September 20, 2019

Archives for May 2012

Connecticut Valley Camera Club Photography Exhibit and Reception May 18

Tel Aviv Beach by Dianne Roberts

The Connecticut Valley Camera Club (CVCC) is having a photography exhibit at the Synagogue in Chester (55 East Kings Highway).  The subject is “open” with 45 member prints for viewing and for sale at very reasonable prices.

The public is invited to attend the opening reception from 8:30 pm to 9:30 pm on Friday, May 18, 2012. The exhibit is open to the public from 10-3pm M-F from May 21st through July 31st ,2012.

The CVCC meets the last Monday of each month at 7:00 pm at the Community Room (lower level) of the Deep River, CT Library (photographers at all levels are welcome).

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Essex Library Spring Book Sale May 19, 20

The Essex Library’s Spring Book Sale, to be held at the Library on May 19 and 20, will feature items signed by actress Katharine Hepburn in a special silent auction to be held Saturday. Pictured with the items are Jean Caron (l) and Dora Grover (r).

The Friends of the Essex Library are holding their Spring Book Sale at the Library, located at 33 West Avenue, on Saturday May 19 and Sunday May 20. Money raised by the sale goes to provide numerous special library programs and activities. Outstanding features at this event are two silent auction items signed by Katharine Hepburn. Lot 1 is a signed copy of the book “The Private World of Katharine Hepburn”. Lot 2 consists of a signed note to a fan on Miss Hepburn’s personal stationery plus a copy of Sotheby’s 2004 Auction Catalogue, “Property from the Estate of Katharine Hepburn”. The silent auction will be held on Saturday only.

The sale will run from 10 AM to 5 PM on Saturday May 19, and from 1 to 5 PM on Sunday May 20, when everything remaining will be half price. There will be a special table of books signed by their authors. Other offerings will include clean, well-sorted books on cooking, gardening, history, literature, art, travel, philosophy, science, nature, nautical subjects, sports, self-help, foreign languages, and more. There will be tables of fiction, children’s books, paperbacks, book sets, and audio-visual materials.

Specific information about titles offered in various categories and the signed books available will be on the Essex Library website, at www.essexlib.org.

On book-sale Saturday library materials can be checked in and out from 10 AM to 2 PM, but computers in the adult section will not be available for use. There will be no library services available on Sunday.

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Free Train Rides this weekend, May 12, 13

Essex Steam Train & Riverboat is delighted to kick off its season with Neighbor Appreciation Weekend, May 12 & 13, 2012.

Neighbor Appreciation weekend includes free TRAIN and BOAT rides for residents in 5 towns along the Valley Railroad’s operating line – – Essex, Deep River, Chester, Haddam, and Old Saybrook.

  • Passengers may elect a 1-hour train ride or 2 1/2-hour train and boat ride at 11:00am12:30pm2:00pm, or a 1-hour train ride at 3:30pm.

Hop aboard this springtime adventure bursting with flora and fauna! The magnificent Connecticut River Valley that’s our own backyard, will be on full display from the multiple decks of the Becky Thatcher riverboat. Enjoy close up views of the wildlife’s natural habitat as the train traverses the tidal wetlands of Pratt Cove and Chester Creek. Treasure the historic sites including East Haddam Swing Bridge, Goodspeed Opera House, and Gillette Castle.

 

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A Day in the Wild at Bushy Hill Open House May 19

Ivoryton, CT Bushy Hill will be hosting “A Day in the Wild” on Saturday, May 19 from 10am-3pm. This event is free and open to the public!  Join us to learn more about the Bushy Hill Summer Day Camp. Stop by to meet the directors and tour the camp. We have a variety of activities to participate in, such as primitive fire making, dream catcher crafts, hikes through the Cedar Swamp, and much more!

Bushy Hill at Incarnation Center is located at 253 Bushy Hill Road, Ivoryton, CT. Please meet at the Activity Center field. If you have any questions call (860)767-0848. Visit our website at www.bushyhill.org for more information.

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Caring for your Treasures – Fallon & Wilkinson Furniture at Gather, May 17

Furniture Conservators Fallon & Wilkinson will give a lecture, Caring for your Treasures and answer questions on Thursday, May 17 at Gather, 104 Main Street, Ivoryton, CT, noon-1 p.m.

Fallon & Wilkinson, brings a combined 45 years of training and experience to the care and conservation of furniture, wooden artifacts, and interior woodwork, blending old world craftsmanship with modern conservation practices. The firm also provides museum quality reproduction furniture for institutions and private clients. Since its founding in 2000, Fallon & Wilkinson, has built a worldwide reputation for its knowledge of antique furniture and the delicate art and science of conserving it.

Tad D. Fallon and Randy S. Wilkinson both trained at the Smithsonian Institution’s prestigious Furniture Conservation Training Program. Tad completed a conservation fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City and holds a Master’s Degree in Conservation from Antioch University in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Randy completed fellowships at the Preservation Society of Newport County in Rhode Island and the Mystic Seaport Museum in Connecticut and holds a Master’s Degree in Conservation from Antioch University in Yellow Springs, Ohio.

To register call Essex Books at 860-767-1707 or call Gather at 860-767-7816.

*Bring one of your own treasures to ask the experts about conservation.

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May 31 Referendum Set on Proposed 2012-2013 Deep River Town Budget

DEEP RIVER— The board of selectmen has set a May 31 full day referendum on the proposed $14.28 million town government/school budget plan for 2012-2013.
Selectmen set the date for the referendum after a quiet public hearing Tuesday on the proposed $3.5 million town government budget and a proposed $5.4 million appropriation for Deep River Elementary School. First Selectman Richard Smith said about a dozen residents turned out for the public hearing, with no calls for significant changes or reductions in the spending package that was developed by the selectmen and board of finance.
The proposed $3,509,265 town government budget is combined with a $334,000 capital expenditure plan and the proposed $5,400,787 appropriation for the elementary school. Also included in the total $14,284,323 spending levy is the town’s $4,304,478 share of the Region 4 education budget, which is locked in after voters of Chester, Deep River, and Essex approved the Region 4 budget in a referendum Tuesday.
The budget plan is expected to require a four-tenths of a mill hike in the property tax rate. The tax rate would rise from the current 24.28 mills to a rate of 24.68 mills, or $24.68 in tax for each $1,000 of assessed property value.
Last year, the tax rate increased by 2.55 mills after a town-wide property revaluation that was completed in 2010 led to an eight percent drop in the grand list of taxable property. About 1.8 mills of the 2011 increase was attributed to the drop in the grand list after the mandatory  property revaluation was conducted amid a slow national economy and weak area housing market.
Smith said the board of selectmen decided to hold a full 14-hour 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. referendum, despite extremely low voter turnout in recent budget referendums. Last year, a total of 361 voters turned out over the 14 hours, approving the budget plan on a 244-120 vote. Deep River has voted by referendum on the town budget each year since a contentious budget season in 2001 that included two voter rejections of the budget package.
Smith said selectmen would work with registrars of voters to determine exactly how many voters turn out on May 31 between 6 a.m. and 12 noon. He said selectmen would consider a 12 noon to 8 p.m. referendum in 2013 if the morning turn out remains extremely low.
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Connecticut Valley Camera Club Exhibit at CBSRZ Gallery Opens May 18

