August 26, 2016

‘Plywood Cowboy’ Plays a ‘Concert in the Garden’ Tonight

Photo courtesy of Steve Dedman

Photo courtesy of Steve Dedman

CHESTER – Plywood Cowboy will present a Special Friday Night Concert at the Leif Nilsson Studio on Friday, July 8, from 7 to 9 p.m.

Formed in 2015 in the Connecticut River Valley, Plywood Cowboy is poised to rewrite the American Songbook. “With great harmonies, clever songs & tasty guitar pickin’, Plywood Cowboy is one of the best new bands on the Americana scene,” said Chris Bergson, NY Blues Hall of Fame Inductee. Bottle-fed on roots music, multi-instrumentalist and singer/songwriter Steve Dedman and his band strike deep at the soul of American music with songs about hound dogs, heart strings, and the vice of the bottle.

Plywood Cowboy is reaching new audiences through their expanding live performance schedule, and is currently writing and recording new material that is on track for a debut album release in 2016. Their music reflects decades of playing and performing experience by Steve and his band mates. Combining Austin Gray’s ever-present harmonies and palpable telecaster work, Shane Tanner’s warm Fender bass lines and Henry Yorzinski’s exacting drumwork, Plywood Cowboy’s music sits comfortably on the ears of its listeners.

The band has appeared numerous times on iCRV Radio and has been a featured band on WESU 88.1FM ‘Voice of the City’. They’ve also found the spotlight on stages throughout Connecticut including Infinity Hall and The Kate, and destination venues from Monadnock Pumpkin Festival (NH) to Puckett’s (TN). In addition to the core lineup, guest musicians are often featured at live performances, including Emily Marcello on violin, and others on pedal steel, tenor saxophone, and banjo.

Cowboys of the airwaves, no one in the band owns any cows. Not as of yet, at least. Steve learned to play guitar from his father, David, and family friend John Hanus, who would pick guitars and sing their favorite country songs over their CB radios, and take the time on Sundays to teach Steve how to pick in country-western style. From Kris Kristopherson to Lefty Frizzell, John and David taught a young Steve true American music. Few knew John by his real name, but many knew him by his CB handle, “Plywood Cowboy,” a reference to his day job hauling lumber around the Northeast. Though both CB’ers have left the airwaves, it is through the band’s music that their influences will forever be heard.

Follow the herd with Plywood Cowboy on the path to release their debut album and enjoy the sounds of “incredible, toe-tapping, quality Ameriana music” (Ibby Carothers, iCRV Radio). More at http://www.plywoodcowboy.com/

A $20 donation at the door is requested. Feel free to BYOB and picnic and enjoy the outdoor bistro style seating in the amphitheater (inside the gallery if inclement weather).Gates open a half hour before the show. First come first seated. Sorry, no pets allowed.  For more information, call (860) 526-2077 or visit http://www.nilssonstudio.com. The studio is at 1 Spring Street, in the heart of Chester Center.

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Buy Tickets Now for Essex Community Fund’s Evening at Ivoryton Playhouse, Sept. 8

Essex Community Fund event in 2015.

Essex Community Fund event in 2015.

ESSEX – Tickets are selling quickly for the Essex Community Fund’s Evening at the Ivoryton Playhouse on Thursday, Sept. 8. Featuring one of the world’s most popular musicals, The Man of La Mancha,  ECF’s Evening at the Playhouse stars Connecticut’s own David Pittsinger.

Inspired by Cervantes’ Don Quixote, considered by many to be “the best literary work ever written,” The Man of La Mancha features the antics of Don Quixote and his faithful sidekick Sancho Panza. Come hear songs like “The Impossible Dream” and “I, Don Quixote” and many others.

Pre-show reception and festivities begin at 6:30 p.m. under the tent with a post-show “Meet the Cast” dessert and coffee. All proceeds go to support ECF’s ongoing mission to enhance the quality of life for the residents of our three villages. For tickets ($75) or to make a donation, contact a board member or visit www.essexcommunityfund.org.

The Essex Community Fund began over 65 years ago with the same goal – helping local non-profits provide much needed services for the residents of our three villages. Its mission is to enhance the quality of life of residents in Essex, Centerbrook and Ivoryton. This is accomplished by identifying community needs, providing financial support, and forging partnerships with local non-profit organizations.

Some recent initiatives include Compassion Counts: Exploring Mental Wellness, Teen Hunger Initiative, and The Bridge Fund, as well as continuing involvement with the Fuel Assistance Program, The Shoreline Soup Kitchen, Essex Park and Recreation, and the Essex Board of Trade programs and events. For more information or to make a donation, please visit www.essexcommunityfund.org.

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38th Annual Chester Road Race Attracts 800+ Runners

And they're off! (Al Malpa photo)

And they’re off! (Al Malpa photo)

On a glorious Fourth of July morning, 800-plus runners (and a few walkers) participated in the 38th Fourth on the Fourth Chester Road Race. Four miles, up and down Chester’s many hills, the race is a major fundraiser for the Chester Rotary Club and attracts many of the same runners year after year.
Chris Rosenberg of Old Saybrook, the store manager of Sound Runner, was the first place winner with a time of 21:13. Chris won the race in 2015 as well. (Al Malpa photo)

Chris Rosenberg of Old Saybrook, the store manager of Sound Runner, was the first place winner with a time of 21:13. Chris won the race in 2015 as well. (Al Malpa photo)

Nick Fresenko, of Louisville, Ohio, was second overall. His time was 21:38. (Al Malpa photo)

Nick Fresenko, of Louisville, Ohio, was second overall. His time was 21:38. (Al Malpa photo)

Coming in third place overall, Lee Cattanach, with a time of 21:54. (Al Malpa photo)

Coming in third place overall, Lee Cattanach of New London, with a time of 21:54. (Al Malpa photo)

 

The list of winners in each category can be seen here: 2016 road race results

 

Cheryl Anderson was the first woman to win, with a time of 23:11. (Al Malpa photo)

Cheryl Anderson was the first woman to win, with a time of 23:11. (Al Malpa photo)

 

The POW/MIA veterans group comes every year to run in the Chester Road Race. (Al Malpa photo)

The POW/MIA veterans group comes every year to run in the Chester Road Race. (Al Malpa photo)

 

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Chester Library Says Goodbye to Linda Fox, Hello to Stephanie Romano

A reception for outgoing Library Director Linda Fox and incoming Director Stephanie Romano will be held at Chester Library on July 7. (Skip Hubbard photo)

A reception for outgoing Library Director Linda Fox and incoming Director Stephanie Romano will be held at Chester Library on July 7. (Skip Hubbard photo)

CHESTER – After 13-plus years of being the Director of Chester Public Library, Linda Fox retires from her position on Thursday, July 7, and Stephanie Romano stepped into Linda’s position full-time on July 6.

Linda wrote the Library Board of Trustees in February, to tell them of her plan to leave the library this summer. She said, “Being a Public Library Director is a job that I never expected to love, but love it I have for more than a decade.  It has been challenging, rewarding and a great pleasure to work for and with you, the library staff, the Friends, and the people of Chester.  We’ve accomplished good things together, haven’t we?  The library is more technologically current, staff and service hours have been expanded, and the community is more engaged with the library, not to mention that we are closer than ever to creating an accessible, 21st-century library building for the community.  The thought of not being around for the opening of those doors brings with it a true sense of disappointment.”

Longtime Library Friends member Sally Murray said, “Linda has consistently given her all, and then some, for the people of Chester; her tireless efforts have brightened our town in ways most people will never recognize but which benefit all of us.”

Longtime Library Board of Trustees Chairman Terry Schreiber, who hired Linda in 2002 and Stephanie this spring, added, “We feel Stephanie will be a perfect match for our library. She is enthusiastic and willing to reach out to people to continue to make Chester Library a warm, friendly, welcoming place.  We will miss Linda very very much – she was the face of the library for so many years – but we wish her well and know she looks forward to new  adventures.”

Stephanie Romano comes to Chester from the Old Lyme-Phoebe Griffin Noyes Library, where she worked since May 2007, most recently as Access Services Manager (see separate article on LymeLine.com here). Describing herself, Stephanie wrote, “My path to being a librarian has not been a direct one! I worked at Research Books (a book distributor for corporate libraries) in Madison for about eight years before deciding to go back to school. The work I was involved in with Research Books involved interaction with librarians on all different levels and was the reason I chose to pursue a degree in Library Science.  I loved the fact that every librarian I spoke with, no matter which field they were in, loved their job.  I knew that I also wanted a job that I was going to love after 25 years.”

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Happy Fourth! Celebrate at Essex Harbor 4th of July Boat Parade

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAESSEX – The Annual Essex Harbor 4th of July Boat Parade will be held on Monday, July 4.  All boats are welcome to join the parade.

Boats are encouraged to “Dress Ship” and assemble around Day Marker 25 at 12:45 p.m.  The parade will start at 1 p.m. and proceed clockwise around the harbor twice.

Skippers should monitor VHF Channel 69 for parade instructions.

The parade will be led by the Commodore of the Essex Corinthian Yacht Club, Steve Rodstrom, in his 27-foot Bertram “Osprey.” If you have any questions, contact Steve at commodore@essexcorinthian.org or 207-841-2333.
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Maple and Main Gallery’s Summer Exhibit on View through Sept. 4

"Daffodils and Oak," by Claudia Van Nes, at Maple and Main Gallery

“Daffodils and Oak,” by Claudia Van Nes, at Maple and Main Gallery

CHESTER – Over 230 new paintings and sculptures by 46 artists will be featured in the annual Summer Exhibit at Maple and Main Gallery, which is on view through Sept. 4.

This exhibit showcases a wide selection of art from traditional seascapes and landscapes to vibrant abstracts, from collage and encaustic to oil, pastel and watercolor.

The gallery is highlighting an artist each week who will show additional work and give a demonstration or talk.

On display in the Stone Gallery during July is “Quiet Places,” an exhibit of work by artists Kim Petersen and Elvira Omaechea.

Maple and Main, at One Maple Street, Chester, is open Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday from noon to 7 p.m.; and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.  For more information, visit mapleandmaingallery.com or call 860-767-6065.

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Celebrate the Fourth Today at Ivoryton’s Independence Day Parade

CMS New Horizons Band (file photo)

CMS New Horizons Band (file photo)

IVORYTON –  The 11th annual Ivoryton Village Independence Day Parade (formerly The 4th of July Parade) will take place on Saturday, July 2, at 10 a.m. The parade will wind through the village of Ivoryton, ending at the Ivoryton Park. The patriotic ceremony begins in the Park gazebo immediately following the parade. The ceremony features speakers and singers. The New Horizons Band from the Community Music School will play.

Everyone is welcome to march, including children on decorated bikes along with motorized cars and tractors and floats. The parade will line  up vehicles at 9:15, with marching groups gathering at 9:30 at Walnut and Main Streets. Motorized vehicles will form on Cheney Street. If you are interested in joining the parade or would like more information, please contact ealvord@ivoryton.com.

The parade this year will coincide with the Ivoryton Village Farmers Market – food and music in the park. The Ivoryton Tavern and the Blue Hound Cookery will have parade specials. Ivoryton also welcomes  Brickside Pizza, 104 Main St., for take-out pizza and calzones.
In the event of rain, the parade will be cancelled, but the ceremony at the gazebo will be held at 10 a.m.
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Last Chance to See ‘Downtown Chester’ Original Paintings at Maple and Main Gallery Today

Dan Nichols paints a Chester scene

Dan Nichols paints a Chester scene

“Downtown Chester,” a show of original paintings done by Maple and Main Gallery artists depicting the center of Chester, will be at the gallery Friday, July 1 through Sunday, July 3.

