December 10, 2018

Archives for July 2016

Celebrate the Fourth Today at Ivoryton’s Independence Day Parade

CMS New Horizons Band (file photo)

CMS New Horizons Band (file photo)

IVORYTON –  The 11th annual Ivoryton Village Independence Day Parade (formerly The 4th of July Parade) will take place on Saturday, July 2, at 10 a.m. The parade will wind through the village of Ivoryton, ending at the Ivoryton Park. The patriotic ceremony begins in the Park gazebo immediately following the parade. The ceremony features speakers and singers. The New Horizons Band from the Community Music School will play.

Everyone is welcome to march, including children on decorated bikes along with motorized cars and tractors and floats. The parade will line  up vehicles at 9:15, with marching groups gathering at 9:30 at Walnut and Main Streets. Motorized vehicles will form on Cheney Street. If you are interested in joining the parade or would like more information, please contact ealvord@ivoryton.com.

The parade this year will coincide with the Ivoryton Village Farmers Market – food and music in the park. The Ivoryton Tavern and the Blue Hound Cookery will have parade specials. Ivoryton also welcomes  Brickside Pizza, 104 Main St., for take-out pizza and calzones.
In the event of rain, the parade will be cancelled, but the ceremony at the gazebo will be held at 10 a.m.
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Last Chance to See ‘Downtown Chester’ Original Paintings at Maple and Main Gallery Today

Dan Nichols paints a Chester scene

Dan Nichols paints a Chester scene

“Downtown Chester,” a show of original paintings done by Maple and Main Gallery artists depicting the center of Chester, will be at the gallery Friday, July 1 through Sunday, July 3.

The paintings in the Downtown Chester show were mainly done during June, a number of them from the gallery porch, in the street during the Chester Sunday Market and along the sidewalks.

The show will open Friday at noon until 8 p.m., and will remain open Saturday, July 2 from noon to 6 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

Maple and Main is at One Maple Street in Chester. For more information, go to mapleandmaingallery.com or call 860-526-6065. Hours: Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday, noon to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 7 p.m.

Donna Dubreuil Favreau, "Chester's Farmers Market"

Donna Dubreuil Favreau, “Chester’s Farmers Market”

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Essex Library Hosts Art Exhibition by Phyllis Bevington Through September

One of the signature paintings by Phyllis Bevington that will be on display in Essex Library's September exhibition.

One of the signature paintings by Phyllis Bevington that will be on display in Essex Library’s September exhibition.

ESSEX — With her father’s encouragement, Phyllis Bevington’s interest in art began during her childhood. Yet it was not until later, when she studied at the Lyme Academy of Fine Art that this interest developed into a passion. Bevington’s creative development was fostered by numerous artists and teachers at both the Academy and Lyme Art Association, including Dean Keller, Dan Gheno, Jerry Caron, Lou Bonamarte, Noel Belton, Bernie McTigue, Christopher Zhang, and Leah Lopez.

Reflecting upon her artistic career, Bevington states, “Those tentative classes at the Academy have led to years of discovery, satisfaction, frustration and enduring friendships. I have been fortunate to travel to fascinating sites to paint and to meet with many people with similar interests, all while doing something I love.”

This passion for painting has prompted Bevington to attend workshops in New Mexico, Portugal, Madeira, France and Ireland. Throughout her career, she has worked in many media, but currently prefers to work in oil. Today, the artist frequently participates in shows and exhibitions and is active with “The Brushstrokes,” a group of en plein air painters. Her paintings are featured in collections in the United States, United Kingdom, and Chile.

Bevington’s exhibit will run from Saturday, Sept. 3 through Wednesday, Sept. 28. The exhibit is free and open to all.

The Essex Library is located at 33 West Ave. in Essex.

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Emails Confirm High Speed Rail Through Old Lyme

We received the following as a press release from SECoast on June 29. It has been published on the organization’s Facebook page and website with the supporting documentation, which for technical reasons, we are currently unable to publish.

