December 8, 2019

Archives for June 2019

Carney Hosts Office Hours in Old Saybrook, 8-9am, June 24

State Representative Devin Carney (R-23rd)

State Reps. Devin Carney (R-23rd) and Jesse MacLachlan (R-35th) along with State Sen. Paul Formica (R-20th) will hold Office Hours throughout the 23rd District on various dates between June 10 and 27.

These events will provide constituents with an opportunity to ask questions or share their ideas and concerns about state government, local issues and the 2019 legislative session which will come to a close on June 5.

The remaining Office Hours schedule is as follows:

Lyme
NOTE TIME CHANGE!
Tuesday, June 18, from 5 – 6 p.m.
State Rep. Carney
Lyme Public Library
Community Room
482 Hamburg Rd.

Old Saybrook
NOTE DATE CHANGE!
Monday, June 24, from 8 – 9 a.m.
State Rep. Carney
Vicky G. Duffy Pavilion
155 College St.

Westbrook
Thursday, June 27, from 6 – 7 p.m.
State Rep. Carney & State Rep. McLachlan
Westbrook Public Library
Community Room
61 Goodspeed Dr.

Anyone unable to attend, but who would like to speak to Rep. Carney may contact his office at 800-842-1423 or by email at: devin.carney@housegop.ct.gov.

Carney represents the 23rd General Assembly District, which includes the towns of Lyme, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook and a portion of Westbrook.

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Letter to the Editor: Thank You to the Wonderful People of Essex, Ivoryton, and Centerbrook

To the Editor:

An Open Letter to the Wonderful People of Essex, Ivoryton, and Centerbrook:

Last July I was diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer. Your generosity, thoughtfulness and concern has been overwhelming. Thanks to your continuing support, I have been able to keep up the fight, gain strength from you, and learn what true compassion is.

The last time I spoke with the Director of Park and Recreation, Mary Ellen Barnes, she told me, “Boris, we are all like family here.” I didn’t reply at the time, but yes you were right, we truly are like family.

There are so many people to thank individually; I am going to try to the best of my ability during this difficult time. I would like to
thank Mike Birner and his son Joe Birner; Mayor Norm Needleman; Maria Lucarelli; Kelly Ann Sterner; Paul Kenefick; Ryan Welch and the Welch family; Bob and Rose Rutty; Scott Clark; Tom McQuinney; Mary Ellen Barnes; and Marion Stiehl.

I know there are many more people that have helped including all those in Town Hall, the Essex Police Department, and countless others that have contributed to my GoFundMe page. I can’t thank you all enough for your prayers and support.

With Sincere Appreciation,

Boris A. Churyk,
Essex.

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Sing! Cappella Cantorum Offers One-Day Vocal Camp, Saturday

Photo by David Beale on Unsplash.

The valley-shore chorus of Cappella Cantorum offers a One-Day Vocal Camp on Saturday, June 15, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, 5 Lyme St., Old Lyme. All singers ages 13 and up are welcome to attend.

The camp offers intensive choral practice in group and private lessons that will improve sight reading, ear training and blending in a choral environment.

Learn from accomplished choral leaders Simon Holt, director of the Salt Marsh Opera, Cappella Cantorum and the choir of the Congregational Church of Old Lyme, and Paul Laurence Fletcher, critically acclaimed oratorio and concert soloist.

Lunch will be provided. Cost is $45 for the group session and $55 for the group session plus a private vocal lesson with Mr. Fletcher. The private lessons are limited and offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

Reserve a spot at www.cappellacantorum.org or by calling 860-941-8243.

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Take a Walk ‘Through the Garden Gate,’ June 15; Proceeds Benefit Ivoryton Library

See eight beautiful gardens on the ‘Through the Garden Gate’ tour, June 15, in Ivoryton,

IVORYTON — It’s spring (finally) and what better way to celebrate than a walk through some beautiful gardens.

Come enjoy eight historic gardens on Ivoryton Library’s fifth annual Through the Garden Gate fundraiser tour on Saturday, June 15.

