November 16, 2018

Archives for November 2018

Recount Called in 33rd State Senate District Race

AREAWIDE — Secretary of the State Denise Merrill’s office said on Thursday that another state Senate race will be subject to a recount.

State election officials said a recent correction to a reporting error in Essex has put the contest for the 33rd District [which includes the Town of Lyme] within a margin that requires a recount. The new tally leaves Essex’s Democratic First Selectman Norm Needleman leading East Haddam Republican state Rep. Melissa Ziobron by 137 votes.

John Heiser of the Essex Registrar of Voters office said …

Read the full article by Clarice Silber, which was published today on CTMirror.com, at this link.

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Registration Open for ‘Trees in the Rigging,’ Nov. 25; ‘Boat Floats’ Added to Community Carol Stroll This Year

Buddy the Elf stands aboard one of the vessels in last year’s Lighted Boat Parade. Photo by CT River Museum.

ESSEX — Kick off the holiday season in Essex with the annual Trees in the Rigging Community Carol Sing and Lighted Boat Parade!  

The Connecticut River Museum, the Essex Board of Trade, and the Essex Historical Society combine to present this annual event that includes a traditional, lantern-lit carol stroll down Main Street where spectators are invited to bring their own lanterns or flashlights and join in with the Sailing Masters of 1812 Fife and Drum Corps and a parade of antique cars. 

Participants can gather at the Essex Town Hall at 4 p.m. The stroll steps off at 4:30 p.m. beginning on West Ave. and ending at the Connecticut River Museum with a parade of vessels dressed out in holiday lights and passing in review along the Connecticut River. 

Judges view the ‘Trees in the Rigging’ parade. Photo by CT River Museum.

Santa and his elves will arrive by one of the parade boats for visits with children on the lawn of the Connecticut River Museum. The Connecticut River Museum will also be open that evening for all to attend the 25th Annual Holiday Train Show.

New for this year’s land parade will be “Boat Floats” or small watercraft on trailers that are decorated for the holidays and can be towed down Essex’s streets.  Members of the public are welcome to decorate their own boat to be pulled or walked down the parade route.  This addition is starting small-scale – so folksy, homemade and low-budget will suit the spirit of the parade perfectly.  Rowboats, kayaks and canoes will all work, too. 

Contact Essex Historical Society to register your “Boat Float” and receive important driving and parking info: 860-767-0681 or mjosefiak@essexhistory.org

The essence of this free community event is the parade of boats dressed in holiday lights that sail along Essex’s waterfront in a friendly competition.  Prizes will be awarded to the top three best dressed boats.  Winners will be invited to receive their prize and have their photo taken on Monday, Nov. 26, at 4:30 p.m. at the Connecticut River Museum.

Join the on-the-water fun and register your boat for the lighted boat parade.  Registration is required to participate in the boat parade that usually begins around 5:15 p.m. from the south end of Essex Harbor.  To register, send emails to: akyff@ctrivermuseum.org. Information should include: vessel name; type of boat and description; owner(s) name; contact information (phone and preferred email); decorating scheme (if known at time of registration).  Registration must be received by Monday, Nov. 19 at 4:30 p.m.

To make your own lanterns at home: 

  • Step 1: fill an empty aluminum can with water and freeze. This will make it easier to punch holes for the design in the can.
  • Step 2: using a hammer and nail, punch holes in the can to make a connect-the-dots style picture of a holiday design. Use plenty of holes to allow the light to shine through.
  • Step 3: punch two holes near the rim to attach a wire handle.
  • Step 4: after the ice is melted, attach a votive or other small candle to the inside bottom of the can.

The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open Tuesday – Sunday from 10 am – 5 pm.  For more information, call 860.767.8269 or go to www.ctrivermuseum.org.

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Charles Sennott, Founder of The GroundTruth Project, to Speak at SECWAC Meeting, Wednesday

Seen here reporting in Afghanistan, Charles Sennott will be the speaker at the SECWAC meeting at Connecticut College on Wednesday

AREAWIDE — The Southeast Connecticut World Affairs Council (SECWAC) hosts Charles M. Sennott on Wednesday, Nov. 14  when he will speak on “GroundTruth in a Post-truth Era,” at 6 p.m. The talk will be held in the Ernst Common Room at Blaustein Hall in Connecticut College.

An award-winning foreign correspondent and founder of The GroundTruth Project, Sennott will discuss the work of this non-profit news organization around the world. Specifically, Sennott will look at the assault on a free press in the US and globally and how it is impacting international coverage. A crisis in journalism is becoming a crisis for democracy.