Emails obtained by SECoast as part of a Freedom of Information Act request filed with the Connecticut Department of Transportation, indicate that the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) decided four months ago to route the next generation of high speed rail infrastructure on a new bypass through Old Lyme and eastern coastal Connecticut. They have yet to announce this decision publicly.

Gregory Stroud, executive director of SECoast, a nonprofit collaborative on issues of preservation in Southeastern Connecticut and the Lower Connecticut River Valley, obtained internal Connecticut Department of Transportation emails from Commissioner James Redeker to Public Transportation Chief James Andreski which appear to confirm FRA   plans for a Kenyon, Rhode Island to Old Saybrook, Conn., high speed rail bypass through Old Lyme in or adjacent to the I-95 corridor. These plans would also include a separate New Haven to Springfield, Mass., route as part of a newly “modified” NEC Future: Alternative 2 proposal.

Within two days of the close of public comment, agency emails indicate that the FRA had committed to a coastal bypass route through Connecticut. Redeker writes on Feb. 18, 2016, that “after spending a few hours with the team, David Carol tells me the NEC Future team … will be leaving the Kenyon bypass for the spine to Boston, because they are completely focused on delivering four-track capacity to Boston.”

Carol, a former Old Lyme resident, is heading efforts by Parsons Brinckerhoff to develop high speed rail between Boston and Washington, DC. The multinational engineering and design firm, a veteran of such projects as the Big Dig in Boston, and the Raymond E. Baldwin bridge at the mouth of the Connecticut river, is leading a state and federal project, dubbed NEC Future, to modernize high speed rail along the Northeast Corridor.

The possibility of a Kenyon to Saybrook bypass, a surprise late addition to past evaluations of high speed rail, has provoked widespread concern and opposition from citizens and organizations in the region, and prompted roughly 1200 public comments to the Federal Railroad Administration out of 3000 from across the United States.

Old Lyme is internationally recognized as the home of American Impressionism, and the FRA’s initial proposal called for a new rail bridge and elevated tracks through the picturesque marshes and heart of the town’s National Register Historic District.

Further emails, after a Feb. 26, 2016 Northeast Corridor Commission meeting of private, state, and federal officials at Parsons Brinckerhoff headquarters in Manhattan, appear to confirm a long-standing decision to route the rail project through Old Lyme in modified form as a tunnel. Andreski informed Redeker and other state transportation officials, that the FRA project manager in charge, Rebecca Reyes-Alicea,“explained the various adjustment [sic] they were making in response to public comments. For example the Old Lyme Kenyon Bypass concept is being modified. Hartford Line [sic] will be included as an additional feeder spine …. Rebecca stated they recognize more work is need on the alternative concepts …. Still I believe they are pressing forward on Alternative 2 with the mods decribed [sic] above.”

“This routing decision will have a major impact on the historic, cultural and environmental resources of Connecticut’s eastern seacoast communities,” said Daniel Mackay, Executive Director of the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation. “The FRA and its consultants settled on a preferred route four months ago – it’s long past time they meet the residents of the region face to face to address numerous concerns about where and how they propose to build this industrial-scale transportation infrastructure, and how they will protect the resources that make these Connecticut communities unique.”

Stroud called on the FRA and Parsons Brinckerhoff to delay the decision on a preferred route until after the project had passed public and environmental scrutiny. “Due diligence can’t follow decision-making in a multi-billion dollar project such as this,” Stroud stated. “These plans for a Kenyon to Saybrook bypass were not part of the original 98 alternatives announced by the federal government in 2012. They have not undergone the same level of agency or public scrutiny as other routes.”

He added, “not one single environmental study has been conducted to determine the feasibility or impact of a tunnel under the Connecticut River estuary or under Old Lyme’s National Register Historic District. Plans for crossing the Thames River are undefined. Not one public meeting on this project has been held in New London or Middlesex counties or southern Rhode Island.”

