognized Sen. Formica’s advocacy in protecting consumers from unaffordable expenses for essential energy services. Formica represents Bozrah, East Lyme, a portion of Montville, New London, Old Lyme, a portion of Old Saybrook, Salem and Waterford. For more information, go to www.aarp.org or www.senatorformica.com.
Share

“The 39 Steps,” Zany Spoof of Hitchcock Movies, at Ivoryton Playhouse Through June 19

FullSizeRender

Dan Fenaughty and Larissa Klinger. Photo by Ivoryton Playhouse

IVORYTON – Mix a Hitchcock masterpiece with a juicy spy novel, add a dash of Monty Python and you have “The 39 Steps,” a fast-paced whodunit for anyone who loves the magic of theater! This two-time Tony and Drama Desk Award-winning treat is packed with nonstop laughs, over 150 zany characters (played by a ridiculously talented cast of four), an on-stage plane crash, handcuffs, missing fingers and some good old-fashioned romance!

“The 39 Steps” is set in England, just before the war. A young man bored with life meets a woman with a mysterious accent who says she’s a spy and needs to take refuge in his apartment. Murder and mayhem soon follow as our hero is chased across the wild and wooly British countryside, meeting a host of ridiculous characters and climaxing in a death-defying finale! A riotous blend of virtuoso performances and wildly inventive stagecraft, “The 39 Steps” amounts to an unforgettable evening of pure pleasure!

The first version of the play was written by Simon Corble and Nobby Dimon for a cast of four actors and funded by a £1,000 Yorkshire Arts Grant. It premiered in 1995 at the Georgian Theatre Royal in Richmond, North Yorkshire, before embarking on a tour of village halls across the north of England. In 2005, Patrick Barlow rewrote the script, keeping the scenes, staging and small-scale feel, and in June 2005 this re-adaption premiered at the West Yorkshire Playhouse. In 2006, it opened in the West End and in 2008 it premiered on Broadway to rave reviews. The New York Times proclaimed, “Theatre at its finest!… Absurdly enjoyable! This gleefully theatrical riff on Hitchcock’s film is fast and frothy, performed by a cast of four that seems like a cast of thousands.”

This production introduces Ivoryton audiences to the husband and wife team of Dan Fenaughty and Larissa Klinger, who have both performed these roles before in the national tour. The clowns are played by Ivoryton favorite, David Edwards, and Jonathan Brody, making his Ivoryton debut. All four actors are members of Actors Equity. The play is directed by Erik Bloomquist, a two-time Emmy-nominated writer/director/producer and former Top 200 Director on Project Greenlight. Erik is currently in post-production on the television adaptation of “The Cobblestone Corridor,” a seriocomic mystery series based on his internationally acclaimed short film of the same name. The set design is by Dan Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Cully Long.

“The 39 Steps” opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on June 1 and runs through June 19. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $44 for adults; $39 for seniors; $22 for students and $17 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting www.ivorytonplayhouse.org

Ticket prices go up on June 1 to $50 for adults and $45 for seniors, so purchase tickets now for all the summer shows for the best prices. (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Share

Maple and Main Gallery’s Summer Exhibit on View through Sept. 4

"Daffodils and Oak," by Claudia Van Nes, at Maple and Main Gallery

“Daffodils and Oak,” by Claudia Van Nes, at Maple and Main Gallery

CHESTER – Over 230 new paintings and sculptures by 46 artists will be featured in the annual Summer Exhibit at Maple and Main Gallery, which is on view through Sept. 4.

This exhibit showcases a wide selection of art from traditional seascapes and landscapes to vibrant abstracts, from collage and encaustic to oil, pastel and watercolor.

The gallery is highlighting an artist each week who will show additional work and give a demonstration or talk.

On display in the Stone Gallery during July is “Quiet Places,” an exhibit of work by artists Kim Petersen and Elvira Omaechea.