Sennott is an award-winning correspondent, best-selling author, and editor with 30 years of experience in international, national and local journalism. A leading social entrepreneur in new media, Sennott started GroundTruth in 2014, and in 2017 launched the non-profit organization’s new, local reporting initiative, Report for America.

Reporting on the front lines of wars and insurgencies in at least 20 countries, including the post-9/11 conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq and the 2011 Arab Spring, Sennott began his career in local news covering cops, courts, and municipal government. Sennott’s deep experience reporting led him to dedicate himself to supporting and training the next generation of journalists to tell the most important stories of our time.

Sennott is also the co-founder of GlobalPost, an acclaimed international news website.

Previously, Sennott worked for many years as a reporter at the New York Daily News and then the Boston Globe, where he became Bureau Chief for the Middle East and Europe, and a leader of the paper’s international coverage from 1997 to 2005.

Sennott has also served as a correspondent for PBS Frontline and the PBS NewsHour. He has contributed news analysis to the BBC, CNN, NPR, MSNBC and others. He is a graduate of Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University.

A reception will begin at 5:30 p.m., with the main event beginning at 6 p.m. The presentation is a part of the SECWAC 2018-2019 Speaker Series. For non-members, tickets ($20) may be purchased at the door; ticket cost can subsequently be applied towards a SECWAC membership. Attendance is free for SECWAC members (and their guests). Membership September 2018 through June 2019 is $75; $25 for young professionals under 35; free for area college and high school students.

Immediately following the presentation, SECWAC meeting attendees have the option for $35 to attend a dinner with the speaker at Tony D’s Restaurant, New London. Reservations are required at 860-912-5718.

The Ernst Common Room at Blaustein Hall, Connecticut College, 270 Mohegan Avenue, New London, CT 06320. (MAP HERE)

SECWAC is a regional, nonprofit, membership organization affiliated with the World Affairs Councils of America (WACA). The organization dates back to 1999, and has continued to arrange eight to 10 Speaker Series meetings annually, between September and June. The meetings range in foreign affairs topics, and are hosted at venues along the I-95 corridor, welcoming members and guests from Stonington to Old Saybrook, and beyond.

SECWAC’s mission is “to foster an understanding of issues of foreign policy and international affairs through study, debate, and educational programming.” It provides a forum for nonpartisan, non-advocacy dialogue between members and speakers, who can be U.S. policy makers, educators, authors, and other experts on foreign relations. Learn more at http://secwac.org.

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Letter to the Editor: Needleman Says, “The Election Is Over … Let’s Get To Work”

To the Editor:

The voters of the 33rd District have chosen me to be their advocate in the State Senate for the next two years. The depth of my gratitude to the voters and to the hundreds of volunteers who helped throughout the campaign is beyond my ability to express.

The electioneering is finished, and now we will confront the hard work: get the state back on track, and secure a fair share of support for the towns in our district.  My opponent and I differed in our approach to addressing those issues, but we agreed that the core challenge is restoring the state’s financial health and economic vitality. There is no quick fix, but in my view the path we must travel is clear.

First, we have to bridge the partisan divide that stands in the way of good ideas and sensible solutions. Partisan politics have crippled our state, and it should be obvious by now that retreating to an ideological corner is lethal to the kind of cooperation we badly need. As I said throughout the campaign, I will work with anyone who is committed to finding real solutions, regardless of political affiliation.

Second, renovating our approach to developing revenue projections and budgets is vitally important, but is not the only component of the path to recovery. As importantly, the state needs a comprehensive economic development plan that clearly defines strategies and tactics for creating jobs. We need a plan that builds a compelling and durable appeal to businesses of all sizes…a plan that creates a marketing and communications framework for coalescing the state’s many attributes and advantages into a compelling message. Without a comprehensive plan, the road to economic vitality will be random and reactive, instead of well directed and focused.

Third, I will tirelessly advocate to make certain that every town in our district receives its fair share of support from Hartford. The perspective I have gained from real world experience in budgeting and managing town and business operations will add both credibility and impact to the voice our towns have in the State Senate.

But we also need to address issues that go beyond the state’s finances. We can never stop advocating for measures that address the quality of life in our towns: women’s issues; primary, secondary, and higher education; benefits to our seniors; support for small businesses; and job training for the thousands of unfilled, high paying technical and manufacturing jobs.