The tour, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., takes you through Victorian homes, a renovated carriage house, and other notable sites in this former factory town.

You can purchase the $25 tickets by calling Ivoryton Library at 860-767-1252. Lunch at the Copper Beech Inn, which must be ordered ahead of the tour, is an additional $15.

You may also purchase tickets for $30 the day of the event between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the library at 106 Main St. in Ivoryton.

Come out for a wonderful drive in the country … Ivoryton is waiting.

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It’s ‘First Friday’ in Chester Tonight!


CHESTER — Celebrate the Connecticut River Valley’s original First Friday festivities tonight from 5 to 8 p.m. The boutiques, galleries and restaurants in the charming (and walkable!) town of Chester are open late and offer fun new products, exhibitions and food and drinks.

An innovative new exhibit on pop art featuring works by Keith Haring, Sol LeWitt and Andy Warhol at Chester Gallery is among the happenings on First Friday in Chester on June 7 as registration continues for the 2nd Annual Chester Ladies’ Sip & Shop, set for Thursday, June 20.

On First Friday, most Chester village shops are open until 8 p.m., featuring new products, introductory sales and free libations.

CHESTER GALLERY is launching its “Pop and Beyond” exhibit, which will showcase the serigraphs, lithographs, etchings and gouaches of Jim Dine, Sam Francis, Adolph Gottlieb, Keith Haring, Robert Indiana, Robert Motherwell, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist and Andy Warhol, who will hang alongside Sol LeWitt in the town where he spent the latter years of his life.

Also included in the exhibit are works by Irene Barberis, an Australian/British artist, who met LeWitt in 1974 and is the first artist to have the privilege to make work in LeWitt’s studio in Chester and has produced new bodies of artworks responding to the space and his processes.

Caryn Paradis, LLC Interior Design is showcasing two very talented artisans on First Friday: Sarah Barnes, owner of The Planters Effect, will be sharing her love of plants with a variety of potted plants, and artist Lexi Axon will be showing her work.

Shops at the Mill House will feature Chester artist Kathleen Cataldi, who will be on hand to show her art, photos, fabric and vegan leather purses, and her classic linen and duck cloth aprons with custom embroidered designs.

Leif Nilsson is unveiling new and old paintings of his home and hometown of Chester at the Leif Nilsson Spring Street Studio and Gallery, and hosting the band, Arrowhead.

Dina Varano Gallery is showcasing June’s birthstone with a new collection of Dina’s pearl jewelry, including Tahitian, fresh water and baroque pearls.

Free registration is ongoing for Chester’s 2nd Ladies Sip & Shop, which has been set for Thursday, June 20. Proceeds from this popular shopping event will support Child & Family Services of Southeastern Connecticut.

In addition to on-street parking in Chester, there is free parking available in the town’s public lots on Main Street by the cemetery, on Water Street and on Maple Street. More information about First Friday and the 2nd Ladies’ Sip & Shop is available on Facebook.com/VisitChesterCT or by calling (860) 322-4047.

* Cover image credit to Chester Gallery, ‘New Years 1988’, Keith Haring (1958-1990) and LA II (Angel Ortiz)

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Legal News You Can Use: Injured at Work? Should I Make a Worker’s Comp. Claim?

Looks safe enough, but injuries can happen anywhere in a work environment.

Sponsored Post from Suisman Shapiro Attorneys-at-Law 

Imagine that you’re working at your desk. There are no significant hazards around you. You reach up and pick up a heavy box above you, and you suddenly feel a snap along your shoulder. You’ve been working in the same position for many hours, and combined with the strain of the weight of the box, you’re now struggling with a painful injury.

Situations like yours aren’t uncommon. It’s actually relatively common for accidents to happen on the job with little that can be done to prevent them. Whether it’s because of repetitive motions, picking up something too heavy or other causes, injuries can happen in an instant.

When they do, you need to know what to do next. No matter what kind of injury you suffer, your employer should help you file a claim with the workers’ compensation insurance carrier. If your injury is extremely painful, a coworker can take you to the hospital, or your employer can call for an ambulance.

It’s important that you receive care right away so that you can prevent the injury from worsening.

