May 28, 2015

Conversations About Regionalization Continue at Deep River Elementary Today

REGION 4 — A series of informal conversation about Regionalization for parents at elementary schools will be held on the dates indicated below. Coffee and pastries will be provided.

Superintendent Dr. Levy, the school principal and board of education will be available at each location for informal discussions.

  • Tuesday, May 26, at Deep River Elementary Cafeteria from 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
  • Friday, May 29, at Essex Elementary Cafeteria from 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Tickets on Sale Now for Acclaimed British Comedy, ‘Calendar Girls’ at Ivoryton Playhouse

Jacqui Hubbard and Beverley Taylor.  Photo by Anne Hudson.

Jacqui Hubbard and Beverley Taylor. Photo by Anne Hudson.

IVORYTON – The summer season opens June 3 in Ivoryton with the US professional premier of one of the UK’s most popular shows, ‘Calendar Girls.’  Adapted by Tim Firth from his smash hit Miramax film of the same name, it is based on an inspiring true story that is both poignant and hilarious.

A group of extraordinary women, members of a very ordinary Yorkshire Women’s Institute, spark a global phenomenon by persuading one another to pose au natural for a charity calendar with a difference.  As interest snowballs, the ‘Calendar Girls’ find themselves revealing more than they’d ever planned …

Dazzlingly funny, shamelessly sentimental and utterly captivating, this is one of the best-selling shows in British theatre history. It will make you laugh, cry … and walk out singing Jerusalem!

The fundraising phenomenon of the Calendar Girls was inspired by the death of Angela Baker’s husband, John Richard Baker, an Assistant National Park Officer for the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority, who died from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma at the age of 54 in 1998.

During his illness Angela’s friends began to raise money, initially with the aim of purchasing a sofa for the visitors’ lounge in the hospital where John was treated. Nothing could have prepared them for the way their original calendar took off (selling 202,000 copies in its first year). To date they have raised over £3 million for Leukemia & Lymphoma Research, the UK’s leading blood cancer charity.

The Ivoryton Playhouse will also be using this opportunity to raise awareness for several cancer charities. Wednesday, June 3, at 7:30 p.m. is Cancer Survivor Night – half price adult ticket price for those individuals who have survived the challenge of cancer. Participating organizations include Terri Brodeur Breast Cancer Foundation, Little Wonder, Valley Shore YMCA – Hope is Power Program and Middlesex Hospital‘s Center for Survivorship and Integrative Medicine.

Jacqui Hubbard, Artistic/Executive Director, is directing the production and is also stepping on stage in the role of Annie. Beverley Taylor, Ivoryton Company Manager, will be joining her in the role of Chris.

“We are both Northern English lasses” says Hubbard, “I spent four years trying to get the rights to produce this wonderful play and, though directing and performing at the same time will be a challenge, I knew I had to do it. These women are in our bones and it will be a rare treat to get to step in front of the curtain for a change.”

Joining them on stage are Vickie Blake, Danielle Bonanno, Erik Bloomquist, Victoria Bundonis*, R. Bruce Connelly*, Lily Dorment*, David Edwards*, Katrina Ferguson*, Maggie McGlone Jennings, and Maria Silverman*.

Set design is by Tony Andrea, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Cully Long.

Calendar Girls opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on June 3, and runs through June 21. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.)

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Deep River Historical Society Hosts Cartoonist C.D. Batchelor Exhibit, Home Tour

Self portrait by C.D. Batchelor.

Self portrait by C.D. Batchelor.

DEEP RIVER  — Viewed by millions daily in The New York Daily News and syndicated in 1,000 newspapers across the country, the work of C.D. Batchelor was thought-provoking and challenged the reader to draw his own conclusions.

Batchelor was hired by The New York Daily News in 1931 and his strong, graphic cartoons filled the upper-right columns of the editorial page, seven days a week for the next 25 years. He was the first political cartoonist to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and by 1947 his work was circulated to nearly three million readers.

Funded in part by a grant from the Connecticut Humanities, the Deep River Historical Society invites you to step into his world, view a collection of his work that spanned 40 of the most turbulent years in U.S. history.

The exhibit titled, “Draw Your Own Conclusions: The Political Cartoons of C.D. Batchelor,” will be open at the Stone House of the Deep River Historical Society at 245 Main Street, Deep River on Saturdays and Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. through the months of July and August.

One of C.D. Batchelor's famous cartoons.

One of C.D. Batchelor’s famous cartoons.

On June 6, a special opening day event will include the rare opportunity to tour the historic 18th century Deep River home of Batchelor.  Tickets for this event are $15 and are  limited given the capacity of the house.  Contact Rhonda Forristall via email at rcforristall@gmail.com or 860-526-5086 for more information about times and availability of tickets for this day.

Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives.

RiverFare 2015 Returns Thursday for 22nd Year of Fun on Essex Waterfront 

Kick off Summer on the shoreline with some of the best culinary delights the River Valley has to offer. Join Allen G. Ciastho (The Tea Kettle Restaurant), Brian Checko & David Schumacher (Red House), David G. Caistho (Impressive Catering Services), Norm Needleman (Tower Labs.) Chris Dobbs (Executive Director, Connecticut River Museum)  Rob Peterson (C Sherman Johnson Co., Inc.) Anna Lathrop (Gourmet Galley Catering) Frett Marsha (Catering by Selene) & Earl Swain (Cloud Nine Catering) for the 22nd annual RiverFare.

Kick off Summer on the shoreline with some of the best culinary delights the River Valley has to offer. Join Allen G. Ciastho (The Tea Kettle Restaurant), Brian Checko & David Schumacher (Red House), David G. Caistho (Impressive Catering Services), Norm Needleman (Tower Labs.) Chris Dobbs (Executive Director, Connecticut River Museum)  Rob Peterson (C Sherman Johnson Co., Inc.) Anna Lathrop (Gourmet Galley Catering) Frett Marsha (Catering by Selene) & Earl Swain (Cloud Nine Catering) for the 22nd annual RiverFare.

ESSEX — On Thursday, May 28, from 6 to 9 p.m., the waterfront lawn of the Connecticut River Museum will come to life again as the scenic setting for RiverFare 2015.

Known as the unofficial kick off of summer on the shoreline, RiverFare, the area’s most popular tasting event, will feature gourmet food, wine, micro brews and silent auction all on the museum grounds overlooking the beautiful Essex Harbor.  Like a kid in a candy store, move from table to table sampling the best culinary delights the Connecticut River Valley has to offer.

This year’s lineup of Connecticut’s leading restaurants and food purveyors includes RiverFare newcomers Impressive Catering, The Tea Kettle Restaurant, Coastal Cooking Company and Big Nanny’s Soft Biscotti, and back by popular demand are Red House, Fromage Fine Foods, Deep River Snacks, Gourmet Galley Catering, Griswold Inn, Essex Coffee & Tea, Catering by Selene, The Cheese Shop of Centerbrook, The Ivory Restaurant, Cloud Nine Catering and others.

RiverFarers will also have the opportunity to join in the fun of bidding in the silent auction which features a diverse array of fine gifts, services, and entertainment experiences.  Items include a refurbished ’76 Sunfish Sailboat and Trailer, a private kayak tour, a 2 night stay in Cooperstown, NY plus tickets to the Baseball Hall of Fame and a seasonal Mooring on the Connecticut River.  Check out additional auction items at ctrivermuseum.org.

Major Support for RiverFare is provided by Tower Labs and C. Sherman Johnson Co.  Addition support is provided by, Bogaert Construction, Centerbrook Architect and Planners, Clark Group, Edidio Assante Wealth Management, iCRVRadio.com, Middlesex Hospital, Reynolds’ Garage & Marine, Inc. Bob’s Discount Furniture, Sapia Construction, Wells Fargo Advisors, blp Enterprises, Carr Douglas & Cline, Caulfield & Ridgway, Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, Treasure Hill Farm and Trowbridge Stone Masonry.

Additional in-kind support is provided by Bob’s Centerbrook Package Store, Rhode VanGessel Design, Essex Printing, Guilford Savings Bank, Connecticut Rental Center and Apparel Plus.

Media support is provided by Valley Courier.

RiverFare admission is $60 per person in advance and $65 on the day of the event.  Patron tickets may be purchased for $150 and include a premium bar and $100 tax deduction.  Net proceeds will help support the Connecticut River Museum’s mission to increase public awareness and access to the heritage, culture, and natural beauty of New England’s Great River.

For more information or to make advance reservations, go to www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860.767.8269.    The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street in Essex.

 

 

Dry Pants Model Yacht Club Hosts Successful 2015 New England Spring Regatta

Sail away!

Sail away!

DEEP RIVER — Plattwood Pond in Deep River was the home over the May 16-17 weekend to one of the most popular model sailing events in the Northeast: the 10th Annual  New England Spring Regatta  for  CR-914 model yachts.  Once again, it was a great success for both participants and curious onlookers.

Competitors were invited from all over the northeast. The top five sailors in order of finish were Kevin Dooley (USCG Academy sailing coach), Brain Jobson ( Essex), William James ( Worcester, Mass.), Brian Kerrigan( Essex), and John Skerry (Marblehead, Mass.) The top two sailors have previously won National CR-914 Championships.

Regatta winners proudly display their certificates.

Regatta winners proudly display their certificates.

The boats that were sailed are known as CR-914s, a nationally syndicated one-design class of boats that are 1/12 scale copies of America Cup racers. Over 5000 exist and can be found in every state of the nation. These radio-controlled boats are 36” long and can easily be carried in the trunk of most cars fully-rigged. They are fast, very competitive, and identical in every way-including weight. Winning and losing is totally dependent on the competence of the skippers.

Interested parties in the lower Connecticut River Valley can find club members sailing every Sunday at Plattwood Park in Deep River from 10:30 a.m. until noon as well as Thursday evenings until dark. Visitors are always welcome to try sailing these boats.

For more information, visit the Dry Pants Model Yacht Club’s website or call 860-767-5052.

Lecture Thursday in Audubon Society’s CT River Series Considers Estuary Ecology

painting

ESSEX — The Connecticut River Estuary Lecture Series hosted by the Connecticut Audubon Society continues Thursday, May 28, with a presentation on the ecology of the estuary at Essex Meadows starting at 4 p.m.

The first lecture of our Connecticut River Estuary series was a terrific success, with over 110 people attending Essex Meadows last Thursday to hear Michelle Eckman, Connecticut Audubon Society’s (CAS) director of education and Dr. Paul Spitzer scientist and osprey researcher.

This second lecture will be presented by Dr. Wayne (Rocky) Geyer, senior scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, and Dr. Gail Kineke, associate professor at Boston College and a Woods Hole scientist. Their National Science Foundation funded work promises to create a fundamentally new understanding of the mechanics of the Connecticut River Estuary.

One of the Audubon Society’s advisors, Dr. Rita Colwell retired Director of the National Science Foundation, believes that Rocky in one of the leading scientists in the fight against rising sea water.

The title of the second lecture is “The Value of the Connecticut River to Our Environment.” Estuaries like the lower Connecticut River are among the most biologically productive ecosystems on earth. Geyer and Kineke will discuss their current estuary research in the Connecticut River and why a field station on the lower Connecticut would aid that work. In addition, Dr. Paul Spitzer will briefly continue his discussion on his osprey research.
The third and final lecture titled, “Aesthetic Beauty of the Estuary: Vision of Artists and Writers” will look at the role of the estuary in painting and writing and be presented by Jeffrey Cooley, founder and owner of The Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme. It is set for 4 p.m., Thursday, June 4, at Essex Meadows.

Admission to the lecture is free but RSVP’s are required. To RSVP, contact Allison Bryant at the Connecticut Audubon Society at abryant@ctaudubon.org or 203 259-0416 x106. A reception follows each lecture.

 

For more information on the lecture series, visit www.ctaudubon.org/2015/04/connecticut-river-estuary-lecture-series/.

These lectures are one of the initial projects of a new regional board formed by the Connecticut Audubon Society to focus on the lower Connecticut River valley and southeastern Connecticut.

The new board will work in conjunction with Connecticut Audubon Society staff and state Board of Directors to provide direction and support to the organization’s conservation and education work in Old Lyme, Lyme, Essex, Old Saybrook, and other communities in southeastern Connecticut.

The board’s other seminal projects include the introduction of Connecticut Audubon’s award-winning Science in Nature outdoor education program at Essex Elementary School and an effort to expand Osprey Nation, Connecticut Audubon’s citizen science Osprey monitoring program.

For decades Connecticut Audubon Society has maintained nature sanctuaries in Montville, Haddam, East Haddam, Stonington and Middletown. In addition to being a key component of the region’s native habitat, the sanctuaries serve as portals of opportunity into nature for children and families in the region.