The paintings in the Downtown Chester show were mainly done during June, a number of them from the gallery porch, in the street during the Chester Sunday Market and along the sidewalks.

The show will open Friday at noon until 8 p.m., and will remain open Saturday, July 2 from noon to 6 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

Maple and Main is at One Maple Street in Chester. For more information, go to mapleandmaingallery.com or call 860-526-6065. Hours: Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday, noon to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 7 p.m.

Donna Dubreuil Favreau, "Chester's Farmers Market"

Donna Dubreuil Favreau, “Chester’s Farmers Market”

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Emails Confirm High Speed Rail Through Old Lyme

We received the following as a press release from SECoast on June 29. It has been published on the organization’s Facebook page and website with the supporting documentation, which for technical reasons, we are currently unable to publish.

Emails obtained by SECoast as part of a Freedom of Information Act request filed with the Connecticut Department of Transportation, indicate that the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) decided four months ago to route the next generation of high speed rail infrastructure on a new bypass through Old Lyme and eastern coastal Connecticut. They have yet to announce this decision publicly.

Gregory Stroud, executive director of SECoast, a nonprofit collaborative on issues of preservation in Southeastern Connecticut and the Lower Connecticut River Valley, obtained internal Connecticut Department of Transportation emails from Commissioner James Redeker to Public Transportation Chief James Andreski which appear to confirm FRA   plans for a Kenyon, Rhode Island to Old Saybrook, Conn., high speed rail bypass through Old Lyme in or adjacent to the I-95 corridor. These plans would also include a separate New Haven to Springfield, Mass., route as part of a newly “modified” NEC Future: Alternative 2 proposal.

Within two days of the close of public comment, agency emails indicate that the FRA had committed to a coastal bypass route through Connecticut. Redeker writes on Feb. 18, 2016, that “after spending a few hours with the team, David Carol tells me the NEC Future team … will be leaving the Kenyon bypass for the spine to Boston, because they are completely focused on delivering four-track capacity to Boston.”

Carol, a former Old Lyme resident, is heading efforts by Parsons Brinckerhoff to develop high speed rail between Boston and Washington, DC. The multinational engineering and design firm, a veteran of such projects as the Big Dig in Boston, and the Raymond E. Baldwin bridge at the mouth of the Connecticut river, is leading a state and federal project, dubbed NEC Future, to modernize high speed rail along the Northeast Corridor.

The possibility of a Kenyon to Saybrook bypass, a surprise late addition to past evaluations of high speed rail, has provoked widespread concern and opposition from citizens and organizations in the region, and prompted roughly 1200 public comments to the Federal Railroad Administration out of 3000 from across the United States.

Old Lyme is internationally recognized as the home of American Impressionism, and the FRA’s initial proposal called for a new rail bridge and elevated tracks through the picturesque marshes and heart of the town’s National Register Historic District.

Further emails, after a Feb. 26, 2016 Northeast Corridor Commission meeting of private, state, and federal officials at Parsons Brinckerhoff headquarters in Manhattan, appear to confirm a long-standing decision to route the rail project through Old Lyme in modified form as a tunnel. Andreski informed Redeker and other state transportation officials, that the FRA project manager in charge, Rebecca Reyes-Alicea,“explained the various adjustment [sic] they were making in response to public comments. For example the Old Lyme Kenyon Bypass concept is being modified. Hartford Line [sic] will be included as an additional feeder spine …. Rebecca stated they recognize more work is need on the alternative concepts …. Still I believe they are pressing forward on Alternative 2 with the mods decribed [sic] above.”

“This routing decision will have a major impact on the historic, cultural and environmental resources of Connecticut’s eastern seacoast communities,” said Daniel Mackay, Executive Director of the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation. “The FRA and its consultants settled on a preferred route four months ago – it’s long past time they meet the residents of the region face to face to address numerous concerns about where and how they propose to build this industrial-scale transportation infrastructure, and how they will protect the resources that make these Connecticut communities unique.”

Stroud called on the FRA and Parsons Brinckerhoff to delay the decision on a preferred route until after the project had passed public and environmental scrutiny. “Due diligence can’t follow decision-making in a multi-billion dollar project such as this,” Stroud stated. “These plans for a Kenyon to Saybrook bypass were not part of the original 98 alternatives announced by the federal government in 2012. They have not undergone the same level of agency or public scrutiny as other routes.”

He added, “not one single environmental study has been conducted to determine the feasibility or impact of a tunnel under the Connecticut River estuary or under Old Lyme’s National Register Historic District. Plans for crossing the Thames River are undefined. Not one public meeting on this project has been held in New London or Middlesex counties or southern Rhode Island.”

The state and federal-level conversations captured in these emails occurred several weeks prior to a private March 11, 2016 meeting between David Carol and Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder, aides and other local officials. These emails obtained by SECoast as part of a May 22, 2016 Freedom of Information Act request, funded in part by donations from the local community, are the first public confirmation of FRA plans for high speed rail along the Northeast Corridor.

Two additional Freedom of Information Act requests filed earlier with the Federal Railroad Administration on April 4, 2016 remain unfilled.

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State Police Promote Safe Driving Throughout July 4 Weekend; Sobriety Checkpoints, Roving Patrols Planned Locally

AREAWIDE — The Connecticut State Police Public Information Office has issued the following important press release.

As thousands of drivers plan to travel during the upcoming long holiday weekend, Connecticut State Troopers are also preparing to patrol in increased numbers to keep roads and highways safe for all drivers.

Troop F is planning the following roving patrols and checkpoint locations:

06/30/16                         Roving Patrols – Interstate 95 within Troop F patrol area

07/01/16                         Roving Patrols – Rte. 9 and Rte. 66 in town of Middlefield

07/02/16                         Roving Patrols – I-95 exits 56-71

07/03/16                         Roving Patrols – Rte. 9 and Rte. 66 in town of Middlefield

07/03/16                         DUI Sobriety Checkpoint – At Rte. 156 and Ferry Rd. in the town of Old Lyme. This will be in conjunction with the Breath Alcohol Testing Mobile Unit.

07/04/16                         Roving Patrols – I-95 exits 56-71

July 4 is Monday, allowing for extra time for beach outings, cookouts and fireworks. This translates to increased traffic starting as early as Friday, July 1, and continuing through the evening of July 4.  Many will be driving through and around the state of Connecticut for Independence Day events.

State Police will participate in Operation C.A.R.E. (Combined Accident Reduction Effort) starting at midnight on July 3 and running through midnight on July 5.

Troopers will be strategically placed to reduce speed on the highways and roadways during the holiday period. In addition, State Troopers will operate sobriety checkpoints numerous locations throughout Connecticut. Drivers can expect to experience concentrated enforcement operations at locations where a high number of alcohol-involved crashes and incidents.  (Please see attached list.)

As always, State Police consistently work toward preventing accidents – especially fatal crashes – on Connecticut’s roads and highways. Troopers will utilize laser units, and both marked and unmarked State Police cars to enhance safety and to remove all drunk drivers from Connecticut’s roads.

“We need your help. Obeying the rules of the road is everyone’s responsibility. We ask all drivers to buckle up, adhere to the speed limit, put down cell phones, and please be courteous to other drivers,” said Dora B. Schriro, Commissioner of the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection.

Colonel Alaric J. Fox, Commander of the Connecticut State Police, added, State Troopers depend on drivers to follow the law. Please do not drink and drive since that is a deadly combination. If you are on the road and drunk driver, please call 911, as this is a true emergency.”

Planning to consume alcohol to celebrate our nation’s birthday? Then please designate a driver so that this festive, enjoyable summer weekend does not turn into a tragedy. Never drink and drive.

During July 4, 2015, weekend, Connecticut State Police issued the following number of summons:  859 for speeding and 33 for driving under the influence.  State Police investigated 170 motor vehicle crashes, with injury and two fatalities.

Troopers also issued 2,461 tickets for other hazardous moving violations.

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First Friday to be Celebrated Tonight in Chester Center

CHESTER – Start the July Fourth Weekend off with a bang! Come to First Friday in Chester Center.

On this first of Chester’s First Fridays, the evening of July 1st brings art gallery shows, a trunk show, live music, the opening of the doors of Chester’s newest shop, The French Hen, and more.

The town is buzzing with anticipation about The French Hen, which has just moved here from Essex. On its Facebook page, the shop is described as “a gift boutique where you will discover the beautiful, unique and the curious. Lush with product and creativity, the store will delight your senses.” The French Hen will be at 8 Main St.

Chester’s two other brand-new shops will also be open on First Friday. Strut Your Mutt at 29 Main St. will be hosting a “Yappy Hour” from 6 to 8 p.m. with wine for you and water for your dog. Homage Art Gallery and Café at 16 Main St. is having Teen Open Mic Night from 6 to 8 p.m.

Two pieces in Dina Varano’s new summer collection, “Ocean Dreams.”

ELLE Design Studio presents “Natural Occurrences,” paintings and works on paper, by Deborah Weiss during the month of July. The exhibit opens with an opening reception on July 1, from 5 to 8 p.m.  ELLE design is at 1 Main Street.

At Dina Varano Gallery, First Friday brings the opening of Dina’s jewelry collection for the summer, “Ocean Dreams.” The collection features white and light-hued gemstones with brushed sterling silver that is expertly and intuitively crafted into one-of-a-kind necklaces, earrings, and bracelets. The inspiration came from all things seen and felt at the beach: the light breezes, ocean waves, warm sunshine, and salty-fresh air.

Stop in and take a look at the newly refurbished, resized, refeathered Lark on First Friday, July 1st. Owner Suzie Woodward says, “We are renewed, restored and reinvigorated by the rearranging, readorning and rebrightening of one of Chester’s enchanting shops.  Along with our recelebration for our grand reopening, MaryAnne Delorenzo will be hosting a trunk show featuring beautiful, handmade lamp work and sterling.”

All this plus live music on the Pattaconk Patio, great shopping at the Lori Warner Gallery, and the “Downtown Chester” art show at the Maple & Main Gallery (see separate story and images here).

More details on Facebook.com/VisitChesterCT.

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‘Youth Art Booth’ is Marshview’s ‘Artist of the Month’ for August

The Marshview Gallery’s August Artist of the Month is actually a group of young artists featured in Old Saybrook’s “Youth Art Booth” at the Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Arts and Crafts Festival.

Sponsored by Old Saybrook Youth and Family Services (OSYFS) and Old Saybrook Healthy Communities Healthy Youth (OS HCHY) the Youth Art Booth features a collection of talented young artists each year working in a variety of media.  Since 2005 approximately 175 young artists (ages 7 through college) have been featured in the booth, gaining a unique opportunity to exhibit and discuss their artwork with patrons and other artists at the Festival.

This group of talented young people credits the excellent art programs in Old Saybrook’s public schools for sparking their interest in the arts.  While a few have also studied at private art schools in the area, others have explored working in different mediums on their own!  The booth curator  says that several of the artists who have been featured in the booth in the past have gone on to major in fine art or art education post high school.

The group’s exhibit includes photography; charcoal and pencil drawings; watercolor and acrylic paintings; as well as beadwork and other crafts.  Subject matter will include Landscapes, Fantasy, Shell Art, Animals, Portraits and more.