I make the same pledge to those who voted for me and to those who didn’t: I will listen to your concerns, I will give you straight answers, and I will never stop working for you. The challenges and the issues that concern you will always be my focus.

It is time to bridge the partisan gap and start on the road to finding solutions. I’m optimistic, because I believe all of us recognize that we have to set aside our differences and truly work together.  That’s the approach and the attitude I will bring to Hartford as your state senator.

Thanks to all of you for your encouragement and support.

Sincerely,

Norm Needleman,
Essex.

Editor’s Note: The author is the first selectman of Essex and state senator-elect for the 33rd Senate District.

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Deep River Public Library Holds Mayflower STEM Challenge, Thursday

DEEP RIVER — The Deep River Library will be holding a Mayflower STEM Challenge geared toward children in grades 2 – 4 on Thursday,  Nov. 15, from 4 to 5 p.m. Registration is required for this event.

Participants will be split into two teams and will work cooperatively through a series of tasks to complete the challenge. Students will need to be able to add decimals, work though a simple engineering task as a team and crack a rebus code to follow the clues.

For more information, visit http://deepriverlibrary.accountsupport.com and click on the monthly calendar, or call the library at 860-526-6039 during service hours: Monday 1 – 8pm; Tuesday 10 am – 6 pm; Wednesday 1 – 8 pm; Thursday and Friday 10 am – 6 pm; and Saturday 10 am – 2 pm.

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All Active, Retired Military Invited to Join Tri-Town Veteran’s Day Parade Today

TRI-TOWN — Tri-Town Veteran’s Day Parade kicks off at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11, down Main St in Deep River.

All active duty and veterans are welcome to march.

Muster at 12:30 p.m. behind Deep River Elementary School.

Ceremony follows at the Memorial Green.

Listen for all church bells to ring at 11 a.m. throughout the towns in observance of the 100th anniversary of Armistice.

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Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm Hosts 29th Annual ‘Farm Day’, Nov. 24; All Welcome

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm Annual ‘Farm Day’ always draws a large number of visitors.

LYME — Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm will host their 29th Annual ‘Farm Day’ on Saturday November 24th from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 139 Beaver Brook Rd. in Lyme, Conn. The annual event is a Lyme tradition, bringing families together to celebrate the heritage of the 101-year-old farm.  The open house ‘Farm Day’ is a free event and features activities for people of all ages.

The Sankows invite the public to see the animals; including over 600 sheep, learn the history of the Sankow farm, and to discover how the farm products are produced and used.   Suzanne Sankow says “Stan and I continue to encourage families to learn the importance of farming and local agriculture.  We greatly enjoy seeing the next generations explore the farm, pet a cow, try a sheep’s cheese or just have fun being outdoors before the winter cold arrives”.

Activities for the family include wagon hayrides, wool spinning and sock making demonstrations.  Live music will be performed by The Locomotives, a folk/blues/rock band, who will be playing songs from the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s in addition some originals.

Visitors can shop from a few local vendors including Four Root Farms who will be onsite selling holiday wreaths and swags made with all-Connecticut grown evergreens, rose hips and berries.

The Farm Market and Wool Shop will be open during the event and will feature a variety of artisanal sheep and cow’s milk dairy products and meats as well as new wool products including wool socks, pillows, blankets, capes and sweater capes. Complimentary tastings of sheep’s and cow’s cheese will be available including the Award-Winning BIG E ‘Best in Class’ Feta Pesto.

Lamb and chicken sausage sandwiches, Abbey, Pleasant Cow and Pleasant Son mac & cheese, lamb and white bean chili, chicken corn chowder, hot chocolate and cider will be available for purchase.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm, is a 175 acres sheep and dairy farm located in Lyme, CT.  The 101 year old farm is home to a dozen Jersey Cows alongside the 450-600 sheep – Frislands, Romneys and natural coloreds.

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm is the largest sheep farm in Connecticut and the only licensed producer of sheep’s milk in Connecticut.  They make and sells artisanal sheep and cow’s milk cheeses as well as yogurts, milk, and gelato.

The Wool Shop on the farm features wool garments including socks, scarves, sweaters, hats, vests, and blankets as well as cones of yarn made from their own wool. They offer fresh lamb meats at their farm store beside homemade entrees such as white bean chili and lamb curry stew.

Visit www.beaverbrookfarm.org for more information.

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Collomore Concert Series Concludes With ‘Andes Manta,’ Nov. 25

The ‘Andes Manta’ group from the Ecuadorian Andes will play the final Collomore Concert, Nov. 25.