The chair of the new Regional Board is Herman Blanke of Old Lyme. Other members are Patsy McCook (secretary) of Old Lyme; Emily Bjornberg of Lyme; Elsie Childs of Old Lyme; Jim Denham of Essex; Margarita Emerson of Niantic; Eleanor Robinson of Old Lyme; Dr. Ted Vanitallie of Old Lyme; and Claudia Weicker of Old Lyme.

Herman Blanke and Jim Denham are also members of Connecticut Audubon Society’s Board of Directors.

In addition, Old Lyme resident John Forbis and Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder have provided essential support to this effort.

“Having had the fortune to live in Essex for 15 years, I have always appreciated the values of the Connecticut River; its incredible aesthetic beauty, its ecological contributions, and its great historical legacy to the people of this nation., said Alexander Brash, president of Connecticut Audubon Society.

He continued, “In keeping with the great tradition of conservationists of the area, we are looking to work with its citizens and school children in order to highlight and protect the area’s birds, unique biodiversity and habitats, and leverage such interactions for greater awareness of conservation issues across the state.”

“There is a great conservation tradition to uphold in this region,” said Herman Blanke. “Roger Tory Peterson of Old Lyme helped make birding the popular pastime that it is and also drew the connection between birds and conservation. A century ago, the painters of Old Lyme turned this beautiful landscape into art. We view it as our goal and our responsibility to carry on that tradition of conservation and appreciation for the beauty of the natural world.”

Jim Denham said, “From its inception, Connecticut Audubon Society has made conservation education the foundation of its work. Each generation is responsible for helping the next generation understand how the natural world works and why conservation is important, and for making sure the wonders of nature don’t get lost amid all the distractions of the modern world. That’s what we are trying to accomplish at Essex Elementary School, and we intend for it to be a stepping stone to collaborations with other schools as well.”

Science in Nature, which provides curriculum-based outdoor science education to students in elementary and high schools, recently completed its first session at Essex Elementary, with a field trip to Chatfield Hollow State Park in Killingworth. The second session is set for May 28 at Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison.

Science in Nature teaches the principles of conservation science in local outdoor settings, focusing on climate and weather, rocks and soils, ecological adaptations, and wetland ecology. The goal is to increase environmental literacy among elementary, middle and high school students so they will understand basic environmental science principles and be more likely to participate in finding solutions to environmental issues within their communities.

In October it was named the best outdoor conservation program in the region by the New England Environmental Education Alliance. Schools from almost 50 communities in Connecticut have participated in Science in Nature, although Essex Elementary is the first in southeastern Connecticut to take part.

Osprey Nation uses volunteer citizen scientists, working under the direction of Connecticut Audubon’s conservation staff, to find and monitor nests of the state’s resurgent Osprey population.

More than 400 Osprey nests have been identified and plotted on a map. The greatest concentration in the state is on Great Island in Old Lyme. Connecticut Audubon is hoping that increased awareness of the project will propt more local residents to volunteer to as Osprey stewards in Old Lyme and elsewhere throughout the southeastern part of the state.

Founded in 1898, Connecticut Audubon Society is the state’s original and still independent Audubon Society. The Society manages four nature centers, two museums, and 19 sanctuaries across the state. It uses the charismatic nature of birds to inspire the next generation of conservationists, and to work with the current generation to protect and improve the state’s natural habitats for the betterment of state residents, birds and other wildlife.

Connecticut Audubon Society’s headquarters are at Birdcraft Sanctuary in Fairfield. It has regional centers and associated boards in Fairfield, Pomfret, Glastonbury and Milford.

Historic Waterfront Tours Scheduled in Deep River During Summer Months

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town's waterfront during walking tours this summer.

Deep River Historical Society will explain the history of the town’s waterfront during walking tours this summer.

DEEP RIVER — Deep River’s commercial connection to the rest of the world started at the end of Kirtland and River Streets in the early 1800’s. What is now known as the Town Landing, was a shipyard and dock, which collectively, were the linchpin to Deep River’s mercantile success. The shipbuilding provided the vessels and the dock provided the point of delivery of raw materials and the shipment of end products, that made Deep River an economic success.

A lecture and tour of Deep River’s Historic Waterfront will be offered every second and fourth Saturday morning, this June, July, August and September. Tours are sponsored by the Deep River Historical  Society. The tour will start at the home of sea captain and ship builder, Calvin Williams, at 131 Kirtland Street, (immediately left of the Mt. Saint John entrance pillars), starting at 10 a.m. SHARP, each tour day. Each tour is expected to be about 1 1/2 hour duration and will start punctually at 10 a.m.

Reservations are recommended and tickets may be acquired at the door, or in advance, from the program’s director: James Hogan, by calling 860-391-2354, or at two convenient store locations: Celebrations, 161 Main Street, Deep River and Old Saybrook Antiques Center, 756 Middlesex Turnpike, Old Saybrook.

The costs for tickets is $20 per family; $10 adults; $5 students and senior citizens. 100% of all donations will benefit the Deep River Historical Society. All donations are tax deductable. Program is “rain or shine”.

For more information, call James J. Hogan III  at: 860-391-2354

Tour Dates are:
June: 13 and 27
July: 11 and 25
August: 8 and 22
September: 12 and 26

Gala Reception Friday for Essex Art Association’s Elected Members’ June Show

'The Flying Bergdorfs' by Carol Young.

‘The Flying Bergdorfs’ by Carol Young.

Each year, at every individual summer exhibit, the Essex Art Association gives a special top prize to “the artist they would like to see more of.” The prize is an opportunity to have a solo exhibit in the Exit Gallery alongside the next year’s regular exhibits.

The honoree for June is Carol Young of Essex, who will present paintings, mixed media, sculptures and assemblages in her show titled, “Through Rose-Colored Glasses.”

Young’s work has been variously described as “curious, imaginative, colorful, quirky, sometimes naughty, but never calm.”  “The Flying Bergdorfs,” for example, are a group of acrobats that the artist saw inside a microscopic photograph of a basal teardrop. “Maude’s Disturbing Wallpaper” is a portrait of a clearly chaotic, easily-confused nanny that she had had to endure.

Young’s most important mentors were her inventive father and more than a thousand creative art class children who, for over 30 years, privately taught ‘Mrs. Young’ at her previous home in Westport, Conn.

A gala reception for the Elected Members’ June Show, “Calm and Chaotic” and for “Through Rose-Colored Glasses” in the Exit Gallery will be held on Friday evening, May 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Essex Art Association, 10 North Street, Essex.

The Gallery will continue to be open and free to the public every day of the week from 1 to 5 p.m. from May 30 to June 12, when the gallery will close for indoor renovations.

Maple & Main Celebrates its Sixth Anniversary with New Exhibition, Reception Saturday

'In a Yellow Vase' by Claudia van Nes is one of the signature paintings of the Anniversary Exhibition at Maple & Main Gallery in Chester.

‘In a Yellow Vase’ by Claudia van Nes is one of the signature paintings of the Anniversary Exhibition at Maple & Main Gallery in Chester.

CHESTER – Maple and Main Gallery’s Anniversary Exhibit opens Wednesday, May 27, with a gala celebration Saturday, May 30, from 5 to 8 p.m.

To mark the launch of its sixth year, Maple and Main will serve appetizer platters donated by both L&E and Good Elephant restaurants located across Main Street from the gallery. Cake, champagne and wine will also be offered.

The gallery will be filled with new paintings and sculptures by 38 Connecticut artists – the vast majority of which will be shown for the first time.

Maple and Main has come a long way since its start by a handful of artists, but it still adheres to the goal set six years ago: to show only original fine art in as wide a selection of styles and medium as possible.

The Anniversary Exhibit runs through July  19.

Maple and Main, at One Maple Street, is open Wednesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, call 860-526-6065, email mapleandmain@att.net. or visit the gallery’s Facebook page and/or on-line gallery and website at mapleandmaingallery.com.

Essex’s New ‘Pocket Park’ to be Dedicated Sunday, All Welcome

ESSEX — All are welcome to attend the dedication of Morgana’s Place, May 31, at 1 p.m. on the corner of North Main St. and New City St. in Essex.

The unveiling of the statue of Morgana, Ina Bomze’s beloved companion, will take place.

Approximately a year ago, Ina Bomze purchased the property, removed the remnants of the building, replenished the grounds and deeded it for perpetuity to Essex Land Trust.

The Trust invites you to consider making donations for the ongoing care and maintenance of this new pocket park or as additional support to assist Essex Land Trust (P.O. Box 373, Essex) in keeping all of their properties vibrant and groomed for all to enjoy.http://essexlandtrust.org/

Contact Ed Tucker, MD at edtuckermd@aol.com or 860-767-2332 for further information.

Light refreshments will be available.  This event will be held rain or shine.

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds to Host Summer Sculpture Showcase

The signature piece of Gil Boro's Summer Sculpture Showcase, "Queen Anne's Lace" by Gints Grinsberg.

The signature piece of Gil Boro’s Summer Sculpture Showcase, “Queen Anne’s Lace” by Gints Grinsberg.

OLD LYME — Gilbert Boro, owner and sculptor at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme, has announced an exciting new exhibition on the grounds of his studio featuring examples of his own contemporary work accompanied by a selection of works created by a number of other widely acclaimed sculptors working in contrasting media.  This Summer Sculpture Showcase will be on view from Monday, June 8, through Sunday, Sept. 13, and feature an Opening Reception on Friday, June 19, from 5 to 7 p.m.  All are welcome to attend the reception at which light refreshments will be served.

Nine sculptors will be exhibiting in Boro’s expansive Sculpture Gardens located on the 4.5 acres of his residence on historic Lyme Street in the heart of Old Lyme, Conn.  Their works will be interspersed amongst Boro’s own sculptures along with works by 13 other contributing artists on the beautifully landscaped grounds offering a unique plein air experience combining both large- and small-scale contemporary sculptures, many of which are for sale.  The sculptors whose work – and in some cases, more than one piece – was selected for the Showcase are:

Diane Barcelo
Ashby Carlisle
Fay Chin
Gints Grinsberg
Lannie Hart
Deborah Hornbake
Elizabeth Knowles
David Millen
Elizabeth Miller McCue
William Thielen

The signature piece of the exhibition is “Queen Anne’s Lace” by Gints Grinsbergs.  It is a large — 144” in height, 56” in diameter — yet delicate structure that evokes the intricate design of lace in its welded and stainless steel structure.  Grinsbergs’ work has been featured at various museums and galleries and is Included in private and corporate collections throughout North America.

'Waves' by Fay Chin.

‘Waves’ by Fay Chin.

Fay Chin’s abstract aluminum sculpture in the exhibition titled, “Waves,” explores pyramidal relationships in a large, ground-based structure.  A sculptor and painter, she has exhibited stone and metal sculptures nationally and internationally in museums, galleries, and public spaces with larger installations.

“Modern Dance,” a multi-colored sculpture utilizing wire fencing wrapped in vinyl surveying tape, is a collaborative work by Elizabeth Knowles and William Thielen.  Natural patterns inspire the work of Knowles and Thielen, who live and work respectively in New York City and Carbondale, Ill.  Both have an extensive body of individual work and have received numerous awards, grants and residencies.

'Pipehenge' by Gil Boro.

‘Pipehenge’ by Gil Boro.

Boro has enjoyed a distinguished career as a sculptor, architect, educator and international design consultant.  He explores the interplay of space, place and scale in a wide range of media including stone, wood, metal and fiberglass.  His vast body of work has been exhibited in numerous galleries throughout the US and internationally, and has also been purchased by collectors, corporations and foundations in both the US and Europe.  Boro currently has several works being exhibited at off-site locations including the South Carolina-based Art League of Hiltonhead’s Biennale (where he was recently awarded second place in their 24th National Juried Exhibition), the New England Sculptor’s Association’s exhibition in Portsmouth, N.H., and Ramey Fine Art in Palm Desert, Calif.

This inaugural Summer Sculpture Showcase offers a unique opportunity for established sculptors to exhibit their work in a different location, while also effectively creating a new exhibition within the Sculpture Gardens.  Boro comments, “I’m delighted to be able to open my grounds to these exceptional sculptors whose work intrigues me.  Each one offers original creative thinking resulting in a fascinating combination of contrasting conceptual designs in a variety of media.  I think any visitor to the exhibition is going to be thoroughly engaged by what he or she sees – including children.”