Everyone is welcome to join us at the Artists’ Reception on Friday, Aug. 12 from 5 to 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

The Estuary Council of Seniors is located at 220 Main St., Old Saybrook

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Award-winning D.B. Rielly Performs Concert in Garden

D.B. Rielly

Photo courtesy of D.B. Rielly

CHESTER – Leif Nilsson Spring Street Studio and Gallery presents the next Concert in the Garden on Thursday, June 30, from 7 to 9 p.m.

D.B. Rielly is an award-winning singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist who, along with his band, performs a wide-ranging collection of Americana music, including Roots, Zydeco, Blues, and Alt-Country. WMLB in Atlanta calls him “one of the best songwriters you’ve never heard of” and Country Music People Magazine says he is “rootsy, frequently very funny, witty and cynical, literate and highly enjoyable. Rielly is definitely someone to watch out for.” D.B. promises his listeners an “instantaneous cure for all afflictions.”

 Check out D.B.’s videos, they are amazing! http://www.youtube.com/dbrielly<.

A $20 donation at the door is requested. Feel free to BYOB and picnic and enjoy the outdoor bistro style seating in the amphitheater (inside the gallery if inclement weather).Gates open a half hour before the show. First come first seated. Sorry, no pets allowed.  For more information, call (860) 526-2077 or visit http://www.nilssonstudio.com. The studio is at 1 Spring Street, in the heart of Chester Center.
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Pettipaug Sailing Academy on “Day One”

Getting the boats in the water at the Pettipaug Yacht Club.

Preparing the boats for entry into the water at the Pettipaug Yacht Club.

ESSEX — Monday, June 27, was the opening day of the sailing classes at the Pettipaug Sailing Academy in Essex. When the sailing classes began, there was no waiting around for talks on dry land. Rather almost immediately the student sailors were ordered to get in their boats, and start sailing around on the Connecticut River.

The weather was perfect for the young, and many inexperienced sailors. There was a steady breeze over the water, but a not too heavy one. Also, the sometimes blazing sun was hidden behind thick clouds. It was perfect sailing weather for the 55 sailing students to take a three-hour class to learn how to sail.

And then, the crews of three to a boat students climb on board,

And then, the crews of three to a boat students climbed on board …

And everything was set and ready to go,

Then everything was set and ready to go …

... for sailing out on the waters of the Connecticut River.

… for sailing out on the waters of the Connecticut River.

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Essex Art Association’s Summer Open Exhibition on Show Through July 23

Golden-Iris-by-C-DunnESSEX — The third exhibition of the Essex Art Association (EAA) 2016 season is an open show whose theme is “Inside Out.” The juror, Jon Sideriadis, is a member of the faculty at Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts in Old Lyme. A science fiction and fantasy illustrator and author, Sideriadis is currently writing and illustrating an original mythology series. $1,700 will be awarded to exhibiting artists for their work in various media.

Each season five EAA artists are selected by a juror to exhibit their work in the small “Exit Gallery.” The Exit Gallery artist during this exhibition is Carol Dunn, an award-winning printmaker, photographer and mixed media artist, specializing in alternative processes for creating artwork. She says, “I enjoy working with many non-traditional mediums. I continue to learn and experiment with new materials and techniques. I also like to combine many techniques into one piece, which often makes it difficult to explain to someone exactly how something was created.”

Dunn continues, “More than anything else in the creative process, I love the interplay of color and texture. I have spent countless hours photographing peeling paint and rusting metal. When I mix inks to begin printmaking, I often get sidetracked by marveling at the pigments on my palette, enjoying how the colors play off each other, wondering what will happen if I mix two unrelated colors into a blend with my brayer.”

She concludes, “Sometimes I think I could just mix colors forever and never begin the actual application of the color to plate or paper. When working with collage, I have difficulty eliminating items, because I find such beauty in the smallest scraps of handmade paper, or an old ledger filled with beautifully drawn numbers, letters, and script.”

Dunn’s techniques include Mixed Media, Photopolymer Etchings, Overprinted Collages, Acrylic Skins, Printing on Handmade Papers, Collagraphs, Prints on Aluminum, Polaroid Emulsion Lifts and Transfers, Linocuts and Monotypes. She notes, “I have a large studio full of natural light, where I enjoy teaching others many of my techniques for art making. I hope you enjoy my work. You can contact me or find out more about my classes, and see more of my work, through my website: www.caroldunnart.com.“

The “Inside Out” exhibition opening reception will be held Friday, July 1, from 6 to 8 p.m. Both exhibits are open at no charge to the public from July 2 to July 23 at the Essex Art Association Gallery located in the sunny yellow building in the center of Essex at 10 North Main Street. Gallery hours are 1-5 p.m. daily, closed Tuesdays.
For more information, call 860-767-8996.
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Ladies of the ‘Historic Sewing Circle’ Visit Deep River Historical Society, Aug. 28

Kandie Carle, here in Edwardian dress, will be one of the Aug. 28 visitors.

Kandie Carle, here in Edwardian dress, will be one of the Aug. 28 visitors.

Come and welcome the ladies of the Historic Sewing Circle who will be gathering at the Deep River Historical Society at the Stone House, 245 Main Street, Deep River on Aug. 28, at 2 p.m.

Ladies from all over Connecticut, who interpret different historical time periods from the 1740s to the early 1900s, will be sewing at the Stone House and discussing their projects with visitors. They will be delighted to chat about their fashions and the sewing techniques of the various eras they represent.

While they have visited numerous other historic sites, this is the first time that they will be at the Stone House in Deep River, and wearing reproduction historic clothing. Also on display will be the Society’s extensive vintage quilt collections and ladies hats.

Photo is of Kandie Carle in Edwardian clothing.

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World Class Frisbee at Deep River Public Library, June 29

Todd Brodeur

Todd Brodeur

DEEP RIVER – Get ready for some high-flying fun when World Class Frisbee visits the Deep River Public Library on Wednesday, June 29, at 6 p.m.

Watch Free-Styling Frisbee Champion Todd Brodeur as he amazes us with some fabulous tricks. You might just learn a few skills to try out on your own! Free and open to all, no registration required.

This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Deep River Public Library.

For more information, go to website at http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, email the Children’s Department at drplchildrensdept@gmail.com or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 5 pm.

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See ‘RENT’ at Ivoryton Playhouse Through Aug. 28

Rent
IVORYTON —  Jonathan Larson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical RENT opens at the Ivoryton Playhouse on Wednesday, Aug. 3, running until Aug. 28.

Johnny Newcomb* as Roger and Alyssa Gomez* as Mimi Marquez in 'Rent' at Ivoryton Playhouse opening Aug. 3.

Johnny Newcomb* as Roger and Alyssa Gomez* as Mimi Marquez in ‘Rent’ at Ivoryton Playhouse opening Aug. 3.

Loosely based on Puccini’s opera, La Boheme, RENT details one year in the life of seven artists and musicians, living in New York’s run down “Alphabet City” in the late 1980s.  As this circle of friends struggle with life, love, infidelity, and the usual hopes & fears of modern day life, they must also cope with drug addiction and the rising specter of AIDS.  In the midst of all this, one of them attempts to capture all of their lives on film, hoping to make artistic sense of it all.

Jonathan Larson died in 1996, the day before his musical opened in New York. He never witnessed its phenomenal success. RENT opened on Broadway on April 29, 1996. It went on to win every major best musical award, including the Tony Award, as well as the Pulitzer Prize for drama.

RENT closed after 5,124 performances and is the seventh longest running show in Broadway history.  Over the course of its groundbreaking 12-year New York run, RENT transformed the definition of musical theater – and changed Broadway forever.  The musical has been translated into every major language and been performed on six continents.

The Ivoryton Playhouse welcomes back returning actors Jamal Shuriah*, Sheniquah Trotman*, Collin Howard*, Tim Russell and Grant Benedict as well as Johnny Newcomb*, Alyssa Gomez*, Patrick Clanton*, Jonny Cortes, Maritza Bostic, Stephanie Genito, Ronnie S. Bowman, Jr, Mac Cherny, Sandra Lee, Josephine Gottfried

This production is directed by Ivoryton Playhouse Artistic / Executive Director Jacqueline Hubbard and is choreographed by Todd Underwood.  Musical director is Michael Morris, with set design by Martin Scott Marchitto, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Lisa Bebey.

After Larson’s death and the amazing success of his musical, his friends wanted to honor his commitment to his community of people whose lives are a daily struggle for survival. They set aside the first two rows at each performance as $20 seats so that the people the show was about could afford to see it. These special tickets would go on sale at 6 p.m. each night and the line usually formed by noon on weekdays and often 24 hours in advance on weekends. In honor of Jonathan Larson and the community that we serve, the Ivoryton Playhouse will save 20 seats for every performance at a $25 price. Those seats will be available after 6 p.m. every show day.

If you are interested in helping support this program or our Little Wonder program that provides a free night at the theatre for patients and their families dealing with the nightmare of cancer, please give Krista a call at 860 767 9520 ext 205.

Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.  Due to popular demand, two additional Saturday matinee performances have been added on Aug. 20 and 27 – both at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $50 for adults; $45 for seniors; $22 for students and $17 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting our website at www.ivorytonplayhouse.org

(Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

*denotes member of Actors Equity

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Opening Reception for Essex Art Association’s Late Summer 2016 Open Show, ‘Lost & Found,’ Aug. 26

Painting by Pamela Ives Paterno, whose work will be on display at the Essex Art Association.

Painting by Pamela Ives Paterno, whose work will be on display at the Essex Art Association.

The fifth and final exhibition of the Essex Art Association (EAA) 2016 season is an open (judged only for awards) show whose theme is “Lost & Found.” The exhibition juror, Nathaniel Foote, a graduate of The Cooper Union, has lived and worked in New England, the Northwest, Europe, and New York City where he won two Emmy awards for art direction/production design and graphic design. $2000 will be awarded to exhibiting artists for their work in various media.

Each season five EAA artists are selected by a juror to exhibit their work in our small “Exit Gallery.” The Exit Gallery artist during this exhibition is Pamela Ives Paterno. Paterno began oil painting when she was in seventh grade but switched to watercolor when she was a young mother. She felt the lighter media called for a light subject matter and birds in flight became a fascinating challenge.

Paterno has studied drawing and painting at The Art Institute in Chicago, Drake University, and Central Connecticut State University. She has won awards in both oil and watercolor and has work in the artists’ collection in the Wethersfield Town Hall. She has illustrated five children’s books and continues to enjoy painting birds and children being caught in action.

The “Lost & Found” exhibition opening reception will be held Friday, August 26, from 6 to 8 pm. Both exhibits are open at no charge to the public Aug. 27 – Sept. 17 at the Essex Art Association Gallery located in the sunny yellow building in the center of Essex at 10 North Main Street, Essex, Conn. Gallery hours are 1 to 5 pm daily, closed Tuesdays. For more information, call 860-767-8996.

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Essex Zoning Commission Approves New Restaurant in Centerbrook Section of Town

30 Main Street, Centerbrook

30 Main Street, Centerbrook

ESSEX — The zoning commission Monday approved a special permit for a new restaurant to be located on the first floor of a partially vacant commercial building at 30 Main St. in the Centerbrook section.

The application of ECC Realty and Colt Taylor was unanimously approved after a brief public hearing where several residents spoke in support of the plans. Taylor told the panel he was raised in Essex,  has been involved with restaurants in both New York and California,and wants to return to open a restaurant in his hometown.

