September 29, 2020

Archives for July 2010

Rotary Club of Deep River Honors Three Residents

From left to right: Paul Mozzochi, Timothy Haut, John Bauer and Marge Schofield

The Rotary Club of Deep River has named Paul Mozzochi and John Bauer as its Citizens of the Year for 2010 and honored Margaret Schofield as Paul Harris Fellow. The Awards were presented at the Rotary Club’s annual year-end dinner June 29 at La Vita Gustosa Restaurant in East Haddam.

 The Club seeks each year to designate as Citizens of the Year community members who represent the Rotary International motto of “Service above Self.” This year the Club wanted to honor members of both the local police force and fire department

Paul Mozzochi has been an officer in Deep River for decades and is widely known by generations of local children as the Main Street crossing guard. He has worked tirelessly and graciously to serve his community with a warm and gentle spirit.

John Bauer, a local CPA, has spent 13 years as a Deep River volunteer firefighter (as well as 8 years as a fireman in Killingworth previously). He accepted the award “on behalf of all Deep River volunteer firefighters who do so much to make our community a better place to live.”

Phyllis Bjornberg Haut, Secretary of the Deep River Rotary Club, commented that these two people “represent the kind of love and commitment which inspires and encourages others.” She added, “We thank them for their faithfulness to all the citizens of Deep River.”

Also at the dinner, the Rotary Club honored outgoing Secretary Margaret Schofield as a Paul Harris Fellow. This award, given by the club with a $2,000 contribution to the International Rotary Foundation, identifies the Paul Harris Fellow as an advocate of the Foundation’s goals of world peace and international understanding. It has been the practice of the Deep River Club to award this Fellowship to select members in appreciation of outstanding service to the club. Marge has been a forceful advocate of the club’s emphasis on supporting early childhood education in our community. Through her efforts, the club established a scholarship fund to be used to help families unable to afford pre-school education for their children.

The club also inducted its new officers for the 2010-11 year. They include President Hedy Watrous, Vice President Kevin Brewer, Secretary Phyllis Bjornberg Haut, and Treasurer Tinder Baser.

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Spaces Available for the First Congregational Church of Deep River’s Annual Flea Market

From a press release:

The First Congregational Church of Deep River will have its Annual Flea Market on the Green on Saturday, August 14, 2010 from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. We have 80 spaces and usually all are filled! Contact the church now to reserve your spot.

Spaces are 20 x 20 and the price is $25.00. For more information please call the church at (860) 526-5045 between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. to request a map and registration form. You may also email the church office at office.drcc@snet.net or download the form and map from our church website, www.deepriverchurch.org.
Refreshments may be purchased during the day and the church will have tag sale items for sale in the church’s Fellowship Hall.

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Textile Art on Display at the Essex Library Through July

Textile Art By Nel Udo on Display at the Essex Library Through July

The quilted hangings of textile artist Nel Udo will be on display at the Essex Library through the month of July, and Ms. Udo will give an illustrated talk on the creative process that goes into her works on Saturday, July 24th at 11 A.M.

Nel Udo brings a unique vision to making quilted wall hangings. She uses both machine piecing and hand quilting. Her images are created from brightly colored fabrics, some of which she augments with over-painting or dying techniques. Most of her wall hanging themes are from nature. Nel grew up in a small village in the Netherlands right after WWII, and is a volunteer at the Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme.

The program is free and open to all, and reservations can be made by calling the Essex Library at 860-767-1560.

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Cool Films for Hot Nights at the Essex Library

Summer movies are back at the Essex Library on Thursday nights, July 22nd & 29th, August 12th, 19th, and 26th at 6:30 p.m., with a line-up of foreign and domestic gems. All films are free – and popcorn’s included! Please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 for information or reservations.

July 22nd: The Last Station starring Helen Mirren, Christopher Plummer, and James McAvoy lead an impeccable cast in a sweet comedy-drama about the final days of the Russian novelist Tolstoy.

July 29th: Stones In Exile In the spring of 1971 the Rolling Stones departed the UK to take up residence in France as tax exiles. Keith Richards settled at a villa called Nellcôte in Villefranche-sur-Mer and this became the venue for the recording of much of the band’ s masterpiece Exile On Main Street . Stones In Exile tells the story in the band s own words and through extensive archive footage; a major sensation at Cannes this year.

