April 28, 2015

Community Music School Hosts Free Concert by Multi-Generational Orchestra, Tuesday

CMSStringEnsemble_FullStagePhoto

Close to 50 string musicians of all ages will fill the Valley Regional High School stage for the Community Music School’s Sinfonia and String Ensemble Concert on Tuesday, April 28 at 6:30. The concert is free and open to the public.

CENTERBROOK – On Tuesday, April 28, at 6:30 p.m., nearly 50 string musicians will take the stage at Valley Regional High School in Deep River for the Community Music School’s Sinfonia and String Ensemble Concert.  Ranging in age from nine to eighty-four, members of the two multi-generational performance groups will play a variety of classical pieces, including works by Vivaldi, Bach, and Dvorak, all under the direction of Martha Herrle.  The free concert is open to the public and sponsored by the Essex Winter Series.

Both Sinfonia, a group of 10 beginning violin, viola, and cello musicians, and String Ensemble, a group of 35 intermediate to advanced players, are a rare breed of orchestra and quite possibly the only of its kind in Connecticut.   “There are many youth orchestras and many adult orchestras around the state but I am not aware of any ensembles where all ages are allowed and encouraged to participate,” stated Martha Herrle, conductor and founder of both orchestra groups.

Herle continued, “As a musician and a teacher, it is a joy to work with various ages and backgrounds, to have school-age musicians playing alongside adult members.  The String Ensemble is a very mixed bag of some very talented people  –  students, several teachers, an inventor, a physician, a veterinarian, an attorney, a pastor, even two professional opera singers – all who share the same passion for music.”

String Ensemble members come from several shoreline towns (and beyond) to rehearse together at Old Saybrook High School for 26 weeks beginning in September and ending just prior to the annual concert performance.  Compared to its modest start in 2002, with just four children and one senior adult, the orchestra’s growth is a testament to its all inclusive policy of being open to all intermediate to advanced string musicians, regardless of age and with no audition requirement.

The orchestra also serves as a great opportunity for family members to share in their musical interests and spend time together.  In fact, the current ensemble boasts three sets of mother and child musicians.  East Haddam resident Irene Haines and her 16-year old daughter Bridget is one.

“Martha has a special gift. She is able to teach, nurture and direct young, old and everyone in between with varied abilities into an amazing performance,” commented Irene Haines. “I am the luckiest mom in the world as I get to share a stand with my daughter in the viola section – what a great way to spend quality time together!”

Herle received her Bachelor of Music Education degree from Hartt College of Music, studying both violin and viola. She spent the following year studying string quartet literature at the University of Connecticut with the Laurel String Quartet. She is the founder of Goodwin Strings, a before-school group violin instructional program for 2nd and 3rd graders at Goodwin Elementary School in Old Saybrook.

She also presents the Community Music School’s weekly music program for the collaborative preschool students at Essex Elementary School and is a teaching artist for Kate’s Camp for Kids. Martha is the founder and conductor of CMS Sinfonia and CMS String Ensemble orchestras, and the Chamber Connections program.

For more information on the Sinfonia and String Ensemble Concert taking place at Valley Regional High School, located at 256 Kelsey Hill Road in Deep River, or other Community Music School events, visit www.community-music-school.org or call 860.767.0026.

The Community Music School, located at 90 Main St. in Centerbrook is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to building community through music since 1983.

Panelists “Looking Both Ways” Discuss End-of-life Issues; Free Event Today, Open to All

ESSEX – Several faith communities in the Lower Connecticut River Valley will host a free event designed to educate, encourage and explore with participants medical, legal, spiritual, relational, and memorial issues confronting each of us as we (or those we love) approach the end of our lives. The event, “Looking Both Ways: Decisions of a Lifetime” will be held on April 25, from 9 a.m. to noon at the Town Hall in Essex. Check-in  and coffee are at 8:30 a.m.

Members of the clergy, medical and legal professionals, funeral home and hospice care professionals will make presentations and allow time for questions. Panelists include The Rev. Kathy Peters, United Church of Chester; Deborah Ringen, MSN, RN-BC, Faith Community Nurse of the Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley; Melanie Cama, BSN, CHPN, Middlesex Hospital Hospice and Palliative Care; Dr. Timothy Tobin, Middlesex Hospital Primary Care, Medical Director for Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley; Sam Fulginiti, Funeral Director, Robinson Wright & Weymer Funeral Home and Jeannine Lewis, Esq., Hudson and Kilby, LLC.

Participants will receive a workbook to use as a reminder and a guide for individual work on various areas of personal decisions.

Sponsors of the event are Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, Deep River Congregational Church, First Congregational Church in Essex, UCC, First Baptist Church in Essex, Our Lady of Sorrows Church, Essex, St Joseph’s Church, Chester, United Church of Chester, Hudson and Kilby, LLC, Ivoryton Congregational Church, Robinson, Wright & Weymer Funeral Home, Middlesex Hospital Hospice & Palliative Care, Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley and Valley Shore Clergy Association.

Space at the forum is limited. Advance reservations are encouraged by calling the Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley, (860) 767-0186 or The First Congregational Church in Essex (860) 767-8097. Some walk-ins will be welcome.

CT River Museum to Fiddle the Night Away with Angelini Wines Tonight

1.Angelini Vineyards and Estate 1 – The Angelini Family vineyards are located in the timeless central region of Le Marche, Italy

The Angelini Family vineyards are located in the timeless central region of Le Marche, Italy

ESSEX — This coming Saturday, April 25 the Connecticut River Museum brings back its popular 1814 Tavern Night.  This lively 19th century evening will take place at the museum’s historic Samuel Lay House overlooking scenic Essex harbor.  The house will be transformed into a candlelit seaside tavern from the War of 1812.

The evening includes a wine tasting with Angelini Vineyards & Estate, fiddle music and drinking songs by noted folk musician Craig Edwards, tavern games, and a food pairing of early American cuisine provided by Catering by Selene.  There will also be select popular historic wines such as claret and port to sample.   Additional wine and beer will be available at the cash bar.

Craig Edwards performs a broad range of American roots music and will perform fiddle music and drinking songs at the April 25th Evening at the Lay House.

Craig Edwards performs a broad range of American roots music and will perform fiddle music and drinking songs at the April 25 evening at the Samuel Lay House.

Edwards plays a broad range of American roots music. He first began playing music as a child growing up in Staunton, Va. He majored in ethnomusicology at Wesleyan University where he studied West African drumming with Abraham Adzenyah, and traveled to Ireland, Louisiana and Nova Scotia to learn from old-timers there.

After graduating, Edwards formed a series of bands playing old-time, Irish, Cajun, Zydeco, blues and other roots styles. He worked as a staff musician at Mystic Seaport for many years and served as director of the Mystic Seaport Sea Music Festival. He now performs solo and with several groups playing a variety of genres, teaches Traditional Fiddle Styles at Wesleyan University, and designs music installations for historic music exhibits at museums.

Named a Connecticut Master Teaching Artist by the Connecticut Commission on the Arts, Edwards has won numerous fiddle and banjo contests.

Tastings take place at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m.  Space is limited and reservations are required.  Call to reserve tickets at 860-767-8269 or visit ctrivermuseum.org.  Tickets are $22 for museum members or $27 for the general public (must be 21 or older and show valid ID).  Admission includes wine tasting, light bites, and entertainment.  The evening is sponsored in part by Guilford Savings Bank.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on Mondays until Memorial Day. Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $6 for children age 6-12, free for children under 6.

For more information, call 860-767-8269 or go to www.ctrivermuseum.org

Corinthian YC Hosts Jerry Roberts Book Talk Tomorrow

British Raid
ESSEX — Local historian Jerry Roberts, former director of the Connecticut River Museum and current director of the New England Air Museum, will share his latest research and analysis of  the April 1814 British attack on Essex on Sunday, April 26, at 4 p.m., at the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club.  Roberts will discuss his account of the battle in his book, “The British Raid on Essex, The untold story of the burning of American privateers in Connecticut.”

This is the dynamic account of one of the most destructive maritime actions to take place in Connecticut history: the 1814 British attack on the privateers of Pettipaug, known today as the British Raid on Essex. During the height of the War of 1812, 136 Royal marines and sailors made their way up the Connecticut River from warships anchored in Long Island Sound. Guided by a well-paid American traitor, the British navigated the Saybrook shoals and advanced up the river under cover of darkness.

By the time it was over, the British had burned 27 American vessels, including six newly built privateers. It was the largest single maritime loss of the war. Yet this story has been virtually left out of the history books—the forgotten battle of the forgotten war. This new account from author and historian Roberts is the definitive overview of this event and includes a wealth of new information drawn from recent research and archaeological finds. Lavish illustrations and detailed maps bring the battle to life.

Reviews of Roberts’s book to date include:

“Jerry Roberts’s account, The British Raid on Essex, built on new research on both sides of the Atlantic, reads like a fast-paced action chronicle, which sheds light on a significant but forgotten attack on Connecticut soil during the War of 1812.” —Dan McFadden, Mystic Seaport Magazine

“The ‘forgotten battle of the forgotten war’ is no longer forgotten thanks to this action-packed, thoroughly researched who-dun-it of a book. Combining the sciences of history and field archaeology, Jerry Roberts has resurrected one of the most improbable and significant battles ever fought on Connecticut soil. Once you start reading, it is impossible to put down!”—Nicholas F. Bellantoni, Connecticut State Archaeologist

Join the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club as Roberts brings the battle to life literally where the actual event occurred.

Seating is limited. Reserve your space by emailing ecyc@essexcorinthian.org or calling (860) 767-3239 before April 23. The lecture is free of charge.

The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 9 Novelty Lane in Essex.

Creative Workshop to Repurpose a Cigar Box at ‘The Hammered Edge’ Tomorrow

Cigar_Box_workshiop
IVORYTON —
Local artist Lisa Fatone hosts a creative workshop titled, ‘Repurpose that Cigar Box into an Embellished Treasure Chest,’ on Sunday, April 26, from 1 to 4 p.m. at The Hammered Edge Studio & Gallery in Ivoryton.

Cigar boxes are available for $2 each, or bring your own. Fatone will have materials on hand, but bring anything sentimental you would like to incorporate into your creation. Suggested items are fabric, crystals, ribbons, feathers, photos, etc., and also bring your own glue gun, if possible.

Fatone, a graduate of the Paier College of Art and Albertus Magnus College in New Haven, CT., holds a Bachelor in Fine Art degree and  has worked as a graphic designer and studio artist since 1982.

She shares with her interpretations of what she sees in nature in several  different media including watercolor, collage, assemblage, hand-lettering, jewelry design and repurposed materials.

Admission per person is $40; prepaid by reservation only. Contact Kathryne Wright at 860-581-8058 or KathryneLWright@comcast.net to make a reservation

The Hammered Edge Studio & Gallery is located at 108 Main Street Ivoryton, CT

Essex Garden Club Holds ‘Divide & Pot’ Days in Preparation for May Market

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Pictured left to right are Barbara Burgess, Susan Perl, and Judy Saunders in back.

Essex Garden Club members have been busy digging perennial plants from their own gardens as well as from other private gardens offered for these digs.  Two Divide and Pot days are being held at Cross Lots where these plants are divided and potted attractively by our members.

May Market will be held on Saturday, May 9, from 9am to 2pm, rain or shine, in Town Park, Essex Village.  These beautiful and unique plants will be sold at that time, plus man other items.

Come and enjoy the fun!

Essex Hosts Town Budget Hearing Tonight

The Town of Essex hosts a public hearing for the fiscal year 2015-2016 budget will this evening, Thursday, April 23, in the Essex Town Hall Auditorium at 7:30 pm. The proposed Town Government Budget is available on the Town website under News and Announcements.

Additionally, mark your calendar for the Region 4 Budget referendum on May 5th and the Annual Budget Town Meeting on May 11th.

If you are looking to improve your understanding of the Town’s budget process, residents are encouraged to read the “Citizens’ Guide to the Essex Town Budget 2015-2016.” This guide is available in hardcopy form at the Town Hall as well as being available in electronic form on the Town website.