The state and federal-level conversations captured in these emails occurred several weeks prior to a private March 11, 2016 meeting between David Carol and Old Lyme First Selectwoman Bonnie Reemsnyder, aides and other local officials. These emails obtained by SECoast as part of a May 22, 2016 Freedom of Information Act request, funded in part by donations from the local community, are the first public confirmation of FRA plans for high speed rail along the Northeast Corridor.

Two additional Freedom of Information Act requests filed earlier with the Federal Railroad Administration on April 4, 2016 remain unfilled.

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State Police Promote Safe Driving Throughout July 4 Weekend; Sobriety Checkpoints, Roving Patrols Planned Locally

AREAWIDE — The Connecticut State Police Public Information Office has issued the following important press release.

As thousands of drivers plan to travel during the upcoming long holiday weekend, Connecticut State Troopers are also preparing to patrol in increased numbers to keep roads and highways safe for all drivers.

Troop F is planning the following roving patrols and checkpoint locations:

06/30/16                         Roving Patrols – Interstate 95 within Troop F patrol area

07/01/16                         Roving Patrols – Rte. 9 and Rte. 66 in town of Middlefield

07/02/16                         Roving Patrols – I-95 exits 56-71

07/03/16                         Roving Patrols – Rte. 9 and Rte. 66 in town of Middlefield

07/03/16                         DUI Sobriety Checkpoint – At Rte. 156 and Ferry Rd. in the town of Old Lyme. This will be in conjunction with the Breath Alcohol Testing Mobile Unit.

07/04/16                         Roving Patrols – I-95 exits 56-71

July 4 is Monday, allowing for extra time for beach outings, cookouts and fireworks. This translates to increased traffic starting as early as Friday, July 1, and continuing through the evening of July 4.  Many will be driving through and around the state of Connecticut for Independence Day events.

State Police will participate in Operation C.A.R.E. (Combined Accident Reduction Effort) starting at midnight on July 3 and running through midnight on July 5.

Troopers will be strategically placed to reduce speed on the highways and roadways during the holiday period. In addition, State Troopers will operate sobriety checkpoints numerous locations throughout Connecticut. Drivers can expect to experience concentrated enforcement operations at locations where a high number of alcohol-involved crashes and incidents.  (Please see attached list.)

As always, State Police consistently work toward preventing accidents – especially fatal crashes – on Connecticut’s roads and highways. Troopers will utilize laser units, and both marked and unmarked State Police cars to enhance safety and to remove all drunk drivers from Connecticut’s roads.

“We need your help. Obeying the rules of the road is everyone’s responsibility. We ask all drivers to buckle up, adhere to the speed limit, put down cell phones, and please be courteous to other drivers,” said Dora B. Schriro, Commissioner of the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection.

Colonel Alaric J. Fox, Commander of the Connecticut State Police, added, State Troopers depend on drivers to follow the law. Please do not drink and drive since that is a deadly combination. If you are on the road and drunk driver, please call 911, as this is a true emergency.”

Planning to consume alcohol to celebrate our nation’s birthday? Then please designate a driver so that this festive, enjoyable summer weekend does not turn into a tragedy. Never drink and drive.

During July 4, 2015, weekend, Connecticut State Police issued the following number of summons:  859 for speeding and 33 for driving under the influence.  State Police investigated 170 motor vehicle crashes, with injury and two fatalities.

Troopers also issued 2,461 tickets for other hazardous moving violations.

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First Friday to be Celebrated Tonight in Chester Center

CHESTER – Start the July Fourth Weekend off with a bang! Come to First Friday in Chester Center.

On this first of Chester’s First Fridays, the evening of July 1st brings art gallery shows, a trunk show, live music, the opening of the doors of Chester’s newest shop, The French Hen, and more.

The town is buzzing with anticipation about The French Hen, which has just moved here from Essex. On its Facebook page, the shop is described as “a gift boutique where you will discover the beautiful, unique and the curious. Lush with product and creativity, the store will delight your senses.” The French Hen will be at 8 Main St.