Canal du Midi by Deborah Rutty

Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek will be exhibiting 45 photographs by 22 members of the Connecticut Valley Camera Club in the Main Street Gallery of the synagogue. The show will run from May 18 to July 27, Monday through Friday from 10 am to 3 pm. The photos represent a juried selection, covering a wide variety of subjects, including very old Connecticut cemeteries, classic European synagogues, brilliant nature studies and contemplative landscapes and waterscapes.

Danny Street Synagogue Interior by Vincent Pipit

The Connecticut Valley Camera Club is an organization whose purpose is to help its members hone their technical and creative skills through presentations, interactive workshops and critiques. CVCC members Sheila Wertheimer and Elin Dolle organized the show with Linda Pinn, curator of the Main Street Gallery at CBSRZ.

Elegance by Edward McCaffrey

The exhibit is free and open to the public. All photos are for sale. For further information, call 860-526-8920. Congregation Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek is located at 55 East Kings Highway in Chester.

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A Little More About Prayer

The daily news of worldwide events makes me wonder how the human spirit endures so much torment-both physically and psychically. Humankind is constantly besieged with unbearable anguish, and for many the suffering goes on for months, years and in some instances, a lifetime.

It has always been the minister’s purpose to transmute their flocks’ pain and suffering into character. While suffering may indeed build character, I can’t help wondering why we are so reluctant to get angry at God. Maybe the creator wants to know how we really feel.

The words attributed to the dying Jesus as he endured three hours of raging human pain, “My God, My God, why hast thou forsaken me” are the most passionately honest words found in Scripture. This cry, born out of human despair, poignantly describes the human situation.

Thinking about Jesus’ cry of desolation transports me back to an incident that happened a few years ago.  I was entering my home through the backyard and noticed a tiny mouse lying on the step. It was either ill or badly hurt, but alive.  I knew the mouse was dying, and that I should end its suffering.  However, I was too cowardly to kill the little mouse.

Although I don’t believe the Creator is up there somewhere floating in the clouds, I remember looking up and yelling at God, “do something, this is your responsibility.”  When I looked down, the mouse was dead.  It is curious, but that tiny mouse symbolized all the horror, violence, misery and injustice that I see in our world.

While I remember feeling rage towards God, I also felt close to my Creator for the very first time. It was several months later that I understood what transpired on the back step. I was visiting a friend who had been seriously ill for the past six months. She had cancer in her lung, her kidney and her liver. Throughout her illness she appeared stoic and prayed frequently. Members of her church visited with her and prayed with her regularly.

On this particular day, my friend was very weak-but not too weak to tell me about a dream that she had the previous night. In the dream she was carrying a giant gift box tied with a bright red ribbon. She was carrying the gift to a church at the top of a hill. As she climbed the steps to the church, she kept falling backwards as the box was too big and cumbersome.

After an arduous climb, my friend finally reached the door to the church. She had a terrible time opening the door as she would not put the box down-not for an instant. Once inside the church, she could not take a seat because the box was hitting people in the head.

Finally, an old man with a long beard and wearing a white robe came over to her and suggested that she simply put the box on the alter. My friend did not want to give up the box so she left the church. As she was lugging the big box down the steps she awakened from her dream.

My friend asked if I knew what the dream meant. I in turn asked her what was in the gift box. She claimed that she didn’t know so I suggested that we take a look inside.  Together, we imagined ourselves untying the big red bow and looking inside.

With tears streaming down her fragile face, she looked into the box and told me that it was filled with garbage. Spontaneously, she cried out “what have I done to deserve this? Where are you? I can’t stand this anymore. I hate you God!”

My friend did not need for me to interpret her dream. She understood, at the deepest level, that the garbage symbolized all the negative feelings that she was denying God. She understood also that the wise man in her dream was urging her to leave the box of garbage on the altar as a gift for God.

The next morning, my dying friend smiled as I entered her room. With her mouth so dry and cracked that she could hardly speak, she told me that during the night she looked across the room at the wall facing her bed and saw a beautiful young man with long glowing hair. He was standing in a field of wild flowers-beckoning to her.

She said to me, “he has come to take me to God.” My beloved friend slipped into a coma that night and died two days later. Her dream, her tearing passion, and her vision helped me to understand that a despondent cry to God is a beautiful prayer of trust and of healing.

Implied in her prayer was an affirmation of faith and respect for the integrity of God. Her prayer showed enough trust in God’s love to express her rage for the horrors that she simply did not understand.

Alison Nichols, M.Div.
Essex, CT

 

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Chester Elementary School Joins Screen-Free Week

 

Body murals created at the Chester Elementary School Family Night

CHESTER — For the fifth year in a row, Chester Elementary School joined thousands of schools, libraries and community groups nationwide in a coordinated effort to encourage millions of Americans to turn off televisions, computers and video games for seven days and turn on the world around them.  Screen-Free Week is a chance for children to read, play, think, create, be more physically active and to spend more time with friends and family.

“Screen-Free Week is a much needed respite from the screen media dominating the lives of so many children,” said Wendy Fiore. “Now, more than ever, it’s imperative that we help children discover the joys of life beyond screens.”  On average, preschool children spend over four and a half hours a day consuming screen media, while older children spend over seven hours a day including multitasking. Excessive screen time is linked to a number of problems for children, including childhood obesity, poor school performance, and problems with attention span.

Students practicing yoga at the Family Night

A Family Night was hosted with a poetry slam, yoga, as well as creating body murals with Lori Lenz and Wendy Fiore.