Maple and Main, at One Maple Street, Chester, is open Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from noon to 7 p.m.; and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.  For more information, visit mapleandmaingallery.com or call 860-767-6065.

Share

Tri-Town Parades Cancelled Because of Forecasted Rain

flags-clip-art-RTdKR6AT9The towns of Chester, Deep River and Essex have cancelled their Memorial Day parades because of the rain in the forecast.

According to the Town of Chester Facebook page, “Due to the impending rain tomorrow- the Memorial Day parade to the Chester Meeting House is cancelled. We WILL be meeting as planned in the [St. Joseph] church parking lot and walking to the War Memorial for a brief ceremony honoring our fallen veterans. Please join us – it will not be the first time Memorial Day will be honored with a sea of umbrellas!”

The Town of Deep River reported via Facebook, “The Memorial Day Parade and ceremonies planned in Deep River for Monday starting at 9:00 am have been cancelled due to impending bad weather. Please remember those who fought for our freedom with your families and friends and have a safe and happy Memorial Day.”

We could not find a posting of the Town of Essex page, but from the Facebook page of Mary Ellen Barnes, the Town of Essex’s Park and Recreation Director, “I just received word that the Memorial Day Parade for the Town of Essex has been cancelled due to anticipated rain. There will be a ceremony at Essex Town Hall at 930am. Please call the Veterans Hall in Centerbrook for more information. +1 (860) 767-8892. Please Share!”

 

 

Share

Women’s Sailing Group at Pettipaug Yacht Club Begins Sailing Season June 14

The launching pier for the sailboats of the Women’s Sailing Group

The launching pier for the sailboats of the Women’s Sailing Group

The Women’s Sailing Group of the Pettipaug Yacht Club will begin its sailing season on Tuesday, June 14, between 5:30 and 6 p.m. at the club house on the Connecticut River in Essex. Since there will be actual sailing races in the waters off the club house at this time, those participating should bring with them: a PDF floating vest, a bottle of drinking water, high quality boat shoes and a dish of good food that can be to be shared with others.

It should be noted as well that women of all ages and all degrees of sailing skills are welcome to participate in the sailing races of the Women’s Sailing Group of the Pettipaug Yacht Club.

This sign welcomes Pettipaug Yacht Club members and visitors to the site of Woman’s Sailing Group.

This sign welcomes members and visitors to the Pettipaug Yacht Club.

To participate in the Women’s Sailing Group races, it is necessary to be a member of the Pettipaug Yacht Club. The club’s Membership Chairperson, Laura Nunno, will be on hand on June 14 to sign up new club members.

Also, non-members of the club can participate in the races on a one time basis, provided they sign a waiver to the effect that the club will not be responsible for any injuries that they might incur at the club’s races.

There is a $25 fee for participating in the races of the Women’s Sailing Group. Men are not allowed to participate except as spectators.

Further questions about the Women’s Sailing Group races can be sent by e-mail to probinson02@snet.net or by calling 860-526-2775.

Share

Sign Up Now to Read to Mia, the Reading Therapy Dog, on July 28

Mia, the Reading Therapy dog, is eager to be read to at the Deep River Public Library.

Mia, the Reading Therapy dog, is eager to be read to at the Deep River Public Library.

DEEP RIVER – Mia, the Reading Therapy dog, and her handler, Terrie Carpenter, will visit the Deep River Public Library on Thursday, July 28 at 3 p.m.

Reading Therapy animals can build confidence with children who are emerging or struggling readers. Young children can make up stories by using the pictures in book. Older readers can build their read-aloud skills. This program is best suited for children ages 3-11. Each child is given a 15-minute time slot. Registration is required for this activity. Call today to reserve your spot.

This program is free and sponsored by the Friends of the Deep River Public Library. For more information, go to http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on our monthly calendar, email the Children’s Department at drplchildrensdept@gmail.com or call the library at 860-526-6039.
Share