The three-story building at 30 Main St. once housed a restaurant for a few years in the late 1980s, but has housed mostly office uses in recent years. The plans call for a 130-seat restaurant and bar.
In approving the permit, the commission specified that use of the second floor would be limited to a small office for the business and storage. Taylor said he hopes to open the restaurant, which would offer “progressive New England comfort food,” before the end of the year.
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Jacobik Presents Solo Exhibit at Maple & Main Through August; Gives Poetry Reading, Aug. 25

Gray Jacobik

Gray Jacobik

CHESTER – Artist and poet Gray Jacobik is combining paintings and her literary work for the first time in a solo exhibit during August in the Stone Gallery at Maple and Main.

“Lines Spoken: In Paint, in Wax, in Words” will feature broadsides of poems paired with paintings so that these two major modes of expression can talk across lines. The formal written lines of verse, where meaning is in the foreground and the visual or graphic element recedes, will be displayed in conjunction with paintings where the visual message dominates and meaning is no less significant, just less determined.

'Dreams Begin Responsibilities,' acrylic, by Gray Jacobik.

‘Dreams Begin Responsibilities,’ acrylic, by Gray Jacobik.

Gray’s paintings in oil, acrylic and encaustic will be on display along with images of corresponding text from her published books including her latest collection of poetry, The Banquet, which is being nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

The_Banquet_book_coverGray, who lives and works in Deep River, will give a reading of selected work reading from The Banquet, Thursday, Aug. 25, from 7 to 8 p.m. at Maple and Main.

Maple and Main, at One Maple Street, is open Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 6p.m.;  Friday and Saturday, noon to 7 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

For more information, visit Mapleandmaingallery.com or call 860-526-6065.

The Gallery is also on on Facebook and Instagram.

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‘Thursdays on the Dock’ Concludes Aug. 25 at CT River Museum

Geoff Kaufmann will perform Thursday at Connecticut River Museum

Geoff Kaufmann  at Connecticut River Museum

ESSEX — Since 2010, Thursdays on the Dock have become the unofficial start to the summer weekend.  This year, thanks to lead sponsorship from the Essex Wellness Center, the free concert series that features a different band each night and the panoramic views of the Connecticut River is back and bigger than ever.

‘Thursdays on the Dock’ take place every Thursday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., July 7 through Aug. 25, on the museum’s historic waterfront.  Phyllis Stillman, Connecticut River Museum Development Manager, said, “We are fortunate to have received sponsorship from Essex Wellness Center and Connecticut River Dock & Dredge, which is allowing us to bring in a broad range of musical acts that will appeal to a diverse audience.”

On Aug. 25, Small Pond All Stars will entertain.

Museum Director Christopher Dobbs noted that patrons will hear the sounds of “Dixieland jazz, classic rock, folk, blues and more during the series.”  A new feature this year is the partnership with iCRV Radio.”

Heidi Kunzli, owner of the Essex Wellness Center and leading sponsor, said that she has always enjoyed coming down to the museum for these events, “There’s nothing quite like a relaxing evening by the harbor taking in the music and the view.”

In addition to the lively music, a cash bar is available.  For the second year, Porky Pete’s BBQ will be serving food and the Essex Wellness Center will offer complimentary massages.  The museum’s main floor galleries and gift shop will also be open for a bit of waterfront and local history.

For more information, call 860-767-8269. The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street and is a membership-supported educational organization. Membership is open to all. More information can be found at www.ctrivermuseum.org

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Essex Zoning Commission Approves 52-Unit Apartment Complex on Plains Rd.

The Plains Road property where the Iron Chef restaurant has been long empty has been approved for apartments.

The Plains Road property where the Iron Chef restaurant has been vacant for many years has been approved for the Essex Station apartments.

 

ESSEX — The zoning commission Monday approved plans for a three-building 52-unit apartment complex with an affordable housing component at a 3.7-acre parcel on Plains Road that includes the long-vacant former Iron Chef restaurant property.

The special permit for the Essex Station apartments at 21, 27 and 29 Plains Road was approved o a 4-1 vote, with commission Chairman Larry Shipman and members Alvin Wolfgram, Jim Hill and Susan Uihlein  voting to approve the permit and member William Reichenbach opposed. The application from Signature Contracting Group LLC was submitted under state statute 8-30g, a law intended to promote additional affordable housing in Connecticut.

The statute limits the jurisdiction of municipal land use commissions to issues of public health and safety, while requiring that at least 30 percent of the dwelling units in a development be designated affordable housing and reserved for people or families with incomes at or less than 80 percent of the median income for the municipality. At least 16 of the Essex Station units would be designated as moderate income housing with monthly rents expected to be about $1,800.

The plans were presented at a series of public hearings that began in February, and appeared to generate increasing objections from some residents as the review process continued. Many of the objections focused on the proximity of the site to the Valley Railroad tourist excursion line.

In more than 90 minutes of discussion Monday, the panel considered two draft motions prepared by longtime commission counsel Peter Sipples, one to approve the permit with conditions, and another to deny the application. In the end, the motion of approval included several conditions, most of which had been accepted by the applicant during the public hearing process.

The major conditions include a strict prohibition on any expansion or condominium conversion of the units, construction of a six-foot high security fence around the perimeter of the property,  installing sound barriers if needed between the residential units and the railroad, and construction of a walking-bicycle path on Plains Rd. that would extend east to connect with existing sidewalks on Rte. 154. There would also be a requirement for elevators in the buildings, particularly the single three-story building, and a provision in future leases that would note the proximity to other uses, including the tourist railroad and a nearby wood-processing facility. The development site is located in a business and industrial zone.

During the discussion, Shipman noted the apartments would be a better residential use near the railroad than owned condominiums, and suggested the requirements of the affordable housing statute limited the panel’s ability to control some aspects of the project, including density and building height. The sewage disposal system for the three building complex must be approved by the state Department of Public Health.
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Deep River Library Kicks Off Summer with Family Fun Night

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DEEP RIVER – Summer Reading kicks off on June 22 with the Deep River Public Library’s Wednesday Family Fun Night! Come for a rocking good time with a DJ Dave Dance Party, starting at 6 p.m. Get the whole family moving and grooving! This program is free and open to all, no registration required.

Programs are sponsored by the Friends of the Deep River Public Library. For more information, go to http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar; email the Children’s Department at drplchildrensdept@gmail.com; or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8 .pm.; Tuesday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 p.m.; Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

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Bozzuto’s Inc. Kicks Off ‘Reach for the Stars’ Campaign to Help Special Olympics Athletes Shine

special olympicsDEEP RIVER – This summer, until Aug. 13, grocery shoppers can visit their neighborhood IGA supermarket (such as Adams in Deep River) and make a donation to help Special Olympics athletes reach for the stars.

Bozzuto’s Inc. and The IGA Hometown Foundation invite their customers and the community to join them in supporting local Special Olympics athletes by participating in their annual ‘Reach for the Stars’ campaign by making a donation of $1, $2, $5 or more at checkout. In recognition of each contribution, a “star” with the donor’s name (if desired) will be displayed in the store for the duration of the campaign.

The ‘Reach for the Stars’ campaign aims to help share the joy of sport and encourage inclusion and respect for people of all abilities – on and off the playing field. Since 2008, the hang tag promotion has been conducted to assist Special Olympics in providing year-round sports training and competition opportunities for thousands of athletes, statewide.

All proceeds from this effort will go to the local Law Enforcement Torch Run Program, which encompasses a variety of events supporting Special Olympics that include the annual Torch Run, and Cop-on-Top and Tip-A-Cop fundraising events, all hosted and run by volunteer law enforcement officers.

Bozzuto’s, Inc., is a family-owned, full service, wholesale food distribution company headquartered in Cheshire, Connecticut, that serves over 1,500 supermarket retailers in 10 states.  Bozzuto’s is a proud supporter of IGA and is a five-time winner of IGA’s highest honor, The President’s Cup.

The Hometown Foundation is a non-profit, charitable foundation dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for individuals and their families in hometowns and surrounding communities where it operates. The Hometown Foundation honors and assists five key areas of interest: Children, Cancer, Diabetes, Military, and Emergency Response Personnel.

Special Olympics Connecticut (www.soct.org) provides year-round sports training and competitions for close to 13,000 athletes of all ages with intellectual disabilities and Unified Sports® partners – their teammates without disabilities. Through the joy of sport, the Special Olympics movement transforms lives and communities throughout the state and in 170 countries around the world by promoting good health and fitness and inspiring inclusion and respect for all people, on and off the playing field.

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Hike the Pond Meadow Preserve with Essex Land Trust, Saturday

Pond Meadow2

IVORYTON – Since Pond Meadow was acquired in 2014, much has been accomplished to transform this unique Land Trust destination in Ivoryton. The property has three distinguishing aspects: an abundance of old trees; a swamp traversed by a 450-foot elevated walkway/bog-walk; and, when the trees are leafed out, a double canopy not unlike a rain forest. The property comprises 18 acres and includes a bridge over a stream that flows into the Falls River, built by Eagle Scout Dan Ryan and his Boy Scout Troop 12.

The Essex Land Trust will lead a Pond Meadow hike on Saturday, June 25, beginning at 9 a.m. at Comstock Park in Ivoryton. Hikers should wear appropriate footwear for wet soil conditions. Access and parking are at the end of Park Road, Ivoryton, across from Comstock Park. Bad weather cancels.

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Cello Recital by Eva Ribchinsky at Essex Library

Eva Ribchinsky

Eva Ribchinsky

ESSEX – A cello recital by local resident Eva Ribchinsky will be held on Saturday, June 25, at 4 p.m. at Essex Library.

Ribchinsky has just graduated from the Cleveland Institute of Music and is headed to Carnegie Mellon University this fall to pursue a master’s degree in music. She will play works by Bocherini, J.S. Bach and Gaspar Cassado.

Admission to this program is free and open to the public. Please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 to register or for more information. The library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex.

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Six Fridays of Summer Dance Movies at Acton Library, See ‘Mad Hot Ballroom,’ Aug. 19

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Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire

OLD SAYBROOK – The Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook will be hosting a Summer Dance film series in the Grady Thomas Room on six Fridays running July 8 through Aug. 19 at 1 p.m.

  • Mad Hot Ballroom, an actual documentary of  NYC schoolchildren’s dance competition on Aug. 19.

For more information, call the Acton Library at 860-395-3184, or visit the library during regular hours, or visit on-line at www.actonlibrary.org.  The library is located 60 Old Boston Post Road, Old Saybrook.

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Author Richard Friswell Discusses His Book of Essays at Essex Library, Saturday

friswellESSEX – Author and cultural historian Richard Friswell is on the faculty of Wesleyan University’s Lifelong Learning Institute. He is also the editor and publisher of ARTES, an international fine arts, architecture and design e-magazine.

He is an elected member of the Association Internationale des Critiques d’Art (one of only 450 individuals in the United States), and an award-winning writer, with two national medals from Folio:Magazine for his editorial contributions in the field of art journalism. He writes and lectures on topics related to modernism.

He will speak at the Essex Library about his book of autobiographical essays, “Balancing Act,” on Saturday, June 25 at 2:30 p.m. Copies of the book will be available for purchase and signing.

Admission to this program is free and open to the public. Please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 to register or for more information. The library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex.

 

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Enjoy ‘Fun Friday’ at Deep River Library, Aug.19

Deep River Library building at 150 Main Street, Deep River

Deep River Library building at 150 Main Street, Deep River

DEEP RIVER — Deep River Library hosts ‘Fun Fridays’ through August as follows:

Aug. 19 — Special Activity! Water Table in the Children’s Garden.  Come splash with friends.  Starts at 10:30 am; open to all ages.