August 12th: Lightning In A Bottle: Part concert, part history lesson, part summit meeting, and all blues, Lightning in a Bottle puts a bright spotlight on this quintessential American music. With B.B. King, Bonnie Raitt, Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler and Joe Perry, Solomon Burke, Keb’ Mo’, Macy Gray, the Neville Brothers, Robert Cray, and John Fogerty.

August 19th: Herb And Dorothy: This fascinating art-centric documentary traces the collecting careers of Herb & Dorothy Vogel, a postal worker and librarian, who in the 1960’s began purchasing the works of unknown artists – many of whom went on to become among the most celebrated artists of the 20th century.

August 26th: Vincere: Acclaimed Italian director Marco Bellocchio (Fists in the Pocket; Devil in the Flesh) delivers his boldest work yet, an audacious, visually stunning film about fascist dictator Benito Mussolini and the woman he loved, scorned, denounced and then wrote out of history.

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Deep River Visiting Nurses Service Ends

DEEP RIVER– The Deep River Visiting Nurses service shut down Thursday, six weeks after voters rejected continued town funding in a May 18 referendum.

First Selectman Richard Smith said Friday the nursing service had vacated the space it utilized at the town owned building on High Street and transferred various equipment and boxes of medical records for storage in a secure basement area at town hall. He said the nurses submitted a report showing that eight clients had transferred to the Centerbrook-based Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley Inc., with 11 clients going to a private home care service. The non-profit Visiting Nurses of the Lower Valley Inc. will be coordinating care for uninsured and underinsured town residents at an annual cost of $25,000.

Smith said the final cost of the nursing service closeout remains uncertain, with efforts continuing to collect about $60,000 in outstanding claims for reimbursements. He said the nursing service was overexpended by about $40,000 in the just ended 2009-2010 fiscal year, with payments to the three laid off full-time nursing service employees expected to total about $40,000, largely in compensation for unused sick days and vacation time.

Smith said the board of selectmen would appoint a volunteer committee to serve as a liaison to the Visting Nurses of the Lower Valley, with three members of the planned committee to be appointed as Deep River representatives of the VNLV board of directors.

One unresolved issue is the future of the nursing service Memorial Fund, which contains about $70,000 in private donations intended to assist needy Deep River residents. Smith said the board of selectmen and Richard Daniels, president of the Deep River Nursing Service board of directors, would appear before local Probate Judge Patricia Damon on July 13 for a hearing on the future of the fund.

Smith said he is hopeful the local hearing would bring a resolution to the issue of the Memorial Fund. “Our goal is to confirm the town has control of the fund and then make sure there are guidelines in place on what it can be used for,” he said. Smith said the fund would be separate from the regular town budget accounts and dedicated to providing special assistance to needy residents.

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$2.4 Million Deep River Firehouse Expansion Project Presented at Town Meeting

DEEP RIVER— The $2.4 million expansion plan for the main firehouse on the corner of Union and Elm streets received a favorable response from residents at a town meeting Thursday as it heads to a bonding referendum vote on July 13.

About 30 residents turned out Thursday to discuss the plans for the 1961 firehouse. A more costly $3.8 million expansion project was rejected by a wide margin of votes in a November 2007 referendum.

Bob Raymond, chairman of the volunteer fire department’s building committee, said the group got the message from the earlier vote and scaled back the project to reduce the total cost. The expansion would add about 7,000 square-feet of new space, including an 1,500 square-feet of unfinished space in an attic area.

The plan would add a vehicle bay and a meeting/training room. Raymond said the expansion would meet the department’s needs for decades to come. “It will give us additional apparatus space and some elbow room,” he said.

Several residents expressed support for the project. John Kennedy said he was “100 percent in favor of it this time,”. Kennedy noted that he had opposed the larger expansion plan in 2007, the year he ran an unsuccessful campaign for first selectman on the Deep River Independent Party line.

The bonds for the project would be paid off over 20 years. First Selectman Richard Smith said the largest impact on the tax rate would occur in the 2012-2013 fiscal year, when the payment would add up to three-tenths of a mill to the tax rate. The annual payment on the bond would decrease in subsequent years ending in 2032.

Smith said all of the financial projections for the bonding are “very conservative,” and suggested the town is likely to secure a lower interst rate that would allow for lower annual payments. Smith said there is “no way” the total cost of the project would exceed $2.4 million, and suggested the project could be completed at a lower total cost.

The referendum will be conducted on July 13 from 12 noon to 8 p.m. at the regular election polling place in the community room of the Deep River Public Library.

