October 14, 2019

Connecticut Water Issues Voluntary Water Conservation Request

water-conservationPersistent dry weather conditions and higher than normal demand for water has prompted Connecticut Water to ask its customers across the state to voluntarily reduce their water use. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor, conditions across Connecticut range from abnormally dry to moderate drought.

The Company has a number of sources and operational flexibility to meet its customers’ needs, but given the extended dry weather conditions and no indication that these weather patterns will change, the company felt it was important to ask its customers now to voluntarily conserve.

Craig J. Patla, Vice President – Service Delivery, states, “Having an adequate supply of water for drinking, sanitation, and fire protection is Connecticut Water’s highest priority.  While our supplies, overall, are in good shape, we face unique challenges with many smaller systems that rely on small local wells and in the Shoreline area where there is a seasonal influx of customers to local beach communities.”

He continues, “We are asking customers to help us by eliminating unnecessary water use and taking steps to avoid wasting water.  This will reduce the demands on our water supplies, reduce stress on local water resources, and ensure sufficient water is available to meet the needs of all customers.” Connecticut Water’s Shoreline area includes the communities of Clinton, Guilford, Killingworth, Madison, Old Saybrook, and Westbrook.

Connecticut Water is asking its customers to voluntarily conserve water by eliminating non-essential water use. Here are some specific things that customers can do:

  • Residential customers are asked to avoid watering their lawns;
  • Businesses, municipalities, and schools are asked to avoid irrigating their grounds and ball fields;
  • Fire departments are asked to avoid using water in their training exercises; and
  • All customers are asked to promptly repair any leaks.

Connecticut Water will continue to monitor water demands and will modify its request for water conservation measures accordingly.

Connecticut Water has additional suggestions on how to save water that are available by visiting its website atwww.CTWater.com/conservation. Customers without internet access can call 1-800-286-5700.

The website of the U.S Drought Monitor is: http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/Home/RegionalDroughtMonitor.aspx?northeast

The U.S. Drought Monitor, established in 1999, is a weekly map of drought conditions that is produced jointly by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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