Final Afternoon to View Valley Regional HS Student Show at Essex Art Association

Artwork by Jill Beecher Matthew.

Artwork by Jill Beecher Matthew.

The Essex Art Association (EAA) has announced the start of the 2015 exhibition season.

Ron and His Shadow

“Ron and his shadow”

This week the traditional Valley Regional High School Student Show is being held. Visitors to the gallery can view student work between the hours of 3 and 5 p.m. today, Thursday, April 23.

The EAA is looking forward to this new season and hopes readers will join them at their exhibitions. The Association is located at 10 North Main St. in Essex.

For further information, call 860-767-8996 or email essexartct@gmail.com

Ivoryton Playhouse Looks at (Older) Love in “The Last Romance”

Rochelle Slovin* and Chet Carlin* in "The Last Romance," which opens at Ivoryton, April 22

Rochelle Slovin* and Chet Carlin* in “The Last Romance,” which opens at Ivoryton, April 22

IVORYTON – On an ordinary day in a routine life, an 80-year-old widower named Ralph decides to takes a different path on his daily walk — one that leads him to an unexpected second chance at love. Relying on a renewed boyish charm, Ralph attempts to woo the elegant, but distant, Carol. Defying Carol’s reticence — and the jealousy of his lonely sister Rose — he embarks on the trip of a lifetime and regains a happiness that seemed all but lost.

Tony Award winner Joe DiPietro’s The Last Romance, a bittersweet romantic comedy with a little Puccini and a smidgen of dog treats, opens in Ivoryton on April 22.

DiPietro recently won two Tony Awards for co-writing the musical Memphis, which also received the 2010 Tony, Drama Desk and Outer Critics Circle Awards for Best Musical and which will be opening in Ivoryton in August this year. DiPietro is an Ivoryton favorite; his shows I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change (the longest-running musical revue in Off Broadway history), and the Broadway musical All Shook Up were both popular successes at the Playhouse.

Stephen Mir and Chet Carlin* in "The Last Romance"

Stephen Mir and Chet Carlin* in “The Last Romance”

Directed by Maggie McGlone Jennings, the cast includes Chet Carlin* as Ralph, whose Broadway credits include Fiddler on the Roof with Theodore Bikel and the National Tour of Sir Peter Hall’s As You Like It; Kate Konigisor*, the Artistic Director of Shakespeare with Benefits, as Rose; Stephen Mir as the Young Man and Rochelle Slovin*, making her Ivoryton debut as Carol and reigniting a theatre career after spending the past 30 years as the Founding Director of the Museum of the Moving Image in New York.

The set design is by William Stark, lighting design by Tate Burmeister and costumes by Vickie Blake.

The Last Romance opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on April 22, and runs through May 10. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m, Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Photos by Anne Hudson

  1. Stephen Mir and Chet Carlin*
  2. Rochelle Slovin* and Chet Carlin*

*Indicates member of Actors Equity Association

This production is generously sponsored by Essex Meadows and The Clark Group

Essex Historical Society Celebrates its 60th Year with Dickinson Initiative

Essex Historical Society members Herb Clark, Susan Malan and Sherry Clark outside the Yellow Label Building with Rob Bradway of the Valley Railroad (second from right).

Essex Historical Society members Herb Clark, Susan Malan and Sherry Clark outside the Yellow Label Building with Rob Bradway of the Valley Railroad (second from right).

ESSEX — The Essex Historical Society (EHS), a non-profit organization formed in 1955 and boasting 250 members today, will be celebrating its 60th year throughout 2015 with a variety of special events and programs.  Of special note is the Dickinson Initiative, a series of five events aimed at increasing awareness of the impact of the E. E. Dickinson Witch Hazel business on Essex.

According to EHS President Sherry Clark, “We wanted our anniversary celebration to have a purpose and highlighting the Dickinson legacy seemed like the perfect choice given the company’s historical significance for much of the 20th century.  We are particularly excited to unveil our plans to refurbish the “Yellow Label” building in partnership with the Valley Railroad Company.”

The “Yellow Label” building, which sits on the southern end of the railroad depot property on Plains Road, is a familiar and somewhat iconic site to area residents although most are probably not aware of its history. First constructed around 1915 as a birch mill for the production of birch oil, it served as a storefront for the E.E. Dickinson Witch Hazel products in the 1980’s.

The renovation project entails the replacement of windows, roof, and deteriorated structural elements as well as general cleaning and painting, all to be done by the Valley Railroad. EHS will refurbish the Yellow Label signs and install Dickinson history exhibit panels in the newly repaired space.

Plans are now being finalized for a Dickinson Initiative Pre-Construction Party to take place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on May 15 on the grounds surrounding the Yellow Label building. The free event is open to the public and will feature tours of the Yellow Label building, Witch Hazel advertising art on display in the Jensen Gallery, River Valley Junction building, and cocktails and hors d’oeuvres. At 6:15 p.m., a short presentation of the Dickinson Initiative plans and a Yellow Label Day Proclamation by the Board of Selectman of Essex will take place.  The dedication and unveiling of the refurbished building is targeted for one year later on May 15, 2016.

Other 60th Anniversary/Dickinson Initiative events will include a special fundraising reception to take place at three Dickinson buildings on North Main Street in Essex on Sunday, Sept. 13; the EHS 5th Annual Fall Foliage Antique Auto Show and Tour of Dickinson business and family sites in partnership with the Belltown Antique Car Club on Sunday, Oct. 18; and a special program entitled “Creating the E. E. Dickinson National Brand” to be presented in January by EHS and held at the former Dickinson corporate office at 31 North Main Street, Essex, now the Wells Fargo office building.

The Essex Historical Society was formed and incorporated in 1955. According to news reports at the time, the Town of Essex was about to announce its intention to sell Hills Academy located on Prospect Street. It was no longer useful to the Town for classroom space and had been rented to various tenants for many years. A concerned group sprung into action and the first unofficial meeting of the Board of Directors was held at Essex Town Hall on Friday, December 10, 1954. Edwin B. Pratt was nominated President, John A. Bjerkoe, Vice President, Elizabeth J. Mundie became treasurer and William H. Matthews, curator.

The newly formed Essex Historical Society purchased the Hills Academy building from the Town for one dollar. From 1955 to 1985, Hills Academy served as the Society’s meeting house, as home to its growing collection of Essex memorabilia, and as exhibit space depicting the story of Essex history.

Then in 1985, the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (known then as S.P.N.E.A. and now renamed Historic New England) deeded the Pratt House Museum on West Avenue to the Society and the focus of activity shifted to the Pratt family narrative.

Today, Pratt House continues to interpret 18th century farm life in Essex and the nine generations of Pratt Smithies, many of whom lived in the house. The barn houses a set of panels depicting a time line of Essex history and an early loom that is worked on by an award winning group of weavers. The beautiful meadow to the rear of the property is the site of the Community Garden and often the scene of antique car shows and old fashioned summer fairs. Hills Academy provides additional meeting and exhibit space on the first floor and storage and office space on the second floor for the collection and archival files.

Essex Historical Society serves the three villages of Essex — Centerbrook, Essex and Ivoryton –  and strives to be the center of excellence for collecting and sharing historic resources for Essex and the surrounding area, and to be the facilitator among other organizations focused on the history of the area, so that they may inspire future generations.

For more information on the Essex Historical Society, its events and membership, visit www.essexhistory.org or call 860-767-0681.

Essex Winter Series Presents Attacca Quartet Master Class for Strings This Afternoon

The Attacca Quartet will conduct a Master Class in Essex,

The Attacca Quartet will conduct a Master Class at the Community Music School in Essex, April 20,

CENTERBROOK - Community Music School (CMS) and Essex Winter Series present a master class with the Attacca Quartet on Monday, April 20, at 4 p.m. at Community Music School, 90 Main St., Centerbrook. Members of the Quartet will offer advice on technique and performance for student musicians who will each play during the class. The master class is free and open to the public.

The internationally acclaimed Attacca Quartet has become one of America’s premier young performing ensembles.  Praised by Strad for possessing “maturity beyond its members’ years,” the group was formed at the Juilliard School in 2003, and made their professional debut in 2007 as part of the Artists International Winners Series in Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall.

From 2011-2013, the quartet served as the Juilliard Graduate Resident String Quartet, and for the 2014 – 2015 season the Attacca Quartet was named the Quartet in Residence for the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The Attacca Quartet was featured as the 2015 Essex Winter Series Emerging Artists and performed at their second StringFest this past January.

Community Music School offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 30 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. The School programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.

For additional information, visit www.community-music-school.org or call 860-767-0026.

Acclaimed Naturalist Himmelman Speaks Tomorrow on ‘Butterflies in our Gardens’

John Himmelman

John Himmelman

ESSEX – The Essex Land Trust hosts John Himmelman, naturalist, author/artist of 70 books, and co-founder of the Connecticut Butterfly Association who will give a talk on butterflies, Tuesday, April 21, at 7 p.m., in the Essex Library, 33 West Ave., Essex.

Did you know that over 100 species of butterflies could be seen in our Connecticut gardens? Hear about their intriguing lives and learn how to attract and identify these often unnoticed but important animals of our region. This popular presentation answers many of the questions that are asked about the lives, and preferences, of this fascinating group of insects.

ButterflyThe photos taken in and around Himmelman’s home in Connecticut are used to illustrate the show.  Some topics covered are; butterfly families and species, life cycles, finding butterflies, and creating butterfly habitats.

The event is free and open to the public.  Himmelman will also bring along some of his books for those who might be interested in making a purchase.

Essex Rotary Hosts Sail Cloth Exhibition & Sale, Opening Reception Tonight

Sail_Cloth_Art_ExhibitionESSEX The Rotary Club of Essex in partnership with the Essex Art Association presents the Sail Cloth Art Exhibition and Sale at the Association’s gallery at 10 North Main St., Essex.

The show will feature original works in oil, watercolor, and mixed media.

There will be an Opening Reception with wine and hor d’oeuvres Friday, April 17, from 5 to 8 p.m.  All are welcome and there is no charge for admission.

Weekend exhibition hours will be Saturday, April 18, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sunday, April 19, from 12 to 4 p.m.

San Francisco Architects Present Their Work at Essex Library This Evening

An example of stunning architectural design by Kuth Ranier Architects.

An example of stunning architectural design by Kuth/Ranieri Architects — the Gallery Room in a Nob Hill Guest House in San Francisco.

ESSEX — Byron Dean Kuth and Elizabeth Ranieri of the innovative San Francisco architecture firm of Kuth/Ranieri will present their work at the Essex Town Hall on Friday, April 17, at 7 p.m.

Over two decades their firm has produced a broad spectrum of work, from small-scaled objects and installations to buildings and urban design proposals. They have earned a regional and national reputation for innovative works that integrate current cultural discourse with contemporary issues of design, technology and the environment. Their projects include an installation for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Soundhenge, and the Harvey Milk Memorial Streetcar.

A Fine Arts and Architecture graduate of Rhode Island School of Design, Kuth has taught at California College of the Arts, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and as a Friedman Professors at the College of Environmental Design at UC Berkeley. He launched the Deep Green Design Alliance (DGDA), a multidisciplinary think tank for sustainable strategies in architecture and urban design.

Ranieri holds degrees in Architecture and Fine Arts from the Rhode Island School of Design and has taught at the California College of the Arts, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and as a Friedman Professor at UC Berkeley’s College of Environmental Design. She has earned a national reputation for innovative expressions of sustainable systems at a building and planning scale. She has led the firm’s research and development on infrastructural approaches to water conservation, water treatment, and adaptive strategies to rising seas.

Their talk is free and part of the Centerbrook Architects Lecture Series, which is one of many programs that are offered regularly by the Essex Library (http://www.youressexlibrary.org/). Call the library at (860) 767-1560 to register. Sponsored by Centerbrook Architects, the series is in its seventh year.