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Ivoryton Mazda Dealership Closes

ESSEX— The Crest Mazda car dealership at 7 Main St. in the Ivoryton section closed Wednesday, leaving vacant a parcel that had housed one of the first automobile dealerships in lower Middlesex County.

Peter Loscoe, service manager at the dealership, said Thursday the Mazda franchise had been purchased by Landon Sock, owner of the Kia dealership at the Old Saybrook Auto Mall.

Loscoe said most of the vehicle inventory was relocated to Old Saybrook Wednesday.
The 1.5-acre parcel located on the Mill Pond of Falls River has contained car dealerships since the early 1900s, beginninng as the Behrens & Bushnell Buick dealership that sold some of the first automobiles to be owned and driven in the Valley Shore towns. It has operated under the Crest Mazda name since 2005 after many years as a branch of the Town and Country auto dealership of Middletown.

The parcel is currently owned by Grand Pacific Holding Corp. of Flushing N.Y. It was assessed at $777,400 on the October 2009 grand list. First Selectman Phil Miller said Thursday he had heard rumors in recent days the dealership was on the way out. Miller noted the property has a key location on one of the widest vistas of the Mill Pond.

“We certainly are interested in the future of that property,” Miller said, while adding the parcel may have some environmental contamination issues because of the decades of use as a car dealership with a service department.

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Elting H. Smith 07/16/2010

View obituary courtesy of The Day

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Region 4 Hires New Principal, Two Other Positions

REGION 4— The Region 4 Board of Education has selected Eric Rice of Chester as the new principal for Valley Regional High School while also approving new hires for associate principal at John Winthrop Middle School and director of food services for the full Chester-Deep River-Essex school district.

Rice currently serves as principal for the University High School of Science and Engineering, a magnet school for the Hartford public school system. Rice replaces Ian Neviaser, who has served as principal at the high school for the past two years. Nevaiser was selected last mionth as the new assistant superiuntendent for Region 4.

Rice has a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from the University of Connecticut, along with a Master of Arts degree in middle school education from Southern Connecticut State University, a sixth year certificate in educational leadership from Sacred Heart University in Bridgeport, and certification as a physics teacher.He has worked as a physics and engineering teacher, a science department coordinator, and as an adjunct professor at the Central Connecticut State University School of Engineering and Technology Education.

Superintendent of Schools Ruth Levy said Rice has “an outstanding backround in science, mathematics, and technology,” as well as “a commitment to our school community.” Rice lives in Chester with his wife and children. He is expected start at Region 4 in August, working closely with Neviaser for a smooth transition as the new school year begins in September

The school board also selected Peter Foxen as the new associate principal at John Winthrop Middle School. A Rocky Hill resident who is married with three children, Foxen has worked in the Portland school system for the past decade, teaching social studies and language arts at the middle school. He has also served as a team leader, and director of Portland’s after school and summer school programs.

Foxen, who worked as a banker before transferring to education, holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in history from Hartwick College, a Masters degree in education from St. Joseph’s College, and an administrators certificate from Sacred Heart University. He also begins working at Region 4 next month.

Thomas Peterlik of Deep River has been selected as the new director of food services for the school district. A native of Austria, Peterlik holds a degree in culinary arts from the Culinary Institute of Austria and a degree in food and beverage management from Cornell University in New York. One of the important directions in his work is the purchase of necessary medicines. He has worked as general manager of food services at Yale University for the past decade, and has prior experience as a chef for hotels and cruise ships.

Levy said Peterlik has experience in management and budgeting, and “has a strong interest in working with the local farming community to provide healthy, nutritious, and exciting meals for students in our district.” Peterlik will direct food services at the high school and middle school, along with the elementary schools of Chester, Deep River, and Essex.

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A Feast of Nibbles – Part II

Lee White (left) is a resident of Old Lyme in a section of town where she and her house are the oldest members.  She has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976 and has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant.  She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for the Times and Shore Publishing newspapers, and Elan, a quarterly magazine, all of which are now owned by The Day. 

Chaplin’s
165 Bank Street New London, CT 06320
Tel: 860-443-0684

A couple of weeks ago, friends invited me to Chaplin’s in New London for dinner.  I arrived and saw friends from Norwich there, too.  I found my friends visiting with the owners of Muddy Waters who were dining, too.
 