Boro is somewhat unusual as a professional sculptor in that he loves to see folk of all ages directly interacting with his sculptures, noting that he has a strong aversion to exhibitions, “… where people can’t touch my work.”   Apart from attracting visitors to see the works on his grounds, Boro is thoroughly invested in the vibrant Old Lyme arts scene and hopes this exhibition will help cement the town as a summer destination for art-loving visitors from near and far, especially during the town’s Midsummer Festival on Friday, July 24, and Saturday, July 25.

Located at 80-1 Lyme St., less than a minute from Exit 70 on I-95, the Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds are open 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.  Admission is free.  Children, field trips and group visits are all welcome. The Studio is open by appointment. 

For further information, contact 860-434-5957, visit www.sculpturegrounds.com or email studio80sculpturegrounds@gmail.com

Essex Garden Club Announces 2015 Scholarships

ESSEX — The Essex Garden Club has announced the winners of its 2015 scholarships.

Scholarships of $1,000 each were awarded to Mackenzie Goller of Ivoryton, and Sarah Watson and Elsbeth Kane, both of Essex.

Goller, a 2013 graduate of The Williams School has just completed his freshman year at Wheaton College in Massachusetts.  He is pursuing an independent major in agriculture, called Food and Environmental Studies.

Watson is a junior at Gettysburg College.  Her major is  Environmental Studies with a concentration in Sustainable Development.  This past semester, she was in Denmark with the Danish Institute for Study Abroad continuing her studies in sustainability of various issues such as sustainable chocolate production and urban gardens.

Kane is a sophomore at Columbia University majoring in Environmental Biology.   She has also studied abroad, spending last summer in Sao Paolo, Brazil, in an Ecosystems Experience Program at a reforestation site within the Atlantic Forest.

Additionally, 15 camperships at $125 each were given to Essex Park and Recreation Summer Session to educate younger children on the beauty and wonder of nature.  The Club also supports the Bushy Hill Nature Center in Ivoryton by offering four camperships of $520 each.

The Garden Club wishes to thank all those who supported the club’s annual May Market, the proceeds from which enable the club to make such donations.

Join CT River Museum for a Shad Fishing Informational ‘Riverquest’ Trip, June 3

A trip to learn 'All About Shad Fishing' is being offered on RiverQuest.

A trip to learn ‘All About Shad Fishing’ is being offered on RiverQuest.

ESSEX — On Wednesday, June 3 at 7:30 p.m., the Connecticut River Museum (CRM) will host a shad fishing excursion from its docks.  The evening will include a trip on RiverQuest to learn about shad fishing traditions.

Participants will see examples of shad nets and other gear, watch fishermen at work on the River, and enjoy a dessert and non-alcoholic beverage.  Beer and wine will be available for purchase.

Tickets are $40 for CRM members and $45 for the general public.  Reservations are required.

For more information, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org or call the museum at 860-767-8269.

 

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  1. RiverQuest and the Connecticut River Museum will offer a Shad Fishing Night, June 3rd. Photo: Joan Meek, Connecticut River Museum.

Essex Library Presents ‘South Pacific – Behind the Scenes’ with Hubbard, Edwards, June 15

4_south_pacific_tmmESSEX — On Monday, June 15, at 7 p.m. join Ivoryton Playhouse Executive/Artistic Director Jaqueline Hubbard and South Pacific Director David Edwards at the Essex Library for a talk about this great musical and its place in the history of musical theater.

The influence and impact of arguably the greatest musical theater writing partnership of the 20th century – Rodgers and Hammerstein – will be discussed.  Hubbard will talk about why she chose South Pacific for the 2015 Season and how audiences are responding.  The themes of South Pacific, including racial prejudice and gender roles will be explored.  Director David Edwards will also talk about his vision for this production and the challenges of producing such a large production on Ivoryton’s small stage.

Edwards is an accomplished actor and director who has performed on and off Broadway, as well as on TV and in films. He appeared in last season’s Ivoryton Playhouse production of La Cage Aux Folles and this season’s Calendar Girls.  His numerous directing credits include multiple productions of The Producers and South Pacific, as well as Showboat and many others.

British native Hubbard has been the Ivoryton Playhouse’s Executive/Artistic Director for over 20 years.  During her tenure she has breathed new life into the century old theater, overseeing of a complete renovation in 2006 that has enabled it to become a year-round facility.  Hubbard also directs, and acts in, many of the Playhouse’s productions each year.

This program is being presented in conjunction with the Playhouse’s July 9 performance of South Pacific, which will jointly benefit the Essex and Ivoryton Libraries.  The cast includes local residents Patricia Schumann and David Pittsinger, who played the part of Emile on Broadway.

Seats are now on sale at both libraries, and are selling quickly.  They are priced at $60, and entitle purchasers to attend a pre-performance reception, as well as an opportunity to enjoy desserts and meet the cast after the show is over.

Letter to the Editor: Thanks for Book Sale Help from Friends of Essex Library

National Honor Society volunteer Essex Public Library booksale workers from Valley Regional High School

National Honor Society students from Valley Regional High School volunteered as workers at Essex Library’s recent book sale.

To the Editor:

The Board of the Friends of the Essex Library would like to thank all who contributed to the success of our recent book sale.  A successful  sale requires significant work by many volunteers including those who  work during the day-and-a-half event and  those who sort, repair, price and store books in preparation for the sale, help set-up for the sale by arranging tables, chairs and books by category, and who put everything away afterwards.

Many people contribute hours to this event.  We are especially grateful to six Valley Regional National Honor Society students who assisted in our clean-up effort by lifting and stowing heavy boxes of unsold books, many of which will be given to a variety of non-profit organizations.  Kristen Kilby, Neve Flynn, Hannah Halsey, Tina Mitchel, Leah Harger and Julia Hammond, thank you!  We also thank the library staff for their support, with a special thank you to Anna Cierocki for being with us both days.

We would be remiss in not thanking those who contributed, and those who purchased, books, CDs and DVDs.   Your support of the library is deeply appreciated.

Our next sale is October 3-4 and we hope to see you there!

The Friends of the Essex Library

Nilsson’s Paintings on Show in CT DEEP Commissioner’s Office During Summer

Yellow Flag Iris on Seldens Creek by Leif Nilsson

Yellow Flag Iris on Selden’s Creek by Leif Nilsson, oil, 48″ x 36″, spring 2014 ©

CHESTER — Thirty paintings of Selden’s Creek in Lyme, Conn., done by Chester artist Leif Nilsson over the past 10 years from his boat will be hanging in the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner’s office for the summer months as part of the ‘Arts in the Parks’ series.

An opening reception will be held on Wednesday, May 27, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. at 79 Elm Street, Hartford, CT 06106-5127.
Call 860-424-3000 for hours and to RSVP for the opening.
To see a preview of the works, visit http://nilssonstudio.com/deep/

Essex Resident DeLeeuw Named CT Middle School Principal of the Year

Judy DeLeeuw, Principal of East Lyme Middles School and CT Middle School Principal of the Year.

Judy DeLeeuw, Principal of East Lyme Middles School and CT Middle School Principal of the Year.

ESSEX — Dr. Judy DeLeeuw, Essex resident and principal of East Lyme Middle School (ELMS), has been named the 2015 Connecticut Association of Schools (CAS) Middle School Principal of the Year. Described by former East Lyme First Selectman and current State Senator Paul Formica as an “inspirational and collaborative leader,” DeLeeuw was selected for her intrepid leadership, her commitment to educational equity, and her what’s-best-for-kids approach to school administration.

She has worked with a broad network of stakeholders to build and sustain a student-centered, engaging, inclusive and academically rigorous school where student achievement is abounding; teachers are challenged and supported; and parents are vital partners in their children’s education.

Reacting to the announcement of her selection, DeLeeuw remarked, “I am extremely honored and humbled to receive this award from CAS. I will celebrate this accolade with those who inspire me to lead each day; the teachers and the students.”

During her eight years as ELMS principal, DeLeeuw has distinguished herself as an industrious and reform-minded leader who cares deeply about the well-being of all members of the school community. According to ELMS Assistant Principal Jason Bitgood, who nominated DeLeeuw for the award, “As a leader committed to change, Dr.
DeLeeuw faces challenges with passion, perseverance and compassion.”

Language Arts teacher Audrone Venduras adds, “A sign at the entrance to ELMS reads, ‘Welcome to Your School.’ This is not an empty slogan but a philosophy which Judy embraces by successfully fostering a sense of ownership and collaboration among students, parents and staff to make ELMS the educational powerhouse that it is.”

Selected as the CAS Middle School of the Year in 2012, ELMS is a dynamic, creative, student-centered middle school where innovation and excellence flourish. The energy and vitality that permeate the school building are a direct result of DeLeeuw’s passion for educational excellence.

The 900-student school facility is divided into Kivas, or “gathering places,” which serve as small, personalized learning communities for students and teachers. This unique design concept supports differentiated learning and interdisciplinary instruction, which facilitate the development of 21st-century skills critical for success in the recently implemented Connecticut Core assessments.

Noted one member of the CAS School of the Year Selection Committee: “ELMS is a cutting edge school. Its interdisciplinary units are far-reaching and promote authentic learning; and, its eighth grade Capstone projects are the equivalent of research at the college level.”

DeLeeuw works tirelessly to maintain a vibrant, caring, student-centered culture which allows all children to grow socially and emotionally as well as academically. A constant presence in the corridors and classrooms, she uses every available opportunity to interact with and build relationships with her students.

Says Venduras, “Walk down the hallway, stop by the cafeteria, or observe bus dismissal and you will see a constant stream of children greeting their principal, for Judy has a remarkable relationship with her kids. She is accessible and genuinely interested in what they have to say.”

Recalls ELMS sixth grader Jack Derry, “During our end-of-the-year assembly, Dr. DeLeeuw joined the staff in a flash mob dance to the song ‘Happy.’ She was laughing and just having fun with everyone. My friends and I appreciate that she truly understands and relates to kids our age.”

One of DeLeeuw’s greatest achievements was her successful transformation of ELMS’ instructional services for special education students. She led her staff in transitioning from special education pullout classes to general education inclusion classes, increasing the amount of time students with disabilities spend with non-disabled peers from 56 to 90 percent. ELMS is now a place where all students learn together in the same well-supported classrooms with the values of tolerance, acceptance and sensitivity as cornerstones for success.

The Principal of the Year Program, sponsored annually by the Connecticut Association of Schools, was established in 1984 to bring recognition to the principalship and to spotlight the important role of the principal in shaping the educational environment and experiences of children. The program recognizes outstanding school principals who have succeeded in providing high quality learning opportunities for students. These administrators have demonstrated excellent leadership, commitment to staff and students, service to their communities, and contributions to the overall profession of
educational leadership.

Each year nominations are solicited for an Elementary, Middle and High School Principal of the Year. The winners are chosen by a selection committee consisting of active and retired principals and assistant principals. State principals of the year must demonstrate success in the areas of collaborative leadership; personal excellence;
curriculum, instruction, and assessment; and personalization.

DeLeeuw will be honored by CAS at the “Celebration of Distinguished Administrators” to be held on Oct. 22, 2015.

Opening Reception for Wnek’s ‘Soul of the Landscape’ Photo Exhibit at CBSRZ, June 7

'Whispers of Past' by Peter Wnek illustrate's the photographer's captivating style.

‘Whispers of Past’ by Peter Wnek beautifully illustrate’s the photographer’s captivating style.

CHESTER — Award-winning photographer Peter Wnek explores the ‘Soul of the Landscape’ in his exhibition of fine art photography at the Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ), which runs through July 28, with an opening reception on Sunday, June 7, from 4 to 7 p.m.

‘Soul of the Landscape’ celebrates the beauty and spirit of our woodlands and waterways, as seen in Whispers of the Past and its breathtaking view along the Connecticut River. Wnek’s work captures the light and details one might expect from a painting—which is no accident. He has long been inspired by the purity and innocence of the American landscape as portrayed by the 19th century Hudson River painters. “I strive for that same warm light, the luminous or stormy skies, to invoke a charm or a mood,” he explains.

Wnek’s photographs often reveal the story of the landscape—its whisper of bygone days, the intrinsic cycles of nature. With a focus on local scenes, this exhibit speaks to the beauty that surrounds us, the coastal vistas and woodland spaces that are unique to our state. In a familiar kaleidoscope of colors, see the rising and setting sun, the harmony of sky and land, the collusion of rock and sea.

As Wnek explains, “I am intrigued by the soothing compositions and repetitive patterns that collectively reveal the Divine at work.”

Featured in this exhibit is Silver Glade, an image of trees on a ridge near Meriden. It recently won the Salmagundi Club of NYC’s 2015 “Henry O’Connor Award” for excellence, portraying the gentler, quieter landscape of New England.

It is that voice of New England which Wnek most hopes to capture in his photographs, “those intimate moments of our own landscapes” waiting to be revealed.

