December 19, 2018

Planning for Resilient Ecosystems: Salt Marsh Program, April 12

OS Salt MarshOLD SAYBROOK – A program on salt marsh advancement and the future of Old Saybrook’s salt marshes will be presented on Tuesday, April 12, at 7 p.m., at the Vicki G. Duffy Pavilion, 155 College Street, by Dr. Adam Whelchel, director of science for the Nature Conservancy (TNC).

Whelchel will discuss the TNC’s Marsh Advancement Zone Assessment that will be used by policymakers planning for the next 100 years of coastal land use. The program will also include time for questions from those in attendance.

Connecticut is the first state in the nation to complete a future salt marsh assessment down to the individual lot for the entire coastline. Using a model developed in collaboration with the University of Connecticut, the Nature Conservancy’s Coastal Resilience Team has just finished a Salt Marsh Advancement Zone Assessment for all 24 coastal municipalities as well as a comprehensive report for the entire coast. Ultimately, the future of Connecticut’s salt marshes depends on land use decisions and policy implications that will be made based on our ability to predict change over the next 100 years.

The detailed parcel-scale information will provide land trusts, municipal staff, volunteer commissions/boards and private property owners with answers to questions such as: Where and how much salt marsh advancement already occurs on existing open space such as nature preserves, parks, refuges, etc; where and how much salt marsh advancement occurs on currently unprotected and undeveloped parcels; where and how much conflict will there likely be between the built environment roads, airports, schools, neighborhoods, businesses, and daily flooding from tides?

To access the Salt Marsh Advancement Zone Assessments for your community, visit http://coastalresilience.org/project-areas/connecticut-solutions/#Reports, and scroll down.

Come hear Dr. Whelchel explain the Conservancy’s Salt Marsh Advancement Zone Assessment and join in the discussion about the future needs of this resource. Free admission. To find out more, visit the Old Saybrook Land Trust website, oslt.org.

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