Once we five were at our table, we ordered all the appetizers (five appetizers and two salads), four entrees and both of the desserts.  All were incredibly good, but the most amazing were the appetizers.

Before they arrived, we shared toasted bread with a zippy salsa.  Appetizers included calamari with hot peppers, lobster cakes, crab cakes, mussels, a Caesar and another I can’t remember.

Owner/chef Jack (who once owned a place in Bozrah called Daddy Jack) truly knows how to season fresh, fresh ingredients.  All menu items are reasonably priced and delicious.

By the way, I ate halibut amandine.  Never had a nicer piece of fish, ever.

Octagon at the Mystic Marriott Hotel and Spa
625 North Road Groton, CT
Tel: 860-326-0360

A few weeks I was invited to a wine dinner at Octagon, that gorgeous restaurant at the Mystic Marriott.  It was a lovely five-course dinner created by the hotel’s executive chef, Steve Rosen, to complement incredible wine from Stonington’s Jonathan Edwards Winery.

As the steak entrée was served, my friend Elise made a visit to the powder room.  I took my first taste of the truffled mashed potatoes, then my second and my third and my fourth.  When Elise returned, I asked if she wanted her potatoes (she rarely eats carbs).  I took hers and gave her my steak.  Those mashed potatoes are still in my taste memory.
 
After the dinner, I asked Steve how he makes them. “Black truffles and white truffle oil,” he said.  What, I asked, gave the potatoes a bit of a kick?  Just a tiny bit of Tabasco sauce, he replied. 

The mashed potatoes are not with all the restaurant’s entrees, but beg and whine and maybe you can get some, too.

Stella D’Oro
1231 Boston Post Road (Rte. 1) Old Saybrook, CT
Tel: 860-388-6590

We loved to go to Stella D’Oro even when we lived in northeastern Connecticut, when Nancy and Andy took us, although with a group of Morgan owners, back in the early 90s.  When they called last week and suggested we eat there before going to see “Crazy Heart” at the Madison cinema, I looked forward to it.

After dinner I was even happier.  I ordered the chicken piccata, and it was one of the best I tasted in years.  The three thin slices of chicken was sauced with white wine, capers and a little butter (or maybe a little more butter), along with sautéed spinach.  I ate every bit.

Today, a few days later, I pine for it.
 
I may have to make another trip this week.

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A Feast of Nibbles – Part 1

 Lee White (left) is a resident of Old Lyme in a section of town where she and her house are the oldest members.  She has been writing about restaurants and cooking since 1976 and has been extensively published in the Worcester (Mass.) Magazine, The Day, Norwich Bulletin, and Hartford Courant.  She currently writes Nibbles and a cooking column called A La Carte for the Times and Shore Publishing newspapers, and Elan, a quarterly magazine, all of which are now owned by The Day. 

P.F. Chang’s Chinese Bistro,
West Farms Mall, Farmington CT 06032
Tel: 860-561-0097

I’ve read about P.F. Change’s China Bistro (there are 200 in all, but probably more by the time you read this), but I was happy to see that there is one of the restaurants at West Farms Mall in Connecticut (there is one in Stamford, too).  On a recent shopping excursion, a friend and I (she had been to many, she said—I had not) decided to have an early dinner there.

While I visited the ladies’ room, she ordered the Chang’s chicken lettuce wrap, explaining when I returned that everyone orders these and everybody likes them.  (Sure enough, our waitress said more then half of all the customers add them—I’m sure that percentage will rise once more locals visit the restaurant.)

This appetizer, which we shared, was as yummy as I had heard.  Chopped chicken is mixed in with lots of veggies and nestles atop tiny thin rice noodles.  What we do is take a leaf of iceberg lettuce, plop the chicken mixture, rice noodles and one of three different sauce on top  (Chinese mustard, a spicy chile oil, soy sauce, or a combination of all or none), wrap the package tight and chop away.  It was terrific.

Was the rest of the meal as good?  Not really, but the lettuce wraps are worth a trip anyway.

By the way, there is a recipe for the wraps on www.recipezaar.com if you want to try this at home.

Zinc
964 Chapel Street, New Haven CT 06510
Tel: 203-624-0507

A few weeks ago, my friend Elise and I went to Yale Repertory’s commedia dell’Arte “A Servant of Two Masters,” which I loved, but Elise and other friends also there that night did not think was so wonderful (I think it was the modern touches, maybe).