‘Soul of the Landscape’ runs through July 28, Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, 55 East Kings Highway, Chester, CT 06412.

For gallery specific information, call 860-526-8920.

For more information about photographer Peter Wnek, visit www.PeterWnekPhoto.com.

Next ‘Concert in the Garden’ Features ‘The Dizzy River Band,’ June 11

The Dizzy River Band. Photo courtesy of The Dizzy River Band.

The Dizzy River Band. Photo courtesy of The Dizzy River Band.

CHESTER — Leif Nilsson hosts another ‘Concert in the Garden,’ Thursday, June 11, from 7 to 9 p.m., this time featuring ‘The Dizzy River Band’ at the Spring Street Studio and Gallery. This monthly concert series highlights eclectic international singer/songwriter artists from cool jazz to blue grass.

Tom Soboleski comments,”Dizzy River Band is one of the best original bands you’ll find anywhere. They do some covers for people like Clapton and Red Hot Chili Peppers but what makes them special is the unique original songs they’ve written and composed – great lyrics about life’s ups and downs. To top it off, they’re all outstanding musicians and their harmonies are heavenly – you need to hear them to grasp and be awed by their signature sound.”

Gates open half hour before the show — first come first seated. Seating is Bistro Style in the amphitheater. The concert will be moved indoors in the event of inclement weather.

A $10 donation is appreciated. The event is BYOB – pack a picnic and buy your own wine or beer at the Chester Package Store across the street.

Chester’s Essex Savings Bank Hosts Free Shredding Event Saturday

CHESTER — Essex Savings Bank is sponsoring a Free Shredding Event on Saturday, May 30, from 9- to 12 p.m.at its Chester Branch, located next to the Chester Town Hall. Everyone is invited to bring two boxes of paperwork to be shredded for free by Shredding Source.

The event is being held in conjunction with the Chester Branch’s food drive to help aid in stocking the Chester Food Pantry.

Essex Savings Bank is a FDIC insured, state chartered, mutual savings bank established in 1851. The Bank serves the Connecticut River Valley and shoreline with six offices in Essex (2), Chester, Madison, Old Lyme and Old Saybrook. Financial, estate, insurance and retirement planning are offered throughout the state by the Bank’s Trust Department and wholly-owned subsidiary, Essex Financial Services, Inc., Member FINRA, SIPC.

Investments in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and annuities are not FDIC insured, may lose value and are not a deposit, have no Bank guarantee and are not insured by any Federal Government Agency.

Shoreline Artist Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd Holds One-Woman Art Show, Reception at Chester Village West Tonight

Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd in her in-residence studio at Chester Village West

Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd in her in-residence studio at Chester Village West

CHESTER — Accomplished artist Elizabeth Gillies “Mike” Boyd will hold a one-woman art show and reception on Friday, May 22, from 4 to 6 p.m. at Chester Village West, 317 W. Main St., Chester, CT 06412.

Free and open to the public, the art show and sale will include refreshments and live music.

Boyd’s art show will offer a retrospective sampling of her talents, including a mixture of portraiture, landscape, still life, abstract and collage in various media.

Boyd’s artistic training began at an early age. She has worked with American Impressionist painter and teacher Frank Vincent Dumond and abstract artist Theodore Roszak. A member of Connecticut Women Artists, Inc., for the past 35 years, she has been active as an organizer, juror and painter with art associations and centers in Guilford, Madison and Clinton.

She has had her work shown at the Sylvan Gallery in Clinton, Gallery One in in Old Saybrook, the Cooley Gallery in Old Lyme and the Wall Street Gallery in Madison.

For more information on the May 22 art show and reception, call 860.526.6800 or email chestervillagewest@lcsnet.com.

Music & Memory Documentary Film Screening, Panel Discussion Scheduled at ‘The Kate,’ June 2

An Alzheimer’s patient reacts to music of "The Beach Boys.” Photo courtesy of BOND360

An Alzheimer’s patient reacts to music of “The Beach Boys.” Photo courtesy of BOND360

OLD SAYBROOK – Community Music School, the Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter, and The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center present a screening of the award-winning documentary film “Alive Inside” on Tuesday, June 2, at 7 p.m. at The Kate, 300 Main Street, Old Saybrook. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased by phone at 860-767-0026 or in person at Community Music School, 90 Main Street, Centerbrook; or by visiting www.thekate.org.

“Alive Inside” follows social worker Dan Cohen, founder of the nonprofit organization Music & Memory, as he demonstrates music’s ability to combat memory loss and restore a deep sense of self to those suffering from it. Filmmaker Michael Rossato-Bennett chronicles the astonishing experiences of individuals around the country who have been revitalized through the simple experience of listening to music. His camera reveals the uniquely human connection we find in music and how its healing power can triumph where prescription medication falls short.

The documentary visits family members who have witnessed the miraculous effects of personalized music on their loved ones, and offers illuminating interviews with experts including renowned neurologist and best-selling author Oliver Sacks and musician Bobby McFerrin. Many will remember the viral video “Henry Wakes Up!” – a clip from the film that shows a 92-year old nursing home resident enthusiastically responding to music.

The evening will include a brief performance by the New Horizons Band and post-screening panel discussion with experts in the field of memory loss. The New Horizons Band is a program of the Music School that offers active adults the opportunity to play music with their peers in a supportive environment.

This film is not rated, but is recommended for ages 13 and up.

For additional information, contact Community Music School at 860-767-0026.

Editor’s Notes: Community Music School offers innovative educational music programming and music therapy led by a board-certified music therapist for infants through adults, building on a 30 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.

Alzheimer’s disease affects more than 70,000 people in Connecticut. The Alzheimer‘s Association provides services to those affected by Alzheimer’s and other dementias; advocates for policy change and research funding; and advances research toward prevention, treatment and a cure. The Alzheimer’s Association Connecticut Chapter’s main office is in Southington, with regional offices throughout the state in Hamden, New Milford, Norwich, and Norwalk. To learn more contact the Connecticut Chapter at 800-272-3900www.alz.org/ct

Popular Essex Shad Bake to be Held Again at CT River Museum

1.Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

1. Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the
traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

ESSEX — Fifty-seven years ago, the Rotary Club of Essex introduced the quintessential New England shoreline tradition; a dining experience known as a shad bake.  Yankee Magazine has called it one of the “Top 20 Summer Events”.

The Essex Shad Bake returns to the Connecticut River Museum on Saturday, June 6, from 3 to 6:30 p.m.  This year, the bake is made possible through the generous support of Admiral Sponsor Gowrie Group, along with Fishermen Sponsors Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, and Guilford Savings Bank.

The museum’s executive director, Christopher Dobbs says, “We are once again pleased to host and partner with the Rotary Club of Essex on this iconic event that celebrates part of the River’s heritage and that supports the many worthwhile projects of the Rotary.” This volunteer-run event has been organized by the Rotary Club of Essex and is now coordinated by Bake Master Joseph Shea.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones  from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones
from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Shea states, “We offer one of the most unique culinary traditions in New England; at one of the most historic sites along the River. . . it is a winning combination!”  You might find one of your favorite doctors or dentists at the de-nailing table where they take the shad off the oak planks or enjoy a freshly shucked clam or oyster from a local banker.

Join seasoned Shad Bake pioneers for a story from shad bakes of yesteryear including the year of the big flood.  The Shad Museum in Haddam, the Connecticut River Museum, and the Connecticut River Watershed Council will also offer programs during the day on the history and traditions of the shad fishery.

Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

For shad lovers, the lure is the secret ingredients and the authentic method of preparation and cooking handed down from Connecticut natives.  Done in front of the fire, the fish picks up the smoky flavor of the fire with the seasoned oak boards on which it is cooked.  Add to this delicacy homemade potato salad, tossed green salad, and scrumptious pies from Lyman Orchards and you have yourself a gourmet meal.

Don’t care for shad?  The event also offers BBQ chicken and hot dogs.

Share a piece of Connecticut and Essex history with your friends and family.  In addition to the food, participants will enjoy live music and touring the museum which will be open until 6 p.m.  The atmosphere is vibrant with antique cars, picnickers, and the delicious smell of shad roasting around the open fire.

To whet your appetite, on Wednesday, June 3 at 7:30 p.m., the Connecticut River Museum will host a shad fishing excursion on board RiverQuest.  Participants will get a chance to hear about traditional shad fishing, see related artifacts, and go on a boat ride to view shad fisherman ply their trade on the water.  The boat ride will include dessert and non-alcoholic beverages.  Beer and wine will be available for purchase.

Buy your tickets today to the Shad Bake.  The $30 adult and $10 child (10 and under) ticket include the full meal and admission to the museum.  Beverages (soda, beer and wine) will be available at an additional price.  No carry-in alcohol will be permitted.

To purchase tickets, visit www.rotaryclubofessex.com or buy them in person at the Centerbrook Package Store and the Connecticut River Museum.  For additional information on the Shad Fishing Excursion, visit the Connecticut River Museum’s website.

Onsite and street parking at the Connecticut River Museum is limited.  On the day of the event, an Essex Meadows shuttle will be running between the museum and several key parking locations that include the Essex Town Hall parking lot and Pratt House field (29 West Ave.).  The free shuttle service will start at 3 p.m. and run until 7:30 p.m. with pick-ups and drop-offs every 15 minutes.

 

The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street and is open 10 am to 5 pm, closed Mondays until Memorial Day. The Museum, located in the historic Steamboat Dock building, offers exhibits and programs about the history and environment of the Connecticut River. For a full listing of Museum programs and events, go to www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

 

The Rotary Club of Essex is the local chapter of Rotary International that is made up of service minded professionals.  The club and its members are committed to improving the community, connecting with other professionals, sharing their time and experience with the young, supporting global causes, and using their skills to help others.  For more information about the Shad Bake and Rotary Club visit http://www.rotaryclubofessex.com.

 

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Photo Captions:

 

  1. Preparing Shad – Rotary Club of Essex volunteers prepare shad at the 2014 bake the

traditional way by nailing them onto oak boards and using a specially prepared rub.

 

  1. Baking Shad – Connecticut River shad baking in front of fire on oak planks.

 

  1. Boning Demonstration – Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones

from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

Last Day of Essex Library Friends’ Spring Book Sale Today

Preparing for the Sale are, from left to right, Debbie Barnes, Janice Atkeson, Linda Levene, and Ellie Champion

Preparing for the Spring Book Sale are, from left to right, Debbie Barnes, Janice Atkeson, Linda Levene, and Ellie Champion

ESSEX — The Friends of Essex Library will hold a Spring Book Sale Saturday and Sunday, May 16 and 17, at the library at 33 West Ave. in Essex. The annual sale will provide funds for numerous special library programs and activities. Proceeds from previous sales recently enabled the Friends to purchase new sliding doors at the main entrance to the library.

Dates and times for the Sale are Saturday, May 16, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, May 17, from 1 to 4 p.m. when all items will be half-priced.

The Sale will include carefully sorted books in good condition on nautical subjects, gardening, cooking, history, literature, art, travel, philosophy, science, nature, sports, self-help, foreign languages, and books in large print. There will be tables of fiction, children’s books, paperbacks, CDs, DVDs, and books on CD.

Specific information about the sale, including signed books and titles offered in the various categories, will be on the Essex Library website: www.youressexlibrary.org. Click on “Friends” and the “Book Sale” page.

On book-sale Saturday, library materials can be checked in and out from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., but computers in the adult section will not be available for use. There will be no library services on Sunday, when all book-sale items will be half price.

Acclaimed Conductor Launches Book Exploring Music, Leadership Connection Today in Chester

IgnorantMaestro coverCHESTER — It is only fitting that a book that has roots in Chester will be introduced at Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ) before readers in China, Israel, Great Britain, Germany and other countries see it.

Therefore, on Sunday, May 17, at 3 p.m., Itay Talgam, author of “The Ignorant Maestro: How Great Leaders Inspire Unpredictable Brilliance,” will come to Chester from his home in Tel Aviv to launch an international tour in a free ‘Books & Bagels’ program at CBSRZ.

Talgam is one of Israel’s leading orchestra conductors, having founded the Tel Aviv Symphony and led the Israel Philharmonic, as well as many orchestras in other countries.

Itay Talgam

Itay Talgam

A protégé of the great Leonard Bernstein, Talgam had the idea of writing a book that explores the art of leadership from the podium. This sprung out of his very popular TED Talk on leadership (with more than five million views). His argument is that leaders in all fields can learn new insights about leadership not from music itself but from the people who make music.