For more information on Centerbrook Architects, visit www.centerbrook.com.

Essex Garden Club “Seedy Ladies” Prepare for May Market

Pictured L>R are Dee Dee Charnok, Jane Dickinson, Coral Rawn, Gay Thorn, and Daphne Nielson  preparing tomato plants for the Essex Garden Club May Market.

From left to right, Dee Dee Charnok, Jane Dickinson, Coral Rawn, Gay Thorn, and Daphne Nielson prepare tomato plants for the Essex Garden Club May Market.

ESSEX — The Essex Garden Club hosts its May Market at Town Park, Main Street, Essex Village on May 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., rain or shine.

A most popular feature of the sale is the home grown tomato plants.  This year there will be 24 varieties of plants to choose from including bush, early, heirloom, artisan, and grape.  The “Seedy Ladies” grow all the plants from seed in a home greenhouse and nurture them until they are ready for the sale.

These plants sell out quickly, so mark your calendars and come early to find the plant of your choice.

Corinthian YC Hosts Leukemia Cup Regatta Kick-Off Celebration in May, All Welcome

ESSEX — Set sail to save lives with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is proud to join Duck Island Yacht Club, North Cove Yacht Club and Brewer Pilot’s Point Marina in supporting the 2015 Leukemia Cup Regatta. The Connecticut Westchester Hudson Valley Chapter of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) has elected to hold its annual Leukemia Cup Regatta Kickoff Celebration once again at the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club, located at 9 Novelty Lane in Essex, Conn.

This year’s kick-off celebration will be held on Tuesday, May 12, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Come enjoy drinks, hors d’oeuvres and prizes, meet the 2015 Honored Skipper Devon Marcinko, and enjoy a fascinating presentation by Gary Jobson, while celebrating the launch of the 2015 regatta season and the countdown to Leukemia Cup 2015, to be held on Aug. 29.

The Leukemia Cup Regatta is a great way to combine the joy of sailing and raising funds for the lifesaving programs of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Sailors who enter their boats in the regatta are eligible to win terrific prizes, including a chance to participate in the Fantasy Sail in Bermuda in late October with Gary Jobson, National Leukemia Cup Chairman, world-renowned America’s Cup sailor and sports commentator.

Jobson became chairman in 1993, and 10 years later, was diagnosed with lymphoma. In his own words he “became a beneficiary of the research advances I had helped support”, and is cancer-free today. He continues to travel extensively supporting LLS events throughout the country.

the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is pleased to welcome him back for the Leukemia Cup Kick-Off Celebration on May 12th, 2015.

The Leukemia Cup Regatta is an important event in support of blood cancer research, as well as all related areas of assistance for patients and their families. The Kick-Off Celebration is open to the public: everyone, no matter whether you are a sailor or not, is invited to attend and find out more on how to help support the lifesaving work of LLS.

For more information and to purchase tickets to the 2015 Leukemia Cup Kick-Off celebration on May 12 hosted by the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club, to register for the Leukemia Cup Regatta on August 29, or to purchase post-race party tickets, visit: www.leukemiacup.org/ct, contact Christine Schuff at christine.schuff@lls.org or call (914) 821-8969.

For information on becoming a sponsor of the Leukemia Cup, visit the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club website or email ecyc@essexcorinthian.org.

Essex Library Presents ‘Right Plant, Right Place’ Landscaping Program Tonight

The Buttonbush is always a good addition to your landscaping plans.

The Buttonbush is always a good addition to your landscaping plans.

ESSEX – Wondering why certain flowers, shrubs or trees never seem to thrive in your yard? Want to know what plants are best suited for the insects and birds in our area? Based on the Right Plant, Right Place principle, learn from this illustrated talk by Master Gardener Gail Kalison Reynolds what ecological processes affect your backyard, how native plants facilitate ecological balance, and why native plants are appropriate for backyard landscaping and gardening.

This event will take place on Thursday, April 16, at 6:30 p.m. at the Essex Library. Admission is free.

Gail Kalison Reynolds, MFS, directs the UConn Master Gardener Program in Middlesex County and is an independent ecological and technological consultant.  She has both undergraduate and master’s degrees from Yale University and many years of technological experience, including five information security professional certifications.  In addition, she is the Chair of the Haddam Conservation Commission and the Manager of the Higganum Farmers’ Market.

Call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 for more information and to register.  The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue, Essex CT 06426

Photographer Tony Donovan Exhibits at Essex Library During May

tony 4.tif
ESSEX — A photography exhibit will be held at Essex Library Association through the month of May featuring guest artist, Tony Donovan.

Ivoryton resident Tony Donovan began his photography career in Ireland in north Belfast in the early 1970s. As he puts it, “It was a difficult place to take pictures, the people were on edge and wary; suspicious of a stranger.” He shot street scenes and people he befriended, mostly children, with a handheld Leica and the available light. The situation was extreme since he had no control over events and that has shaped his work ever since. He considers himself a documentary, artistic photographer seeking to make expressive, poetic pictures from life. The photograph’s subject is the most important consideration for him.

Donovan has also captured woodsman Amos Congdon at his Lyme, Conn., sawmill, see photo above. Congdon makes the perfect image of the American past; sharpening a saw, feeding cattle and tallying a woodlot. A sawmill is a wonderful place to take photos with its patterns of circles and squares, scattered pieces of wood and the lines lumber produces.

Donovan has been photographing a summer basketball tournament, more recently, for a number of years, even receiving a Middletown Commission on the Arts grant to do so in 2010. The Middletown Summer Hoopfest has offered Donovan the opportunity to record some of the drama, effort, spirit and grace played out in those games. He comments, “Photography, like any creative process, often requires a subject that summons up in the artist the will and commitment to work over a long period of time. The Hoopfest has been such a subject for me. Certainly, these basketball images have an historic value and, hopefully, some of them attain a poetic worth.”

The exhibit will be open Saturday, May 2, and run through Saturday, May 30: it is free and open to all. The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue, Essex, CT 06426.

Second Session of ‘Beowulf’ Seminar in Essex Library, April 28

beowulf-coverESSEX – Who was the first superhero in the English language?

Whose epic adventures greatly influenced J. R. R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit?

It was Beowulf, of course.

Follow the Old English story of Scandinavian warrior Beowulf who, armed with only a magic sword and a heroic code, vanquishes the monster Grendel –and Grendel’s mother too. After becoming a wise and noble King of the Danes, he battles a mighty, fire-breathing dragon with tragic consequences.

Using the Northern Ireland Poet Laureate Seamus Heaney’s magnificent translation, University of New Haven faculty member Chuck Timlin will lead a seminar looking at the great 3182 line poem that stands as the beginning of English Literature.

This seminar will also look at several passages of the poem in the original Old English.

The five-seminar sessions will be held on Tuesday evenings April 14 & 28 and May 5, 12 and 19 from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Essex Library. This seminar is free and open to the public. Register in advance by calling 860-767-1560.

The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue, Essex, CT.

‘Nights on Broadway’ Gala Benefits Community Music School, Saturday

Looking forward to welcoming guests at Nights on Broadway are (standing L to R): Melissa Lieberman and David LaMay of Essex Financial Services; Robin Andreoli, CMS executive director CMS; vocalist Courtney Parrish; vocalist Richard Pittsinger; honorary co-chairs Jennifer and John Bauman. Seated are Laureen Sullivan of Essex Savings Bank and Charles Cumello, CEO of Essex Financial Services.

Looking forward to welcoming guests at Nights on Broadway are (standing L to R): Melissa Lieberman and David LaMay of Essex Financial Services; Robin Andreoli, CMS executive director CMS; vocalist Courtney Parrish; vocalist Richard Pittsinger; honorary co-chairs Jennifer and John Bauman. Seated are Laureen Sullivan of Essex Savings Bank and Charles Cumello, CEO of Essex Financial Services.

ESSEX — Curtain Up! Light the Lights! On Saturday, April 18, Community Music School students and faculty take center stage performing classic Broadway show tunes for Nights on Broadway, the School’s 10 annual benefit gala. Guests will gather at the charming Lace Factory, 161 River Street, Deep River, for a lively party with gourmet food stations inspired by Broadway hits and prepared by Cloud Nine Catering, silent and live auctions, and a fun photo booth. Nights on Broadway promises to be a magical, musical evening!

Selections from the shows Wicked, RENT, Fiddler on the Roof, and Les Misérables are scheduled to be performed. Featured student performers include Emma Hunt (vocals) of Essex; Michael Rasberry (saxophone) of Lyme; Sonny Capaccio (vocals) of Guilford; Courtney Parrish (vocals) of Westbrook; Arnold Moore (violin) of Killingworth; and Richard Pittsinger (vocals) of Essex, a recipient of the Carolyn R. Greenleaf Memorial Music Award. Faculty performers include Karli Gilbertson (piano/vocals), Matthew McCauley (bass), Kevin O’Neil (guitar), Andrew Studenski (saxophone), and music director Tom Briggs (piano).

Support of the Community Music School gala provides the resources necessary to offer scholarships to students with a financial need, music therapy services, and outreach through arts education and community concerts. “Nights on Broadway is an extremely important event for us,” stated Executive Director Robin Andreoli, “Proceeds will help us continue our mission of enrichment through the arts with a focus on public performances and community outreach.”

She continues, ” Of course, musical theater has always been a part of our programming with Broadway Bound, a summer program for ages 8 to 15, so it’s fitting that Broadway music is this year’s theme. Programs like Broadway Bound, Kate’s Camp for Kids, the CMS Jazz Ensemble, New Horizons Band and many others allow students of all ages to build on their individual and ensemble skills for performance.”

Nights on Broadway sponsors include Essex Savings Bank and Essex Financial Services, Bogaert Construction, The Clark Group, Tower Laboratories LTD, Grossman Chevrolet-Nissan, Thomas H. Alexa – Comprehensive Wealth Management, Angelini Wine LTD, The Bauman Family Foundation, Brewer Pilots Point Marina, Essex Winnelson, Gowrie Group, Guilford Savings Bank, Leonardo & Associates P.C., W. Jay Mills CFP® – The Oakely Wing Group at Morgan Stanley, Periodontics P.C., Ring’s End, The Safety Zone, and Valley Courier.

Tickets for the evening are $100 per person ($40 is tax deductible). A sponsor ticket of $150 per person provides a greater charitable gift ($90 is tax deductible) and is also available. Tickets may be purchased online at community-music-school.org, at the school located at 90 Main Street in the Centerbrook section of Essex or by calling 860-767-0026. Now in its 32nd year of building community through music, the Community Music School is a private, non-profit organization.

Essex Savings Bank Donates Over $29,000 as Part of Community Investment Program

ESSEX – Results of the recent voting by Essex Savings Bank customers who participated in the Bank’s Community Investment Program were announced at a meeting of employees, directors and trustees at the Bank’s Plains Road Office on Wednesday, April 8.

The Top Ten Winners in attendance received special recognition.  They were in order by number of votes:

  1. The Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries
  2. Forgotten Felines, Inc.
  3. Old Saybrook Fire Company Number One, Inc.
  4. High Hopes Therapeutic Riding, Inc.
  5. Tait’s Every Animal Matters (TEAM)
  6. Dog Days Adoption Events, Inc.
  7. The Essex Fire Engine Company No. 1
  8. Bikes for Kids, Inc.
  9. Pet Connections, Inc.
  10. Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley, Inc. (VNLV)

The customer balloting portion of Essex Savings Bank’s 2015 Community Investment Program, began on Feb. 2 and concluded on March 2. The program entitles the Bank’s customers to select up to three charities from a list of 90 qualified non-profit organizations. Fund allocations are awarded based on the results of these votes.

Gregory R. Shook, President and Chief Executive Officer of Essex Savings Bank stated, “At Essex Savings Bank, we believe the way to move the world forward is by giving back. Our Community Investment Program is designed to provide vital financial support to those organizations that enhance the quality of life in our communities.”