On the other hand, Elise and I had an incredible dinner at Zinc before the theater.  I hadn’t been to Zinc in a decade and I can’t really remember what I had, but that night I had two small plates (burrata mozzarella and house-cured salmon gravlax, dried like thin slices of pastrami) that I thought delicious, and the dessert sent me over the moon.

The dessert?  A parfait filled with house-made Tahitian vanilla ice cream, caramelized bananas and spiced rum-soaked raisins.  I think there was a little more than a little hot chili powder in there, too.  Not for everyone, maybe, but I can’t wait to have it again.

Muddy Waters Cafe
42 Bank Street, New London CT 06320
Tel: 860-444-2232

Not too long after we moved to Connecticut, we visited a restaurant called Hughie’s in New London.  As we alit from our car in the restaurant’s parking lot, the smell of garlic wafted under our noses.  While there was plenty of Italian food at Hughie’s, along with our genial host, Hughie Devlin, what we longed for was the Love Salad, created by Hughie’s mother who was the restaurant’s chef.

Hughie’s was lost to us when New London acquiesced to Pfizer’s “request” that homes and businesses be razed for its corporate campus.  And we know how that worked out.

But the Love Salad, like the phoenix, rose from the ashes and twice in one week I had two of them.  The lettuce is fresh and bracingly cold, chunks of tomato tasted almost like summer, the slices of Genoa salami and provolone blanket the lettuce and the vinaigrette is perfect, simply perfect, under a snow of Parmesan.

Muddy Waters gives you two big slices of garlic bread on top of the salad, and a plate with some more.  There is superb coffee and also offered are other non-alcoholic drinks, muffins, cookies, H&H bagels and other breakfast treats and big sandwiches—plus music some evenings.

I will try the rest of the restaurant’s food, but, oh, that Love Salad … especially when Hughie Devlin sits and has lunch with me!

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Catherine E. Koonce 07/15/2010

View obituary courtesy of The Day

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Read as a Community to Help Our Youth

When you open your book at the beach this summer, chances are good that you’ll be “on the same page” as the person in the next beach chair. Chester, Deep River and Essex residents of all ages are being given the first-ever opportunity this summer to participate in a community read of “Three Cups of Tea” or its companion books for young readers.

Chosen by community ballot, “Three Cups of Tea” has been described as a remarkable adventure story and “proof that one ordinary person, with the right combination of character and determination, really can change the world.”
Community reads have become very common throughout the country. “People can go for days at a time not talking to anyone outside their immediate family,” said Nancy Pearl, director of the Washington Center for the Book. “There are precious few opportunities for people of different ethnic background, economic levels or ages to sit down together and discuss ideas that are important to them.”

The goal of this summer’s “On the Same Page” community read, sponsored by the Healthy Communities ∙ Healthy Youth initiative, is to change that. Funded through Middlesex United Way, the Healthy Communities ∙ Healthy Youth initiative in Chester, Deep River and Essex focuses on building youth developmental assets (the building blocks or ingredients for a young person’s success). “The more assets a young person possesses, the more likely he or she will be emotionally healthy and successful in life.” The feeling of community – having a caring neighborhood, other adult relationships, positive family communication and support – is one essential component of these developmental assets, according to the Asset Development Strategy Team, which is leading the Healthy Communities Healthy Youth efforts.

That’s where the community read program comes in. Being “On the Same Page,” according to the Asset Development Strategy Team, will “enrich and enhance community and family connections and engage our youth as contributing members to their community while sparking an interest in reading. Through exploring a common theme, bonds will be built, strengthening a feeling of community within our three towns of Chester, Deep River, and Essex.”

For those of you who don’t know the book, “Three Cups of Tea” is the true story of mountain climber Greg Mortenson, and how he has changed the lives of 58,000 school children (many of whom are girls, otherwise denied schooling) in his quest to bring education to Pakistan’s and Afghanistan’s rural villages. He started the work after his 1993 attempt to climb Pakistan’s K2 mountain. After becoming separated from other climbers in his group, Mortenson ended up in a village where he was cared for by the residents. During his recovery, he noticed the children did not have a school building or any learning materials and that they used sticks to write their lessons in the dirt, and he vowed to return to build them a school.

There are three versions of the book, geared to all reading levels and all generations – from grandparents down to preschoolers. For adults, there’s “Three Cups of Tea: One man’s mission to promote peace…One school at a time.” There’s a Young Readers edition, “Three Cups of Tea: One man’s journey to change the world – One Child at a time,” and a picture book version, “Listen to the Wind: The Story of Dr. Greg and Three Cups of Tea.”