These programs are free and open to all; no registration required. Programs are sponsored by the Friends of the Deep River Public Library.

For more information, visit http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on our monthly calendar, email the Children’s Department at drplchildrensdept@gmail.com or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 12:30 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 5 pm. *July and August, Saturday 10-am – 2pm.

 

 

 

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Acton Library Screens ‘Mad Hot Ballroom,” Hosts Discussion, Today

Image courtesy of Paramount Vantage

Image courtesy of Paramount Vantage

For the final movie in the Summer Dance Movie Series, Mad Hot Ballroom, Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook welcomes Raeleen St. Pierre of Fred Astaire’s Bloom Ballroom to discuss and demonstrate the benefits of dance after the 1 p.m. showing on Friday, Aug. 19.

Mad Hot Ballroom is a documentary of New York City’s schoolchildren’s dance competition and their introduction to ballroom dances. The film follows a few of the 4th grade students from three of the 60 participating schools tracking their transformation from hesitant participants to enthusiastic dancers of the merengue, rumba, tango, the foxtrot and swing.

Raeleen St. Pierre, Owner and Professional Instructor at Fred Astaire’s Bloom Ballroom, was recently asked by USA Dance to take over a local chapter for Programming in K-12 Schools. USA Dance is a non-profit organization designed to promote social dancing nationwide. She will discuss the four pillars of dance: rhythm, control, balance, and coordination and why dance can help anyone involved in sports by improving kicks, swings, hits, etc.

St. Pierre began ballroom dancing at the age of five with square dancing and round dancing (country western ballroom) with her family. She continued dancing through high school adding baton, gymnastics, and theatre arts into the mix. St. Pierre also studied tap, ballet, jazz, yoga, and tai chi; always pursuing the world of health and fitness, even opening her own fitness coaching business for a time.

Through her adult years, St. Pierre continued her education, attaining degrees in Child Development, English, Psychology and Business Development as well as certifications in group fitness including Zumba, CPR, First Aid and personal training. Dancing, however, remained her passion and she honed her skills while raising a family, incorporating it into her work with children and at risk populations.

In March 2007, she joined a newly opened Fred Astaire Dance Studio. In April 2012 she accepted a position in Old Saybrook. In June 2014, she accepted the General Manager position at Fred Astaire Ridgefield where she managed a staff of six while teaching couples, singles, and children. And last year in July of 2015, St. Pierre was asked to take over the Old Saybrook studio. This has allowed her to combine her love of physical fitness and psychological health with her passion for dance.

For more information, call The Acton Library at 860-395-3184, or visit the library during regular hours: Monday through Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday 10am – 5pm, or visit on-line at www.actonlibrary.org .

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Fifth Annual ‘Run for Chris’ 5K Takes Place in Essex: Registration Open Through Race Day

Run for Chris 5K (VNN file photo)

Run for Chris 5K (VNN file photo)

ESSEX — The 5th Annual ‘Run for Chris’ 5K will be held Saturday, June 25, at Essex Town Hall. It is both a memorial and charitable event, the primary purpose of which is to raise money for educational endeavors in the schools of the Lower Valley of Middlesex County.

Chris Belfoure greatly appreciated the opportunities afforded to him that introduced him to new places, peoples and cultures, such as his time spent studying and working in China. (He had participated in the trips abroad while at Valley Regional High School.) He felt that every young person should have similar opportunities to expand their horizons, since his experiences had so profoundly impacted him and his worldview.

Thus, to honor his memory and perpetuate his ideals, the Chris Belfoure Memorial Fund has been established at the Community Foundation of Middlesex County. The proceeds from the ‘Run for Chris’ go directly to these causes.

To preregister for the race, go to aratrace.com, and click on ‘Run For Chris.’ (Race day registration starts at 7 a.m.) Overall and age-group awards will be given, and all participants will receive a free, tech t-shirt. Fun Run for Kids 6 and under starts at 8:15 a.m. along with the CB4 Mile Run for ages 7-14. The 5K and 2 mile walk start at 8:45 a.m. The run through beautiful Essex is USATF Certified. There will be great raffle items and a face painter to add to the fun.

Registration link: http://www.chrisbel4mf.com/run-for-chris-5k.html

 

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Hear the Best Youth Music Around at ‘LymeStock 2016’ Today at Ashlawn Farm

The Brazen Youth will be headlining Lymestock 2016 at Ashlawn Farm on Sunday

The Brazen Youth will be headlining Lymestock 2016 at Ashlawn Farm on Sunday

MusicNow Foundation, Inc. is hosting the 3rd Annual Lymestock 2016 Father’s Day concert and picnic at Ashlawn Farm in Lyme on Sunday, June 19, from 12 to 7 p.m.  The festival will present New England’s award-winning young artists with local, aspiring youth opening the performances.  Gates open at 11:30 a.m.  Children are welcome.

Highlights this year will be a performance by Rumblecat, who received the 2016 New England Music Award for ‘Best in the State of Vermont’, and Brazen Youth, recipients of ‘New England’s Radar Music Award 2015.’ Additionally, performances by Joe Holt of Brooklyn, New York and ‘Radar Music Winner’ James MacPherson and the Bonzai Trees will highlight the day of music.

Joe Holt is another big name that will be performing on Sunday at Lymestock 2016.

Joe Holt is another big name that will be performing on Sunday at Lymestock 2016.

Opening performances by local emerging artists, Sophia Griswold and Connected, Drew Cathcart and Blind Fool, The Modern Riffs, and Julia Russo will take the stage for a day of music, food and fun on the farm for Father’s Day.

Hamburgers and hot dogs along with lunches, desserts and summer refreshments will be available for sale or guests can pack their own.

Lymestock 2016 will benefit Youth in Music mission initiatives of the MusicNow Foundation, Inc.
(www.musicnowfoundation.org) serving southeastern Connecticut and beyond.  The concert picnic is
presented in collaboration with Ashlawn Farm, Pavoh.org and sponsored in part by LymeLine.com, the Bee and Thistle Inn, and iCRV Radio — among others.

MusicNow Foundation, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to the support of live music to engage, educate and enrich young artists through performance opportunities, enrichment workshops, and collaborative mentorships / internships to nurture creative and artistic development.

Advance tickets can be purchased in advance at Nightingale’s Acoustic Café at 68 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, Conn. or by calling (860) 434-1961. Advance tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students.  Gate tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students.

For more information, call (860) 434-1961 or email info@musicnowfoundation.org

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Valley Regional Celebrates Class of 2016 With Memories, Music and Merriment

In the distance on the bleachers, the Valley Regional High School Class of 2016. All photos by Laura Matesky of lauramateskyphotography.com

In the distance, the Valley Regional High School Class of 2016 stands on the bleachers. All photos by Laura Matesky of lauramateskyphotography.com

A clear blue sky accompanied by 75° weather and a gentle breeze created the perfect ambience for the Valley Regional High School’s (VRHS) 151 students of the Class of 2016 to graduate this past Wednesday, June 15.

The girls of the Class of 2016 filed into the stadium.

The girls of the Class of 2016 file into the stadium.

Teacher Kevin Woods (wearing sunglasses) filed in with the faculty.

Teacher and boy’s varsity basketball coach Kevin Woods (wearing sunglasses) files in with the faculty.

Valley Regional Principal Michael Barile hugs this year's VRHS Hall of Fame inductee.

Valley Regional Principal Michael Barile hugs this year’s VRHS Hall of Fame inductee.

Valedictorian Christina Mitchel.

Valedictorian Christina Mitchel (above) and Salutatorian Acacia Bowden (below delivered heartfelt and inspirational speeches that led the graduates to reflect on the past, the present, and the future.

Honor Essayist Mary Proteau (below) completed the triumvirate with an equally compelling speech.

Honor Essayist Mary Proteau.

 

While the students gave their speeches, the dignitaries listened attentively.

Principal ?? beamed as he listened to the speeches.

Michael Barile, VRHS Pricipal, smiles broadly as he listens to the speeches.

Several students in the graduating class lightened the mood with two musical numbers.
The bright Scottish tune, “Loch Lomond” was sung by Valley’s senior ensemble choir, including sopranos Angelina Annino, Miranda Holland, Carly Zuppe, Emma Colby, Eme Carlson, Avery Carlson, and Erica Vaccaro; altos Cassidy French, Leslie Clapp, Jordan Adams­Sack, Joy Molyneux, Amanda Hull, Caitlin Glance, and Rachel Breault; tenor Dilan Rojas; and basses John Cappezzone, Brooks Robinson, Riley Sullivan, and Will Elliot. This song showcased seniors Dilan Rojas, Emma Colby, Carly Zuppe, and Eme Carlson.

Valley Regional's Senior Ensemble sang 'Loch Lomond' and "I lived' during the event.

Valley Regional’s Senior Ensemble sang ‘Loch Lomond’ and “I lived’ during the event.

The second musical song, a cover of “I Lived”, by One Republic, was performed by singers Dilan Rojas, Carly Zuppe, and John Cappezzone, supported by Tyler Atkinson on the guitar and Brooks Robinson on drums.

Senior Class Treasurer Julia Hammond and Secretary Katie Amara presented the Class Gift.

Senior Class Treasurer Julia Hammond and Secretary Katie Amara presented the Class gift of benches for the art hallway during the ceremony as well.

The presentation of diplomas began ...

The presentation of diplomas began …

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… and continued … with Region 4 Superintendent Dr. Ruth Levy shaking each graduate’s hand …

... and ended!

… and ended!

 

Hat_toss

The evening culminated when the class tossed their caps high into the air, symbolizing their level of energy and high ambition for the next chapter of their lives.

When the ceremony was complete, all that remained were fond memories ... and a handful of hats on the ground.

When the ceremony was complete, all that remained were fond memories … and a handful of hats scattered on the ground.

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Sunshine to Sing at Inaugural Osprey Festival Saturday in Sound View, Old Lyme

Standing by one of the osprey nests being used to promote this Saturday's Osprey Festival are board members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce (from left to right) Mark Griswold, Jan Ayer Cushing, Doug Lo Presti and Joann Lishing.

Standing by one of the osprey nests being used to promote this Saturday’s Osprey Festival are board members of the Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce (from left to right) Mark Griswold, Jan Ayer Cushing, Doug Lo Presti and Joann Reis Lishing.

Family-Oriented Event Features ‘The Voice’ Finalist Braiden Sunshine, Art Lectures, Kid Contests, Vendors Galore  … and More

The Lyme-Old Lyme Chamber of Commerce is hosting a new ‘Osprey Festival’ at Sound View this coming Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.  This is an exciting, family-oriented seaside festival that honors the majestic osprey and celebrates many of the great aspects of Lyme and Old Lyme.

The Chamber is partnering with the Connecticut Audubon Society’s Osprey Nation, the Roger Tory Peterson Estuary Center, Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts of the University of New Haven, and the MusicNow Foundation to bring together art, music, nature and events.

Osprey_Festival_logo_cropped

This inaugural annual event is designed to kick-off the summer season and attract residents from our two towns as well as the surrounding communities. Mark your calendars now for what promises to be an enjoyable, entertaining and educational event.

A portion of Hartford Ave. in Sound View will be closed off for the festival.  The morning and early afternoon will be focused on young families with free carousel rides, kid’s competitions, school bands, and young local musicians. At the same time, a great variety of vendors will be selling their wares on Hartford Ave.

The afternoon will be geared towards the older population in Lyme and Old Lyme with lectures from world-renowned speakers on art and nature including artist Michael DiGiogio giving a field demonstration and talk at 12 p.m., and ornithological expert Dr. Paul Spitzer speaking at 2:15 p.m. on ospreys in the Lower Connecticut River.