Lary Bloom

Lary Bloom

It was more than two years ago that Lary Bloom, a writer and longtime resident of Chester, first talked to him about the idea, and how to write a book that readers with little or no interest in classical music would find interesting and instructive. That’s when they embarked on a collaboration that eventually resulted in “The Ignorant Maestro.”

Its primary argument is that the best orchestra conductors are perfect models for enlightened leadership everywhere because they bring a precise measure of “ignorance” to the task. That is, they are not only open to learning something new, but must, in collaboration with the people he or she rely on, do so in order to complete any new task in the best possible manner.

Talgam’s TED Talk, for example, shows Leonard Bernstein conducting only with his face – expressions, gestures, lifts of the eyebrow, closing of the eyes, etc. – leaving room for plenty of contribution and interpretation from his players.

The book, like the TED Talk, is full of funny lines, which is one of the reasons the video is so popular, and one of the reasons his speeches are in demand all over the world. He has consulted for the United Nations, the Israeli Defense Force, international banks, nonprofits, health care conglomerates, universities, and even spy networks.

The book’s publisher is Portfolio/Penguin, a subsidiary of Random House. From the dust jacket: “Choosing ignorance might seem a terrible quality to exhibit in your workplace—a sure path down the stairs and out the corporate door. But stick with me here and see how it leads you upward. You’ll understand why great leaders embrace ignorance and use it to elevate their people to new heights of achievement.”

As always with the Books & Bagels programs, there will be refreshments and a chance to meet the author. No reservations are needed.

For more information, contact the CBSRZ office 860-526-8920 or visit www.cbsrz.org. Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.

World Renowned Singers Pittsinger, Schumann to Star in Ivoryton’s ‘South Pacific’

David Pittsinger

David Pittsinger

IVORYTON —  Ivoryton Playhouse announced yesterday that world renowned American bass-baritone David Pittsinger* will be revisiting the role of Emile deBecque – the role he played in the Lincoln Center production to great critical acclaim – in the July production of South Pacific at the Ivoryton Playhouse.

Peter Marks of the Washington Post wrote of his performance’ “That quadruple bassoon of a voice interpreting the Richard Rodgers melodies – among the most melting ever composed for the theater – is all the seduction that you or Nellie need. Somehow, the effortlessness of Pittsinger’s technique helps in the illusion that the great romance at the core of “South Pacific” truly is operatic in scope.

Mr. Pittsinger is a stage performer of the greatest distinction.  Having appeared on the world’s leading opera and concert stages in Vienna, Salzburg, Brussels, Paris, Tanglewood, Pesaro, New York, Santa Fe, Cincinnati, Los Angeles and San Francisco, he is equally at home in baroque through contemporary operas, as well as musical theater.

Patricia Schumann

Patricia Schumann

He will be joined by his wife, internationally celebrated soprano Patricia Schuman*, who will also be making her Ivoryton Playhouse debut, as Bloody Mary. A performer of great breadth, Ms. Schuman began her career with the great Mozart repertoire, performing Donna Elvira (Don Giovanni) and Contessa Almaviva (Le nozze di Figaro) at the Metropolitan Opera and has performed at most of the great opera houses throughout Europe and the United States.

David and Patricia made their home in Essex almost 20 years ago, and even though their work in the opera world has them travelling all over the world, they both feel a special connection to Connecticut shoreline. David, who grew up in Clinton and attended the University of Connecticut and Yale, is thrilled to be giving back to his community and the Playhouse is honored to welcome both of them to the historic Ivoryton stage.

South Pacific opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on July 1 and runs through July 26. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m.  Additional matinee performances are at 2 p.m. on Thursday, July 16, Saturday, July 18, and Saturday, July 25.  Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.  There is no performance on Saturday, July 4.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.)

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

See Madhatters “Seussical” in Chester Tonight

Performing in 'Seussical' are Jalen Moody of New London as Horton the Elephant, Hannah Schwartzman of Deep River as JoJo and Erin Lynch of Middletown as the Cat in the Hat.

Performing in ‘Seussical’ are Jalen Moody of New London as Horton the Elephant, Hannah Schwartzman of Deep River as JoJo and Erin Lynch of Middletown as the Cat in the Hat.

CHESTER — Madhatters Theatre Company presents ‘Seussical’ at Chester Meeting House, 4 Liberty St., in Chester Conn,.  Performances are Friday, May 15, at 7 p.m.Saturday, May 16, 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. and Sunday, May 17, at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $20 adults and $15 children 12 and under.  To reserve tickets please call (860) 395-1861 or e-mail madhattersctc@aol.com.  This production is a fundraiser for ‘Willys friends’.
Further information available at: www.ctkidsonstage.com/madhatterstheatrecompany

Essex Corinthian YC Explores “Teaching Life Lessons & Character Through Sailing,” May 31

arctic_tern_sailboat

ESSEX — For more than 100 years, the United States Coast Guard Academy (CGA) has consistently developed exceptional leaders of character who are Semper Paratus (Always Ready) to perform courageously in any conditions of the maritime environment.

Coast Guard Lieutenant Commander Zeke Lyons, one of the Officers in Charge in the Coast Guard Academy’s Coastal Sailing Program, will visit the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club on Sunday, May 31, at 4 p.m. to reflect on three years of adventure and guiding experiential learning with CGA cadet crews during summer cruises throughout New England on board the Academy’s fleet of eight custom designed Leadership 44 sloops.

Lt. Cmdr Lyons is completing a three year assignment as a Company Officer on the Academy’s staff.  In addition to sailing each summer as part of the Coastal Sailing Program, he was also an Instructor of Organizational Behavior and Leadership in the Management Department.

Prior to his assignment at the Coast Guard Academy, he graduated from the Eisenhower Leadership Development Program at the United States Military Academy at West Point in conjunction with Columbia Teacher’s College in New York City.

Lt. Cmdr Lyons will combine humor and insights about the CGA experience to shed light on how the Academy develops leaders of character and his talk will highlight why, as Vice Admiral James Pine said, “The sea has, though the ages, been of all schools, the best for bringing out the qualities of leadership.”

This talk is open to the public but space is limited.   Contact the club’s office at 860-767-3239 or ecyc@essexcorithian.orgto reserve space.  There will be an informal reception following the talk.

The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 9 Novelty Lane in Essex.   For more information about the Club, visitwww.essexcorinthian.org

St. John’s in Essex Designates Today as ‘Memorial Sunday’ with Special Services

ESSEX — This year Sunday, May 17, has been designated as “Memorial Sunday” at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Essex. At all three services on that day at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m., the congregation will remember through special prayers and music those who have lost their lives in service.

For that day the church has called upon its veterans and their families to participate in many of the roles traditionally filled by members of the congregation–as greeters, ushers, acolytes, servers, chalicebearers, flagbearers, and those leading the prayers.

Area veterans are invited to join the service. A reception will follow the services in the parish hall.

Because the national Memorial weekend coincides with the Church Feast of Pentecost, St. John’s Memorial Sunday services are scheduled on May 17 this year. These special services are part of the Ministry to Veterans, Active Military and Their Families, which was begun last year at the Church.

Space Reservations Open for Annual August Flea Market at Deep River Congregational Church 

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Congregational Church is already preparing for its annual Flea Market and Rummage Sale which will be held on during the third weekend of August.   The Aug. 15 Flea Market is held on Marvin Field and on the grounds around the church.

The 20 x 20 foot spaces are available for $30 and can be reserved by contacting the church office for a reservation form and map at 860-526-5045 or office.drcc@snet.net or forms can be downloaded from the church web site at www.deeprivercc.org

Letter to the Editor: A Note of Thanks From Essex Garden Club

To the Editor:

On Saturday May 9th in Town Park the Essex Garden Club held its 63rd May Market.  The Silent Auction Committee of May Market would like to thank our area merchants, friends and artists for the incredible generosity they showed in supporting this year’s Silent Auction.

As May Market is the Club’s only fund-raiser, we depend on its proceeds to support our civic projects in Essex Village, Centerbrook and Ivoryton.  These range from helping to maintain the town parks, to providing scholarships to college students and camperships to elementary students, planting trees in town, organizing horticultural activities with elementary and junior high school students and decorating throughout town with greens for the holidays.

The Essex Garden Club would like to thank the following merchants, friends and artists most sincerely for their wonderful donations to the Silent Auction:

Acer Gardens, Aegean Treasures, Ashleigh’s Garden, Bartlett Tree Experts, Bob’s Centerbrook Package Store, The Cheese Shop of Centerbrook, The Copper Beech Inn, Cottage Whimsey, De Paula Jewelers, English Accents Antiques, Essex Winter Series, Goodspeed Musicals, Haystacks, Hortus Perennials, The Ivoryton Playhouse, Marily MacKinnon Interior Design, John & Wendy Madsen, Mimi Merton, Charlotte Meyer Designs, Musical Masterworks, New Earth Acupuncture, One North Main, Augie Pampel, A Pocketful of Posies, Pough Interiors, Mark Pratt, Saybrook Country Barn, Eileen Taylor, That’s the Spirit, Walker-Loden, Weekend Kitchen, and Weltner’s Antiques and Art.

With thanks.

Sincerely,

Dawn Boulanger, Alyson Danyliw, Genie Devine, Marily MacKinnon

The Essex Garden Club
May Market Silent Auction Committee

Essex Library Features Art Exhibit by Andrew Teran During June

Artwork by Andrew Teran

Artwork by Andrew Teran

ESSEX — An art exhibit will be held at the Essex Library Association through the month of June featuring guest artist, Andrew Teran of Essex.

Essex resident Andrew Teran attended Parson’s School of Design in the late 1970s, studying graphic design and then wood sculpture.  His working career focused on high-end carpentry and restoration for many years. As a second career, Andrew worked in construction & corporate sales for 15 years. Now retired from corporate life he has turned his focus back to art, his first love.  He has recently moved to the area to be on the Connecticut River and spend more time in his art studio.

He has always been fascinated by graphic shapes; triangles & hearts are favorites, by far. He finds that the triangle is the perfect shape- yet variations in size, shape, structure create totally different and beautiful dynamics.

In addition to graphic shapes, or in combination with them, he has a love for modern packaging labels and regularly finds that they create strong visual and sometimes literal statements when incorporated in a piece.  The pop art feel and look of modern packaging labels catches his interest everywhere he goes. Collage pulls him to combine visual elements and textures that build a richness he never tires of creating.

The exhibit is free and open to the public during the library’s open hours. The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex, CT. Call (860) 767-1560 for more information.

Exhibition by Chester’s Leif Nilsson Currently on Show in Colinsville

The Studio with Poppies, oil, 30" x 40" , Leif Nilsson spring 2002 ©

The Studio with Poppies, oil, 30″ x 40″, Leif Nilsson spring 2002 ©

CHESTER — Gallery 526 at 20 Depot St. in Collinsville, CT is hosting a one-man-show by Leif Nilsson of Chester featuring 24 garden and Connecticut River paintings.

Leif (pronounced Layf) Nilsson comments, “This exhibition represents an autobiographical pictorial chronology of my process of painting and developing my gardens and understanding the Connecticut River over the past 28 years.”

Inspired by the natural beauty surrounding the Lower Connecticut River Valley, Nilsson paints his plein air impressionistic landscape compositions directly from life. Setting up his easel in and around his hometown of Chester, Nilsson creates engaging garden, Connecticut River and village paintings that invite the viewer to walk right in.

Some of the paintings are completed ala prima, meaning all at once, while others may take several sittings at the same time of day to achieve the correct harmonious atmosphere as he observes it. Generally, heavily textured paintings have more layers applied in an effort to represent the scintillating effects of light in nature over a period of time. Nilsson’s brushwork is a result of his dedication to observing nature.

Nilsson completed a full curriculum of Classical Studies at the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts in Old Lyme, Conn. He enhanced that education with several sojourns to Scandinavia, Asia Minor and Europe where he studied the French 19th and early 20th century painters; Bonnard and Monet for color; Pissarro and Vuillard for composition and Van Gogh for energy.

A successful working artist for over 20 years, Nilsson continues to exhibit his paintings in several galleries throughout the United States, while also promoting his work through his website, and at the Leif Nilsson Spring Street Studio and Gallery, LLC in Chester where collectors visit him regularly to view and purchase his latest works. The studio is open on weekend afternoons from noon to 6 p.m. and other times by chance or appointment. Six times a year he hosts a gallery opening reception for his newest works along with other galleries in Chester. He also teaches painting to children and adults and gives lectures at high schools, universities, art clubs, and museums.

Nilsson has hand-made most of his Florentine style, metal leafed, finished corner frames in his studio. The soft luminous gold tone complements his paintings without overwhelming them. Now he orders them from reputable framemakers and assists collectors with their choices.