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Governor Malloy to Commemorate Burning of the Ships Day on May 12 in Essex

 

PHOTO 1: Community rowboat races will be one of the many free Burning of the Ships Day events happening in Essex Village on Saturday, May 12. Pictured here is the 2011 team fielded by the Sailing Masters of 1812. PHOTO 2: Free Men of the Sea will be on hand for colonial weaponry demonstrations and maritime games at the Connecticut River Museum’s Burning of the Ships Day on Saturday, May 12.

Essex, CT – On Saturday, May 12, Governor Dannel Malloy will arrive in Essex Village to help commemorate the historic 1814 British raid on Essex.  The festivities begin at 2:00 pm with the annual Burning of the Ships Commemoration Parade presented by the Sailing Masters of 1812 Fife & Drums Corps.  Along with 14 other regional fife and drums corps, they will march down Main Street to the Essex waterfront to perform a small “muster” and ceremony remembering the fateful night when British troops rowed upriver and destroyed 27 ships during the War of 1812.  Joined by Connecticut River Museum Executive Director Jerry Roberts, Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman and State Representative Philip Miller, the Governor will recognize the Sailing Masters for nearly 50 years of service in keeping Connecticut’s heritage alive and then officially proclaim Essex as a War of 1812 battle site with a presentation to the Connecticut River Museum for their efforts in researching and telling the story.

At the conclusion of the ceremony, the Connecticut River Museum will present re-enactors, colonial weaponry demonstrations, and maritime games on its lawn while hosting community rowboat races off of its docks.  At 5:00 pm, the public is then invited to join museum staff in the Burning of the Fleet exhibit gallery for a special evening of grog, rum and tales of the British raid. The program will end in time for the 8:00 pm start of the 3rd Annual Regency Ball hosted by the Sailing Masters of 1812 at Essex Town Hall.

For more information on the Sailing Masters of 1812, go to www.sailingmasters.org. For more information on the Connecticut River Museum, go to www.ctrivermuseum.org or call (860)767-8269.


Burning of the Ships Day Itinerary

Governor Arrival

1:45 pm │Connecticut River Museum, 67 Main Street:  Governor Malloy arrives at the Connecticut River Museum prior to the 2:00 pm parade (before the street is closed) for a quick tour at the 1814 British Raid on Essex exhibit.

Sailing Masters of 1812 Commemoration Parade

2:00 pm │Essex Town Hall, 29 West Avenue:  The Sailing Masters of 1812 along with approximately 14 visiting fife and drum corps assemble at Town Hall and proceed on foot down Main Street to the Essex waterfront.

Waterfront Commemoration Ceremony

2:15 pm (approx.) │Foot of Main Street, adjacent to Connecticut River Museum

Sailing Masters Captain Ted Nelson begins commemoration ceremony by welcoming those gathered, introducing the corps and saying a few words.  He then introduces Connecticut River Museum Executive Director Jerry Roberts.

Jerry Roberts provides a brief history of the 1814 British raid on Essex and introduces Essex First Selectmen Norman Needleman.

First Selectman Needleman says a few words and introduces State Representative Phil Miller.

Representative Miller says a few words and then introduces Governor Malloy.

 

Governor Malloy speaks to the following three themes of the day:

  1. Kick off of the Bicentennial of the War of 1812 in CT
  2. Recognition of  the Sailing Masters for keeping our heritage alive for nearly 50 years
  3. Official declaration of Essex as a War of 1812 battle site (see attachment from SHPO)

If possible, the Governor could present an official proclamation to the Sailing Masters for their years of public service in addition to presenting a proclamation recognizing Essex as a War of 1812 battle site to the Connecticut River Museum for display in the Museum’s exhibit.

Ted Nelson thanks the Governor, Phil Miller, Norm Needleman and Jerry Roberts.  He then cues the start of the fife and drum corps muster while the Governor stands in review.  Fife and drum corps disperse back up Main Street to Town Hall.  Connecticut River Museum commences community row boat races and lawn activities.  Governor departs Museum grounds.

 

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Deep River Land Trust Unveils New Logo for 15 Deep River Land Trust Properties

Over 30 Deep River residents turned out for sign unveiling ceremony

The day itself could not have been more perfect for a gathering of the   Deep River Land Trust. The sun was sparkling. The air was clear, and the beauty of the natural surroundings was beyond description.

It was also a perfect day for the unveiling of the Land Trust’s new logo for its 15 protected properties in Deep River. Over thirty Deep River residents turned out for the unveiling ceremony, which was held on Sunday at the Evelyn and Hawthorne Smyth Sanctuary in Deep River.

The Sanctuary itself is located on Essex Street in Deep River. To find the Sanctuary, as you head out of town towards the Town of Essex, you   first cross some railroad tracks. Continuing, the Sanctuary is on your left up an incline. There is also a parking area on your right just before the Sanctuary. The new sign at the Sanctuary marks the beginning of a trail within the Sanctuary.

After some generalities about the beauty of the place, Deep River Land Trust President Suzanne Haig made some serious points about the importance of the work of the Deep River Land Trust. She said that the properties of the Deep River Land Trust were not about just “preserving the land.” “It is also about preserving the habitat for the wild species that live on the land,” she said; “It is a fish and wild life refuge.”

Deep River Land Trust President Susanne Haig holds forth

Haig also said, “We are not only preserving the land for ourselves, but also for future generations.” In addition, she noted that the Deep River Land Trust was now meeting with other local land trusts on a monthly basis to address common issues.

“This is your land,” she concluded. “It is just as nice as Pettipaug and easier to get to.”

Then, it came time for the unveiling of the first of the new signs with the new logo. The logo itself was designed by local Deep River graphic artist Caryn Paradis.

Deep River First Selectman Dick Smith unveils sign while Haig ducks

Deep River First Selectman Dick Smith did the honors of pulling the cover away from the first sign with Deep River Land Trust President Haig looking on.   After the unveiling, Smith made this observation, “Preserving the land in Deep River is the most important component in preserving the quality of life in our town,” he said.

Colorful sign and logo by Deep River graphic artist Caryn Paradis

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30 Artists Answer Chester Historical Society Square Challenge

Sophy Johnston and Max Hotkowski, both of Chester, are combining their resourceful and creative talents to enter the Chester Historical Society's Square Roots challenge. Above, they preview the early stages of their indoor/outdoor hanging sculpture, utilizing square aluminum knitting gauges made by the Bates Company in 1950 in Chester (photo courtesy of Skip Hubbard).