CHESTER — The Collomore Concert Series wraps up its 45th season at the Chester Meetinghouse on Sunday, Nov. 25, with music of the Ecuadorian Andes, played on more than 35 traditional instruments by the music group Andes Manta.

The vibrant and powerful music of Andes Manta is a joyous celebration of daily life. Songs and festivals mark the blessing of a house, the birth of a child, and the cycles of planting and harvesting. Energetic music and dance animate religious festivals blending pre-Colombian and Catholic rituals.

Natives of the Ecuadorian Andes, the four Lopez brothers – Fernando, Luis, Bolivar, and Jorge – form the group.  They are well known all over America for their virtuosity and extraordinary performances. From Carnegie Hall to the Discovery Channel, the National Cathedral to Lincoln Center and in hundreds of schools and universities, their powerful and moving performance has received standing ovation after standing ovation.

As one presenter said, “The crowd would not let them stop. These guys are magic.”

A selection of the instruments played by ‘Andes Manta.’

The four brothers learned their traditional folk music as it has been learned for thousands of years, passed from father to son, and brother to brother. They have played the entire range of Andean instruments since their childhood, but each has specialties.

Fernando specializes in strings, and most often plays guitar, the bandolin, and the charango. Luis is a noted virtuoso on the charango and the quena, the Andean flute. Jorge specializes in the Andean stringed instruments, while Bolivar is a noted wind musician and the featured performer on the ronadador, an Ecuadorian panpipe that is unique in the world for the “chordal” note that it produces.

The Sunday, Nov. 25, concert will be at 5 p.m. at the Chester Meetinghouse, 4 Liberty St., Chester. A reception follows the concert so you can meet the four brothers.

Read more about Andes Manta on the website, www.collomoreconcerts.org. Tickets for the concert are $30 (students, $5). Tickets can be purchased online at www.collomoreconcerts.org using PayPal, or call (860) 526-5162.

The Collomore Concert series is under the auspices of the Chester Historical Society.

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High Hopes Holds ‘Holiday Market’ Today with All New ‘Tasting Center’

Last year’s Holiday Market at High Hopes drew huge crowds.

AREAWIDE — On Nov. 11, Veterans’ Day, High Hopes will host its 8th Annual Holiday Market with more than 60 carefully curated vendors  coming together with food trucks, kids’ activities, a wine and beer tasting tent, and a whole barn full of holiday spirit, to benefit over 1,750 children, teens and adults. Artisans come to the market to share their wares and help High Hopes to raise friends; the High Hopes Holiday Market is also the organization’s opportunity to share what they do.

Between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., over 3,000 visitors will come through the farm gates in search of holiday inspiration. They’ll find something for everyone on their list from handmade silver jewelry to unique up-cycled clothing, woolly socks to silk scarves, goat soap to homemade honey, babies’ gifts to coffee table books, and cheese makers to chocolatiers. But it’s not just about shopping … the Market is a fun day out for the whole family.

Thanks to Market Partner, Benchmark Wealth Management of Old Lyme, entry to the market remains free with a non-perishable food item for the Shoreline Soup Kitchen and Pantries. Last year High Hopes was the largest single-day collection point with our visitors donating over 3,000 lbs of food just in time for the Holidays.

Grab a group of friends and your “Passport” to Taste the World. Grand Wine & Spirits will be piquing your palate with a selection of wines and beers from each of 12 different producing regions across the world. The Gourmet Galley Catering will be tempting your taste buds with seasonal small-bites, holiday treats and a raw oyster bar.

Tickets can be purchased ahead of time online for $20 (a 33 percent saving, which also means you get fast-tracked into the tent on the day.) Tickets on the day will be $30 on a first-come-first-served basis. State or Federal photographic I.D. will be required for all entrants. Tickets are available at this link

As well as vendors, there will be kids’ activities, information about High Hopes 2019 Summer Camps, and some of the hottest food trucks on the Shoreline. Take the time to walk the beautiful “runway” and meet the High Hopes special herd of therapy horses.

Stop one of the many volunteers and find out why they joined with over 650 others this past year to help High Hopes deliver over 12,000 equine-assisted activities and therapies to over 1,500 children and adults who come through the organization’s programs, celebrating “ability not disability.”

Nov. 11 is Veterans’ Day, and thanks to our community partner MassMutual, veterans will be able to take some time out, browse some helpful resources, watch “Mark’s Story” and enjoy cider donuts and piping hot Omar Coffee in the Veterans’ Tent.