Each year, the Bank donates 10 percent of its net income to non-profit organizations within the immediate market area consisting of Chester, Deep River, Essex, Lyme, Madison, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and Westbrook. This year, the Bank has allocated $98,741 to assisting non-profit organizations who offer outstanding services to our community and one third of that amount is then voted upon by the Bank’s customers.

According to Thomas Lindner, Vice President and Community Relations Officer for Essex Savings Bank, 6,987 votes were cast this year for a total of $29,620. By year end 2015, the total distribution of charitable funds will reach 4 million dollars since the inception of the Bank’s Community Investment Program in 1996.

Essex Savings Bank is a FDIC insured, state chartered, mutual savings bank established in 1851. The Bank serves the Connecticut River Valley and Shoreline with six offices in Essex (2), Chester, Madison, Old Lyme and Old Saybrook. Financial, estate, insurance and retirement planning are offered throughout the state by the Bank’s Trust Department and subsidiary Essex Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA, SIPC. Investments in stocks, bonds, mutual funds and annuities are not FDIC insured, may lose value, are not a deposit, have no Bank guarantee and are not insured by any Federal Government Agency.

Click here to see the full results with voting numbers and amounts donated to each organization.

Run Forwards or Backwards Today! Race Event in Essex Benefits LVVS

And they're off!

And they’re off!

ESSEX – This coming Saturday, April 11, Literacy Volunteers Valley Shore (LVVS) will hold its 8th Annual Backward Mile and 5K Run/3K Walk.  Registration for the races begins at 7:30 a.m. at the Essex Town Hall, on West Avenue. The Erl and Dot Nord Memorial Backward Mile race, open to runners older than 18, begins at 8:30 a.m.; the 5K race and 3K walk both begins at 9:15 a.m.. T-shirts will be given to the first 100 runners.

Runners below the age of six can participate in the Lollipop Run, which begins at 8:50 a.m.  All Lollipop runners will receive lollipops.

Registration forms are available from the LVVS offices, (860) 399-0280 or you can register online at www.register.fasttracktiming.com. Fees for those signing up prior to March 31  are $18 for the backward mile, $23 for either the 3K walk or 5K run, $5 for the Lollipop race and to compete in any combination $40. Students can participate for $10 per race or $15 for any two races.

Runners with additional questions about the race may contact Elizabeth Steffen, Race Director at esteffen@vsliteracy.org .

Essex Land Trust Hosts ‘Hike of the Month’ Today at Heron Pond

ESSEX – The Essex Land Trust hosts its April Hike of the Month tomorrow, Saturday, April 4 at Heron Pond Preserve, Heron Pond Road, off Rte. 154.  Meet at 9 a.m. to join the hike, which will be led by Karen Carlone.

With two lively watercourses flowing down separate valleys with a ridge in between, Heron Pond is a stream-follower’s delight. The 30-acre preserve’s easy-walking terrain is crisscrossed by four trails reaching from high ground and rocky outcroppings to sandy streambeds. Trails can be wet, and stream crossings are unimproved.

Heron Pond, once the homestead of John Clark Pratt and later, his son, Ralph, was acquired through the private development of surrounding property and opened in 2007. Traces of old roadbeds and stonewalls hint at the land’s early uses, which included logging and the pasturing of farm animals.

The new-growth forest canopy has kept undergrowth to a minimum, giving Heron Pond an open feel. A prominent grove of evergreens and birch surround the pond, which is on private property. Larger maple, beech and oak trees appear on higher ground among the eroded rock ledges.

Also, keep a look for ferns and mountain laurel—and don’t be surprised to see Barred Owls throughout the year.

Community Music School Presents New Horizons Band in Concert, April 23 & 26

The New Horizons band of the Community Music School gather for a photo.

The New Horizons band of the Community Music School gather for a photo.

The New Horizons Band of Community Music School (CMS) is performing two concerts on April 23 and April 26. The band will present a joint concert with Groton New Horizons at the Groton Senior Center, 102 Newtown Rd. in Groton at 1 p.m. on Thursday, April 23. Both bands will perform separately, and then collaborate on several pieces in a variety of styles.

The CMS New Horizons Band will also play on Sunday, April 26at 3 p.m. at the Acton Library, 60 Old Boston Post Rd. in Old Saybrook.

The band is a beginning adult band of 17 members, many of whom had never played an instrument before joining, and is part of a national network. Under the direction of Patricia Hurley, the CMS New Horizons Band will perform marches, jazz selections, and music from the stage and screen. Hurley has provided guidance to the musicians who have started the Groton chapter.

Both concerts are free and open to the public. Readers are invited to come and meet Hurley and the members of the band to find out more about the program. Prospective new members are invited to attend a rehearsal any time. The band rehearses on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:45 a.m. to noon at the Community Music School, 90 Main Street, Centerbrook. No previous experience necessary.

Community Music School offers innovative music programming for infants through adults, building on a 30 year tradition of providing quality music instruction to residents of shoreline communities. CMS programs cultivate musical ability and creativity and provide students with a thorough understanding of music so that they can enjoy playing and listening for their entire lives.

Visit www.community-music-school.org or call 860-767-0026 for program information.

‘New Deal’ Art Exhibition on View at CT River Museum

The Connecticut River Museum’s spring exhibit, New Deal Art Along the River, will open April 2nd. This painting, On the Rail by Yngve Soderberg is a watercolor on paper on loan from the Lyman Allen Art Museum. Photo courtesy of Lyman Allen Art Museum.

The Connecticut River Museum’s spring exhibit, New Deal Art Along the River, opens April 2. This painting, On the Rail by Yngve Soderberg is a watercolor on paper on loan from the Lyman Allyn Art Museum. Photo courtesy of Lyman Allen Art Museum.

During the depths of the Great Depression, the federal government created work relief programs to put unemployed Americans back to work. President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” programs provided all types of jobs – including opportunities for out-of-work artists. The Federal Art Project (1935 – 1943) paid artists to paint murals and easel art, sculpt, and teach art classes. Their art was always located in a public place such as a school, library, or government building so that all Americans had access to it for inspiration and enjoyment.

The subject matter for much of this artwork is known as the “American Scene” – showcasing regional history, landscapes, and people. The Connecticut River Museum’s new exhibit has selected artwork that represents artists from the Connecticut River Valley, or that depicts views of regional or maritime traditions of the Connecticut River and coastline.

“These paintings offer us a glimpse at Connecticut from sixty years ago,” says Museum Curator Amy Trout. “We think of that time as being dark and depressing, but these paintings show us a vibrant time and place.”

The exhibit contains 20 works of art ranging from pastels, etchings, watercolors, and oils. There are also examples of bas relief work from Essex sculptor Henry Kreis who designed the state’s Tercentenary medal and coin in 1935 under the Civil Works Authority (CWA) funding. The paintings come from area museums such as the Lyman Allyn Art Museum, Mystic Arts Center, Connecticut Historical Society, and the Portland Historical Society, among others.

Even though these paintings were originally intended for public viewing, many have found their way into museum storerooms and are rarely seen. “It’s important to get them out on display and remind people of the wonderful legacy that was left to us. It gives us a chance to talk about Connecticut during the 1930s and appreciate the art that gives us greater insight into that period,” says Trout. The artists are also relatively unknown. Many continued in the field of art after the Depression, but few achieved great fame. “They needed to make a living, so many became commercial artists, illustrators, or teachers.”

The exhibition will open Thursday, April 2, with a preview reception at 5:30 p.m. featuring a short lecture by curator Amy Trout.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10 a.m. through 5 p.m. and closed on Mondays after Columbus Day. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors, $5 for children age 6-12, free for children under 6.

For more information, call 860-767-8269 or go to www.ctrivermuseum.org

Despite Snow, Determined Pettipaug YC Members Successfully Put Docks Into CT River

It was not an easy task and, at one point, a dock almost got away.

It was not an easy task and, at one point, a dock almost got away.

ESSEX – “Even when it’s snowing, club members have been excellent when it comes to giving us a hand,” said the Pettipaug Yach Club’s Rear Commodore, Kathryn Ryan, on Saturday.

Pettipaug Yacht Club house where the dock party took place.

Pettipaug Yacht Club house where the dock party took place.

She added, “We scheduled this day to put the docks in, and a nice mix of old and new members showed up to give us a hand.”

The puddled driveway down to the club house.

The puddled driveway down to the club house.

All told some 24 club members checked in — navigating challenging conditions en route to the club — to put the dock in the water for the upcoming sailing season.

Club members straining to put the dock’s in rapid Connecticut River waters

Club members straining to put the dock’s in rapid Connecticut River waters

The club had originally scheduled putting in the docks two weeks ago, but the weather did not clear until this past weekend.

Despite the wait, the weather was still not particularly nice with a steady light snow, and a chilling temperature of 34 degrees.

But the job was done!

Essex Winter Series Presents Season Finale Today

Artistic Director and pianist Mihae Lee has been captivating audiences throughout North and South America, Europe, and Asia in solo recitals and chamber music concerts

Artistic Director and pianist Mihae Lee has been captivating audiences throughout North and South America, Europe, and Asia in solo recitals and chamber music concerts

For the fourth and final concert of the Essex Winter Series (EWS) 2015 season, pianist and artistic director Mihae Lee will take the stage with two other celebrated artists in a program of masterpieces of the rich piano trio repertoire.

The concert will take place on Sunday, March 29, at 3 pm at Valley Regional High School in Deep River. Making their EWS debuts in this program, “Mihae Lee and Friends,” will be violinist Chee-Yun and cellist Julie Albers. Both have performed as soloists with many of the world’s major orchestras, are highly-regarded artists on the chamber music circuit, and have recorded extensively.

The selections include piano trios from the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. First on the program will be the Trio No. 39 in G major by Joseph Haydn, who, along with Mozart, developed the genre by adding a cello to the violin-piano duo to create many more interesting musical possibilities. Written in 1795, the piece is nicknamed the “Gypsy” trio after its finale in the Hungarian style.

In contrast to Haydn, who ultimately wrote 45 piano trios, the early twentieth-century composer Maurice Ravel wrote just one. This 1914 work, completed just before his enlistment in the French army at the start of World War I, has become a staple of the repertoire and will be performed before intermission.

The concert will conclude with the second and final trio by one of the great nineteenth-century composers, Felix Mendelssohn. His C minor Trio from 1845 is among the romantic master’s finest and most beloved works.

Tickets, all general admission, are $35, with $5 tickets for full-time students, and may be purchased on the EWS website, www.essexwinterseries.com, or by calling 860-272-4572.

The March 29 concert is dedicated to the memory of Marilyn Buel, former member of the board of trustees of EWS, who passed away in August, 2014. Mrs. Buel, an ardent supporter of the arts, helped build support for Essex Winter Series’ Fenton Brown Emerging Artist Concerts and also served as president of the board of Chestnut Hill Concerts.

About the artists:
Mihae Lee

Praised by Boston Globe as “simply dazzling,” Artistic Director and pianist Mihae Lee has been captivating audiences throughout North and South America, Europe, and Asia in solo recitals and chamber music concerts with her poetic lyricism and scintillating virtuosity. She has performed in such venues as Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, Jordan Hall, Berlin Philharmonie, Academia Nationale de Santa Cecilia in Rome, Warsaw National Philharmonic Hall, and Taipei National Hall.

An active chamber musician, Lee is an artist member of the Boston Chamber Music Society and is a founding member of the Triton Horn Trio with violinist Ani Kavafian and hornist William Purvis. Her recordings of Brahms, Shostakovich, Bartok, and Stravinsky with the members of BCMS were critically acclaimed by High Fidelity, CD Review, and Fanfare magazines, the reviews calling her sound “as warm as Rubinstein, yet virile as Toscanini.”

Lee has appeared frequently at numerous international chamber music festivals including Dubrovnik, Amsterdam, Groningen, Festicamara (Colombia), Great Woods, Seattle, OK Mozart, Mainly Mozart, Music from Angel Fire, Chamber Music Northwest, Rockport, Sebago-Long Lake, Bard, Norfolk, Mostly Music, Music Mountain, Monadnock, and Chestnut Hill Concerts.