In 1950 the C.J. Bates & Son manufacturing company in Chester produced 2-inch-square aluminum pink and green knitting gauges. This spring the Chester Historical Society has challenged area artists, sculptors, photographers, engineers, jewelers, and all others with a creative mind to create finished pieces of art with a few of those squares.

More than 30 people accepted the challenge. All of their creations will be on display and sold through silent auction when the Historical Society hosts a Square Roots Champagne Reception on Saturday, May 19, at the Chester Meetinghouse.

Skip Hubbard, president of the Chester Historical Society, said, “In 2004 we staged a similar challenge, the very popular Brooks for Hooks event, using hooks and screw eyes manufactured by M.S. Brooks & Sons.  It was fascinating to see the variety of work created from those hooks and screw eyes.”

“Eight years later, we still hear comments about the Brooks for Hooks challenge,” said Sosse Baker, co-chairman of the event.  “This challenge has the same potential and should be equally exciting for everyone, from the creators to those attending the reception.”

Besides the silent auction, the champagne reception will feature hors oeuvres from local restaurants and kitchens.  It will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Tickets for the evening are $25 and can be purchased at Chester Gallery and Ceramica in Chester Center.

All the proceeds from the event will benefit the Chester Historical Society and its programs, including Chester Museum at The Mill.  More information is available on the Historical Society website, www.chesterhistoricalsociety.org.

Using a knitted piece as a foundation, Anna Sweeney created a framed series of 25 squares and rectangles (can you count them?) as her entry in the Square Roots Artist Exhibit and Silent Auction hosted by the Chester Historical Society (photo courtesy of Skip Hubbard).

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$17.5 Million Region 4 Education Budget Approved on 412-207 Referendum Vote

REGION 4— Voters approved a $17.5 million Region 4 education budget for 2012-2013 on a 412-207 vote in an eight-hour referendum Tuesday, with the spending plan passing in each of the district towns of Chester, Deep River, and Essex.
Voter turnout was extremely low, with only 619 ballots cast across the three towns. Essex approved the budget on a 263-97 vote. Chester approved the budget on a 73-45 vote. The result was closest in Deep River, where the budget passed on a 76-65 vote. Turnout was down from last year, when 699 voters turned out to approve the Region 4 budget on a 438-261 vote.
Linda Hall, chairwoman of the Region 4 Board of Education, said she was pleased with the result. “It was a very supportable budget,” Hall said, adding the board and district administrators had worked to limit the spending increase while “providing the best that we can give to our students.”
The $17,506,213 spending plan for Valley Regional High School and John Winthrop Middle School represents a $181,280, or 1.05 percent, increase in spending over the current budget. The budget is reduced by anticipated receipts to a net budget of $17,264,934 net budget that is assessed the taxpayers of Chester, Deep River, and Essex based on the number of students from each town attending the two secondary schools.
Tuesday’s result means that each town’s share of the Region 4 budget, $7,701,887 for Essex, $4,304,478 for Deep River, and $4,683,977 for Chester, are locked in as the towns prepare to act on total proposed town/school spending plans for 2012-1013 at annual budget meetings or by referendum later this month.
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Planning Commission to Address Public Access at Foxboro Site

The Croft estate, whose owners oppose "public access," as part of the new development

The Essex Planning Commission could make a big decision at its upcoming meeting on May 10 at 7:30 p.m. at Essex town hall. That is whether the Commission should require the developer of the 11 acre Foxboro Point property to add “public access” areas on the site.

“Public access” occurs when the general public is given a right of access to private property, but it does not affect the ownership of the property.

Public access at the Foxboro Point development could take the form of a pedestrian walkway running down the south side of the property from Riverview Street to North Cove. It could also mean creating a public access strip of land running across the North Cove frontage of the property.

At the April 17 Planning Commission meeting Commission Chairman Dr. Thomas Danyliw, and several other Commissioners, appeared to be sympathetic to some kind of public access with the developer’s proposal.

There is no question that under the Planning Commission’s Subdivision regulations that the Commission has the power to require public access areas in a developer’s property. It is also clear under the regulations that the Commission is not required to adopt public access, if it chooses not to.

The arguments against granting public access

At the last meeting of the Planning Commission, it was clear that many neighboring residents of the Foxboro Point development were very much opposed to public access, even though they seemed generally in favor of the overall project.

Strong opposition to public access was made clear by Greg Ellis, whose wife and her sister own the Croft estate, which is being sold to the developer for the project.  Ellis said that “public access conflicts with our intent to preserve the coastline environment, as it has been for the past 70 years that our family has lived there.”

He argued that, “Public access goes beyond the Essex residents who walk in the area.” “Public access is open to all, and it cannot be assumed that public access will be passive,” he said.

Ellis also said, “Even now, without public access, the intrusion of trespassers results in littering, disturbance of wildlife habitat and breach of privacy.Also he noted that Essex already has, “12 locations in the Village proper of Essex with public access to the water, beautiful views and boat launch areas.”

Some public access sites presently in Essex

Those “public access” areas referred to by Ellis include the extensive grounds of the Osage Trail, which happens to be located just across the road from the proposed development.

Osage Trails, across Foxboro Road from the development site, has "public access"

Another existing public access area in town is just off Teal Lane. This attractive property has benches to sit on, a boat launch area, boat storage racks and even a toilet.

Yet another town public access area is located just off Novelty Lane. It features a pebbled path down to Middle Cove, as well as a bench and a ladder to the water.

"Public access" site off Novelty Lane has a pebbled path and bench at Middle Cove

Those in favor of public access at the new development

For all the hostility to public access by neighboring land owners, a number of influential groups in Essex favor it as a component of the Foxboro Point development. They include the Essex Conservation Commission and the Essex Land Trust.

In its letter to the Planning Commission on April 30, the Essex Land Trust said that it had a “strong preference” for a plan “that sets aside 2.2 acres of open space on the south side of the Foxboro property extending from the street to the water with a path for public access.” “Most new subdivisions in Essex have open spaces set aside,” the letter said, “and Foxboro should be no exception.”

A less preferred option for the Essex Land Trust, it wrote, would be “a fee in lieu of open space … of up to ten percent of the value of the undeveloped land.” The monies from this fee would be spent for an “open space acquisition someplace else in Essex,” it said.

Local Essex resident favoring “public access”

Bill Reichenbach, an Essex resident who has opposed the Foxboro development since it was first proposed, said in an interview that if the development was to go forward, it should at least have a public access component.