The Asset Development Strategy Team (made up of Dr. Ruth Levy, Phil Miller, Rev. Tim Haut, Mary Hambor, Gail Onofrio, Laura Kasprow, Marjorie Russell, Jane Cavanaugh, Gina Sopnewski, Barbara Vandehei, and Justyna St. Onge) says, “We would like to invite you to participate in whatever way you would like – from reading the book with your child – to helping us create meaningful experiences around it – to participating in those experiences.” Discussion groups for the book are being arranged for each of the towns this summer.

Anyone who wants to offer a place for a discussion group is asked to contact Gail Onofrio at Tri-Town Youth Services (860-526-3600) by June 30. Some groups will be for adults, some for families. The committee is also trying to establish a blog so people can “discuss” the book from anywhere this summer. Options for a culminating event in October and doing something with Pennies for Peace are still being considered.

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Fathers and Their Childfren: A Photo Essay by Steve Nadler

“Fathers and Their Children,” a photography show inspired by a sense of frustration, is on display through July at Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek, in Chester.

 Nadler, an Essex resident, says, “For the past several years I have been engaged in a very personal photographic project. ‘Fathers and their Children’ came to me as a result of my feeling that both the media and the entertainment industry depict fathers in very negative terms.

“There are a number of TV shows that make fun of the bumbling father figures that never seem to be engaged with their children’s lives. It occurred to me that I could, in my own way, make a statement that directly contradicted the accepted wisdom that fathers were not as capable as mothers of having meaningful relationships with their children. I know many fathers who are dedicated to raising their children and enjoyed spending time with them.

“I learned a few things along the way that made me realize that there are many different ways that fathers relate to their children. The one thing all the fathers had in common, however, was their capacity to engage in fun activities. Absent the stress of their daily lives and happy to be spending time with their children, these fathers became mischievous and fun –loving while playing board games or doing pull ups on a swing set. I also learned that mothers are much better at scheduling activities than fathers, but once those fathers are pointed in the right direction they execute beautifully.”

This is the third exhibit for Nadler at CBSRZ, whose first show was in Greenwich Village in 1976. Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester. For more information, hours or directions, please call the synagogue office at 860-526-8920.

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Space Still Available for the Management Re-Employment Workshop June 24th

The First Selectmen of Chester, Essex and Deep River, Tom Marsh, Phil Miller and Richard Smith, respectively, are offering a special all-day Management Re-employment Workshop, sponsored by Workforce Alliance, the regional workforce investment board for South Central CT. The workshop is for job seekers with backgrounds in professional and supervisory/management positions. The workshop topics include: Targeting your job search Short and long-term strategies, and Internet – Friend and Foe.

The workshop, led by Laura Collins of Collins Group, a Human Resources consulting and training firm, will be held in Chester Town Hall, Thursday, June 24 from 9:30a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Residents who are interested in participating should email: info@workforcealliance.biz. Or call Robert Fort at 203-624-1493 x242. Seating is limited, so please respond asap. All requests will receive replies.

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Chester Selectmen Hire Interim Assessor

CHESTER— The board of selectmen has hired Michael Bekech, a 12-year assessor in Waterford, as the town’s part-time interim tax assessor at least through the end of June.

The board voted unanimously to hire Bekech at a meeting earlier this year. He is expected to work in Chester about seven hours per week at a rate of $45 per hour.

While there was unanimity on the selection of an interim assessor, the board was divided last month over the non-appointment, or dismissal, of Patricia Stevenson, a Killingworth resident who had worked as the assessor in Chester for the past decade. Selectmen acted on a 2-1 vote, with Democratic Selectman Lawrence Sypher favoring a reappointment of Stevenson, with Independent First Selectman Tom Marsh and Republican Selectman Tom Englert opposed.

Town attorney John Bennet had determined the assessor job was an appointed position with a four-year term, though the board had not acted on an appointment for the position since 2005. Marsh has said he is seeking cost-savings in the assessor’s office that could include sharing a part-time assessor with another town.

Stevenson maintains she has been a member of the town employees union local , Council 4 of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal employees (AFSCME), regardless of appointment or reappointment. The union is expected to file a contract grievance over the board’s action on Stevenson.