In addition to many years of performing regularly at Bargemusic in New York, she has been a guest artist with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and Speculum Musicae; has collaborated with the Tokyo, Muir, Cassatt, and Manhattan string quartets; and has premiered and recorded works by such composers as Gunther Schuller, Ned Rorem, Paul Lansky, Henri Lazarof, Michael Daugherty, and Ezra Laderman.

In addition to her concert career, Lee maintains her commitment to give back to her community and help many worthy charities. At the invitation of the Prime Minister and the First Lady of Jamaica, she has organized and performed in concerts in Kingston and Montego Bay to benefit the Jamaica Early Childhood Development Foundation. For many years she brought world-class musicians, both classical and jazz, to perform in fund-raising concerts for the Hastings Education Foundation outside of New York City, and she recently launched an annual Gala Concert for the Community Health Clinic of Butler County, a free health clinic outside of Pittsburgh.

Born in Seoul, Korea, Lee made her professional debut at the age of 14 with the Korean National Orchestra after becoming the youngest grand prizewinner at the prestigious National Competition held by the President of Korea. In the same year, she came to the United States on a scholarship from the Juilliard School Pre-College, and subsequently won many further awards including First Prize at the Kosciuszko Foundation Chopin Competition, the Juilliard Concerto Competition, and the New England Conservatory Concerto Competition.

Lee received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from The Juilliard School and her artist diploma from the New England Conservatory, studying with Martin Canin and Russell Sherman. She has released compact discs on the Bridge, Etcetera, EDI, Northeastern, and BCM labels.

Violinist Chee-Yun's flawless technique, dazzling tone and compelling artistry have enraptured audiences on five continents

Violinist Chee-Yun’s flawless technique, dazzling tone and compelling artistry have enraptured audiences on five continents

Chee-Yun

Violinist Chee-Yun’s flawless technique, dazzling tone and compelling artistry have enraptured audiences on five continents. Charming, charismatic and deeply passionate about her art, Chee-Yun continues to carve a unique place for herself in the ever-evolving world of classical music.

Winner of the 1989 Young Concert Artists International Auditions and the 1990 Avery Fisher Career Grant, Chee-Yun performs regularly with the world’s foremost orchestras, including the Philadelphia Orchestra, the London Philharmonic, and the Toronto, Houston, Seattle, Pittsburgh and National symphony orchestras. Additionally, she has appeared with the Atlanta Symphony, and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and has performed with such distinguished conductors as Hans Graf, James DePriest, Jesus Lopez-Cobos, Michael Tilson Thomas, Krzysztof Penderecki, Neeme Järvi, Pinchas Zukerman, Manfred Honeck and Giancarlo Guerrero.

Internationally, Chee-Yun has toured with the Haifa Symphony, the Hong Kong Philharmonic, Germany’s Braunschweig Orchestra and the MDR Radio Leipzig and performed with the St. Petersburg Camerata, the Bamberg Philharmonic, the Bilbao Symphony, the London Festival Orchestra, the Nagoya Philharmonic, and the KBS Symphony Orchestra.

Her orchestral highlights include a concert with the Seoul Philharmonic conducted by Myung-Whun Chung that was broadcast on national network television, a benefit for UNESCO with the Orchestra of St. Lukes at Avery Fisher Hall, and her tours of the United States with the San Francisco Symphony (Michael Tilson Thomas conducting), and Japan with the NHK Symphony. Recent and upcoming engagements include return subscription weeks in Pittsburgh and Jacksonville, as well as the Colorado and Austin symphony orchestras and the National Philharmonic.

Julie Albers

Cellist Julie Albers is recognized for her superlative artistry

Cellist Julie Albers is recognized for her superlative artistry

American cellist Julie Albers is recognized for her superlative artistry, her charismatic and radiant performing style, and her intense musicianship. She was born into a musical family in Longmont, Colo., and began violin studies at the age of two with her mother, switching to cello at four. She moved to Cleveland during her junior year of high school to pursue studies through the Young Artist Program at the Cleveland Institute of Music, where she studied with Richard Aaron.

Albers soon was awarded the Grand Prize at the XIII International Competition for Young Musicians in Douai, France, and as a result toured France as soloist with Orchestre Symphonique de Douai.

She made her major orchestral debut with the Cleveland Orchestra in 1998, and thereafter has performed in recital and with orchestras throughout North America, Europe, Korea, Taiwan, Australia, and New Zealand. In 2001, she won Second Prize in Munich’s Internationalen Musikwettbewerbes der ARD, and was also awarded the Wilhelm-Weichsler-Musikpreis der Stadt Osnabruch . While in Germany, she recorded solo and chamber music of Kodaly for the Bavarian Radio, performances that have been heard throughout Europe.

In 2003, Albers was named the first Gold Medal Laureate of South Korea’s Gyeongnam International Music Competition, winning the $25,000 Grand Prize.

In North America, Albers has performed with many important orchestras and ensembles. Recent performances have included exciting debuts on the San Francisco Performances series and with the Grant Park Music Festival where she performed Penderecki’s Concerto Grosso for 3 cellos with Mr. Penderecki conducting. Past seasons have included concerto appearances with the Orchestras of Colorado, Indianapolis, San Diego, Seattle, Vancouver, and Munchener Kammerorchester among others.

In addition to solo performances, Albers regularly participates in chamber music festivals around the world. 2009 marked the end of a three year residency with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center Two. She is currently active with the Albers String Trio and the Cortona Trio. Teaching is also a very important part of Albers’ musical life. She currently is Assistant Professor and holds the Mary Jean and Charles Yales Cello Chair at the McDuffie Center for Strings at Mercer University in Macon, Georgia.

Albers’ debut album with Orion Weiss includes works by Rachmaninoff, Beethoven, Schumann, Massenet, and Piatagorsky and is available on the Artek Label. Julie Albers performs on a N.F. Vuillaume cello made in 1872 and makes her home in Atlanta with her husband, Bourbon.

VRHS Seeking Hall of Fame Nominations, Deadline is April 30

AREAWIDE – Nominations and applications are being accepted for the 32nd annual Valley Regional High School (VRHS) Hall of Fame Award. Anyone may nominate a VRHS graduate who has gone on to excel in a particular profession, avocation, business, hobby, sport, etc., and who was graduated from Valley at least five years prior to nomination.

Call the VRHS office  at 860-526-5328 for an application, or write to the principal, Mrs. Kristina Martineau, 256 Kelsey Hill Rd., Deep River, CT 06417, listing the name of the candidate, address, telephone number, year of graduation and his/her outstanding accomplishments. Deadline for submitting applications is April 30, 2015.

The winner of the Hall of Fame Award will be honored at the graduation ceremony at VRHS on Wednesday, June 17, 2015, beginning at 6:30 p.m.

CT River Museum Offers Canoe, Kayak Paddle Program Partly Funded by Cabela’s

Connecticut River Museum Expands On-water Experiences with the Development of a Canoe and Kayak Paddle Program. Photo credit: Joan Meek.

Connecticut River Museum Expands On-water Experiences with the Development of a Canoe and Kayak Paddle Program. Photo credit: Joan Meek.

ESSEX – The Connecticut River Museum (CRM) will launch a canoe and kayak paddle program on the museum campus in Essex, CT this summer as a major expansion of its environmental outreach.  The Cabela’s Outdoor Fund, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the promotion, conservation and improvement of wildlife and wildlife habitat, hunting, fishing, camping and other outdoor sporting and recreational activities, has made a generous contribution to CRM that will fund the purchase of 10 boats as well as assorted equipment that will make this important educational program possible.

According to the museum’s director, Chris Dobbs, “The Connecticut River Paddle Explorations Program is an exciting expansion of our ongoing environmental education activities and will allow more members and visitors to get out on the water.  We are thankful to the Cabela’s Outdoor Fund for making this possible.”

“Cabela’s Outdoor Fund is proud to support the Connecticut River Museum and its efforts in educating and exposing the community to the great outdoors,” said Jeremy Wonch, vice president of Cabela’s Outdoor Fund. “The Connecticut River Paddle Explorations Program will be great for both the community and the conservation efforts on the Connecticut River.”

Between June and September, CRM will offer canoes and kayaks at a nominal fee as a member benefit and to the public.  The program will allow visitors to explore the local marshes and tributaries around CRM, a great way for adults and families to access the River.

Dobbs commented, “Through the generosity of the Cabela’s Outdoor Fund, the museum will be able to use these boats for a variety of education programs.”  He said that this would include “guided paddles, exploration of nature preserves along the River, and places further afield.”  As part of the expanded vision for the museum, Dobbs would like the paddle program to partner with land trusts, historical societies, and other organizations up and down the River as a way to build appreciation for this “magnificent cultural and environmental resource.”

For more information about this program, to volunteer with the paddle program or to provide additional support, contact the Connecticut River Museum at 860.767.8269 or via email at crm@ctrivermuseum.org.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10 AM – 5 PM and closed on Mondays until Memorial Day. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors, $5 for children age 6-12, free for children under 6.

For more information, call 860-767-8269 or go to www.ctrivermuseum.org.

 

Photo Credit: Support from Cabela’s Outdoor Fund will allow the Connecticut River Museum to expand its paddle programs and provide more people with wonderful experiences like the annual swallow migration. Photo courtesy of Joan Meek.

New State Funding Announced for Elderly Affordable Housing in Essex

State Representative Phil Miller

State Representative Phil Miller

ESSEX – State Representative Philip Miller (D-Chester/Deep River/Essex/Haddam) has welcomed the announcement that elderly affordable housing development in Essex will benefit from a $60 million statewide investment to bolster housing programs announced by Governor Dannel P. Malloy.

The funding for Essex is as follows:

  • Essex Place, Essex– Department of Housing will provide up to $3.83 million to assist in the development of Essex Place, a newly constructed 22-unit affordable elderly apartment building.  Essex Place will be located adjacent to the existing 36-unit Essex Court elderly housing development.  The site is walkable via town sidewalks to local services, grocery stores, restaurants and other community resources. The project is in close proximity to public transportation offered by the Estuary Transit District (ETD) that has regularly scheduled service on the Riverside Shuttle from Chester to Old Saybrook.  The project will consist of 18 one-bedroom and 4 two-bedroom rental units.  The units will serve residents or below 80% of the area median income.

“I welcome the Governor’s announcement that Essex will be awarded $3.83 million for the development of Essex Place. The development of affordable elderly apartments will help residents who live in the community stay in the community,” Rep. Miller said, “In addition the construction of new units has a positive economic impact by creating jobs and providing dollars for the purchase of materials and services. I thank Governor Malloy for this initiative in Essex.”

Rep. Miller is House Chairman of the Planning and Development Committee.

Essex Library Offers Presentation on Scams, Frauds, and How to Avoid Them, April 14

ESSEX – We live in a fast-paced, technological world.  Scammers are all around us and their only goal is to steal your financial information to commit fraud.  Some are high-tech and use their computer to attempt to steal personal financial information.  Some are savvy and use the telephone to try to scam us.  Others simply steal our wallets or rummage through our trash.

What can you do to prevent this from happening?  Your best defense is awareness.

Richard Lalor, Associate Financial Examiner from the Government Relations and Consumer Affairs Division of the Connecticut Department of Banking, will share important tips on how to avoid identity theft and minimize your risk of becoming a victim of financial fraud at the Essex Library on Tuesday, April 14, at 11 a.m.  Admission is free.

Call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 for more information and to register.

The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue, Essex CT 06426

CT River Museum Hosts Tavern Night with Craft Beer, Fine Wine, Good Food; April 25

The Connecticut River Museum’s 1814 Tavern Night features an evening of food, drink, music and games in the Museum’s historic Samuel Lay House. Photo: Connecticut River Museum.

The Connecticut River Museum’s 1814 Tavern Night features an evening of food, drink, music and games in the Museum’s historic Samuel Lay House. Photo: Connecticut River Museum.