For more information and to register for the raffle or Passport to Taste the World Tent, visit this link.  

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Ivoryton Library Hosts Screeching Hawk, Other Mohegan Tribe Guests, Today

ESSEX — November is National Native American Heritage Month.

On Sunday, Nov. 11, Ivoryton Library welcomes Screeching Hawk and other guests from the Mohegan Tribe of Indians of Connecticut. She will bring and discuss jewelry, baskets and other crafts, as well as regalia. Screeching Hawk will also demonstrate tribal dances.

Join the Ivoryton Library at 4 p.m. for this exciting program. For more information, call the library at 860-767-1252.

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Democrat Challenger Palm Defeats Republican Incumbent Siegrist in 36th District

State Representative-Elect (D-36th) Christine Palm.

AREAWIDE — Democrat Christine Palm defeated one term-incumbent State Rep. Robert Siegrist (R) by 6,930 votes to 6,592 in the 36th House District.  The District includes the towns of Essex, Chester, Deep River and Haddam.

Asked her reaction the result, Palm told ValleyNewsNow.com, “There are those who will say that speaking in terms of “red” and “blue” is counterproductive. But there’s no question that Democrats and Republicans approach problem-solving differently.”

She continued, “My job now is to represent all four towns in a way that is authentic, respectful of differences, and driven by both passion and pragmatism. Enlightened public policy always takes into account the needs of all people — regardless of where they fall on the economic spectrum.”

Palm concluded, “And while I will never please everyone, I intend to be a pro-active leader for all the towns in our district.”

 

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‘The Queens of the Golden Mask’ at Ivoryton Strikes a Topical Chord … With a Warning

Gerrianne Genga, Sarah Jo Provost and Ellen Barry perform in ‘The Queens of the Golden Mask.’ Photo by Jonathan Steele.

IVORYTON – It is summer, 1961, and in Celestial, Ala., it’s hotter’n a blister bug in a pepper patch.  It is especially steamy in the kitchen of the Sage household where the matriarch, Ida, has gathered her friends around her to meet the new girl in town.  How will Rose from Ohio fit in with the ladies of Celestial who bake pies, sell Avon and belong to the Ku Klux Klan?

The Queens of the Golden Mask, a world premiere currently being performed at the Ivoryton Playhouse, runs through Nov. 18. Carole Lockwood’s brand new play pulls aside the Cotton Curtain to reveal a hidden piece of history that tells a little-known story and also raises a warning. The normalizing of hate is dangerous and toxic – not only to the objects of the hatred but eventually destroying those who are unwittingly caught up in its comfortable complacency.

The play is based on the experiences of Elizabeth H. Cobbs/Petric Smith, who wrote the autobiographical Long Time Coming: An Insiders Story of the Birmingham Church Bombing that Rocked the World. Smith’s work provides more than an insider’s account of one of the most atrocious events of the civil rights era; it is also the personal journey of a woman inside the world of the most extreme opponents of racial justice.

In the violent world of the Klan, women were subservient; men beat their wives with impunity in order to sustain white male supremacy. Most women were partners in the goal of maintaining white supremacy but there were many who, quietly and with great moral courage, put their lives on the line. This is their story.

Lockwood is an actor and writer, who has performed all over the country, on and off Broadway, but it was a challenge from David Mamet that prompted her to sit down and write a play — she has been writing ever since.

Lockwood has written five plays; Basic CableThe Lone Star Princess; and three scripts based in the civil rights movement, “the girls” of Red Tears (the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church), The Mary Band Road Show (the Selma-to-Montgomery March) and The Queens of the Golden MaskUp on the Roof (rooftops after Hurricane Katrina) is currently in the works.

The cast includes Bonnie Black*, Bethany Fitzgerald*, Jes Bedwinek, and Anna Fagan, who have all previously appeared at Ivoryton, and Ellen Barry*, Gerrianne Genga* and Sarah Jo Provost* who will be making their Ivoryton debut.

The production is directed by Jacqueline Hubbard, Ivoryton’s Artistic Director, with set design by Daniel Nischan, lighting design by Marcus Abbott and costume design by Elizabeth Saylor Cipollina.

Performance times are Wednesday and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. Evening performances are Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.

There will be a talk back with the cast and director plus guests after each performance on Wednesday and Thursday evenings.

Tickets are $55 for adults; $50 for seniors; $25 for students and $20 for children and are available by calling the Playhouse box office at 860-767-7318 or by visiting www.ivorytonplayhouse.org

(Group rates are available by calling the box office for information.) The Playhouse is located at 103 Main Street in Ivoryton.