Limited Edition Fine Art Prints have been made of several of Nilsson’s original oil paintings and these will be available at the gallery.

Nilsson paints outdoors in all types of weather. He will often paint the same place over and over again, trying out different compositions and sizes at various times of day and in all seasons. These paintings often result in a series of works attempting to describe the many moods of nature on a particular subject.

Chester is a favorite subject of Leif Nilsson’s. Its uniqueness and charm have captivated his imagination for years. He has painted many scenes of Chester Center in different times of day, weather conditions and seasons. The vernacular architecture of old crooked buildings lining the curved piazza of Main Street come alive in his colorful paintings of the village in springtime with Rhododendrons in full bloom. Winter is a favorite time of year for him when the town is blanketed with virgin snow, especially at dusk when snowflakes swirl around the glowing lamppost in front of his studio.

The Connecticut River as seen from its banks in Chester to Old Lyme offers a wealth of pictorial opportunities for Nilsson to explore. From the hazy dawn of Eustasia Island in Deep River to the quiet harbors of Old Saybrook’s North Cove and from the golden marshes of Chester to the sweeping meadow of Pettipaug in Essex, there’s plenty of material to keep a landscape painter busy yearlong.

On spring mornings Nilsson is usually busy in his backyard garden tracking the sunlight with a loaded brush or knife revealing the rich colors and textures of the plants and flowers he has cultivated.

Occasionally Nilsson travels abroad to interesting European villages. His little paintings of Prague in the Czech Republic, Casares, Spain and Nova Scotia, Canada from recent trips are also favorites among his collectors. His most recent painting trip was to Cinque Terra in Italy where he produced several gems.

One of his favorite pastimes is to play the banjo. His new band “Arrowhead” will be playing at the opening reception.

For more information, visit http://www.nilssonstudio.com or http://www.gallery526.com or call 860-709-0987. Gallery 526 is open Thursday & Friday 12 – 5pm, Saturday & Sunday 12 – 6 pm, and other times by chance or appointment.

Memory Care Community at Saybrook at Haddam Dedicated to Helen Shulz

The family of Helen Shultz of Old Saybrook gathered at The Saybrook at Haddam for the unveiling of the personalized plaque to commemorate her position as Safe Harbor’s first memory care resident.  Pictured here next to the plaque, left to right, are: Dan Sullivan, Richard Shultz, Judy Sullivan, Peter Sullivan, Bob Shultz, and Matthew Shultz. Two of Helen’s sons, John Schultz of Staten Island, N.Y., and Mark Shultz of Mequon, Wis., were unable to attend.

The family of Helen Shultz of Old Saybrook gathered at The Saybrook at Haddam for the unveiling of the personalized plaque to commemorate her position as Safe Harbor’s first memory care resident.  Pictured here next to the plaque, left to right, are: Dan Sullivan, Richard Shultz, Judy Sullivan, Peter Sullivan, Bob Shultz, and Matthew Shultz. Two of Helen’s sons, John Schultz of Staten Island, N.Y., and Mark Shultz of Mequon, Wis., were unable to attend.

HADDAM – The Saybrook at Haddam has dedicated its Safe Harbor neighborhood to its very first memory care resident, Helen Shultz of Old Saybrook, who lived at the specialized community throughout its inaugural year.  Members of the Shultz family joined the retirement community at a brief ceremony on May 6 to unveil a personalized plaque placed in Safe Harbor in honor of Helen’s memory.

Helen’s children attended the ceremony with their families.  Her daughter, Judy Sullivan, who is executive director of the Old Saybrook Chamber of Commerce, was joined by husband, Dan, and son, Peter; Bob Shultz of Hudson, New Hampshire, attended with his son Matthew from Avon, Conn.; and Richard Shultz came from Norwich, Conn.

During the celebration, Helen’s children expressed their appreciation for the care she received at The Saybrook at Haddam – and for the tremendous support the community offered their own families.

“When a loved one suffers from a memory illness, the family is forced into quite a learning curve,” Judy Sullivan said.  “The entire team at The Saybrook at Haddam walked us through that process, helping us understand Mom’s new ‘world,’ how to have patience, and most importantly how to continue enjoying each moment we had with her.  We are indebted to this community for their care, kindness and expertise and are so honored to have Mom forever be a part of Safe Harbor.”

Helen actually moved into The Saybrook at Haddam in 2011 a few weeks before Safe Harbor was completed.  As soon as the doors officially opened, she moved over to Safe Harbor.  During this time, The Saybrook at Haddam was working to build awareness of its unique and personalized approach to helping those suffering from Alzheimer’s, dementia and other memory-related illnesses, and the Shultz family was the first to put its faith and trust into this new community.

“We owe a debt to the Shultz’s as well, as they were the first to recognize and trust in our approach to memory care,” Kathy Ryan, executive director of The Saybrook at Haddam, said.  “Of course, since Helen was our only resident for a short time, she essentially had one-on-one care and really stole the hearts of our entire community. I like to say she was ‘holding court,’ because she always had a group around her listening to stories, sharing meals, and meeting her every need with lightning speed.  Although we have grown tremendously since those days, Helen helped shape the quality and personality of the community we have become.”

Staff members who cared for Helen also shared warm memories of their premier resident, talking with fondness and laughter about their experiences with her.  They enjoyed her “no-nonsense” style, which likely was a result of the 40 years Helen worked as owner of the successful Shultz Appliance and TV retail shop in Old Saybrook.
Staff appreciated her real sense of family and knew they had made an impact when Helen began treating Safe Harbor like her home.  This was considered a milestone since Helen’s home in Old Saybrook was immensely important to her as the epi-center of very large family holidays, gatherings and memories.
“Safe Harbor really did become her home, and for us that was the true blessing,” Sullivan said.  “If there was a silver lining in Mom’s illness, it was getting to know everyone at The Saybrook at Haddam.  This plaque forever memorialized our connection to this community, and reinforces our hopes that other families find solace and reassurance here as they navigate through the difficult maze of memory loss.”
Editor’s Note: The Saybrook at Haddam (www.thesaybrookathaddam.com) is one of the region’s premier assisted living, retirement, and memory care communities; it offers 106 apartments for individuals or couples.  The manor is located in Haddam, Conn., with proximity to major highways, medical services, restaurants and entertainment venues.  Private tours are being scheduled, and applications for residence are available by calling 860-345-3779.

Essex Land Trust Leads Birding, Nature Walk Today at Essex Meadows

Essex Meadows Walk

ESSEX — Explore the beautiful Essex Meadows grounds and the adjoining section of the new Preserve in an approximately one-hour walk on Saturday, May 16, led by Essex Land Trust President and birder Jim Denham.  Meet at 9 a.m. at Essex Meadows, 30 Bokum Rd.

The timing coincides with the peak of bird migration and breeding season, so expect to see and hear many species around this very diverse landscape.

All levels of knowledge are welcome. Easy to moderate walking on trails.

Cookies and refreshments provided at the conclusion of walk, courtesy of Essex Meadows.

Bad weather cancels.

Celebrated Pianist Dalia Lazar Plays Beethoven at CBSRZ, May 31

Pianist Dalia Lazar

Pianist Dalia Lazar will play Beethoven at CBSRZ.

CHESTER — The celebrated classical pianist Dalia Lazar returns to Chester May 31 at 5 p.m. at Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ). She will play a variety of Beethoven’s piano works, including the “Moonlight Sonata” and the “Pathetique.”

The first time she played for in Chester several years ago, the audience was wowed by her performance and her charm. The Music & More series didn’t expect to be able to lure her back so soon. But Miriam Gardner-Frum, producer of the program, revealed how this unexpected event came to be, and took form over the last few months.

“Dalia offered us a gift. She explained that she is starting an all-Beethoven program in Europe this fall and would love to perform it before a live audience at CBSRZ before going to Europe.  She noted the beautiful space and acoustics in our building in which she would love to play again. She offered to do this performance as benefit for the synagogue.”

Born in Croatia, Dalia began studying piano at an early age. Her first piano teacher recognized her uncommon talent and pianistic ability, and at the age of 16 she was admitted to Moscow’s P.I. Tchaikovsky Conservatory.  During her studies in Moscow, Lazar performed throughout Soviet Union. Immediately after her graduation at the Moscow Conservatory, Lazar decided to continue her career in New York and London where she studied with Karl Urlich Schnabel and Maria Curcio.

As a finalist in New York Concert Artist Guild Competition, Lazar made her New York debut at Rubenstein Hall, followed by her Carnegie Recital Hall debut later that year. Since then she has performed a broad repertoire as a soloist in concerts and recitals worldwide, including the United States, Russia, Venezuela, Israel, Switzerland, Croatia, Mexico and Romania.

Her chamber music repertoire includes the works for violin and piano duo and piano trio, which she performed extensively with her late husband, violinist Lucian Lazar.  Her recent CD includes works by Schumann and Chopin.

Dalia’s playing has been well received by critics, who have characterized her performance as “such noble playing,” (Yediot Achronot, Tel Aviv),  “un sentimento profundo” (Panorama, Venezuela), “that rare combination of charisma, personality and terrific pianistic facility” (pianist Tzimon Barto), and “… an inspiring display of musical excellence”  (Daily Republic).

Tickets for the general public are $25 and children under 16 are admitted without charge (this is a great time to introduce children to the work of a world-class musician.) To order advance tickets, call the CBSRZ office at 860.526.8920, or buy tickets at the door.

CBSRZ is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.

Chester Synagogue to Host Rare Discussion of Jewish Organizations Response to Palestinian BDS Movement

CHESTER — Since 2005, Palestinian organizations have increasingly called for worldwide support for a movement to boycott, divest from and sanction (BDS) Israel.  Although this movement has gained some support in the United States, particularly on university campuses, it has also engendered sharp responses from American Jewish organizations – so sharp that they have consistently refused to appear on the same program as Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP), an organization which supports the BDS movement, to avoid providing any air of legitimacy to JVP and the BDS discussion.

On Saturday, May 30, from 1 to 4 p.m., Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ) in Chester will host representatives of two American Jewish organizations with opposing views on BDS – J Street and Jewish Voice for Peace.  In a forum titled “Can We Talk – BDS, the Jewish Response and Anti-Semitism,” the role of BDS in the Middle East peace process will be explored.

Speaking in favor of the BDS movement will be Robert Gelbach, co-chair of the New Haven chapter of Jewish Voice for Peace, co-convener of the Connecticut BDS coalition, and retired professor of political science from Southern Connecticut State University.  Learn more about JVP at jewishvoiceforpeace.org.

Speaking against the BDS movement will be Shaina Wasserman, New England Regional Director for J Street, a Jewish organization which describes itself as “the political home for pro-Israel, pro-peace Americans.”  Learn more about J Street at jstreet.org.

Audience questions will be highlighted, and there will be time for audience opinions as well.

Andy Schatz, chair of the Social Action Committee of CBSRZ, which is sponsoring the forum, stressed the significance of this discussion not only because of what it may clarify about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but also for what it says about the Jewish community in the U.S.  “We think it is critical for Jewish communities and organizations to discuss openly these tough and uncomfortable issues to reach better solutions, and we are grateful for J Street for being willing to discuss the issue directly with JVP, which the other organizations we invited continued to refuse.”

He continues, “This discussion is another in the CBSRZ’ series of forums ‘celebrating diversity,’ as we think diversity of opinion within the American Jewish community is critical not only to reach those better solutions but to make clear American Jews are not some monolithic body but millions of people with oft-divergent views on issues large and small.”

Schatz noted that some of the topics likely to be discussed include:

  • Is boycott, divestment or sanction ever appropriate against democratic countries, and is any different standard appropriate as to Israel?
  • Can the BDS movement play a legitimate or positive role in the peace process in the Middle East?
  • Is the BDS movement inconsistent with support for Israel, a Jewish state, or a two-state solution?
  • Are boycotts, divestments or sanctions, which impact people and not just governments, inconsistent with religious values?
  • Is anti-Semitism increased by the BDS movement and/or by the refusal of most Jewish organizations to address it?
  • What should be the role of the American Jewish community and organizations in the debate over Israel’s future?

CBSRZ is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.  There is no charge for this event, but to ensure adequate seating, register by sending an email to the CBSRZ office (bethshalom@snet.net) or calling 860-526-8920.   Light refreshments will be provided.

Friends of Essex Library Host Annual Spring Sale This Weekend

DSCF4628

Pictured above are Dee Grover, Nancy Gould, Peggy Tuttle, and Joan Weingardt preparing for the Friends of Essex Library Spring Sale to be held at Essex Library, May 16 and 17.