The Connecticut River Museum brings back its popular 1814 Tavern Night for a double hitter. These spirited 19th-century evenings transform the historic Samuel Lay House into a seaside tavern from the War of 1812. The nights include a wine or beer tasting, food pairings of early American cuisine provided by Catering by Selene, tavern games and raucous drinking songs and ballads. The event is being made possible through the generous support of Guilford Savings Bank.

ELH1814Tavern.winebarOn Saturday, April 25, a variety of fine wines will be enjoyed with Angelini Wines & Estate Wines. This night, Craig Edwards will saw out popular fiddle tunes that get people stomping their feet and singing.

Executive Director Christopher Dobbs states, “Last year’s programs sold out and were a huge hit.” He described the programs as “enchanting evenings that take you back in time – giving visitors a great taste of the food, drink, music and games of early 19th century America.”

Space is extremely limited and advance reservations are required. Tastings take place each night at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $22 for museum members or $27 for general public (must be 21 or older and show an ID). Tickets include wine or beer tasting, light bites, and entertainment. Additional wine and beer is available each night for purchase. You must be 21 or over to attend the event and show a valid ID.

Due to limited space, reservations are required. Tickets may be purchased by going online to www.ctrivermuseum.org or over the phone at 860-767-8269.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and closed on Mondays after Columbus Day. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors, $5 for children age 6-12, free for children under 6.

For more information, call 860-767-8269 or go to www.ctrivermuseum.org.

Master Knitter Lee Gant at Essex Books, May 9

Join Master Knitter Lee Gant at Essex Books at Gather on Saturday, May 9, from 3 to 4 p.m.

Gant is one of the top knitters in the United States and has been featured on PBS, NPR, and in many magazines. She has knitted pieces for world renowned designer Melissa Leapman and can be seen in Vogue, Knitter’s, and Knit ‘N Style.

Gant’s designs have been featured in many books, including 60 Quick Baby Knits, Knitting 2013 Day-to-Day Calendar, Jamieson’s Shetland Knitting Book 2, and Garter Stitch Baby.

She is part of a very active knitting community on social media: her Facebook page has reached 92,000 people in one week. Gant travels internationally on the knitting circuit and is a well-known authority who is also writing knitting pattern books.

In her inspiring book, Love in Every Stitch: Stories of Knitting and Healing, master knitter, teacher, and widely published knitwear designer Gant shares real-life stories about the power of knitting.

As an employee of three different yarn stores, a teacher of countless knitting classes, and a volunteer with at-risk youth, Gant has had the opportunity to gather diverse stories.

The stories Gant shares about herself and fellow knitters from around the world illustrate how each stitch and purl can comfort and calm, heal and renew. A suicidal teenager crochets through pregnancy. A dying woman finds comfort in the company of knitters. A woman finds the courage to face her estranged parents. A woman going blind realizes she can still knit — and experience life. And Gant’s life, riddled with more than just anxiety, has at last become stable and productive. This book includes stories of women, men, and teens who have experienced profound change and enlightenment through knitting and crochet.

“Another lovely story of hope and inspiration. The benefits of knitting and crocheting are seen every day. More and more people turn to these skills to help them deal with so many upheavals in life. Thank goodness we have those to fall back on when everything else seems to go against us.”
—Bouncing Back

A renowned designer and sought-after teacher, Gant is a household name among knitting enthusiasts. Holding the rank of ‘master knitter,’ she enjoys working with adults and children, as young as age eight, teaching self-empowerment through knitting. Some of her designs can be found in 60 Quick Baby Knits, in Knit Picks and Patternfish online, and at Strings and Things in Kauai. Gant’s knitting has won many first place and best-in-show awards at county fairs in northern California. Her new pattern collection for children’s knitwear will publish in the spring of 2016. She now lives in Santa Rosa, Calif., and formerly lived in Guilford, Conn.

To RSVP, call or text Susan McCann at 914-310-5824.

‘Great Women Architects’ is Tonight’s Topic in Centerbrook Architects Lecture Series

The Aqua tower in Chicago by Jeanne Gang. Photo by George Showman.

The Aqua tower in Chicago designed by Jeanne Gang. Photo by George Showman.

ESSEX — Architectural Historian Professor Chuck Benson presents “Great Women Architects and Designers of the 20th and 21st Centuries” at the Essex Town Hall on Friday, March 27, at 7 p.m.

His illustrated presentation focuses on historical luminaries, such as Marion Mahoney Griffin and Mary Colter, as well as prominent contemporary architects like Billy Tsien, Zaha Hadid, and Jeanne Gang. By rising to the topmost level of a historically male-dominated profession, these women and many others like them have blazed the trail for others to follow.

Dr. Benson has been teaching Art and Architectural History for more than 25 years at various universities and has led groups to explore iconic places and buildings in America, Italy, England, France, Germany, Greece, Turkey, and elsewhere. His lecture credits include MOMA, Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. He studied the history of art and architecture at Yale, and holds advanced degrees from Columbia University. He also has studied at Cambridge and Oxford.

His talk is free and part of the Centerbrook Architects Lecture Series, which is one of many programs that are offered regularly by the Essex Library (http://www.youressexlibrary.org/). Call the library at 860-767-1560 to register.

Sponsored by Centerbrook Architects, the series is in its seventh year.

CANCELLED! ‘Essex Go Bragh’ Irish Parade & Festival Takes Place Today

St. Paddy Day 9

ESSEX — UPDATE 03/21 9 a.m. We have just heard from Mary Ellen Barnes that today’s parade has been cancelled.  She writes, ” Due to the snow and below freezing temperatures this morning, the parade organizers feel that we must cancel the parade.  Our priority is always to ensure the safety of our citizens, parade participants, staff and volunteers and we feel that the road conditions are such that in order to do that we must cancel the parade.  Thank you all for your patience and support.  This was not an easy decision, but a necessary one.  See you in 2016!”

03/13 UPDATE: The ‘Essex Go Bragh’ parade and festival planned for March 14 have been postponed for one week due to inclement weather. Both events will now be held on Saturday, March 21.

‘Essex Go Bragh’ translates as ‘Essex Forever’ and is the name of the Irish Parade and Festival that takes place in town this year on Saturday, March 21.  The Parade will step off from the Essex Town Hall at 10:30 a.m., led by 2014 Grand Marshal Mr. Augie Pampel.

Pampel, has been living and contributing to the Essex Community for many years.  He has worked tirelessly as the Town of Essex Tree Warden since 1994.  He is a proud member of the Essex Garden Club and was instrumental in securing Keep America Beautiful Grants, used for Tree Restoration throughout the three villages.

St. Paddy Day 11 (2)Pampel will lead more than 100 marchers through down Main Street Essex in front of hundreds of spectators. The parade will feature nearly 25 units including elected officials, fife & drum corps, floats, Irish step dancers, boy and girl scouts, community organizations, church groups, police, fire, EMS, military, accompanying service and antique vehicles, and more. Members of the Essex Veterans Memorial Hall are the parade honor guard.

The Festival will follow in the Village offering Food, Drink, Horse Drawn Carriage Rides, Live Music by “Rock of Cashel” at the Griswold Inn, and Kids Activities sponsored by the Community Music School.

st. paddy day 11Professional Face Painting by Z Face & Body Art, an Irish Step Dancing demonstration and Guinness Pour at the Gris are some of the festivities planned for after the parade.  The organizers encourage visitors to stay downtown after the parade, enjoy the festival and visit local restaurants and businesses to check out their special St. Patrick Day promotions.

The organizers invite your group or organization to march in the parade.  To confirm your group’s participation or for more information, contact Essex Park and Recreation at 860-767-4340 x110 or recreation@essexct.gov.

Sponsorship opportunities are as follows:

Band Sponsor – $500 

Name Identification on the banner preceding one of the six bands.

An opportunity to participate in the parade ahead of the band

Sponsor volunteers may distribute marketing materials to spectators.

Logo identification on the park and recreation web site

Logo identification on all Flyers distributed

Float Sponsor – $1,000 

Name identification on banners on both sides of Grand Marshal’s Horse Drawn Carriage

Opportunity to participate or march in the parade ahead of the Carriage

Sponsor volunteers may distribute marketing materials to spectators.

Name identification on all flyers distributed

Name identification on Park and Recreation website, www.essexct.gov

Parade Program Advertisers 

Business card size- $150

1/4 page- $250

Half page- $400

Pettipaug Yacht Club Pushes Back First Spring Work Party to March 28

A snowbound Pettipaug Yacht Club.  Photo by Sandy Sanstrom.

A snowbound Pettipaug Yacht Club. Photo by Sandy Sanstrom.

ESSEX — Kathryn Ryan, Rear Commodore of the Pettipaug Yacht Club, has announced a push back for the club’s first, spring work party, now re-scheduled for Saturday, March 28, at 9 a.m. In making the announcement Commodore Ryan said, “We have not yet seen the continued warmth most of us are anxiously awaiting, and as a result we are still not able to get to Pettipaug easily.”

She continued, “The River still has plenty of ice on it, and we are going to reschedule our first work party of the year to March 28.  With some luck by then all the snow will be gone; the river will be flowing nicely, and the temperatures will be seasonal.”

She continued, “Please consider coming to join us for either this work party, or one of our scheduled work parties in April.  We will hope to get our docks in place at the first work party in March (weather permitting, of course), and the third attempt should be the charm, and then continue getting the club ready at the April events.  Any time you can offer us will be greatly appreciated.”

“Think Spring!” she concluded cheerfully.

Eversource Notifies Essex Community of 2015 Tree Trimming

ESSEX – Augie Pampel, Essex Tree Warden, was notified by Eversource, formerly CL&P, that additional tree trimming in the local community would begin this spring.  Residents will see bucket trucks and chippers from Asplundh and Lucas Tree throughout Essex.  These contractors are obliged by the new PURA(Public Utilities Regulatory Authority) laws to go from door to door to notify abutting owners and ask if the owner agrees with the trimming.

Pampel wants residents to know that, according to these new laws, they have the right to challenge the tree companies about the trimming. Those wishing to challenge the trimming or removal should follow the procedure described in the handouts received from the permissions contact person.

The following information was provided by Eversource and will be given to each abutting property owner affected by the upcoming tree work.

Eversource informs residents that year round trimming is “one of the ways we provide safe and reliable electric service”.  By removing potential hazardous growth close to power lines, they provide not only reliable service but also safer physical and visual access for their employees who work on the lines.  Problems can therefore be solved more efficiently.  Eversource states that all work is performed following professional tree care industry standards and best practices.

There are several clearance specifications outlined in the literature provided to you by the permissions contact. You should discuss the specific one that will be used in your area with the permissions contact, who leaves the permission slip with you.

The trees at risk are:

  • Those trees that can fall on or contact power lines and cause an outage.
  • Tree professionals will determine a tree’s hazardous potential based on species, location, health and structural composition.
  • Eversource arborists will also determine a tree’s risk of causing an outage and prioritize removal accordingly.  If a tree must be removed, it will be cut as low to the ground as possible
  • Critical trimming can occur without permission by the abutting owner if there is evidence that the tree or brush are in direct contact with power lines or have visible signs of burning.  This is “to protect public safety and system reliability.”

Low growing shrubs and grasses will not be removed in order to maintain a low-growing plant community.

Eversource will treat hardwood trees that can re-sprout from a cut stump with an herbicide to prevent regrowth.  As per Eversource, the herbicide has been tested and approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.  It will be “selectively applied with a handheld spray bottle by state licensed and certified personnel only to the outer edge and side of a stump.”

According to the Connecticut General Statutes (22a-66a) certain herbicide label information must be provided to the property owner where herbicides are used.  Property owners can ask the tree contractor requesting permission for trimming if herbicides will be used and request the herbicidal labels.

Eversource will make available to customers free of charge all cut wood or mulch produced from the tree work.  Larger limbs and tree trunks will be cut into manageable lengths and mulch can be dumped where vehicle access is possible.