*denotes member of Actors Equity

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Musical Masterworks’ MMModern Presents ‘Quinteto Latino’ This Evening at Centerbrook

‘Quinteto Latino’ will perform Friday, Nov. 9, in the Centerbrook Meeting House.

CENTERBROOK — Experience contemporary chamber music featuring Quinteto Latino tomorrow evening (Friday, Nov. 9) in a Musical Masterworks’ Modern concert starting at 6:30 p.m. at the Centerbrook Meetinghouse. Whether exploring new twists on traditional folk songs or premiering works by living composers, these five musicians blend both the vibrant colors and vigorous rhythms of Latin American music through the tones of the flute, oboe, clarinet, French horn, and bassoon.

Admission is $35 and student admission is $10. Admission includes a reception prior to the concert at 5:30 p.m.; the concert begins at 6:30 p.m.

After the performance, continue your evening with a $40 per person Prix Fixe dinner at the new Los Charros Cantina at The Essex in Centerbrook. Price includes choice of appetizer, tacos, dessert and house margarita. Only available to MMModern concertgoers. Make your dinner reservation by calling The Essex at 860.237.4266 and reference MMModern.

This special performance has been generously sponsored by The Howard Gilman Foundation, Clark Group, Phyllis M. McDowell, Tower Labs and Wade Thomas.

For full details and to purchase tickets, visit Masterworks at www.musicalmasterworks.org or call 860.434.2252.

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Needleman Wins 33rd State Senate District by 303 Votes

State Senator-Elect Norm Needleman

State Representative (R-34th) Melissa Ziobron.

AREAWIDE — Melissa Ziobron, Republican Candidate for the 33rd State Senate District and outgoing House Representative for the 34th District, called her opponent to concede the race just after noon today.

According to the Connecticut Secretary of State, Mr. Needleman leads by 303 votes, or 0.58 percent, which is just 0.08 percent over the 0.5 percent threshold that would trigger an automatic recount.
Rep. Ziobron stated “I am very proud of the race that I ran and grateful for the tremendous effort from my campaign staff and volunteers. We worked hard, earned every vote and did not give an inch of ground.”
Rep. Ziobron concluded: “I want to thank everyone who has supported me, both in this race and elsewhere, most especially my family.”
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Reflecting State Result, Deep River Splits Vote Almost Evenly Between Lamont, Stefanowski; Lamont Ahead by 101

DEEP RIVER — Note these are unofficial results.  We also hear unofficially that Question 2 has passed statewide.

GOVERNOR

Lamont/ Bysiewicz: 1,279

Stefanowski/ Markley: 1,178

Griebel/Frank: 125


US SENATE:

Murphy: 1,584

Corey: 942

Lion: 17

Russell: 14


US HOUSE:

Courtney: 1,662

Postemski: 829

Reale: 16

Bicking: 29


STATE SENATE:

Needleman: 1,525

Ziobron: 1,035


STATE HOUSE:

Palm: 1,377

Siegrist: 1,171


SECRETARY OF STATE:

Merrill: 1,475

Chapman: 993

Gwynn: 17

DeRosa: 29


TREASURER:

Wooden: 1,439

Gray: 1,021

Brohinsky: 27


CONTROLLER:

Lembo: 1,435

Miller: 1,063

Passarelli: 17

Heflin: 16


ATTORNEY GENERAL:

Tong: 1,351

Hatfield: 1,139

Goselin: 31

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Essex Results Give Big Wins to Local Democrats Needleman, Palm

ESSEX– Note these are unofficial results.  We also hear unofficially that Question 2 has passed statewide.

GOVERNOR

Lamont/ Bysiewicz: 2,147

Stefanowski/ Markley: 1,990

Griebel/Frank: 220


US SENATE:

Murphy: 2,562

Corey: 1,632

Lion: 24

Russell: 7


US HOUSE:

Courtney: 2,804

Postemski: 1,422

Riele: 28

Bicking: 38


STATE SENATE:

Needleman: 2,798

Ziobron: 1,543


STATE HOUSE:

Palm: 2,378

Siegrist: 1,926


SECRETARY OF STATE:

Merrill: 2,451

Chapman: 1,755

Gwynn: 29

DeRosa: 32


TREASURER:

Wooden: 2,372

Gray: 1,815

Brohinsky: 39


CONTROLLER:

Lembo: 2,374

Miller: 1,795

Passarelli: 31

Heflin: 36


ATTORNEY GENERAL:

Tong: 2,250

Hatfield: 1,972

Goselin: 50

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Murphy Easily Wins Re-election


U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy speaks to supporters Tuesday night. Photo by Douglas Healey for CTNewJunkie.