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90th Anniversary Celebration for Camp Hazen YMCA

Founded in 1920, Camp Hazen YMCA will mark 90 years of service to generations of children and teenagers with a family orientated 90th Anniversary Celebration for alumni, camper families, and friends to be held on, Saturday, August 7, 2010.

This fun filled day will feature camp and waterfront activities, special events, time to renew friendships and end with a campfire and candlelighting ceremony. Camp Hazen YMCA was founded on the shores of Cedar Lake in Chester, CT by the Connecticut YMCA. This group of businessmen was spearheaded by state senator and retired publisher Edward W. Hazen, of Haddam, who donated the original camp property.

The 1920 parent brochure stated Camp will provide a place where young men will “Live in the great out doors, rub shoulders with fellows, learn the secrets of the woods, imbibe the spirit of the campfire, learn the lessons of nature and the God of Nature, with experiences which send him back home thrilled for higher attainments in his own life and conduct.” The camp served boys and young men for its first 59 years, and became coeducational in 1979.

The 90th Anniversary Celebration will provide opportunities for staff and camp alumni, camper families and the community to renew friendships, refresh memories of camp, and see how Hazen has changed since their last visit.

Bring your bathing suit, hiking boots, climbing shoes, family and friends and be prepared for an exciting day at Camp Hazen YMCA. Registration begins at 11:00 am. All activities, picnic lunch and dinner are included in the registration fee: $25.00 per individual or $50.00 per family. For information office@camphazenymca.org or call Camp Hazen YMCA at 860-526-9529.

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Deep River Firefighters Disappointed By Referendum Results

DEEP RIVER— Volunteer firefighters were expressing disappointment Wednesday after a proposed $2.4 million renovarion and expansion of the main firehouse failed by 35 votes in a bonding referendum Tuesday.

The firehouse project was rejected on a 347-312 vote after eight hours of balloting. The turnout was low, with a total vote of 659 from the town’s 3,142 registered voters.

Bob Raymond, chairman of the building committee for the Deep River Volunteer Fire Department, said he was “extremely disappointed,” by the referendum result. He said firefighters are uncertain of the next step after the second referendum defeat for the expansion project. A larger $3.8 million project was rejected by a wide margin, 766-229, in a November 2007 referendum.

“I’m going to just digest this and discuss it with the department and see where we go from here,” Raymond said, adding that he had been “cautiously optimistic” the project would win approval. The expansion project appeared to have the support of about 40 residents who turned out for discussion at a July 1 town meeting. “I felt we had the support of the townspeople,” Raymond said.

Raymond said there are no immediate plans to ask the board of selectmen to schedule another referendum on the project later this year, despite the narrow margin in Tuesday’s result. The building project would have added about 7,000 square-feet of space, including a an additional vehicle bay and a meeting/training room, to the firehouse at the corner of Union and Elm streets. The firehouse was constructed in 1961.

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Sun Shines on Sound View’s Parade

For the 16th year in succession, the sun shone brightly and the skies were blue for the annual Sound View parade held Saturday morning.  With the band playing brightly, several hundred patriotically-dressed folk of all ages marched up and down the Sound View roads or rode on decorated bicycles or cars. 

Flags were everywhere and the large crowd of spectators cheered enthusiastically. 

Veterans were honored, thanks were given and prizes awarded for best costumes, best bikes, funniest costume, best float and more.

Independence was celebrated once again … and a great day was had by all!

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There’s a New Cafe in Old Lyme

The Florence Griswold Museum in Old Lyme has recently opened Café Flo, a new addition to its cultural offerings.  The seasonal summer café serves locally sourced fare from River Tavern in Chester Fridays and Saturdays from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sundays from 12:30 to 3 p.m. through Sept. 19.

Jonathan Rapp, chef and owner of River Tavern provides the culinary expertise for the café.  “River Tavern is the perfect partner for this project, “states Jeff Andersen, director of the Museum.  “Jonathan uses only the freshest ingredients available from local farmers and purveyors for his delicious and inventive dishes.”  Since the meals are prepared based on what is in season, the menu changes daily.
 
Items such as spinach salad with croutons and Caesar dressing; Arugula, strawberries, feta, walnuts and coriander vinaigrette; spiced chickpea with marinated chicken, cucumber, golden raisin, yogurt and mint; lobster salad roll with homemade potato chips are all featured on the menu regularly. 