In an effort to provide effective communication and better customer service, Eversource will seek property owner approval in advance of the tree work.  They will stop at all homes abutting areas of potential work to provide information and request approval for the trimming.  It is incumbent upon the property owner to read the material carefully, ask questions and/or contact the Eversource permissions contractor listed on the enclosed forms provided to property owners.   You may also call Eversource Customer Care Center at 800-286-2000 or the Eversource Business Contact Center at 888-783-6617. You can email Eversource directly at treeCT@eversource.com.

For trees that hang over the public right-of-way, you may ask for additional consultation:

  • If you live on a town road, please contact your local Tree Warden (Augie Pampel).
  • If you live on a state road, contact the state Department of Transportation (DOT), Commissioner’s Office, 2800 Berlin Turnpike, Newington, CT 06131

Not granting permission:

  • If a property owner does not wish to grant approval for the proposed tree work, he/she should follow the procedures outlined in the material left by the permissions contact.
  • Both the property owner and Eversource may further appeal that decision to the state Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) within 10 days.
  • Contact PURA at 10 Franklin Square, New Britain, CT 06051.  PURA will hold a mediation session within 30 days of an appeal or an arbitration hearing within 60 days, to reach a resolution.

According to Eversource, no property owner will be billed for damages to Eversource power lines or equipment caused by trees on the owner’s property that fall, regardless of the outcome of an appeal.

Augie Pampel is available to anyone who may have questions, concerns or who require more information about this upcoming tree work.  Contact him at 860-767-0766

‘Stand By Your Man: The Tammy Wynette Story’ Opens Ivoryton’s 2015 Season

Katie Barton* and Ben Hope*.  Photo by Jacqui Hubbard

Katie Barton* and Ben Hope*. Photo by Jacqui Hubbard

IVORYTON –  Tammy Wynette was a country music icon. Called the “First Lady of Country Music,” she was one of country music’s best-known artists and biggest-selling female singer-songwriters. Wynette’s “Stand by Your Man” was one of the best-selling hit singles by a woman in the history of country music. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Wynette charted 23 No. 1 songs, helping to define the role of women in country music.

‘Stand By Your Man,’ opening at the Ivoryton Playhouse on Wednesday, March 18, brings the woman behind the legend and the incredible songs that made her the first lady of country music, off the stage and into your heart. Through her eyes, the audience relives her journey from the cotton fields of Itawamba, Miss., to international superstar.

With comic flare and dramatic impact ‘Stand By Your Man,’  recounts triumphs and tragedies and explores Tammy’s relationships with the five husbands she stood by, including George Jones, her beloved daughters, her strong-willed mother and two of her dearest friends: colorful writer and producer Billy Sherrill and film star Burt Reynolds. Among the 26 songs are “D-I-V-O-R-C-E,” “Til I Can Make It on My Own” and “Golden Ring.”

Directed  and musically directed by the husband and wife team of David and Sherry Lutken, who were last at the Playhouse in 2012 with ‘Ring of Fire,’ the show stars husband and wife team Katie Barton* and Ben Hope*. Hope made his Broadway debut in 2012 as the lead in the Tony Award winning musical, ‘Once’, and Barton has just recently finished the national tour of ‘Million Dollar Quartet.’ The show also features Eric Anthony*, Guy Fischetti,  Jonathan Brown, Marcy McGuigan*, Morgan Morse, Sam Sherwood*, Lily Tobin* and Louis Tucci*.

The set is designed by Dan Nischan, lighting by Marcus Abbott, wigs by Liz Cipollina and costumes by Anya Sokolovskaya.

‘Stand By Your Man,’ runs through April 5. Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

Tickets are $42 for adults, $37 for seniors, $20 for students and $15 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website atwww.ivorytonplayhouse.org  (Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.)

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

Generously sponsored by:  A.R. Mazotta and Essex Savings Bank

*member of Actors Equity

Local Author George Rider Presents “Rogue’s Road to Retirement” Today at Essex Corinthian Y.C.

Rogue's RoadGeorge Rider has taken a unique approach to growing old – don’t do it!

After retiring, Rider embarked on a bumpy journey to find himself and a new lease on life.

For the first time, he got in touch with his creative side, an unusual direction indeed, since he spent 70 years of his life as a college athlete turned Navy officer turned Wall Street trader and weekend jock.

Told through a series of uproariously humorous and sometimes poignant adventures, The Rogue ‘ s Road to Retirement is about getting back in touch with your inner rascal and getting off your duff (Rider ends up in an MTV video, a Pepsi ad doing the polka, and Sports Illustrated …)

Rider’s adventures and stories reflect on finding a new passion in retirement by:
  • being kind to your kids (after all, you need them to do the lawn work now)
  • discovering the joys of guilt-tripping your grandchildren into hanging out with you
  • struggling with the age-old dilemma – take another nap or go to the gym
  • driving your spouse nuts now that you’re both home 24/7
  • barhopping (or barhobbling) after age 65
  • savoring the sweet memories of friends and loved ones now gone … and much more.
The Rogue’s Road to Retirement is about the rebels, raconteurs, and roués who refuse to grow old gracefully, who want to grow old the way they grew up – raising hell, having fun, and giving their kids and grandkids a run for their money.
The Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is pleased to host Rider in his home town and yacht club on Sunday, March 15, at 4 p.m.
The presentation is free of charge and open to the public,
Essex Corinthian Yacht Club is located at 9 Novelty Lane in Essex.  For more information, call 860-767-3239 or visit www.essexcorinthian.org

Senators Linares, Formica Tour CT River Museum

From left to right: Museum Executive Director Chris Dobbs, Museum Trustee Eileen Angelini, Sen. Linares, Museum Vice Chairman Joanne Masin, and Sen. Formica.

From left to right: Connecticut River Museum Executive Director Chris Dobbs, Museum Trustee Eileen Angelini, Sen. Linares, Museum Vice Chairman Joanne Masin, and Sen. Formica.

On March 9, area legislators toured the Connecticut River Museum on Main Street in historic Essex village.  Senator Art Linares of Westbrook and Senator Paul Formica of East Lyme pledged to continue to raise public awareness of the museum at the State Capitol and throughout their senate districts.

On the web:  www.ctrivermuseum.org .

The Big Thaw, Hopefully, Prayerfully, Is  Coming Soon …

The launching basin for the Frostbite Yacht Club races, which is totally iced over. Also, the boat crane (on right), that puts the boats in the water is currently of no use.

The launching basin for the Frostbite Yacht Club races, which is totally iced over. Also, the boat crane (on right), that puts the boats in the water is currently of no use.

But don’t bet on it!

The Frostbite Yacht Club in Essex was scheduled to hold its first races off Essex Harbor on Sunday, March 1.  But the launching basin, where club’s members put their boats in the water, was covered over with thick ice and snow.

So the Frostbite sailors postponed their first race of the season to the next Sunday, March 8.  However, these races were also cancelled, because of the ice over the launching basin.

Will the ice thaw by Sunday, March 15?  That’s an open question.

Also, the Committee Boat that monitors the Frostbite Yacht Club sailing races is frozen in its berth in Middle Cove in Essex, and it too was locked in ice on March 1 and 8.  Can it get out by March 15?

Pettipaug Yacht Club Frozen In

Paul Risseeuw, Director of Pettipaug Sailing Academy, is pictured at the head of the driveway that goes down to the Pettipaug Yacht Club. The club is directly on the shore of the Connecticut River.

Paul Risseeuw, Director of Pettipaug Sailing Academy, is pictured at the head of the driveway that goes down to the Pettipaug Yacht Club. The club is directly on the shore of the Connecticut River.

 

Then, there are the docks that are waiting to go into the water at the Pettipaug Yacht Club.  The club is located directly on the shoreline of the Connecticut River.  Work parties were scheduled to put the docks in the water on Saturday, March 14.

The Director of the Pettipaug Sailing Academy, Paul Risseeuw, said, however, it is “highly unlikely,” that the work parties will work as scheduled.

The jumble of mooring poles in Essex Harbor. The poles will all have to be lifted out of the water and replanted for the coming boating season.

The jumble of mooring poles in Essex Harbor. The poles will all have to be lifted out of the water and replanted for the coming boating season.

Risseeuw said, “The ice on the river has to go away enough and enough snow has to melt for members to get down to the club; and the docks have to be accessible to be dragged over to the crane to put them in the water.”  Risseeuw won’t even commit that the way will be clear enough for the work parties to begin on by Saturday, March 21.

As for the high school teams that are scheduled to start sailing races off the Pettipaug Yacht Club on Monday, March 16, Risseeuw feels, assuredly, that their races will have to be postponed.  The teams are from the Daniel Hand High School in Madison and Xavier High School in Middletown.

Connecticut River Museum Announces April Vacation Week Workshops

kids.creating.art.2014

Join the Connecticut River Museum during April School Vacation for a week of creativity and discovery. Come for one session or the whole week.

Kid_drawing_CRMThis year the Connecticut River Museum (CRM) will run two Vacation Workshop sessions.  Session I runs April 6-10, Session II runs April 13-17. Each Session’s programs are Monday – Friday from 9:00am – 12:00pm.  When school is out, CRM is the place to be — bring your imagination and come prepared to create and experiment during an exploration of the River and its history.

The workshops are designed for ages 6 – 12 and include exploration activities in the museum, time outdoors doing nature, science and history projects, and arts and crafts. Programs are $20/day, $85/week for CRM members and $25/Day, $110/week for nonmembers. Advance registration is required and space is limited.

To register, visit ctrivermuseum.org/camps-workshops for details on each day’s program and to download the registration form.  Email jwhitedobbs@ctrivermuseum.org or call 860.767.8269 x113 to reserve. The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street.

 

Is Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman Running for a Third Term? That is the Question 

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman stands beneath a new awning at the parking lot of Essex Town Hall

Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman stands beneath a new awning at the parking lot of Essex Town Hall

If you listen to Essex’s First Selectman, Norman Needleman, he will tell you that — really, truly — he has not made up his mind, whether to run for a third term as First Selectman of Essex … or not.  It must be acknowledged that Needleman’s first two terms as Essex First Selectman have been noteworthy, especially, as regards upgrading the public landscape of the Town of Essex. Needleman’s accomplishments in this area include:

  • Essex Town Center
    Needleman has created and supervised a major upgrade of the Town Center of Essex. New improvements include: (a) reconditioning of Essex’s two tennis courts, (b) building a new and imaginative Essex playscape for children, which has proved to be very popular for young and old alike, (c) a new Town Hall parking lot with parking spaces clearly and precisely lined, and (d) new landscaping of the grounds in the front of Town Hall.Furthermore, Needleman was instrumental in raising significant new monies to help pay for these improvements. The total cost of the upgraded Essex Town Center was $700,000 with $480,000 of that amount raised through a Connecticut Small Town Economic Assistance Program (STEAP) grant initiated by Needleman to help pay for the costs.
  • Ivoryton Main Street Upgrade
    Needleman also raised $400,000 from a second STEAP grant to pay for a major upgrade of the town center of Ivoryton. The improvements will include new cross walks and parking areas, along with a general reconfiguration of the Ivoryton town center. The final plans for the  Ivoryton improvements have been completed so now it is a question of implementing them.If Needleman runs successfully again for Essex First Selectman, he will be able supervise the construction of these already-funded Ivoryton improvements. If on the other hand, he chooses not to run, a new Essex First Selectman would be in charge.
  • Centerbrook Improvements
    Upgrading of the town center of Centerbrook is another town improvement under consideration by Needleman. If this project were to go forward, he says there would most likely be an effort to obtain yet another state STEAP grant to pay for it.  Considering Needlman’s success in obtaining approvals for STEAP grants for both Essex and Ivoryton, it seems likely that he may be able to do so again for this initiative.

Needleman’s Private Job in Essex  

Headquarters of Tower Laboratories LTD, in Essex Industrial Park

Headquarters of Tower Laboratories LTD, in Essex Industrial Park

In addition his public position as First Selectman of the Town of Essex, Needleman is also the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Tower Laboratories, LTD. “Tower Labs,” as it is called in abbreviated form, is a sizeable private company that has no less than 250 employees.