The Friends of Essex Library will hold a Spring Book Sale at the library at 33 West Avenue in Essex.  The annual sale will provide funds for numerous special library programs and activities. Proceeds from previous sales recently enabled the Friends to purchase new sliding doors at the main entrance to the library.

Dates for the Sale are Saturday, May 16, from 10 to 4 p.m. and Sunday, May 17, from 1 to 4 p.m. when all items will be half-priced.

The sale will include current and classical books of fiction, as well as large selections of non-fiction featuring books on gardening, history, literature, art, travel, philosophy, science, nature, sports, self-help and foreign languages.  Always popular is the selection of books on CD’s.

Diligent volunteers spend hours carefully sorting through stacks of books, CD’s, and DVD’s to ensure that only good quality items are placed in the sale. 

The annual sale will provide funds to support the library’s special programs and activities.  Proceeds from previous sales made possible the installation of new sliding doors at the main entrance.

Specific information about the sale, including signed books and titles offered in the various categories, will be on the Essex Library website: www.youressexlibrary.org.  Click on “Friends” and the “Book Sale” page.

On book-sale Saturday, library materials can be checked in and out from 10am to 4pm, but computers in the adult section will not be available for use.  There will be no library services on Sunday, when all book-sale items will be half price.

Marshview Gallery Features Art of Anita Price During May

OLD SAYBROOK — The Marshview Gallery features the watercolor and oil paintings of Anita Price during the month of May.  Price obtains her inspiration from New England’s beautiful homes and gardens as well as its unique shoreline. European travel has also inspired her.

A resident of Mystic, Price holds a degree in fine arts and is always studying and experimenting.  Her work can be seen in shows and galleries along the Shoreline.

The Marshview Gallery at the Estuary Council, 220 Main Street in Old Saybrook is open daily, Monday through Friday from 8 am to 4 pm, and on Saturdays from 8 am – 12 noon.

Essex Celebrates “Burning of the Ships,” A Major American Defeat in the War of 1812

The “Sailing Masters of 1812” of Essex lead the parade.

The “Sailing Masters of 1812” of Essex lead the parade.  All photos by Jerome Wilson.

ESSEX — In the darkness of 3 a.m. on the morning of April 8, 1814, British troops attacked and burned 27 American ships in Essex, both on land and in the harbor.

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman was on hand early in the parade.

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman was on hand early in the parade.

Essex at the time was a major builder of ships, which the British apparently knew, when they planned their attack.

A color guard on parade.

A color guard on parade.

The British attack on the Town of Essex caught Essex residents totally by surprise, to the degree that not a single Essex resident fired a shot as the British burned their ships.

Beating drums and playing fifes.

Beating drums and playing fifes.

However, when daylight came, as the British ship burners were making their way back down the Connecticut River, Americans started firing at the British from the the shore of the river, and at least two of the attackers were killed.

This fife and drum corps dates its ancestry back to 1787.

This fife and drum corps dates its ancestry back to 1787.

Fast forward to modern times and for the past 48 years, the Sailing Masters of 1812 have commemorated the “Burning of the Ships” with a parade down Essex’s Main Street. True to form, they were at it again this year last Saturday, May 9.

Some wore light blue ...

Some wore light blue …

Over 15 marching fife and drum corps participated in this year’s “Burning of the Ships” parade.

... while others went barefoot!

… while others went barefoot!

It must be noted, however, that some in Essex, who take the liberty of adding more than a grain of truth, call the event the “Loser’s Day” parade.

There were also some women marching in the parade.

There were also some women marching in the parade.

On and on the fife and drum corps came ...

On and on the fife and drum corps came …

This little boy’s “Mama” was playing in the band ahead of him in the parade.

This little boy’s “Mama” was playing in the band ahead of him.

This band of bagpipers added a Scottish element  to the parade.

This band of bagpipers added a Scottish element to the parade.

On and came the marchers in the (almost) never-ending parade!

On and came the marchers in the (almost) never-ending parade!

Perennially Popular ‘Celtic Tenors’ Perform at ‘The Kate’ Tomorrow

The Celtic Tenors perform at the Katharine Hepburn Theater on Wednesday.

The Celtic Tenors perform at the Katharine Hepburn Theater on Wednesday.

OLD SAYBROOK — The Celtic Tenors — a three-man vocal group comprising Matthew Gilsenan, James Nelson and Daryl Simpson — are back! Direct from Ireland, they will be performing favorite Irish and popular tunes on Wednesday, May 13, at The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center at 7:30 p.m.

The trio has been weaving together an eclectic repertoire of Celtic, operatic and popular songs for audiences worldwide since 2000.  What began as three talented friends gathering on the operatic stage has become an international and touring sensation that transcends the trio’s classical roots and embraces folk, pop and various other dimensions of musical genres.

Whether playing a neighborhood cathedral or major concert halls in international cities like New York, Amsterdam or Shanghai, you are assured of a professional, sparkling and most of all, good humored performance. Their range extends from beautiful Celtic songs like the haunting Danny Boy to exhilarating opera classics like Nessun Dorma.

The group was signed this summer to Decca/Universal Records and is currently in the studio recording a new album being produced by Charles Fisher, an award winning producer of hits in Australia and overseas for decades, with 12 Australian Record Industry Association (ARIA) Awards to his name, including a Special Achievement for his Lifetime Contribution to Australian Music. His credits include Savage Garden, The Hoodoo Gurus, Olivia Newton-John and many more.

The Celtic Tenors last CD release, Feels Like Home, celebrated the uplifting music of Ireland, Scotland , England and Wales , while borrowing a few songs from other cultures along the way. “We cross a lot of borders when we travel, but we find that people all over the world are similar in many ways. Almost everyone is open to good music and an uplifting message. We have so many great fans around the globe,” says James Nelson.

For tickets, call 860 510 0473 or visit www.thekate.org for tickets.

For more information on the Celtic Tenors, visit www.celtic-tenors.com

Corinthian YC Hosts Leukemia Cup Regatta Kick-Off Celebration Tonight, All Welcome

ESSEX — Set sail to save lives with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is proud to join Duck Island Yacht Club, North Cove Yacht Club and Brewer Pilot’s Point Marina in supporting the 2015 Leukemia Cup Regatta. The Connecticut Westchester Hudson Valley Chapter of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) has elected to hold its annual Leukemia Cup Regatta Kickoff Celebration once again at the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club, located at 9 Novelty Ln. in Essex, Conn.

This year’s kick-off celebration will be held on Tuesday, May 12, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Come enjoy drinks, hors d’oeuvres and prizes, meet the 2015 Honored Skipper Devon Marcinko, and enjoy a fascinating presentation by Gary Jobson, while celebrating the launch of the 2015 regatta season and the countdown to Leukemia Cup 2015, to be held on Aug. 29.

The Leukemia Cup Regatta is a great way to combine the joy of sailing and raising funds for the lifesaving programs of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Sailors who enter their boats in the regatta are eligible to win terrific prizes, including a chance to participate in the Fantasy Sail in Bermuda in late October with Gary Jobson, National Leukemia Cup Chairman, world-renowned America’s Cup sailor and sports commentator.

Jobson became chairman in 1993, and 10 years later, was diagnosed with lymphoma. In his own words he “became a beneficiary of the research advances I had helped support”, and is cancer-free today. He continues to travel extensively supporting LLS events throughout the country.

The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is pleased to welcome him back for the Leukemia Cup Kick-Off Celebration this evening, Tuesday, May 12.

The Leukemia Cup Regatta is an important event in support of blood cancer research, as well as all related areas of assistance for patients and their families. The Kick-Off Celebration is open to the public: everyone, no matter whether you are a sailor or not, is invited to attend and find out more on how to help support the lifesaving work of LLS.

For more information and to purchase tickets to the 2015 Leukemia Cup Kick-Off celebration on May 12 hosted by the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club, to register for the Leukemia Cup Regatta on August 29, or to purchase post-race party tickets, visit: www.leukemiacup.org/ct, contact Christine Schuff at christine.schuff@lls.org or call (914) 821-8969.

For information on becoming a sponsor of the Leukemia Cup, visit the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club website or email ecyc@essexcorinthian.org.

RiverQuest Teams up with Old Saybrook Boy Scout Troop for Selden Island Clean-up

With the backdrop of the Goodspeed Opera House, the Old Saybrook Scouts gather for a photo to display the fruist of their labors after their trash pick-up efforts on Selden Island.

With the backdrop of the Goodspeed Opera House, the Old Saybrook Scouts gather for a photo to display the fruist of their labors after their trash pick-up efforts on Selden Island.

HADDAM/OLD SAYBROOK — It was a sunny, warm day with a little breeze.  The Connecticut River was inviting as always in the eyes of Captain Mark and Mindy Yuknat, the owners of the eco-tourism vessel RiverQuest.

On Saturday, May 2, they invited Boy Scout Troop 51 from Old Saybrook to help with what they hope to become an annual event called, “The 1st Annual Selden Island Clean-up.”

For years Captain Mark has been navigating the Connecticut River.  RiverQuest offers guided tours throughout the year, educating the public about the river and its rich history, wildlife (eagles and ospreys), flora and fauna.  On this day RiverQuest was bringing the Scouts, leaders and volunteers out to Selden Island for a clean-up and a campout.

These Boy Scouts are hard at work on Selden Island.

These Boy Scouts are hard at work on Selden Island.

With the help of the CT DEEP staff located at Gillette Castle, they acquired a camping permit and plenty of trash bags.  Phil Yuris, the park maintainer, was excited to help.  He was very grateful for all the work that was done by the group and hopes that more groups will get involved in the future. As he had hoped, it was a very positive experience for all.

Scoutmaster Dan Sullivan had originally presented the “clean-up” idea to the boys and they were very enthusiastic.

“What a great experience this was, not only for the 16 Scouts, but, also for the four accompanying adults as well. “ Sullivan said, “This was a very different trip for us and all the boys walked away with a very positive experience.  I believe every one of them will take away a new appreciation of the motto “Leave No Trace” and leave everything better than they found it.”

He continued, “We were also able to have all the boys work on earning two merit badges over the weekend, Bird Study and Nature, thanks to  John Ogren from the Old Saybrook Land Trust.  These lessons along with the Clean-up effort hopefully will foster a lifelong appreciation of our environment.”

On Sunday, with about enough trash to fill a pickup truck, they headed back to RiverQuest’s berth at Eagle Landing State Park.  Mindy Yuknat stated, “The Connecticut River starts in a beaver pond in New Hampshire near the Canadian border.  It is cleaner than it ever has been, but there is always room for improvement.  It is amazing how much debris and trash is deposited on the river banks. “

Captain Mark said, “It was a fun weekend and we are already talking about another trip this year.  We hope to get more Scout troops and other groups involved and we hope to get better equipment to help us remove and transport larger items like tires.”

For more information about Selden Neck State Park, visit http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?a=2716&q=435364&deepNav_GID=1650.

For more information about Old Saybrook BSA Troop 51, visit http://www.ostroop51.org

For more information about RiverQuest, visit http://ctriverquest.com/

For more information about Mark Yuknat, visit captainmark@ctriverquest.com or call 860-662-0577.

First Congregational Church of Essex Sponsors May Breakfast Today

CAUTION! MEN COOKING. The men of The First Congregational Church in Essex will do all the cooking for the church's annual May Breakfast on May 9. Chefs hard at work at last year's breakfast are (l to r) Pat Callahan of Essex, Mark Foster of Ivoryton, and John Bogaert and Alan Macgregor, both of Essex.

CAUTION! MEN COOKING. The men of The First Congregational Church in Essex will do all the cooking for the church’s annual May Breakfast on May 9. Chefs hard at work at last year’s breakfast are (l to r) Pat Callahan of Essex, Mark Foster of Ivoryton, and John Bogaert and Alan Macgregor, both of Essex.

(Essex, CT)— On the day of the May Market in Essex Village, The First Congregational Church in Essex, UCC, is sponsoring a May Breakfast on Saturday, May 9, from 6:30 to 10:00 a.m. in Fellowship Hall of the Church, 6 Methodist Hill in Essex. The breakfast is a tradition that dates back nearly one hundred years at the church. Proceeds benefit the Essex Community Fund, as well as the missions of the church

A complete breakfast will be prepared and served by members and friends of the Church. The menu includes pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, oatmeal, coffee, tea, juice and homemade muffins.

There will be a selection of “May Baskets” up for bid or outright purchase, including a Mother’s Day Basket, Italian Dinner Basket, Breakfast/Kitchen Basket and Gardener’s Basket, among others.

The cost is $7.00 for adults and $3.00 for children under 12. Tickets are available at the door.

For more information, call the Church Office at 767-8097.

Chiara String Quartet Perform in Chester Tomorrow

Chiara 2. Photo by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco.