Reichenbach said that public access steps could be taken “limiting access along the water in ways that will address concerns … regarding safeguarding the privacy and security of abutting property owners and protecting the flora and fauna running along the water.”

“Using the Newport Cliff Walk as a paradigm,” Reichenbach suggested that “such access could be limited to a five-foot wide designated pathway running through the conservation easement area [along North Cove].”

“As is the case along the Newport walk, abutting property owners could place fencing and view screening hedges or other plantings on their properties above the conservation easement,” he said. He added that, “due to the upward slope of the properties, views from their houses would not thereby be obstructed.”

Also, he proposed limiting access to the public access areas with restrictions, “such as no picnicking and limiting access to daytime only, also would help address concerns about littering and security.”

In a subsequent letter to the Planning Commission, Reichenbach said, “The Commission should not settle for half a loaf, particularly when the Commission’s regulations expressly authorize it to make public access available, not just to the water, but along the water as well.”

Planning Commission can require public access

Should the Commission ultimately grant some kind of public access, it is clear that under the Essex’s Planning Commission’s Subdivision Regulations, it is empowered to do so.

The Commission’s Subdivision Regulations provide, “In such cases where the proposed subdivision abuts coastal waters, the Commission may require such open space in the form of public access to and along the waterfront.”

Although those opposed to public access in a case such as this, might argue that North Cove can hardly be classified as “coastal waters,” since the waters of North Cove fall under the provisions of the state’s Coastal Management Act, it would appear that North Cove can he legally classified as “coastal waters.” Therefore, making such an argument would, most likely, fail.

Visual “public access” promised to historic windmill

The Foxboro Point developer has agreed to preserve visual public access from Foxboro Road to the iconic windmill below.  As for the other public access proposals, although they have been discussed, there has, as yet, been no commitment to their creation by the developer.

Also, in a step to bolster the attractiveness of its proposal, generally, the developer’s attorney, Probate Judge Terrence Lomme, released an estimate as to the amount of new real property taxes that the Town of Essex would receive, if the Foxboro Point development was approved.

During the construction period the increased real property tax revenues to the town could run as high as $145,000 a year. After the homes in the development have been built, the increase in town real property taxes could increase by as much as $255,000 a year, according to Judge Lomme, who stressed that these figures were estimates.

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Chester Elementary Students Compete in Regional Debate Tournament

Jared Dompier (left) and Rocket Otte (right) represented Chester Elementary School in a recent regional debate tournament run by CivicsFirstCT

On Wednesday, April 25, John Winthrop Middle School hosted a regional debate tournament run by CivicsFirstCT.  There were 37 teams in attendance and Chester Elementary School entered one team:  Jared Dompier and Rocket Otte.

This year’s topic was abolishing the double jeopardy clause in the 5th amendment.  Students researched the topic and  had to debate both the affirmative (which argues abolishing the clause) as well as the negative (which argues the status quo).

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Essex May Market Celebrates 60 Years of the Essex Garden Club

The 2012 Essex Garden Club May Market, a true harbinger of spring, will open on Saturday May 12 from 9 to 2 in the Town Park, to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the Garden Club.  This year, the market will also be open on Friday afternoon from 3 to 5 (with the exception of Members’ plants sold only on Saturday).  This fundraising event which began as a small plant sale across from the Griswold Inn has become an eagerly awaited garden extravaganza. It features annual plants, herbs, garlic salt, gently used home and garden treasures, special gifts for the garden, worms for composting, members’ plants, a Café for lunch and a Silent Auction.

Waiting for the opening bell

The Annuals Tent will be filled with beautiful plants and hanging baskets for purchase at good prices. Also, available will be those plants that attract butterflies and hummingbirds as well as plants that like sunny or shady areas. Potted herbs can be sold separately or arranged in baskets by the Club members to make charming hostess or Mother’s Day gifts.

Gifts for the Garden tent will feature gems for the garden including trellises, frames, handmade items from recycled plastic, shrubs, specimen trees, containers and more.

The Treasures Gazebo will offer slightly used household and garden items and include the favorite Jewelry Booth.

The Club’s famous and beloved garlic salt, has been an essential fundraiser since it was developed in 1953 from a closely guarded recipe brought to the Club by Mrs. Malcolm Pitt.   As in demand today as it was in 1953, it will add zest to any meal.

On Saturday May 12, the Members’ Plant sale, Garden Café and Silent Auction will open with the ringing of the bell. Refreshments will be available bright and early with fresh donuts and coffee.  Lunch offerings will include clam chowder, sandwiches, bowls of chili and chili dogs. Top off your lunch with a luscious homemade dessert.

The Silent Auction will feature an array of items donated by local merchants, such as a freshwater pearl necklace from De Paula Jewelers, a weekender bag by Vera Bradley from The Saybrook Country Barn, and an English silver-plate wine bottle holder from English Accents Antiques.  Other prizes include tickets to plays and concerts, specimen trees and shrubs, gift certificates to area merchants, and a private tour with refreshments in a Club member’s garden.

Finally, the sale of healthy plants, dug, potted and nurtured by members from their own gardens will include perennials, ground covers, evergreens, flowering shrubs, grasses and even some native trees.  Different varieties of young tomato plants, seeded and cultivated by local Girl Scouts, supervised by Junior Activities members, will be ready for planting in our own gardens.

May Market is the Essex Garden Club’s only fundraising event.  The proceeds are used to support the Club’s educational and civic improvement projects, new and ongoing in the villages of Essex, Centerbrook and Ivoryton.  May Market also provides camperships for young students and scholarships for high school and college students.

Come join us to find that special something for your garden!