Chester’s two other brand-new shops will also be open on First Friday. Strut Your Mutt at 29 Main St. will be hosting a “Yappy Hour” from 6 to 8 p.m. with wine for you and water for your dog. Homage Art Gallery and Café at 16 Main St. is having Teen Open Mic Night from 6 to 8 p.m.

Two pieces in Dina Varano’s new summer collection, “Ocean Dreams.”

ELLE Design Studio presents “Natural Occurrences,” paintings and works on paper, by Deborah Weiss during the month of July. The exhibit opens with an opening reception on July 1, from 5 to 8 p.m.  ELLE design is at 1 Main Street.

At Dina Varano Gallery, First Friday brings the opening of Dina’s jewelry collection for the summer, “Ocean Dreams.” The collection features white and light-hued gemstones with brushed sterling silver that is expertly and intuitively crafted into one-of-a-kind necklaces, earrings, and bracelets. The inspiration came from all things seen and felt at the beach: the light breezes, ocean waves, warm sunshine, and salty-fresh air.

Stop in and take a look at the newly refurbished, resized, refeathered Lark on First Friday, July 1st. Owner Suzie Woodward says, “We are renewed, restored and reinvigorated by the rearranging, readorning and rebrightening of one of Chester’s enchanting shops.  Along with our recelebration for our grand reopening, MaryAnne Delorenzo will be hosting a trunk show featuring beautiful, handmade lamp work and sterling.”

All this plus live music on the Pattaconk Patio, great shopping at the Lori Warner Gallery, and the “Downtown Chester” art show at the Maple & Main Gallery (see separate story and images here).

More details on Facebook.com/VisitChesterCT.

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Estuary’s September ‘Artist of the Month’ is Photgrapher Larry Reitz

This beautiful photo is the signature photo of Larry Reitz's exhibition at the the Estuary gallery opening Sept. 9.

This beautiful photo is the signature photo of Larry Reitz’s exhibition at the the Estuary gallery opening Sept. 9.

The Marshview Gallery at the Estuary artist for September is Larry Reitz.  An exhibition of his work is on show at the Estuary Senior Center, 220 Main St, Old Saybrook CT.  Refreshments will be provided.

He is a mostly self-taught photographer specializing in nature and scenic vistas. His images have won several awards including first placements in New England Camera Club and Land Trust competitions. Reitz’s work can be seen at several outdoor art festivals including prestigious shows in Mystic, Old Saybrook, West Hartford and Niantic.

Reitz is known for capturing vivid light, which makes his images ‘pop’ on canvas. From the moment of capture to presentation of the finished piece to the consumer, all the work is done by Reitz. By operating in this manner he is able to control quality at each step, and in addition, the elimination of commercial printing and framing allows him to offer high quality wall art at very attractive prices. The use of archival materials insures the pieces can be enjoyed by multiple generations.

His work will be on display for the month of September and all are welcome to stop in to view work.

The Estuary Senior Center can be reached at 860-388-1611 for questions about services or programs.

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Op-Ed: Himes Is Right On Brexit, But Can Connecticut Capitalize On It?

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

Terry Cowgill

Terry Cowgill

The shockwaves felt by the United Kingdom’s stunning decision to leave the European Union reverberated around the world late last week, eventually finding their way to Connecticut. Interestingly, few public officials here have come forward to comment extensively on one of the most important European policy decisions in decades.

It’s difficult to know precisely what Connecticut’s congressional delegation is thinking since House websites have been down for maintenance for the last several days. Perhaps they’ve been too busy helping to stage the much-publicized sit-in for gun controllegislation to weigh in on this momentous move. Or perhaps they think we Nutmeggers are bored by foreign policy or …

Read the full version of this op-ed by Terry Cowgill on our Independent Media Network partner site CTNewsJunkie.com at this link.

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