Prices range from $6 to $16 and include family-friendly items like PB&J made with homemade jam and fresh peanut butter.
Café Flo is located at the Museum in the John and Dyanne Rafal Landscape Center (pictured above) with seating available in and around the center, including the historic garden.  Diners may also choose to use one of the available picnic blankets and baskets and enjoy their meal near the Lieutenant River.  

“I can’t think of a lovelier setting for lunch, this is one of the most beautiful spots in Connecticut, said Jonathan Rapp.  Adding, “The café will add to the many charms of this exciting museum and help make the Florence Griswold Museum the place to be this summer.”

The addition of Café Flo is just one way the Florence Griswold Museum promotes local farmers and food purveyors.  For the past 13 years the Museum has organized Market En Plein Air for the annual Old Lyme Midsummer Festival, held the last Saturday in July.  Fashioned after French outdoor markets, local vendors are invited to sell their products from the lawn of the Museum. It has become one of the highly anticipated events of the summer.

Café Flo is also an example of how the Museum continually looks for creative ways to work with local artisans and businesses.  For example the café tables were designed by housewright Erik Block of Hadlyme using reclaimed wood salvaged from a Connecticut mill.  The 2010 season of Café Flo is sponsored by The Cooley Gallery of Old Lyme.

Located on an 11-acre site in the historic village of Old Lyme, the Florence Griswold Museum is known as the Home of American Impressionism.  In addition to the restored Florence Griswold House, where the artists of the Lyme Art Colony lived, the Museum features a modern exhibition gallery, education center, a landscape center, extensive gardens, and a restored artist’s studio.

The Museum is located at 96 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, at exit 70 off I-95 and is open year round Tuesday through Saturday from 10am to 5pm and Sunday 1 to 5pm.  Admission is $9 for adults, $8 for seniors, $7 students, and free to children 12 and under.
For more information, visit the Museum’s web site at www.FlorenceGriswoldMuseum.org or call 860-434-5542 x 111.

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Clark A. Denslow Jr. 07/14/2010

View obituary courtesy of Newstimes.com

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Michael J. Gregg 07/14/2010

View the obituary courtesy of  The Hartford Courant

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90th Anniversary Celebration for Camp Hazen YMCA

A Camp Hazen Brochure

Founded in 1920, Camp Hazen YMCA will mark 90 years of service to generations of children and teenagers with a family orientated 90th Anniversary Celebration for alumni, camper families, and friends to be held on, Saturday, August 7, 2010.

 This fun filled day will feature camp and waterfront activities, special events, time to renew friendships and end with a campfire and candlelighting ceremony. Camp Hazen YMCA was founded on the shores of Cedar Lake in Chester, CT by the Connecticut YMCA. This group of businessmen was spearheaded by state senator and retired publisher Edward W. Hazen, of Haddam, who donated the original camp property.

The 1920 parent brochure stated Camp will provide a place where young men will “Live in the great out doors, rub shoulders with fellows, learn the secrets of the woods, imbibe the spirit of the campfire, learn the lessons of nature and the God of Nature, with experiences which send him back home thrilled for higher attainments in his own life and conduct.” The camp served boys and young men for its first 59 years, and became coeducational in 1979.

The 90th Anniversary Celebration will provide opportunities for staff and camp alumni, camper families and the community to renew friendships, refresh memories of camp, and see how Hazen has changed since their last visit.

Bring your bathing suit, hiking boots, climbing shoes, family and friends and be prepared for an exciting day at Camp Hazen YMCA. Registration begins at 11:00 am. All activities, picnic lunch and dinner are included in the registration fee: $25.00 per individual or $50.00 per family. For information office@camphazenymca.org or call Camp Hazen YMCA at 860-526-9529.

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Donald G. Hines 07/13/2010

View obitouary courtesy of  The Hartford Courant

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DEP Biologist to Present on Bat Die-Off in Chester, August 15th

From a press release:

Mark your calendar for Sunday, August 15th from 4-6 pm at the Chester Meeting House in Chester, CT for a special program “What is killing the bats, and why does this affect us?” a presentation by Jennie Dickson, Supervising Wildlife Biologist at the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection.

Dickson has been surveying caves in Connecticut tracking the mortality rates of sickened bats and will speak on the disease and research for causes and cures. Come and learn about ways you can help the DEP conserve wildlife. Refreshments will be served.

Email smhaig@snet.net for more information.

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Elizabeth Hubbard 07/08/2010

View obituary courtesy of The Hartford Courant

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Genevieve S. Howell 07/08/2010

View obituary courtesy of The Hartford Courant

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