What information should you keep from the hospital visit?

Keep every piece of paperwork you receive. You should also inform the medical provider that this is a work-related injury so that they can give you copies of the correct documents for your employer.

If you are hurt on the job in any way, workers’ compensation should be there to protect you and pay for your medical care. Don’t delay in telling someone if you get hurt so you can get care quickly.

The Suisman Shapiro website has more information on the compensation and benefits you may receive after a work injury.

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CT Valley Camera Club Hosts Renowned Photographer George Fellner Tomorrow: All Welcome

George Fellner will give a talk titled “Pictures at an Exhibition: A Mindset for Creative Photography” on June 3 at the CT Valley Camera Club

AREAWIDE — The guest speaker at the Monday, June 3, meeting of the Connecticut Valley Camera Club (CVCC) will be professional photographer George Fellner, who will give a talk titled, “ Pictures at an Exhibition: A Mindset for Creative Photography.” The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at the Lymes’ Senior Center, 26 Town Woods Rd., Old Lyme, Conn. All are welcome. There is no admission charge.

This program explores the characteristics and attributes that make a photograph successful.  While there are numerous categories and genres of subject material, there are nonetheless certain common denominators that can be implemented for making a good photograph.  One can determine a preferred genre as well as a theme that relates to a personal frame of reference for creating a body of work.

Specifically, there is a set of criteria that can be defined as objectives.  For example, an image should have impact and possess a certain attraction that is both compelling as well as captivating for the viewer.  A creative expression that is unique and imaginative, helping to convey a message is paramount for a photograph that is intended to leave a lasting impression.

Furthermore, drama and emotion have the propensity to affect the viewer’s experience.  The elements of composition certainly are a part of the equation, as well as the technical understanding of proper lighting, color balance, resolution, detail, contrast, tonal gradation, among other specific aspects.

Through a discussion of concepts, strategies, and process, George Fellner presents a mindset for creative photography.  His use of visual examples helps to illustrate the positive and negative aspects of a photograph in a descriptive and revealing manner.  The intent is to provide an understanding of what makes a photograph creative and what is involved in judging images in a photo show.  Ultimately, as photographers, we all strive to learn what works for Pictures at an Exhibition.

George Fellner

As a photographer and architect, Fellner is committed to a dual life-path involving visual discovery and design, relating to both the natural and built environments.  He has been presenting photography programs to camera clubs, art guilds, professional organizations, historical societies, community groups, and schools since 2004.  His subjects include landscape, architecture, travel, and elements of nature.

Fellner received his Bachelor of Architecture degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and his Master of Architecture degree from the University of Florida.  Now, with over 30 years as principal of Fellner Architects, he continues to utilize his design sensitivities for creative photography.

Fellner’s photographs have been published in books, journals, magazines, newspapers, and travel guides.  INK Publications magazine (Feb 2013) featured the article Photographer George Fellner: Architect for Body and Spirit.  The book Artists’ Homes and Studios (2015) by E. Ashley Rooney features Fellner’s studio, art, and creative process.  He wrote and published his first book Imaginary Realms: The Visual Language of Stones and Crystals (2016).

His latest book Essence of Architecture in East Haddam: Expressions of a Connecticut River Town is being published in May of 2019.

Fellner’s work has been exhibited in art galleries and museums, both in group shows and solo shows.  A series of his images are exhibited in permanent art collections at the Yale School of Medicine, the Jackson Laboratory at the University of Connecticut, and the NYC offices for Nature Genetics, an international science journal.

The CVCC is dedicated to offering its membership the opportunity to become better photographers. The group offers a variety of presentations and interactive workshops to help members expand their technical and creative skills. Photographers of all levels of experience are welcomed.  The club draws members from up and down the river, from Middletown to Old Saybrook; from East Hampton to Old Lyme; and along the shoreline from Guilford to Gales Ferry.

For more information, visit the club’s website at https://ctvalleycameraclub.smugmug.com/ . CVCC meeting dates, speakers/topics, and other notices are also published on the club’s Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/CTValleyCameraClubPage .