Chiara String Quartet. Photo by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco.

CHESTER — The Robbie Collomore Concert Series brings the award-winning Chiara String Quartet to the Chester Meeting House on Sunday, May 10, at 5 p.m. This will be the last concert of the Collomore Series’ 41st season.

The Chiara Quartet (Rebecca Fischer and Hyeyung Julie Yoon, violins; Jonah Sirota, viola; Gregory Beaver, cello) has established itself as among America’s most respected ensembles, lauded for its “highly virtuosic, edge-of-the-seat playing” (The Boston Globe). They are currently Hixson-Lied Artists-in-Residence at the Glenn Korff School of Music at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and were the Blodgett Artists-in-Residence at Harvard University in 2008-2014.

Now in its 15th season, the Chiara Quartet is moving forward by taking a cue from the past. Harkening back to a tradition that is centuries-old and still common among soloists, the Chiara Quartet has adopted a new way of performing: from memory, without printed sheet music. After spending countless hours working towards playing their repertoire from memory, they now feel that sheet music is a distraction to the performance, instead of an aid.

Their Chester concert will feature string quartets by Mozart, Bela Bartok and Brahms.
Tickets are $24 for adults, $5 for students, and can be purchased by calling 526-5162 or go to collomoreconcerts.org. A reception follows the concert. Refreshments will be provided by Gabrielle’s. The concert sponsor is Ryders Health Management.

 

Ivoryton Library Hosts Mother’s Day Sale Today

IVORYTON — The Ivoryton Library’s annual Mother’s Day Sale will be held this year on Saturday, May 9, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Along with the popular Plant Sale out front, there will be tables of baked goods. The Used Book Sale will be downstairs.

Come early for the best selection.

There will be a Preview Sale of children’s books only downstairs in the Children’s Room on Friday, May 8 from 2 to 5 p.m.

Donations of books, DVDs, audiobooks as well as plants will be gratefully accepted anytime.  Donations of baked goods will be received, Friday, May 8, from 2 to 6 p.m. and Saturday morning.

For more information, call the library at 860-767-1252 or visit www.ivoryton.com

Essex Garden Club Hosts May Market Today

Shoppers enjoy all the attractions of Essex garden Club's May Market.

Shoppers enjoy all the attractions of Essex Garden Club’s May Market.

Preparations are well underway for this year’s Essex Garden Club’s May Market.  The Market will be held Saturday, May 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., rain or shine, in the town park located on Main Street in Essex Village.

Always popular, the Members’ Plants section of the market will offer prized perennials, ground covers, grasses, and shrubs dug and potted from the gardens of club members.  These plants, grown and locally dug, are proven winners in a microclimate and soil similar to other area gardens like yours.

There will be 300 tomato plants, including many heirloom varieties guaranteed to grow in our climate. Colorful assortments of annuals and hanging baskets will be displayed for sale.  Succulents, including Aeoniums, Crassulas, and Echeverias, plus other unusual plants have been ordered.  Knowledgeable club members will be available to assist in choosing just the right plants for containers or gardens.

Herbs and herbal gift creations will be available just in time for Mother’s Day as well as the Garden Club’s famous garlic salt, made from a closely guarded secret recipe since 1953.

The herbs are always a particular draw at the May Market.

The herbs are always a particular draw at the May Market.

Fun to browse through is the “Treasurers” section, featuring jewelry and gently used home and garden items.  Garden pieces, planters, urns, gardening equipment, as well as cook books, horticulture/gardening books, children’s items and an assortment of odds and ends can be found in this area.

“Connecticut’s Own” will again offer products made in our own state of Connecticut.  “Three Sisters” create honey, soaps, candles, lip balms, hand creams and more.  Our delicious and wonderful edibles include maple syrups, jams, marinades, pepper jellies, and fabled breads.  Look for more items to be added!

The Silent Auction tent offers many interesting and unique items for bidding, all from a select group of local merchants.  These items include tickets to performances at local theater and musical groups, antiques, garden items, wines, cheese, jewelry, art, and many other special items that will bring competitive bidding from morning until early afternoon.

The May Market Café is a welcoming gathering place to enjoy a bite to eat or a cooling/warming drink.  Choose from a varied menu including grilled hot dogs, chips, and entrees from Chef Michael of Essex Yacht Club.  Coffee and donuts will be available for the early morning shoppers.

May Market is the Garden Club’s only annual fundraising event.  Proceeds from purchases support the Club’s educational and civic improvement projects.  These funds enable the Club to beautify the landscapes of our town parks and traffic islands.  Annuals are also purchased for the Essex Town Hall, Essex Fire Department, Essex Landfill and Recycling Center, Centerbrook Post Office, Silent Policeman, and to the Ancient Order of Weeders who plant the islands on Route 154.

Importantly, May Market funds provide scholarships for high school seniors, college students, summer camperships for young students, and educational programs for Essex Elementary School and John Winthrop Middle School.

May Market is a gardener’s delight. Come and join the fun and you will undoubtedly find something beautiful for your garden or for someone special in your life.

Master Knitter Lee Gant at Essex Books This Afternoon

Love_in_every_stitchESSEX — Join Master Knitter Lee Gant at Essex Books at Gather on Saturday, May 9, from 3 to 4 p.m.

Gant is one of the top knitters in the United States and has been featured on PBS, NPR, and in many magazines. She has knitted pieces for world renowned designer Melissa Leapman and can be seen in Vogue, Knitter’s, and Knit ‘N Style.

Gant’s designs have been featured in many books, including 60 Quick Baby Knits, Knitting 2013 Day-to-Day Calendar, Jamieson’s Shetland Knitting Book 2, and Garter Stitch Baby.

She is part of a very active knitting community on social media: her Facebook page has reached 92,000 people in one week. Gant travels internationally on the knitting circuit and is a well-known authority who is also writing knitting pattern books.

In her inspiring book, Love in Every Stitch: Stories of Knitting and Healing, master knitter, teacher, and widely published knitwear designer Gant shares real-life stories about the power of knitting.

As an employee of three different yarn stores, a teacher of countless knitting classes, and a volunteer with at-risk youth, Gant has had the opportunity to gather diverse stories.

The stories Gant shares about herself and fellow knitters from around the world illustrate how each stitch and purl can comfort and calm, heal and renew. A suicidal teenager crochets through pregnancy. A dying woman finds comfort in the company of knitters. A woman finds the courage to face her estranged parents. A woman going blind realizes she can still knit — and experience life. And Gant’s life, riddled with more than just anxiety, has at last become stable and productive. This book includes stories of women, men, and teens who have experienced profound change and enlightenment through knitting and crochet.

“Another lovely story of hope and inspiration. The benefits of knitting and crocheting are seen every day. More and more people turn to these skills to help them deal with so many upheavals in life. Thank goodness we have those to fall back on when everything else seems to go against us.”
—Bouncing Back

A renowned designer and sought-after teacher, Gant is a household name among knitting enthusiasts. Holding the rank of ‘master knitter,’ she enjoys working with adults and children, as young as age eight, teaching self-empowerment through knitting. Some of her designs can be found in 60 Quick Baby Knits, in Knit Picks and Patternfish online, and at Strings and Things in Kauai. Gant’s knitting has won many first place and best-in-show awards at county fairs in northern California. Her new pattern collection for children’s knitwear will publish in the spring of 2016. She now lives in Santa Rosa, Calif., and formerly lived in Guilford, Conn.

To RSVP, call or text Susan McCann at 914-310-5824.

Stony Creek Garden Design is Library Topic, Tonight

Stony Creek Gardens

Stony Creek Garden

ESSEX — New York City Architect and local gardener Frederick Bland explores the garden he designed for his Stony Creek home on Friday, May 8, at 7 p.m. at the Essex Town Hall. In “The Making of a Garden(er), An Urbanist Architect in the Garden,” he chronicles his development as both an internationally known architect and a local horticulturalist, and the connection between the two strivings.

A partner in Beyer Blinder Belle and Chairman of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Bland’s design portfolio includes: the Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville, Kentucky, Minnesota’s St. Paul Union Depot, and the Shanghai Cultural Center in China. His Stony Creek garden was featured in the book “Private Gardens of Connecticut.”

Bland earned his Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees in architecture at Yale University, and as a Commissioner on the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission he plays an active role in shaping the future of America’s largest metropolis. An adjunct professor in the Art History Department at New York University, he also has served as a visiting lecturer at Columbia University, Yale University, and Pratt Institute.

His talk is free and part of the Centerbrook Architects Lecture Series, which is one of many programs that are offered regularly by the Essex Library (http://www.youressexlibrary.org/).

Call the library at (860) 767-1560 to register. Sponsored by Centerbrook Architects, the series is in its seventh year.

Essex Park & Rec. Announces Summer Program Schedule

Summer Camp

The Essex Park and Recreation Department has announced the following schedule of summer programs:

BUS TRIP – Lobster Bake in Gloucester & Rockport on Cape Ann

Essex Park and Recreation will be offering a bus trip to the Lobster Bake in Gloucester, on June 13. The program will cost $121 per person and includes: luxury motor coach transportation, a tour director, Lobster Bake at the Gloucester House, a visit to the Fisherman’s statue, and leisure time in Rockport at Bearskin Neck. What’s on the menu at the Gloucester House? 1 lobster, ½ chicken, or steak with corn, potato and lemonade, each prepared to perfection. Busses will depart from Madison commuter Parking Lot at 7:00AM and depart from Gloucester at 5:00PM.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.

SUMMER CAMP

Join Essex Park and Recreation for an exciting, engaging Summer Camp. Essex Park and Recreation will offer eight Summer Camp sessions, the first starting on June 22. Campers grades K-7 (fall 2015) will enjoy water games, fun gym and field activities, arts and crafts and much more. Camp meets Monday-Friday from 8:30AM-3:30PM and the registration fee is $125 per camper, with the exception of Week 2 which has a registration fee of $105.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.

SUMMER CLINIC

Tennis Essex Park and Recreation is offering a series of week long Summer Tennis Clinics with Gary Ribchinsky, starting June 22. The clinics are designed to teach the fundamentals of tennis while featuring individual, group, and age appropriate instruction. The program will focus on improving all facets of the game with an emphasis on fun and success. Registration fee is $70 and open to children ages 5-15. Sessions will meet Monday – Friday from 9 to 10 a.m. throughout the summer.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.

SUMMER CAMP-RUNNING RAMS

Essex Park and Recreation will be offering Running Rams Track and Field camp with local resident and Old Saybrook High School Track and Field Coach Pete Capezzone. The camp will feature instruction for several track and field disciplines. Each day will also include a fun activity, such as ice cream sundae night, pizza night or an awards ceremony. The program runs Monday through Friday starting June 22, from 5-8PM, at Valley Regional High School. Registration fee is $130 and open to children ages 6-15.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.

SUMMER CAMP – SLAMMA JAMMA

Essex Park and Recreation is offering Slamma Jamma Basketball Camp with Kevin Woods and VRHS Players at Valley Regional High School. The camp is focused on individual instruction and fundamentals. Children in grades K-8 (fall 2015) can participate and registration fee varies by session. Fee includes basketball, t-shirt, and certificate.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.

SUMMER CAMP – BASEBALL

Essex Park and Recreation will be offering a Baseball Camp with Jeff Riggs and Between the Lines Staff this summer from July 13-16 at Comstock Park, 9AM-1PM. The camp will help improve overall baseball skills and will be taught through drills, technique instruction and various games. Registration fee is $150 and open to children ages 6-12.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.

SUMMER CAMP – MADE IN SUMMER GIRLS’S BASKETBALL

Essex Park and Recreation will be offering a “Made in the Summer Girls Basketball Camp” with coaches Matt Mesite and Geoff Konstan. The camp is specifically focused on drills that will improve each camper’s shooting, passing, dribbling, and defense. Camp meets M-F from 5:30-8:00PM, July 13- 17 at John Winthrop Middle School. Registration Fee is $45 and open to girls in grades 5-8. Includes a Jersey for each player.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.

SUMMER CAMP– GIRL’S LACROSSE

Essex Park and Recreation is offering a Girls Lacrosse Camp with Coach Greg Ruel. The camp will run August 3-7, from 5:50-8PM at Essex Elementary School. Girls will be taught the fundamental and technical skills designed to make them all-around better players. All lacrosse equipment will be provided by the clinic except a mouth guard (all that is needed is an inexpensive one from Walmart or Target), which is mandatory to participate. The clinic will provide light dinner each night. Registration fee is $105 and open to girls ages 6-15.

For more information or registration, visit www.essexct.gov/park-and-recreation . You may also call the office at 860-767-4340 x110 or email recreation@essexct.gov.