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Essex Selectmen Set Date for Town Meeting on Budget Plan

ESSEX— After a budget battle last year that included one town meeting defeat and a subsequent referendum approval, voting on the proposed spending plan for 2012-2013 will occur at the annual budget meeting that will be held on Monday May 14, the traditional second Monday in May.
The board of selectmen Wednesday formally set the vote on the proposed total $22 million town/school spending plan for May 14 at 8 p.m. in the auditorium at town hall. The board was unanimous in concluding the budget vote should occur at the town meeting, despite a recent request from Bruce MacMillian, the unsuccessful Republican nominee for first selectman last year, for a referendum vote and a separate vote on the budget totals for town government and Essex Elementary School.
The town meeting will vote on the proposed $$6,853,591 town government budget and a proposed appropriation of $7,535,591 for Essex Elementary School. Voting on the town’s $7,701,887 share of the proposed $17 million Region 4 education budget will occur Tuesday May 8 in a 12 noon to 8 p.m. referendum in the district towns of Chester, Deep River, and Essex.
In setting the town meeting vote, the board agreed to seek approval of an earlier starting time for future annual budget meetings. A town ordinance calls for an 8 p.m. start time.
First Selectman Norman Needleman said several residents, including both parents of school-age children and senior citizens, had called for an earlier start to the annual budget meeting. Needleman said he would seek approval of a 7:30 p.m. start time beginning in 2013, a step that would probably require a separate town meeting vote to amend the existing ordinance.
The budget process has been congenial this year, with town hall staff, at Needleman’s direction, preparing a detailed Citizens Guide to the Essex Town Budget. There were no calls for major changes to the town and elementary school budgets at the public hearing on April 19. In 2001, the budget plan was rejected on a 114-81 paper ballot vote at the annual meeting in May, with a revised and reduced budget later winning approval on a 532-438 vote in a June referendum.
In other business, the board also agreed to seek town meeting approval for an amendment to a town ordinance that requires town meeting approval of expenditures from capital sinking funds. The proposed change would eliminate the requirement for a town meeting vote on sinking fund expenditures when a majority of the fund is derived from private donations.
The change is directed at allowing expenditures from the tree committee sinking fund without the need for a town meeting. Nearly all of the money in the tree committee sinking fund, which is directed to tree plantings and related improvements, comes from private donations.
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Essex Winter Series Awarded Grant from the State

The Essex Winter Series has received a 2012 non-matching grant in the amount of $654 from the State Department of Economic and Community Development/Connecticut Office of the Arts. The award is funded by the Arts Endowment Fund, which was established 25 years ago in order to stimulate the development of private sector resources and to support the long-term stabilization of Connecticut’s arts organizations.

Each year, arts organizations may apply for a share of the interest earnings on the Connecticut Arts Endowment Fund if they have reported an increase in the amount of private sector contributions received in the last twelve months. Awards are unrestricted, and may be applied toward capital expenses, administrative costs, programming or the the organization’s endowment.

This is the first time Essex Winter Series has applied for the grant.

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Middlesex Chamber of Commerce Grand Opening of Bloom Art School, Centerbrook

Linda Bronson and Essex First Selectman Norm Needleman at the grand opening of Bloom Art School

Kelly Smith, Chairwoman of the Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce announced that the Chamber held a grand-opening event for the Bloom Art School on Wednesday, April 11th at its location at 85 Main Street in Centerbrook, directly across the street from Essex Elementary School.

Under the expert guidance of illustrator and founder of the Bloom Art School, Linda Bronson, and Bloom’s instructors, students learn how to incorporate materials, techniques, and styles into their own work. They have countless opportunities to explore their creativity, use their imaginations to the fullest, and most importantly, have fun!

Linda Bronson with student artists of Bloom Art School

Bloom is a neighborhood art school that offers exceptional art enrichment for children. In every lesson, Bloom makes it a priority to expose the children to works by great masters, experienced practicing artists, and local craftspeople. They explore art that has been created through different techniques and with different materials in order to broaden their students’ understanding of art and the world around them.

At Bloom, it is their mission and privilege to celebrate your budding artist with you!

To learn more about Bloom Art School and its offerings, please go to www.bloomartschool.com or call them at 860.581.3737.

The Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce has over 2,350 members who employ more than 50,000 people.

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Chester Finance Board Restores $18,000 to Elementary School Budget

CHESTER— The board of finance Tuesday restored $18,000 to the proposed 2012-2013 budget for Chester Elementary School after a public hearing where a recommended $20,000 cut in the local education budget drew both support and objections from residents.

Meeting after the close of the hearing, the board decided to restore $18,000 to the $4.2 million elementary school budget, while deferring $18,000 that was in the capital expenditure plan for repairs to the school roof. First Selectman Edmund Meehan said Monday Wendy King, chairwoman of the local board of education, had told the finance board the school board could accept a delay in funding for the roof repairs.

King said during the public hearing the school board could identify only an additional $2,000 cut for various supplies and repairs. She urged the finance board to restore $18,000 to the $4,205,900 elementary school budget, which would be up by only $41,831 from current spending with the full $20,000 cut.

About 40 residents turned out for the public hearing at the Chester Meeting House, with some speaking in support of restoring funds to the elementary school budget. But others, including finance board members, said a reduction could be justified by continuing drops in enrollment at the kindergarten-sixth grade school. Enrollment has dropped over the last five years, with enrollment of only 256 students expected in September. King said the school board has reduced staff in recent years in response to the declining enrollment, including reduction of a half-time teaching position in the proposed budget.

Tax Collector Madeline Meyer urged the finance board to hold down total spending in the face of the continuing state and national economic slowdown. Meyer said collection of unpaid back taxes has become slower in recent months. “The economy has now hit Chester and it’s not coming in at the same rate,” she said. The budget plan assumes a 98.5 percent collection rate for property taxes.

Virginia Carmony, board of finance chairwoman, said the board has often deferred funding for town projects in recent years to maintain funding for the elementary school. She said this had led to the need for a $102,000 increase in the capital expenditure plan for 2012-2013 that includes funding for needed road repairs.

Meehan said the $18,000 adjustment would not change the total proposed town/school expenditure of $12,748,081 that would be funded by a tax rate of 22.45 mills, an increase of .34 mills from the current tax rate. The new rate, $22.45 in tax for each $1,000 of assessed property value, would represent about $102 in additional tax for a home assessed at $300,000.

In setting the tax rate at 22.45 mills, the finance board included a transfer of $174,641 from the town’s undesignated fund balance to hold down the tax increase. The transfer is expected to leave about $1.34 million in the fund balance in June 2013.

The total proposed spending package, which also includes the town’s $4,683,977 share of the Region 4 education budget, now goes to voters for approval at the annual budget meeting scheduled for Tuesday May 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the Chester Meeting House. The Region 4 education budget goes to the voters of Chester, Deep River, and Essex in an eight-hour referendum on May 8.