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Letter From Paris: Seeing “Red” at the Grand Palais

Nicole Prévost Logan

The year 1917 in Russia marked a unique moment of history when art and  revolution fused together into a mutual source of inspiration. The creativity and energy fed on each other for a short few years, to eventually vanish under the brutal repression and purges of Stalin to become an official and bland art form called “Socialist Realism.”

The exhibit Red – Art and Utopia in the Soviet Country at the Grand Palais, Paris, in the spring of 2019 is breaking new ground in describing that unique moment.

All forms of arts were impacted by the October Revolution, from the visual arts to architecture, theater, cinema, music and, of course, literature.  In addition to major artists, already well known before World War I, such as Malevich, the Bolchevik government did welcome all talented artists eager to experiment with new art forms.

Mayakovsky (1893-1930) was the voice of the Revolution – a giant with a booming voice, who galvanized the crowds when he read his poetry.  His emblematic play, the “Bedbug,” is a satire of the NEP (New Economic Policy.)  A young man of that period is frozen and found himself  in a perfect communist world 50 years later where there was no drunkenness nor swearing. 

He decided he was not made for the future.  As a journalist, Mayakovsky used  simple street  language.  A gifted artist, he drew satirical cartoons, making fun of the “petty bourgeoisie.”  One of the main metro stations in central Moscow was named after him. He shot himself in 1930 at the age of 37.

Malevich (1878-1935), a major artist of the 20th century, was inspired until 1914, by Gauguin, Matisse and Cezanne, and then moved to abstraction and geometric forms until he reached his extreme “White on White” in 1918.  He was the theoretician of art par excellence. 

His book “From Cubism to Suprematism in Art …” is considered one of the most important reference works of the 20th century. Toward the end of his life he was  forced to reintroduce figurative characters into his paintings.  He never left the Soviet Union where he died of cancer in 1935.

Tatlin (1885-1953) was associated with the concept of “constructivism,” based on the use of materials, the exploitation of movement and tension in matter.  He aimed at the harmonization of artistic form with utilitarian goals.

Artists’ association multiplied at that time.  AKhRR  (Association of Russian Artists of Revolutionary Russia) was founded in 1922.  Vkhutemas (higher Institutes of art and technique) were created as early as 1920 all over the country.  Both Malevich and Tatlin occupied important positions in those institutions .

Vsevolod Mayerhold, (1874-1940) following in the footsteps of Stanislavsky (master of the stage in the 19th century – particularly Chekhov plays), revolutionized theatrical techniques, suppressed settings and replaced them by “constructivist” space, trained the actors according to a new system of “bio-mechanic” and how to form human pyramids. His stage production of Mayakovsky’s  “Bed Bug” is emblematic of the Soviet era.

Rodchenko  (1891-1956) was the leading innovator of the 1917 revolution-inspired  art.  He wanted to bring art down from its pedestal.  He stood against estheticism and “art for art” and made art the champion of productivity. He created a new artistic language by experimenting with photography, using photo-montage, double exposures, and unexpected angles. He gloried the machine in a factory or objects of daily life rather than still life motives in traditional art.

Among this group of brilliant artists were two women – Lioubov Popova, (1889-1924), who died of scarlet fever, and  Varvara Stepanova (1894-1958i), Rodchenko’s wife.

A poster by Gustav Klutsis.

Posters became a new art form used as the most important tool of propaganda. They were intended to make a strong and immediate impact on the viewer.  Using a graphic art medium with calligraphy and geometric designs, they carried a simple message.  The color red was used extensively  (it is interesting to note that, in Russian, “red” and “beautiful” are the same word.)

Oversize paintings like “Bolchevik” by Kustodiev are easy to understand.  A giant man walks through dwarfed  city landscape with churches, holding a huge red banner.  The messages of the October revolution were spread throughout the country in the “agit-prop trains”  to educate the masses.  Some figures are impressive: in 1917 the literacy of the population  was 25 percent whereas by 1939, it had risen to 81 percent.