The afternoon’s activities will also feature a bocce contest – sign up your team by emailing info@ospreyfestival.com – and sandcastle-building competition.  The bocce tournament winning team receives $250 in prizes from Black Hall Outfitters.

Old Lyme's own Braiden Sunshine will perform in the evening at the Osprey Festival.

Old Lyme’s own Braiden Sunshine will perform in the evening at the Osprey Festival.

As the evening rolls in, the tone will change to create a night for all ages with some top- notch local bands, and some special games in the street. Old Lyme’s own Braiden Sunshine – a finalist in the most recent popular TV series of “The Voice” – will present a concert at 7 p.m.

Other musical groups that will be featured include the United States Coast Guard Band at 3:45 p.m., Java Grove at 6 p.m., Ramblin’ Dan and the Mellowmen at 5 p.m., Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School Jazz Catz at 3:10 p.m., MusicNow Foundation’s Youth Showcase at 1:10 p.m., and some special guests from Charles Music School’s Adult Rock Band at 11:15 a.m.

Platinum sponsors of the Festival include ASP Productions LLC, Black Hall Outfitters, Connecticut Rental Center, iCRV Radio and Shoreline Web News LLC – publisher of LymeLine.com and ValleyNewsNow.com.  Host sponsors include the Connecticut Audubon Society, Nightingale’s Acoustic Café and Lyme Academy College of FineArts.

For more information, visit www.ospreyfestival.com or email info@ospreyfestival.com.

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Ann Carl Receives “Making A Difference” Award from Essex Congregational Church

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The First Congregational Church in Essex presented its “Making A Difference” Award to Valley Regional High School graduated senior Ann E. Carl of Chester (front row center) at a recent ceremony at the church. Family and members of the church’s Justice and Witness Committee who gathered for the award announcement are: (front row L-R) committee member Delcie McGrath of Essex, parents Elizabeth Carl and Joseph Carl of Chester; committee member Mary-Lawrence Bickford of Essex; (back L-R) church pastor Rev. Ken Peterkin, and committee members Emily Williams of Essex, Sharyn Nelson of Ivoryton and Mike Hennessy of East Lyme.

ESSEX – The First Congregational Church of Essex, UCC has presented its “Making A Difference” Award to Ann E. Carl, a graduated senior from Valley Regional High School.

Sponsored by the Justice and Witness Committee of the church, the $1,000 “Making A Difference” award is given to a senior at Valley Regional High School whose actions continue to challenge those ideas and practices that result in the exclusion of others. These can be small actions: an effort to connect groups or individuals with different ideas and different experiences, acts of inclusiveness, a community project or school activity that unites people in a positive cause or attempts to seek out individuals needing support.

The daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Carl of Chester, award recipient Annie is taking a “Gap Year” to travel and work in Ecuador, the Western United States and South Africa. The “Making A Difference” Award will go towards her fundraising for those efforts.

During her years at VRHS, Annie was a member of the National Honor Society and was active in soccer, track, the Interact Club and the Steering Committee. She has helped to raise funds for “Sharing To Learn,” a non-profit to help the village of Makuleke, South Africa; “CT Brain Freeze,” a polar plunge held by the National Brain Tumor Society; and a soccer game to promote awareness of pediatric cancer.

Other projects that Annie was involved in during her student career include “Tap Is Back Campaign/Chester Cares Initiative” to promote reusable water bottles; “Simply Smiles” Mission Trip to South Dakota to work on the Cheyenne Sioux Reservation; ICVR Radio, promoting accomplishments of local high school students; and a Hiking Sunday to encourage teens to exercise outdoors.

 

 

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Essex Rotary Recognizes Scholarship Recipients at Annual Awards Dinner

Essex Rotary Scholarship winners (left to right) Claire Halloran, Annie Brown, Kaleigh Caulfield, Scott Nelson, Tina Mitchell, Emily LeBlanc and Morgan Hines. Photo by Dick Levene)

Essex Rotary Scholarship winners (left to right) Claire Halloran, Annie Brown, Kaleigh Caulfield, Rotarian Scott Nelson, Tina Mitchell, Emily LeBlanc and Morgan Hines. Photo by Dick Levene

ESSEX – Each year Rotarians gather at the Essex Yacht Club under the leadership of current club President Jordan Welles and Essex Rotary Scholarship Foundation Chairman Scott Nelson to meet and honor our scholars both past and present.  The Rotary Club of Essex has been supporting the college dreams of Essex residents for the past 49 years, having awarded the first scholarship back in 1966.  The club has a legacy that began with stellar Rotarians including Dr. Donald Buebendorf, Doug Jones, Chet Kitchings and Dr. Peter Pool.  That legacy continues under the leadership of a second generation of Rotarians including Don’s son Jeff Buebendorf.  Two of the 2016 recipients share that legacy.

Rotarian Dr. Bill McCann’s granddaughter Annie Brown enters the University of Vermont this fall where she plans to major in education and environmental studies.  Annie is the recipient of the 2016 Dr. Donald M. Buebendorf Scholarship.  Annie plans to spend her summer working with children at the Valley Shore YMCA and at Bushy Hill Nature Center where she hopes to help children connect with each other and with nature.

Tina Mitchell has been awarded a new and unique scholarship this year honoring the club’s 60th anniversary.  Tina will study Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Cornell following a gap year abroad in Hungary as part of the Rotary International Youth Exchange Program.  Tina’s grandfather was an active Rotarian and inventor of the famed shad bake coffee brewer lovingly known as the rocket.

The third 2016 recipient is Kaleigh Caulfield.  Kaleigh is entering the pre-teaching program at UConn Avery Point and eventually plans to work in the field of special education.  This scholarship is a collaborative partnership between the Rotary Club of Essex and the trustees of the Riverview Cemetery.  Board members Peter Decker, Dick Mather and Hank McInerney were on hand for the presentation.

Also in attendance were past recipients from 2013-15.  Emily Le Grand is a finance major at the University of Maryland.  Emily has a strong interest in the non-profit sector and has interned at United Way as well as volunteered with a hunger and homeless project in the DC area this past semester.  Harrison Taylor continues his studies at Connecticut College and has discovered a passion for working with immigrants in the New London area providing education and support navigating the immigration process.  Claire Halloran finished her freshman year at the Tisch School of the Arts at NYU studying film and television production.  Claire’s early projects have already garnered awards and her studies confirm her dedication to this industry and a newfound interest in post-production sound.  Morgan Hines just finished a semester in Prague and now returns to Georgetown for her final year majoring in history and journalism.  Morgan is interning with the Hartford Courant this summer and starts the process of applying to graduate schools in the fall.

Mason King was unable to attend, but continues his studies at Union College.  Allyson Clark was also unable to attend but sent a written update, which Scott Nelson shared with the audience.  Allyson has been working with NFP programs in Brazil including BRAYCE and has also embarked on an entrepreneurial venture to educate tourists on the negative impact that tourism has on poverty-stricken areas such as Rio.  Allyson made the critical decision to transfer to Rhine-Waal University in Germany this past year and has successfully integrated her studies and her tourism project into this new culture.  She is enjoying the diversity and the challenges of cultural immersion and has gained a unique understanding of international migration.

For more information about the Rotary Club of Essex, please visit  www.rotaryclubofessex.com.
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Deep River Resident Recognized for Excellence by Progressive Grocer

Silvana Baxter

Silvana Baxter

DEEP RIVER – Progressive Grocer, a leading retail food industry trade publication, has named Silvana Baxter of Deep River, a Stop & Shop Asset Protection Associate, as a 2016 Top Women in the grocery industry, which honors outstanding female leaders in the retailer and supplier community sectors.  

“Stop & Shop is very proud of the many accomplishments achieved by these dedicated associates who have gone above and beyond their positions within our company and have made many contributions within the communities they serve,” said Robert Spinella, Vice President of Human Resources, Stop & Shop NY Metro Division. “Congratulations to our honorees who serve as true role models for the future of their fellow colleagues.”  

Covering the retail food industry, Progressive Grocer’s core target audience includes top management and key decision makers from chain supermarkets, regional and local independent grocers, supercenters, wholesaler distributors, manufacturers and other supply chain training partners.

The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company LLC employs over 61,000 associates and operates 419 stores throughout Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York and New Jersey.

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Roto Frank of America Helps Connecticut’s Veterans

roto frankCHESTER – Supporting Connecticut’s veterans is an issue that is close to the hearts of Roto Frank of America employees. So it wasn’t surprising that when it came time to select a charitable organization for 2016, Roto Frank employees voted overwhelming for Connecticut Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

Each year, employees of Roto Frank of America, Inc. select among five local charities on which to focus their fundraising activities, which include voluntary payroll deductions by employees, food sales, and fifty-fifty raffles. “We’re proud to support Department of Veterans’ Affairs in their efforts to improve the lives of Connecticut veterans and their families,“ said Sue LeMire, Roto Frank of America’s HR/General Accounting Manager.

Based in Rocky Hill, the Connecticut Department of Veterans’ Affairs has provided care for veterans and their dependents for over 140 years. This includes a health care facility with approximately 180 beds that provides extended health care to veterans, and a domicile with approximately 483 beds available that provides residents with a continuum of rehabilitation care. Veterans also receive substance abuse treatment, educational and vocational rehabilitation, job skills development, self-enhancement workshops, employment assistance and transitional living opportunities.

Founded in 1979, Roto Frank of America, Inc. is a Chester-based manufacturer of window and door hardware. Roto Frank of America is a wholly owned subsidiary of Roto AG, a global company headquartered in Germany, with 13 production plants and 40 subsidiaries worldwide. Roto Frank of America offers solutions for North American and European hardware applications, has an extensive product line including its renowned X-DRIVE™ casement and awning window systems, sash locks, window-opening-control-devices, sliding patio door systems, and European window and door hardware, among others.

For more information, visit www.rotohardware.com

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Letter to the Editor from New Essex Library Friends President

The Friends of Essex Library new Board for 2016 (L-R): Genie Devine, Secretary; Linda Levene, Past President; Jo Kelly, President; Judy Taylor, Catharine Wagner, Susan Hosack (not shown), Members at Large; Pat Mather, Treasurer; Judy Fish, Ivoryton Library Liaison; Peggy Tuttle, Book Sales Coordinator.

The Friends of Essex Library new Board for 2016 (L-R): Genie Devine, Secretary; Linda Levene, Past President; Jo Kelly, President; Judy Taylor, Catharine Wagner, Susan Hosack (not shown), Members at Large; Pat Mather, Treasurer; Judy Fish, Ivoryton Library Liaison; Peggy Tuttle, Book Sales Coordinator.

To the Editor:

I am very pleased to be on the Board of the Friends of the Essex Library as their new President.  I look forward to working with my new Board, the Essex Library Association board, and the Essex community.

Libraries across the country are going through a transformation.  The library many of you, as well as myself, grew up with no longer exists.  Essex Library is becoming an ever expanding multimedia community resource hub; striving to meet the needs and requirements of a changing community.

My goals are to aid and support Essex Library Association in its efforts to meet the challenges of a changing community.  And, with your community involvement in our library system, we will accomplish and surpass these goals.

Thank you for your continued support and involvement.

Sincerely,

Jo Kelly
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Letter to the Editor: Thanks for Essex Library Garden Tour

To the Editor:

“Spectacular gardens!”  “Wonderful day!” were some of the comments heard throughout Essex Village as hundreds of visitors participated in the first Friends of the Essex Library Garden Tour held Saturday June 4. To those who came to walk the gardens and enjoy the beauty of Essex Village, we say, “Thank you!”