Editor’s Note: We are providing this link to an article by Jack Kramer published on CTNewsJunkie.com Nov. 6, which covers Senator Chris Murphy’s victory.  CTNewsJunkie.com is a fellow member of the Local Independent Online News (LION) publishers national organization and we are pleased occasionally to cross-publish our stories.

HARTFORD, CT — U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy easily won a second term Tuesday night defeating Republican challenger Matthew Corey.

Murphy was declared the winner shortly after the polls closed at 8 p.m. Early results showed him with a 3-2 margin over Corey.

Read the full article at this link.

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Carney Claims Victory in 23rd House District

State Rep. Devin Carney

OLD SAYBROOK — On Facebook, State Rep. Devin Carney (R-23) has posted news of his victory over Matt Pugliese by 7129-5690 votes.

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Vote! Election Day is Today, Polls Open From 6am to 8pm

Tri-Town and Old Saybrook voters go to the polls today in a critical mid-term election.  There are no town elections — all the names on the ballot sheet are for state positions, including that of governor.

Visit this link to read the responses that all six of the local candidates gave to our questions.

Visit this link or click on the “Letters” tab above to read all the letters we have received relating to the elections.  Open any letter on its individual page to read the associated comments.

Polling stations open at 6 a.m. today and close at 8 p.m.  Essex and Chester  residents cast their votes at their respective town halls while Deep River residents should go to the Town Library. Optical scan machines will be used. Voters must present identification.

IF YOU HAVEN’T ALREADY DONE SO, WE URGE OUR READERS TO VOTE TODAY!

We will publish the results here on ValleyNewsNow.com very shortly after their announcement.

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We Asked, They Answered: The Candidates Respond to Our Questions

In keeping with a long tradition and in the interests of increasing voter knowledge prior to next week’s critically important mid-term elections, we asked all the candidates, whose districts include some or all of the towns in our coverage area, to send us a brief biography and photo, and answer four questions that we posed to them. The questions came from you — our large and diverse community of readers. We were overwhelmed by the sheer number of questions you sent to us, which we interpret as a clear sign of the level of interest in this election, and are extremely disappointed we could not include more of your questions.

We are pleased to report that five of the six candidates responded to our questionnaire and are delighted now to publish their responses.  We would like to express our sincere thanks to the candidates for taking the time to answer our questions and for adhering to our strict word deadlines — 100 words for the bio and 300 words for each response.

The questions were:

  1. What is the biggest problem facing the state, why is it the biggest problem, and what would you do to help solve it?
  2. What do you think of our leadership in Washington?
  3. What policies or infrastructure do you support at the state level for fostering or managing growth in you district?
  4. Why are you running for this position?

The candidates are:

House District #23 (includes Old Saybrook)

Devin Carney (R – Incumbent)

Matt Pugliese (D)

House District #36 (includes Chester, Deep River and Essex)

Bob Siegrist (R – Incumbent)

Christine Palm (D)

Senate District #33  (includes Chester, Deep River, Essex and Old Saybrook)

Norm Needleman (D) Essex First Selectman

Melissa Ziobron (R) State Rep. House District #34

Click on the candidate’s name above to read their biography and responses to our questions.

For the record and again in keeping with a long tradition, we will not be making any candidate endorsements.

Happy reading … and voting!

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Meehan’s Presidential Memorabilia Display at Acton Library Ends Nov. 7


OLD SAYBROOK — From Oct. 1 until Nov. 7, the Acton Public Library in Old Saybrook will be hosting a display of James Meehan’s presidential memorabilia in their atrium display case. 

The Acton Public Library is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. (starting Oct. 14.)

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Essex Foundation Expands Gateway Beautification 

Sullivan Lawn Service crew members focus on the task at hand – the planting of 15,000 daffodil bulbs at Sunset Pond along West Avenue in Essex thanks to the efforts of The Essex Foundation and its project partners.

ESSEX – The legacy of the late Elizabeth “Diz” Callender continues to enhance the Essex landscape. Through a generous bequest to The Essex Foundation upon her passing in 2014, funding support is now fueling the addition of daffodils along the West Avenue entrance into Essex village.