CHESTER— The board of finance Tuesday restored $18,000 to the proposed 2012-2013 budget for Chester Elementary School after a public hearing where a recommended $20,000 cut in the local education budget drew both support and objections from residents.
Meeting after the close of the hearing, the board decided to restore $18,000 to the $4.2 million elementary school budget, while deferring $18,000 that was in the capital expenditure plan for repairs to the school roof. First Selectman Edmund Meehan said Monday Wendy King, chairwoman of the local board of education, had told the finance board the school board could accept a delay in funding for the roof repairs.
King said during the public hearing the school board could identify only an additional $2,000 cut for various supplies and repairs. She urged the finance board to restore $18,000 to the $4,205,900 elementary school budget. which would be up by only $41,831 from current spending with the full $20,000 cut.
About 40 residents turned out for the public hearing at the Chester Meeting House, with some speaking in support of restoring funds to the elementary school budget. But others, including finance board members, said a reduction could be justified by continuing drops in enrollment at the kindergarten-sixth grade school. Enrollment has dropped over the last five years, with enrollment of only 256 students expected in September. King said the school board has reduced staff in recent years in response to the declining enrollment, including reduction of a half-time teaching position in the proposed budget.
Tax Collector Madeline Meyer urged the finance board to hold down total spending in the face of the continuing state and national economic slowdown. Meyer said collection of unpaid back taxes has become slower in recent months. “The economy has now hit Chester and it’s not coming in at the same rate,” she said. The budget plan assumes a 98.5 percent collection rate for property taxes.
Virginia Carmony, board of finance chairwoman, said the board has often deferred funding for town projects in recent years to maintain funding for the elementary school. She said this had led to the need for a $102,000 increase in the capital expenditure plan for 2012-2013 that includes funding for needed road repairs.
Meehan said the $18,000 adjustment would not change the total proposed town/school expenditure of $12,748,081 that would be funded by a tax rate of 22.45 mills, an increase of .34 mills from the current tax rate. The new rate, $22.45 in tax for each $1,000 of assessed property value, would represent about $102 in additional tax for a home assessed at $300,000.
In setting the tax rate at 22.45 mills, the finance board included a transfer of $174,641 from the town’s undesignated fund balance to hold down the tax increase. The transfer is expected to leave about $1.34 million in the fund balance in June 2013.
The total proposed spending package, which also includes the town’s $4,683,977 share of the Region 4 education budget, now goes to voters for approval at the annual budget meeting scheduled for Tuesday May 15 at 7:30 p.m. at the Chester Meeting House. The Region 4 education budget goes to the voters of Chester, Deep River, and essex in an eight-hour referendum on May 8.
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Barbara Nidzgorski Wins TTYS 2012 Generativity Award

Barbara Nidzgorski, winner of 2012 Generativity Award

Tri-Town Youth Services recently presented its 2012 Generativity Award to Barbara Nidzgorski, Regional School District 4’s Young Scholars Coordinator.  Ms. Nidzgorski is better known locally as Bobbi Nidz.  A Niantic resident, Nidz has been actively building youth developmental assets in the tri-town area for over ten years.

There are currently about 200 students in Nidz’ programs.  These programs include: Math Counts, Mock Trial, Debate Team, American Legion Oratory, Parliamentary Debate, Model United Nations, Lego Robotics, Forensic Tournament and others.  Students who participate are self-initiated.  Many of the teams compete and participants earn and accumulate points.

Ms. Nidz’ degrees include a Bachelor’s in Education, a Master’s in Gifted and Talented from UCONN, and an M.F.A. from Connecticut College in Theater.  Outside of school, Ms. Nidz owns her own Solo Theatre Company, has served for 21 years as General Manager of O’Neill Theatre Puppetry Conference, makes jewelry and plays several instruments.

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Congressman Courtney Brings News of $8 Million Contract for Essex Firm

Bell Power President Martin Bell, Congressman Joe Courtney and Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman

Congressman Joe Courtney came to Essex on April 30 to announce that an Essex based machine company has been awarded an $8 million contract to rebuild diesel engines for the U.S. Army.

Recipients of this welcome work order is Bell Powers Systems, which is located in an industrial park on Plains Road in Essex.  On hand to receive the Congressman was Martin A. Bell, President of Bell Powers Systems, and Essex First Selectman Norman Needleman.

Bell Power worker at reconfigured Yellow Godwin water pump

Company President Bell said that the new contract was an extension of an earlier contract, and was most welcome.  He estimated that work on the Army contract could take as much as four years to complete, and it will mean the continued employment of five workers. The company presently has 63 employees at its Essex headquarters, and does $60 million a year in business.

Bell Power worker at refigured Red Hole fire pump

The company also has an inventory of 1,200 engines, which vary in size from four to 600 horsepower and operates out of a 56,000 square foot building in the Essex industrial area.

Authorized distributor for John Deere and Yanmar

Bell Power is the authorized distributor of two of the world’s largest engine manufactures, John Deere and Yanmar. The essence of Bell Power’s business is that it takes engines that it gets from John Deere and Yanmar and reconfigures and provides value added components so that they fit the specifications that are required by the end user.

Bell Power's distributors' logos on display at company headquarters

Once Bell Power has reconfigured the engines to meet customer specifications, they are sold through the company’s service dealer network, who in turn sells the engines packages to the end users.

Reconfigured engine in high heat testing chamber

As for its marketing area, Bell Powers is the authorized distributor for John Deere diesel engines for all of New England, as well as New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia and a part of West Virginia.  It is also the authorized Yanmar Industrial Engine distributor for all of New England, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland and most of New York.

After the brief announcement ceremony, Bell Systems President Martin Bell made the point that it was small businesses, such as his, that are most important to growing the nation’s economy.

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Diabetes Care Program Available on the Shoreline

Essex, Ct. — Local shoreline residents can take advantage of diabetes care services offered by Middlesex Hospital, at a new location at the Middlesex Hospital Shoreline Medical Center, 260 Westbrook Road, Route 153, in Essex.

The Middlesex Hospital Diabetes Care Program is designed to help all people with diabetes better manage their disease, one such way is through the use creation of the list of the best CBD oil for diabetes. Services include individual counseling by a registered dietitian/certified diabetes educator about healthy eating for weight management and blood sugar control; insulin administration; taking medications; being active and managing risks and problem-solving related to diabetes.

The program is based on the national standards for diabetes self-management education programs and is recognized by the American Diabetes Association and is accredited by the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA). There is a fee for the services, but Medicare and most insurances cover services for diabetes education with the customary copay.

For more information about the Middlesex Hospital Diabetes Care Program in Essex, call (860) 358-3003.

 

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Deep River Sets Public Hearing DateTown/Elementary School Budget Plan

DEEP RIVER— An $8.9 million budget plan for town government and Deep River Elementary School in 2012-2013 will be presented at the annual budget hearing on Tuesday May 8 at 7:30 p.m. in the all-purpose room at the elementary school.