To make such an event possible took the involvement of many people, including those who planned the event, the hostesses at each garden, Master Gardeners, plein air painters, ticket takers and traffic managers.  Your help made the event run smoothly and for this we extend heartfelt thanks.  We especially thank Rhode VanGessel for her patience and tireless effort in making the publicity both eye-catching and beautiful.

Lastly, and most importantly, we wish to recognize the garden owners who worked tirelessly creating their works of art.  Those who attended saw the enormous effort that went into preparing for the event and it was gratifying to see your efforts appreciated by so many people.   All the Friends of the Essex Library say, “Thank You.”

Linda Levene and Daphne Nielsen, co-chairman

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Essex Garden Club Donates $500 to The Farm at John Winthrop

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Pictured are the advisors, Mark Gostkeiwicz and John Woitovich, along with Elizabeth Bartlett from Essex Garden Club.

The Essex Garden Club recently donated $500 to the Farm at John Winthrop School.   Their after-school program  has grown fruits and vegetables to support classroom learning such as cooking and propagation. The produce is also made available to the Shoreline Soup Kitchens.

 

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Broken Arrow Nursery Manager Presents “Spectacular Native Plants” at Essex Library

Andy Brand

ESSEX — The forests, fields and wetlands of the Northeast are filled with an amazing array of beautiful plants that are frequently overlooked when we design our landscapes. On Tuesday, June 14, at 7 p.m. at the Essex Library, Andy Brand will take attendees on a journey through the year highlighting the many exceptional plants that grow right in our own backyards. Both herbaceous and woody plants will be discussed along with their cultivars.

An employee of Broken Arrow Nursery for over two decades, Brand now manages the nursery. He received his BS and MS from the University of Connecticut in Horticulture and Plant Tissue Culture. He was the past president of the American Rhododendron Society, past president of the Connecticut Butterfly Association, and past President of Connecticut Nursery and Landscape Association.

This program is free and open to the public. Call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 to register or for more information. The Essex Library is located at 33 West Ave. in Essex.

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Discover the “Art of Growing Food” with Celebrated Author Ellen Ecker Ogden, Friday; Benefits Child & Family

Ellen Ecker Ogden will speak at Child & Family's Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon on June 17 at Old Lyme Country Club.

Ellen Ecker Ogden will speak at Child & Family’s ‘Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon’ on June 17 at Old Lyme Country Club.

Are you tired of tasteless tomatoes, half-ripe honeydews, or limp lettuce? Do you worry what else might be on the produce you purchase at grocery stores?  If you’ve considered growing your own food so it will be fresh, natural, and ready when you want it (without a trip to the store!), then spend an afternoon with acclaimed food and garden writer Ellen Ecker Ogden, who will present “The Art of Growing Food” as the featured speaker at Child & Family Agency’s Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon.

Ecker Ogden is the Vermont-based author of The Complete Kitchen Garden, The Vermont Country Store Cookbook, and The Vermont Cheese Book, among others.  She is also co-founder of The Cook’s Garden seed catalog, a small family seed business dedicated to finding the best-tasting European and American heirloom vegetables, herbs, and flowers, and she lectures widely on kitchen garden design. Her articles and designs have been featured in such national publications as Better Homes & Gardens, Martha Stewart Living, and the New York Times.

Child & Family Agency’s Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon takes place on June 17, 2016, from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Old Lyme Country Club (I-95, exit 70).  The event begins with a book signing by Ogden at 11:30 a.m., followed by lunch at noon; Ogden will then give her talk, in which she will outline her six steps for successful garden design, based on classic garden design principles.

At the end of her presentation, Ogden will raffle off a one-and-a-half-hour vegetable garden consultation. Tickets are $50, and may be obtained by mailing a check to P.O. Box 324, Old Lyme, CT  06371 (include name, address, phone, email), or by visiting www.childandfamilyagency.org.  Questions? Call 860-443-2896 or email CFA.LOLAuxiliary@gmail.com. Seating is limited.

The Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon is presented by the Lyme/Old Lyme Auxiliary of Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut, who bring you the Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour every other year. (The next Lyme/Old Lyme Garden Tour will take place next year, in June 2017.) Meanwhile, with this year’s Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon, you can satisfy your garden cravings and help children and families at the same time!

Proceeds from the Kitchen Garden Author Luncheon benefit the programs and capital projects of Child & Family Agency of Southeastern Connecticut, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping at-risk children in the context of their families. With a staff of more than 190 dedicated professionals and a service area covering 79 towns in New London, Middlesex, and New Haven counties, Child & Family Agency is the largest private, nonprofit children’s service provider in southeastern Connecticut. In 2015 more than 18,000 children and their families received services from Child & Family Agency. Find out more at www.childandfamilyagency.org or call 860.443.2896.

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Cappella Cantorum Present Men’s Chorus Concert in Old Lyme, June 26

Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus drawing inspired in St. Paul Lutheran  Church in a 2005 concert, drawn by Madeleine Favre of Deep River.

Cappella Cantorum Men’s Chorus drawing inspired in St. Paul Lutheran
Church in a 2005 concert, drawn by Madeleine Favre of Deep River.

Cappella Cantorum presents a Men’s Chorus Concert, Sunday, June 26, at 7:30 pm, the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme at 2 Ferry Rd. Old Lyme, CT 06371.

The music will include When the Saints Go Marching In, Guys & Dolls Selections Order My Steps, Men of Harlech, Ride the Chariot, For the Beauty of the Earth, Barbershop Favorites and Va Pensiero.

Tickets are $20 at the door or online at CappellaCantorum.org. Ages 18 and under are free.  

For more information, contact Barry at 860-388-2871 or barrybasch@gmail.com.

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Deep River Presents Annual Strawberry Social, June 12

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Marian Staye (left) and Gail Gallagher serve up fresh strawberries and homemade whipped cream in Deep River.

DEEP RIVER – The Deep River Historical Society is holding its annual Strawberry Social on Sunday, June 12, from 2 to 4 p.m. Yes, you can expect fresh strawberries and homemade whipped cream! Tickets are $10 for adults and $3 for children 5 years and under. The event will include other surprises for the guests.

The event is held in the Carriage House on the grounds of the Deep River Historical Society at 245 Main Street (Rte. 154), Deep River.

 

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Kayak Trip and Concert Kick Off Summer in Essex

Bring your kayak or canoe to Main Street Park for an afternoon in Middle and South Coves.

Bring your kayak or canoe to Main Street Park for an afternoon in Middle Cove.

ESSEX — The Essex Land Trust is hosting a combined Kayak/Canoe Trip and summer Concert/Picnic to be held at Essex’s Main Street Park on Sunday afternoon, June 12.

Canoers/kayakers should meet at 2:30 p.m. for a planned departure by 3 p.m. Explore Essex’s beautiful Middle and South Coves with guided commentary by naturalist Phil Miller. Kayak/canoe participants should arrive in time to register and sign waivers.  A safety boat will accompany.

Gather at 5:30 p.m. for a BYO picnic and concert by the Essex Corinthian Jazz Band. Bring your own chairs or picnic blankets.

The event is free. All are welcome. Bad weather cancels. Parking is available on Main Street and behind the Essex Post Office.

Essex Corinthian Jazz Band will play in Main Street Park on June 12. Bring your own picnic.

Essex Corinthian Jazz Band will play in Main Street Park on June 12. Bring your own picnic.

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See ‘Blooms with a View’ at Florence Griswold Museum This Weekend, ‘En Plein Air’ Impressionist Painting Demo Today

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme hosts a celebration of the site’s historic gardens featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests.

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme hosts a celebration of the site’s historic gardens featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests.

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme hosts a celebration of the site’s historic gardens featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests.

A favorite event during GardenFest is Blooms with a View: A Display of Art & Flower. From June 10 through 12, visitors can enjoy a display of stunning arrangements created by 15 talented floral artists that interpret works of art in the special exhibitions, The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement. These floral interpretations play off the colors, line, shapes, and subject matter of the artwork in masterful ways. Blooms with a View is included with Museum admission.

On Sunday, June 12, from 1 to 4 p.m., watch Connecticut Impressionist Dmitri Wright create an Impressionistic painting in the gardens of the Museum. Working “en plein air,” Wright will demonstrate the steps involved in going from blank canvas to a garden rendered in color and light. These events are included with Museum admission.

The seventh annual GardenFest at the Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme is a 10-day celebration of the site’s historic gardens, featuring special events, displays, demonstrations, and family activities. From June 3 through 12, visitors can enjoy a wide variety of activities for all ages and interests. Most events are included with Museum admission. Children 12 and under are always free.

This year’s exhibition provides the perfect accompaniment to the Museum’s historic landscape, gardens, and the activities surrounding GardenFest. The Florence Griswold Museum is the only New England venue for the exhibition, The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement, 1887–1920. Organized by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, The Artist’s Garden tells the story of American Impressionists and the growing popularity of gardening as a leisure pursuit at the turn of the 20th century.

After enjoying the exhibition, visitors can walk the Museum’s 13 acres and through the restored 1910 garden. “Miss Florence’s” lovingly tended garden was a favorite subject for many of the artists of the Lyme Art Colony who stayed at her boardinghouse. One of the paintings on view in the exhibition, William Chadwick’s On the Piazza, ca. 1908 shows a female model posing on the side porch of the boardinghouse. A walk to the Lieutenant River provides further examples of vistas painted by the nature-loving artists.

Talented floral artists display stunning arrangements created to interpret works of art in the special exhibitions, The Artist's Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement. June 10 through June 12 at the Florence Griswold Museum.
Talented floral artists display stunning arrangements created to interpret works of art in the special exhibitions, The Artist’s Garden: American Impressionism and the Garden Movement. June 10 through June 12 at the Florence Griswold Museum.

GardenFest includes a variety of activities for families. In addition to the weekly Discovery Sunday activities, when visitors are given supplies and invited to paint in the gardens or down by the river and then pick a project from the Art Cart for further fun and exploration, during GardenFest visitors of all ages can enjoy fun garden-themed events.

Other events include:

Lecture: Producing Pictures without Brushes: American Artists and Their Gardens

Anna O. Marley, Curator of Historic American Art, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and Exhibition

Sunday, June 5, 2pm

$7 (members $5)

Join Marley, the curator of the original version of the exhibition, for a discussion of the role American artists played in both the stylistic development of this American version of Impressionism as well as their impact on the Garden Movement.


Hands-On Photography Workshop

Craig Norton, Photographer and Master Teaching Artist

Tuesday, June 7, 6pm-9pm

$12 (members $10)

Join photographer and master teaching artist Craig Norton for a digital camera photographic workshop focusing on the gardens. Working in the golden light of pre-twilight, participants will learn the basics for mastering images of the garden before taking their own images for constructive critiques. Come learn all your camera can do. Light refreshments included. Participants should bring their own digital camera.


Presentation: Herbs for Hearth and Health

Leslie Evans, Historian and Museum Director, Avery-Copp House Museum, Groton, CT

Wednesday, June 8, 10:30am-2:30pm; presentations at 11am and 1pm

Cost to attend: Included with Museum admission

Join historian Leslie Evans for a presentation on the historic importance of herbs in cooking and medicine as well as how they can be used today. Participants in the presentations will learn the historic uses for both common as well as lesser-known herbs before creating their own herbal vinegar and fragrant sachet. Herbal infused snacks and beverages will be available for tasting. Between presentations, Evans will be available to answer questions and offer additional information.