The first phase of the daffodil project was completed this October with 15,000 bulbs planted in a 3,000 square foot section of turf between Sunset Pond and West Avenue, and blooms expected this spring. Sullivan Lawn Service was hired to provide the planting services. The second phase of the daffodil project will be completed next fall, and includes expanded bulb planting in the Sunset Pond area as well as at the Rte. 153/154 gateway intersection.

The idea for the project came from the fact that Diz Callender enjoyed planting daffodils. Additional funding is coming from The Paul Foundation (owners of the Sunset Pond property), Centerbrook Properties, and individual donors.

A truckload of daffodil bulbs are at the ready to be planted at Sunset Pond along West Avenue in Essex thanks in part to a bequest to The Essex Foundation by the late “Diz” Callender.

The gateway beautification project, which also included the installation of 12 Chanticlear Pear trees and over 300 evergreen and perennial ornamentals at the intersection of Rte. 153 and Rte. 154, is a good example of the types of community efforts supported by The Essex Foundation; projects that are somewhat unique, require quick action, and have an immediate impact.

The Essex Foundation was founded in 1970. It is a non profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to making a difference in the lives of Essex residents. The foundation is funded through donations from the community and strives to fill needs not met by other organizations or sources. In general, funds are granted for special purposes, including buildings, equipment, land, and programs, but not to recurring expenses.

More information can be found at www.theessexfoundation.org.

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Letter to the Editor: Vote Yes on Q2 on Nov. 6 to Protect our Public Lands

To the Editor:

As a strong supporter and user of Connecticut’s wonderful state parks, forests, farmlands and other state-owned recreational and conservation lands (in our area, Nehantic State Forest and Rocky Neck, Harkness and Hammonassett State Parks, just to call out a few of them), I write in support of the public land conveyance constitutional amendment that will appear on our November 6 ballot as Question #2. I urge my friends and neighbors to vote YES. This ballot measure alone is worth a  trip to the polls.

Many people assume that our state-owned recreational and conservation lands are safeguarded for the public forever. Sadly, this is not the case. As things stand now in Connecticut, the state legislature, by simple majority vote,  can sell, swap or give away these lands to private companies or local governments just as it can any other properties that the state owns.
The number #2 ballot proposal, if adopted, would change this. It would amend the state constitution to require a public hearing and a 2/3 vote before the state legislature could take such action. Thus, while not providing absolute protection for publicly-accessible and much-loved  lands, the measure would require direct public input on their fate. It would create an open and transparent process preventing back-room deals.
For many in our community, state parks and forests are our only way to experience nature and the outdoors. For all of us, our state lands are beautiful and unique; they nourish body and soul. They also contribute substantial revenue to the state and to the localities in which they are located.
Please join me in voting YES on ballot question 2 on November 6.

Sincerely,

Christina E. Clayton,
Old Lyme.
Editor’s Note: The author is a former president of the Old Lyme Land Trust.
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It’s ‘First Friday’ in Chester Tonight!

CHESTER — The First Friday of the month means something’s happening in Chester!

The merchants of Chester are kicking off the season of Thanksgiving on the First Friday of November, Nov. 2, by collecting canned goods for Hinka’s Cupboard, the Middletown food pantry. Drop off a can at your favorite shop (or brewmaster), and then enjoy the quaint boutiques, talented artists and the top-notch brewery and restaurants that Chester has to offer during the First Friday activities from 5 to 8 p.m.

Drop-off spots for canned goods include Blackkat Leather(36 Main Street), Leif Nilsson Spring Street Studio and Gallery(1 Spring Street), Little House Brewing Company(16 Main Street), The French Hen(14 Main Street), Shops at the Mill House(5 West Main Street), Chester Package Store(1 North Main Street), Lark(4 Water Street), CAIT SHEA + Sprouted(1 Main Street), Kismet(11 Main Street), Lori Warner Gallery and Swoon(21 Main Street), Dina Varano Gallery(27 Main Street), Strut Your Mutt(29 Main Street), Caryn Paradis(43 Main Street) and The Perfect Pear(51 Main Street).

Merchants, restaurants and galleries will be offering food and drink samples, newly introduced products and specials.

The Chester Gallery continues their exhibit “In the Elements” featuring two new Sol LeWitt gouaches, along with other wonderful sculptures, paintings, neon glass, etchings, baskets and more…visit their website for a list of artists! https://www.chestergalleryct.com/artists/

Blackkat Leather will host Aquinnah Jewelry for the evening. Meet Kelly and customize your own tassel keychains in the shop. Spend $100 or more in store and you get to make one on the house.

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