The proposed town government budget totals $3,509,265, an increase of $120,109, or 3.2 percent, over the current town government5 appropriation. The budget for the elementary school totals $5,400,787, a spending increase of $207,887, or 4 percent. The spending package also includes a $334,000 capital expenditure plan.

The total proposed 2012-2013 spending levy of $14,284,323 also includes the town’s $4,304,478 share of the Region 4 education budget. The Deep River share of the Region 4 budget is down by $82,822 from the current budget share because of fewer students from Deep River attending Valley Regional High School and John Winthrop Middle School.

First Selectman Richard Smith said the budget plan is expected to require a four-tenths mill hike in the property tax rate. The tax rate would increase from the current rate of 24.28 mills to a mill rate of 24,68, or $24.68 in tax for each $1,000 of assessed property value. The budget plan would leave about $412,000 in the undesignated fund balance as of June 30,2013.

Smith said the budget includes a two percent wage/salary increase for all full or part-time town employees, including elected officials. There would also be funding for an additional six hours per week for the elected tax collector and tax collector’s clerk at a cost of $13,900.

The capital expenditure plan, which is up by $126,826 from the current capital expenditure total, includes $200,000 as the town’s  20 percent share of the total cost of replacing the Village Street bridge, a project that is expected to be completed this year. There is also $46,000 to replace the two town police cruisers, and $70,000 to help the water pollution control authority cover bond expenses for the municipal sewer system.

The budget for the elementary school includes full day kindergarten, a planned enhancement that is expected to cost an additional $30,5263 to increase a half-time kindergarten teacher position to full time.

Smith said he expects the board of selectmen to continue a tradition of referendum voting on the budget that began with a contentious budget season in 2001.  The  eight-hour referendum is expected during the last week of May, after the Memorial Day holiday. The Region 4 education budget goes to the voters of Chester, Deep River, and Essex in a 12 noon to 8 p.m. referendum on May 8.

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CMS Presents Saxophone Master Class at Community Music School May 6

CENTERBROOK – Robbie Collomore Concert Series presents renowned classical saxophonist Ashu in a special Master Class at the Community Music School on Sunday, May 6th at 10:30 am. The event is free and open to the public and takes place at the School at 90 Main Street in Centerbrook.

Concert saxophonist Ashu, age 26, has continually defied conventions winning major international and national competitions traditionally won by pianists and violinists.  He made his recital debut at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall in New York and, at age 16, made his concerto debut at DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.  Since then, concerto and recital performances have taken him throughout the USA and Europe

Students from the studio of CMS faculty member Russ Becker will perform at the Master Class.

Ashu will perform a concert as part of the Collomore series later that day at 5 pm at the Chester Meeting House. For ticket information, visit www.collomoreconcerts.org or call 860-526-5162.

For more information about the Master Class, please contact Community Music School at 860-767-0026.

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TTYS Family Scavenger Hunt May 5

Tri-Town Youth Services will be hosting a fun family Scavenger Hunt on Saturday, May 5.

All families are welcome to participate in a treasure hunt around Deep River.  All you will need is a digital camera (or phone camera) and a sense of fun.

Meet at Tri-Town  Youth Services, 56 High Street, Deep River at 1 p.m. This program is free.  Call Tri-Town at 526-3600 to register.

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Red Rocket Acquires Tees Plus; Growth and Expansion Continues

Tee's Plus Production Team

Multi-channel and E-commerce giant Red Rocket Merchandising Corporation closed a deal last week to acquire Tee’s Plus. The purchase enhances Red Rocket’s custom printing division and saves jobs for former Tee’s Plus employees.

“Tee’s Plus is open for business,” said Ed Cook, CEO of Red Rocket. “We will continue to serve regional & national clients with premium branded merchandise and promotional products.”

Acquiring Tee’s Plus enhances the capabilities of Westbrook-based Red Rocket’s existing custom printing services. “Folding our existing operations into Tee’s Plus will be seamless,” said Mr. Cook. “We have the ability to continue providing the exceptional design and print services clients have come to expect from Tee’s Plus,” continued Mr. Cook.

Red Rocket has already re-hired some Tee’s Plus employees and is interviewing others.  The company anticipates significant growth by the end of the year.  “The number of employees will likely double by the end of 2012,” said Mr. Cook.

The acquisition of Tee’s Plus comes less than a year after Red Rocket purchased four other on-line merchandising businesses in southern Connecticut which has already contributed to its growth.

Red Rocket is a privately held company serving clients with music, sports and entertainment apparel and merchandise through multiple marketing channels.  Red Rocket affiliates include Rolling Stone, Disney, Premier Guitar, Live Nation and Marvel among others.  Our custom printing division, Tee’s Plus, provides businesses and organizations with the best quality design and printing for apparel and promotional products whether you need 10 pieces or 110,000.

View their sites at Red Rocket Corp. at http://www.redrocketcorp.com Tee’s Plus at http://www.teesplus.com/.

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‘Disney’s Aristocats’ at the Ivoryton Playhouse Supports Team Avery

Four year old Old Saybrook resident Avery Rose Leopoldino suffers from CDKL5, a rare genetic mutation that mostly affects girls because it is located on the X chromosome.  About 400 people around the world are diagnosed with this disease and Avery is the only one in Connecticut to have it.  Because of these miniscule numbers, little is known in the medical community about CDKL5.

Avery attends Goodwin School but currently suffers with up to six seizures a day and cannot walk, talk or hold her head up.  She is also visually impaired, cannot use her hands and suffers from gastrointestinal issues.

Avery’s parents Mark and Kristen donate all funds raised to CDKL5 organizations and want to raise public awareness of the this rare disorder.  Avery’s father Mark is the manager of Bill’s Seafood Restaurant in Westbrook.

Madhatters Theatre Company is supporting Team Avery in the their upcoming production of ‘Disney’s Aristocats’ at the Ivoryton Playhouse.  Performances Friday May 18 at 7pm, Saturday May 19 at 2pm & 7pm and Sunday May 20 at 2pm.

Tickets $15 Adults and $8 Children 12 and under.  All concession proceeds to benefit Team Avery.  If you would like to support Avery, please mention Team Avery when you call to purchase tickets and we will donate $1 of the ticket price to them.  For tickets please call (860) 395-1861

www.ctkidsonstage.com/madhatterstheatrecompany

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