Lecture: Gardening with Kids: Opening Eyes and Doors

Karen Bussolini, Garden Coach, Writer, and Photographer

Thursday, June 9, 2pm

$7 (members $5)

Our yards – gardens, landscaping, and wild places – offer boundless opportunities for learning through the senses. At a time when so many children – and adults too – suffer from “nature deficit disorder,” obesity, ADHD, and other problems, connecting with nature is more important than ever. Typical suburban landscapes don’t supply the needs of either wildlife or children and can be downright toxic to both. In this talk Bussolini shows – and gets people to think about – easy ways to make the whole yard a safe place rich with sensory stimulation, with rich opportunities for imaginative play, discovery and just plain fun.

Garden lovers are invited to enjoy Café Flo Tuesdays and Saturdays from 11:30am-2:30pm and from 1-3:30pm on Sundays. Menu items are garden-fresh and family friendly. Dine on the veranda overlooking the Lieutenant River or pick up a basket and blanket and picnic along the river.

GardenFest celebrates the Museum’s historic gardens and orchard that are the subject of so many paintings by the Lyme Art Colony artists. Landscape Historian Sheila Wertheimer guided the Museum in the restoration of the gardens and site to its appearance circa 1910. Miss Florence’s garden can be characterized by what is referred to today as a “grandmother’s garden” in which masses of flowers were informally arranged in bordered beds close to home. Varieties of hollyhock, iris, foxglove, heliotrope, phlox, cranesbill, and day lilies were among the many perennials that made up her garden.

The Museum is located on a 13-acre site in the historic village of Old Lyme at 96 Lyme Street, exit 70 off I-95. Admission is $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $8 students, and free to children 12 and under. For more information, visit FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org or call 860-434-5542 x 111.

An additional garden event…

Connecticut’s Historic Gardens announces the 12th annual Connecticut’s Historic Garden Day, Sunday, June 26. These 15 delightful places, scattered throughout Connecticut, offer visitors an opportunity to explore many types of gardens while their historic homes further delight and educate. A variety of special events and activities are planned for the day. Hours, activities, and prices vary by location.

At the Florence Griswold Museum, besides strolling the historic landscape and gardens, visitors are invited to pick up supplies to paint in Miss Florence’s garden or down by the Lieutenant River. The can also enjoy the Museum’s Art Cart, filled with outdoor activities that encourage exploration of the historic landscape. Outdoor activities are free from 12 to 4pm. Museum admission applies to House and Gallery, $10 adults, $9 seniors, $8 students and children 12 and under are free. The House and Gallery are open from 1 to 5pm.

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Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds Hosts Summer Sculpture Showcase 2016 Through Sept. 13

Mega-Dandelion by Gints Grinsberg is the signature piece of Summer Sculpture Showcase at Studio 80 +Sculpture Grounds, which has an Opening Reception Friday, June 10 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Mega-Dandelion by Gints Grinsberg is the signature piece of Summer Sculpture Showcase at Studio 80 +Sculpture Grounds, which has an Opening Reception Friday, June 10 from 5 to 7 p.m.

OLD LYME — Gilbert Boro, owner and sculptor at Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme, will host an Opening Reception for Summer Sculpture Showcase 2016 this coming Friday, June 10, from 5 to 7 p.m.  All are welcome to attend the outdoor reception at which light refreshments will be served. Guests will be free to explore the expansive sculpture gardens and view the more than 100 sculptures on display during the event.

This juried exhibition follows on naturally from last year’s extremely successful Summer Sculpture Showcase 2015, which drew large crowds and had to be extended into October to meet public demand. This new exhibition on the grounds adjoining Boro’s studio and inside the Emily Seward Boro (ESB) Gallery on the property features works created by 17 widely acclaimed sculptors interspersed amongst Boro’s own sculptures, along with works by 13 other contributing artists.  More than 30 sculptors from across the country responded to the Call for Entries submitting some 60 works.

Boro’s Sculpture Gardens are located on 4.5 acres of his residence on historic Lyme Street in the heart of Old Lyme, Conn.  The beautifully landscaped grounds slope down toward the Lieutenant River offering a unique plein air experience for the exhibition, which combines both large- and small-scale contemporary sculptures. Many of the works, which are in a variety of media, are for sale.

The sculptors, whose 25 pieces of work are included in the Showcase, are:
Mark Attebery, Diane Barcelo, Ashby Carlisle, Bryan Gorneau, Gints Grinbergs, Lannie Hart, Jay Hoagland, Deborah Hornbake, Conrad Levenson, Elaine Lorenz, David Madasci, Liza Masalimova, Sui Park, Chris Plaisted,
Bill Vollers, Martha Walker and Melanie Zibit.

The signature piece of the exhibition is “Mega-Dandelion” by Gints Grinbergs.  It is a large — 144” in height, 56” in diameter — yet delicate structure that evokes the intricate design of lace in its welded and stainless steel structure.  Grinbergs explains in his artist’s statement that he looks to nature for inspiration with “interests [that] range from the macroscopic to the microscopic – from flowers and their structure to bacteria and viruses – from the giants of outer space to sub atomic particles.”  He continues, “I build sculptures derived from the universal forms of nature.
All of the sculptures in this series are built from recycled materials … I attempt to transform, up-cycle, these manmade materials into the infinitely more complex forms designed by nature.”

Grinbergs’ work has been featured at various museums and galleries and is included in private and corporate collections throughout North America.

'Water Courses' by Elaine Lorenz is another featured piece in the Showcase.

‘Water Courses’ by Elaine Lorenz is another featured piece in the Showcase.

Created out of cement, fiberglass and paint, Elaine Lorenz’s intriguing “Water Course” comprises three pieces. She states that she has made “sculpture in such diverse materials as wood, metal, concrete, encaustic over a wire armature and ceramic, while maintaining an overall view of nature as a dominant source of energy and influence on her work.”  Lorenz explains her approach in creating art as, “abstract, only alluding to things, relationships or emotions and leaving room for the viewer’s interpretation.”

Lorenz has exhibited her work in numerous group exhibitions and sculpture sites throughout the US and her sculptures are in private, public and corporate collections in numerous states including Alabama, California, Florida, New Jersey and Texas. She has been the Vice President of Exhibitions for the Sculptors Guild since 2011.

Jay Hoagland charming ‘Mephisto’s Waltz’ features a viola made out of steel and copper with a kinetic element.  When the integral weathervane at the head of the instrument catches the wind, the bow travels across the strings playing an eerie melody. Hoagland explains the motivation behind his sculpture thus, “I work because the sheer joy of seeing thought turned into material is rejuvenating but my approach is more and more obviously the result of where and who I’ve been.”

'Mephisto's Waltz'is an intriguing piece of kinetic sculpture.

‘Mephisto’s Waltz’is an intriguing piece of kinetic sculpture.

He continues, “I’m inspired by natural science with an injection of humor and contradiction. Inspiration also comes from the minutae of life, the shape of a stone, the footprints of giants like da Vinci, Calder, Giacometti, Gabo, Hepworth, Moore, and Noguchi. Hoagland concludes, “I see my work as a catalyst to understand, and a lens to clarify, my place in the world.”

The jurors for the exhibition were acclaimed sculptors Gilbert V. Boro and Lisa Simonds, and painter Julia Pavone.

Boro has enjoyed an extraordinary and distinguished more than 50-year-career as a successful architect, sought-after international design consultant and an inspiring educator.  With a BFA from Duke University and post-graduate degrees from Columbia University, NYC, his work explores the interplay of space, place and scale in a wide range of media including steel, stone, wood, metal, aluminum and fiberglass.

Sculptor Gilbert V. Boro in his studio.

Sculptor Gilbert V. Boro in his studio.

Working in sculpture has been a compulsion rather than a possibility for Gil.  While mastering the rigors of technical competence, he developed a deep-seated passion for three-dimensional art, which continues to be the influential force behind his creations. He is both inspired and motivated by the creative freedom of sculpting, finding that abstract work is the means to fulfill his vision.  Boro’s sculptures can be found in art centers and public art venues across the US and throughout Europe; they have also been purchased by private collectors, corporations and foundations in both the US and internationally.

"Nest' is one of Gil Boro's most recent pieces.

“Nest’ is one of Gil Boro’s most recent pieces.

Simonds is a visual artist with a BFA in Sculpture from Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts in Old Lyme, Conn.  She is currently employed as the Exhibitions Coordinator at Lyme Academy and previously worked as an Independent Exhibitions Installer at Lyman Allyn Art Museum in New London, Conn., for eight years.

Pavone is the co-founder of the Alexey von Schlippe Gallery of Art at the University of Connecticut’s Avery Point Campus, and has served as its Curator/Director for the past 24 years.  During her 29-year career, Pavone, who has a BFA from Long Island University in Westbury, N.Y., and an MEd from Lesley College in Cambridge, Mass., has continued her own work as a painter, while variously serving as a teacher, and guest lecturer, juror and curator for numerous exhibitions.

This Summer Sculpture Showcase offers a unique opportunity for established sculptors to exhibit their work in a different location, while also effectively creating a new exhibition within the Sculpture Gardens.  Boro comments, “I’m delighted to be able to open my grounds to these exceptional sculptors whose work intrigues me.  Each one offers original creative thinking resulting in a combination of contrasting conceptual designs in a variety of media.  I think any visitor to the exhibition is going to be thoroughly engaged by what he or she sees – including children.”

Boro is somewhat unusual as a professional sculptor in that he loves to see folk of all ages directly interacting with his sculptures, noting that he has a strong aversion to exhibitions, “… where people can’t touch my work.”  Apart from attracting visitors to see the works on his grounds, Boro is thoroughly invested in the vibrant Old Lyme arts scene and hopes this exhibition will help cement the town as a summer destination for art-loving visitors from near and far, especially during the town’s Midsummer Festival which this year is on Friday, July 29, and Saturday, July 30.

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds are located at 80-1 Lyme St., less than a minute from Exit 70 on I-95, the Sculpture Grounds are open 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.  Admission is free.  Children, field trips and group visits are all welcome.

For further information, contact 860-434-5957, visit www.sculpturegrounds.com or email studio80sculpturegrounds@gmail.com

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“Stuff-the-Ambulance” in Shoreline Soup Kitchens Food Drive, June 11

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AREAWIDE – On Saturday, June 11 local ambulance companies across the shoreline are hosting an areawide food drive to collect non-perishable food for local residents in need. Between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., participating ambulance companies will be at:

Adams Hometown Market in Deep River (Deep River and Chester Ambulance)

Colonial Market in Essex (Essex Ambulance)

Roberts Food Center in Madison (Madison Ambulance)

Stop & Shop in Clinton (Clinton Ambulance)

The donations will go to local food pantries run by the Shoreline Soup Kitchens & Pantries (SSKP). In the summer there are typically fewer food drives, so this food will go a long way to help restock the pantries and ensure that everyone in our communities will have a place at the table.

“We are so grateful to all the town ambulance companies who are generously volunteering their time,” said Patty Dowling, Executive Director of SSKP. “Every day they provide life-saving medical care – and now they are giving of themselves to help fill our pantry shelves through the summer months. Many families that are struggling will have healthy food to eat because of their efforts, and our neighbors in need will know that they are part of a community that really cares.”

“It’s just another way we can work together to help the people in need,” said Steve Olsen with the Essex Ambulance Association.

For more information call (860) 388-1988 or visit www.shorelinesoupkitchens.org.

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