The company specializes in the manufacturing of health and beauty aids, which are sold worldwide. The headquarters of the company is located in two building in the Essex Industrial Park, and the company also has two other locations.

Letter to the Editor: The Reign of the Nuancers

To the Editor:

The Kings and Queens of nuance have deluded themselves into believing that the delicate difference perceived by any of the senses (nuance) gives them a superior ability to make decisions. It appears, however, that nuance is running rough-shod over any semblance of wisdom coming from the Obama administration.

The nuancers are deflecting the reality that worldwide murderous Islamic jihadists are intent on killing all who do not believe in their revolutionary ideology; they are bound by an imperative to fight to kill infidels till death.

This administration’s tag-team of haughty wizards have offered nothing of value. Their fanciful ideas and statements are alarming and devoid of intellectual honesty. Deputy spokesperson for the Department of State, Marie Harf, posits that the extremists are driven by economic deprivation and need jobs — really?

John Kerry, the emperor of nuance, offers the ludicrous statement that the world is “safer than ever.” Kerry hardly inspires confidence in those of us who hear direct threats, witness barbarous immolation and beheadings and understand what is motivating the slaughter. Does Kerry even know that 2014 was the deadliest year for terror attacks in forty-five years?

All of this nonsense is coming from the same administration who made the incogitable decision to trade Bowe Bergdahl, the deserter, for five high-value Taliban prisoners. And why does this administration continue to cuddle-up to Foreign Nationals who continue to break immigration laws. One can only imagine, because we just do not know, how many jihadists are slipping through the borders.

Is the current accommodates approach to Iran another decision influenced by nuance? The last time I checked, Iran was the leading sponsor of State Terrorism and too close to having nuclear capabilities. They would love the “deal” being contemplated by this White House. The “geniuses” are beginning to scare me. They believe that the just war is the war against “global warming” (the biggest hoax ever perpetrated on humankind) and refuse to accept that radical Islamists are driven to wipe out Christians, Jews and moderate Muslims who are, in their minds, infidels.

There are no shades of gray here. The nuancers need to get off their high horse, stop the verbal acrobatics, get a grip and LEAD.

Sincerely,

Alison Nichols,
Essex, CT

TTYSB Encourages Residents to Get Involved in the ‘Year of the Story’

TTYS placemat
Have you noticed the “2015: Year of the Story” placemats at some of your favorite restaurants in the tri-town area, including Moravella’s, Pattaconk, The Villager and Wheat Market in Chester;  DaVinci Pizza, The Ivory, and the Whistle Stop in Deep River; and Centerbrook Pizza in Essex?

Tri-Town Youth Services Bureau (TTYSB) is grateful for the support of these businesses in getting out the word about this year’s Community Story project. Individual adults and youth are also stepping up to participate in this story-making process. Each person, whatever their involvement, does make a difference.

Do you want to pass on your knowledge, experience, sense of resilience and possibility? What has it meant for you to be part of the Tri-Town community?

TTYSB encourages everyone to beciome involved in this project to celebrate our community through stories

How?

First, consider the most challenging thing you had to face while growing up; how did you manage to overcome it? Then tell your story to a trained story-gatherer—many of these volunteers are your friends and neighbors and they will be collecting stories through April, 2015. After that a professional playwright will be turning our community members’ stories into a one-act play. T

Then during the summer of 2015, volunteer to become a member of the cast, crew or audience for the community performance to be held on Oct. 2, 3 and 4th. Three performances, two evening shows and a matinee, will ensure that every community member will get a chance to attend.

Finally, explore additional ways to build assets, community connections and supportive relationships for the benefit of individuals, families and the community throughout 2015 and beyond.

Photo Exhibit Featuring Architects as Traveling Photographers on View at Centerbrook Firm

Exhibit taken in Thailand by Alan Paradis.\

Photo taken in Thailand by Alan Paradis.\

Architects like to travel and usually pack their cameras when they do, and they often see and capture things that others miss. Centerbrook’s peripatetic staff have collected their printed observations from across the globe, and are displaying them in the Drill Bit Gallery at Centerbrook Architects, 67 Main Street in Centerbrook, CT.

“The World According to Architects” is free to the public, weekdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the firm’s offices, which are located in a former factory building that produced metal augurs. It runs March 9 through Labor Day.

Subject matter ranges from graffiti in Thailand and a Hawaiian beach, to a riotously colorful Jamaican fishing village and downtown Essex with a double rainbow arching over the Connecticut River Museum.

More than two dozen prints, one by each photographer, are displayed, augmented by five video screens that allow visitors to view hundreds more images taken by the exhibitors. Photographs of buildings such as Jean Nouvel’s stunning Torre Agbar in Barcelona, a chapel in the Alps, and a red barn in Amish Country are complemented by scenes of nature, people, and striking landscapes, such as a skerry (small rocky island) in Norway. One photo captures the rocks on Bermuda’s Horseshoe Bay Beach that appear to be acknowledging the ocean that helped to shape them.

“This exhibit follows on the heels of an architects’ watercolor show.” said Centerbrook Partner Mark Simon. “It is rare that you find such a large group of visually sophisticated people, and we are delighted to showcase their extraordinary talent in yet another medium.”

The exhibit was organized by Matt Montana, head of the Drill Bit Gallery, and curated by Derek Hayn, the firm’s Graphic Designer, and Patrick McCauley, Master Model Maker and Product Designer. Founded in 1975, Centerbrook Architects has a staff of 66 people.

Exhibit taken in Essex by Brian Adams

Photo taken in Essex by Brian Adams

CBSRZ Hosts Community Passover Seder, April 4; Reserve by March 20

Do you remember the smell of Grandma’s Matzah Ball soup simmering on the stove as she prepared for Passover seder?

If you are looking for an opportunity to reconnect with your Jewish heritage, make a call to learn about Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek (CBSRZ)’s Community Passover Seder at the synagogue in Chester.

The seder will be on the second night of Passover, Saturday, April 4, starting at 6 p.m.  The family-style seder, led by Rabbi Rachel Goldenberg and Cantorial Soloist Belinda Brennan, will stimulate lots of discussion, participation, and singing.

The meal, as prepared by Bob and Linda Zemmel, owners of Alforno Restaurant, will include delicious brisket, chicken, homemade matzah ball soup and many side dishes.  There will also be kid-friendly options.

Call the CBSRZ office at860-526-8920 for information on prices and to make a reservation.  Reservations are required no later than March 20.

Essex Library Association Hosts Artist Exhibit by Susan Chamberland During March

"Are We There Yet?"
ESSEX – An art exhibit will be held at Essex Library Association, 33 West Ave., through the month of March featuring guest artist, Susan F. Chamberland.  The exhibit is free and open to all.

Chamberland, a 21-year-member and past-president of the Essex Art Association, lives in Ivoryton and has been bending and making paper, painting on silk and photographing abstract earthly elements for 40 years.

She is an avid sailor. Her work is simple, graphic, often combining elements surrounding water.  Chamberland’s art mixes earth bound images in mystical ways which host incongruous messages implanted in their titles. Edge is ever prevalent in her pieces, mixing color and contrast, enveloping the viewer to question.

Recently, Chamberland has completed her first children’s novel, The Adventures of Minifred the Mouse. The story brings the reader on a voyage from Liverpool to Boston during the 1848 Irish potato famine through the antics of a six month-old abandoned kitten and a smarty pants ship board mouse.

More of her work can be seen on her website: www.susanfchamberland.com

All Performances of ‘Motherhood Out Loud’ at Ivoryton This Weekend Cancelled

Pictured from top left are Beverley Taylor and Michael Cartwright. From bottom left – Atticus Nischan, Jeanie Rapp, Kase Vradenburgh, Vanessa Vradenburgh, Elle Vradenburgh. Photograph by Anne Hudson

Gathered for a photo are some of the Motherhood Out Loud performers and their children. From top left are Beverley Taylor and Michael Cartwright and from bottom left, Atticus Nischan, Jeanie Rapp, Kase Vradenburgh, Vanessa Vradenburgh, Elle Vradenburgh.  Photograph by Anne Hudson

1:30pm Update: Due to the threat of bad weather this weekend, all three performances of Motherhood Out Loud have been cancelled.

CANCELLED:  Friday, February 20 at 7:30pm in partnership with Women and Family Life Center
CANCELLED:  Saturday, February 21 at 7:30pm in partnership with Community Foundation of Middlesex County to support the Sari A. Rosenbaum Fund for Women & Girls
CANCELLED:  Sunday, February 22 at 2:00pm in partnership with Child and Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut

Call the Ivoryton Playhouse at 860.767.7318 for ticket refunds.

ESSEX – “Mom!” “Mommy!!” “Ma!!!” How many times a day does a mother hear these words? Being a mother is one of the most rewarding, hilarious, joy-filled and heartbreaking jobs in the world. Come and celebrate all things Mom during a staged reading of Motherhood Out Loud at the Ivoryton Playhouse on Feb. 20, 21 and 22 to benefit local agencies that promote programs for women and children.

Motherhood Out Loud features a great variety of pieces by women reflecting upon the diversity of the parenting experience in America today, yet at the same time, the universality of it. From the wonder of giving birth to the bittersweet challenges of role reversal and caring for an aging parent, it is all shared with tremendous candor, heart and humor.

Conceived by Susan R. Rose and Joan Stein, Motherhood Out Loud is written by a collection of award-winning American writers including Leslie Ayvazian, Brooke Berman, David Cale, Jessica Goldberg, Beth Henley, Lameece Issaq, Claire LaZebnik, Lisa Loomer, Michele Lowe, Marco Pennette, Theresa Rebeck, Luanne Rice, Annie Weisman and Cheryl L. West.

Henley is a Pulitzer-Prize winner, Rebeck is the creator of the television series SMASH, and Pennette was Executive Producer of Desperate Housewives and Ugly Betty and is Executive Producer of Kirstie Alley’s television show. Luanne Rice is the New York Times best-selling author of 33 novels, who has a home in Old Lyme.

Directed by Maggie McGlone Jennings (who has directed several shows at the Playhouse), the play features local actors who are well known in the shoreline community. The cast includes Beverley Taylor (a regular on the Playhouse stage), Jeanie Rapp (known to local audiences as the artistic director of Margreta Stage), Vanessa Daniels and Michael Cartwright.

This special production is a partnership between the Ivoryton Playhouse and several different organizations that promote programs for women and children. Friday, Feb. 20, is in partnership with Women & Family Life Center in Guilford; Saturday, Feb. 21, is in partnership with the Sari A. Rosenbaum Fund for Women & Girls at the Community Foundation of Middlesex County; and Sunday, Feb. 22, is in partnership with Child & Family Agency of Southeastern CT. The Ivoryton Playhouse is proud to partner with three different organizations to raise funds to help those in need in New Haven, Middlesex and New London Counties.

Performance times are Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m; Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $40 and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting the Playhouse’s website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org

The Playhouse is located at 103 Main St. in Ivoryton.

‘China Day’ at Essex Elementary Offers Lantern Learning

3rd Grader Raegan Wyrebek-Brasky makes a paper lantern during EESF's China Day.

3rd Grader Raegan Wyrebek-Brasky makes a paper lantern during EESF’s China Day.

ESSEX – Second and third grade students recently practiced martial arts, made paper lanterns and learned new letters during China Day at Essex Elementary School.  The celebration, funded by the Essex Elementary School Foundation’s (EESF) Justus W. Paul World Cultures Program, included activities with Asian Performing Arts of Connecticut and Malee’s School of Tae Chi.
Chinese lanterns made during China Day at Essex Elementary School funded by the EESF.

Chinese lanterns made during China Day funded by EESF at Essex Elementary School. .

The EESF is looking for your support.  The not-for-profit, volunteer organization provides funds for enrichment programs that bring a mathematician and historian-in-residence into the classrooms, as well as an iPad lab and author visits.

For donation information, visit www.essexelementaryschoolfoundation.org.