Gustav Klutsis (1895-1935), born in Latvia, was also one of the best at using photo-montage and posters . He wrote: “Put color, slogan at the service of class war.”  Klutsis was arrested and shot in 1938.

Sergei Eisenstein  (1898-1948) – a pioneer of the cinema – created his own style characterized by melodramatic acting, close-up shots and theatrical editing.  A sequence of “Battlefield Potemkin” has become an absolute classic: during an attack by the Cossacks against Odessa civilians, a baby carriage falls all the way down the long steps.

Eisenstein ‘s mob scenes are so realistic (such as the storming of the Winter Palace in St Petersburg) that they are often mistaken for newsreels in documentaries.

Architecture played a crucial role in bringing about utopia of the proletariat.  Plans for grand buildings, squares and majestic avenues are intended to impress the masses, who are more important than the individuals.  Still standing today is the workers’ club Roussatov designed by Melnikov.

Roussakov Workers’ Club designed by Melnikov, 1927-28.

After the death of Lenin in 1924, power became concentrated in the hands of Stalin, who tightened his control over artists.  In 1932  all artistic associations were suppressed — artists were forced to join the official Union.

The creative, innovative productions had to bend and conform to rules of the new doctrine of Socialist Realism formulated by Andrei Zhdanov in a speech to the Writer’s Union in 1934.  In art,  it can be defined as representation of the bright future of communism through the representation of idealized  workers in healthy bodies.

Therefore, at the 1937 Universal Fair held in Paris, a double statue of a vigorous factory worker and a strong woman kolkhoz farmer stood on top of the Soviet building.

Most representative of this period was Alexander Deïneka, who painted naked, young factory workers taking a break on the beach in the Donbass or Lenin riding in an open sports car through bucolic countryside with several blonde children.

Somehow out of place in 1937 is a delightful painting by Yuri Pimenov called, “The New Moscow.”  A young woman is driving a convertible car on one of the main thoroughfares of central Moscow.  The style is very much in the Impressionist style.

Already in the 1990s, the Tretiakov Gallery of Moscow held exhibits on the 1920s and 1930s Soviet art.  At that time, the Soviet posters were readily available in the book stores of the Arbat pedestrian street.  

Although a large part of the exhibited works included in the “Red” exhibit come from the permanent collection of the Centre Pompidou, Paris, it is interesting to note that in the 1979 Paris-Moscow exhibit organized by that same museum, Soviet art was barely mentioned.

Editor’s Note: This is the opinion of Nicole Prévost Logan.

Nicole Prévost Logan

About the author: Nicole Prévost Logan divides her time between Essex and Paris, spending summers in the former and winters in the latter. She writes a regular column for us from her Paris home where her topics will include politics, economy, social unrest — mostly in France — but also in other European countries. She also covers a variety of art exhibits and the performing arts in Europe. Logan is the author of ‘Forever on the Road: A Franco-American Family’s Thirty Years in the Foreign Service,’ an autobiography of her life as the wife of an overseas diplomat, who lived in 10 foreign countries on three continents. Her experiences during her foreign service life included being in Lebanon when civil war erupted, excavating a medieval city in Moscow and spending a week under house arrest in Guinea.

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Essex Rotary Hosts 61st Annual Shad Bake This Afternoon

Planking the shad to cook in front of the fire in the same manner in which it has been done for hundreds of years.

ESSEX — One of our State’s great culinary customs returns to the Connecticut River Museum tomorrow from 3 to 6 p.m. with the 2019 Essex Annual Shad Bake.  For 61 years, the Rotary Club of Essex has been proudly holding this annual rite of spring, nailing delicious American shad onto oak planks and roasting them around a large bonfire.  Share this wonderful Connecticut tradition with your family and friends.

This year’s Bake is made possible through the generous support of AJ Shea Construction, Guilford Savings Bank, and The JECM Foundation. Additional support comes from Clark Group/Middle Cove Marina, Essex Savings Bank/Essex Financial Services, Tower Laboratories, and many other sponsors.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine.”

The Museum’s interim executive director, Thomas Wilcox said “We are pleased to host and partner with the Rotary Club of Essex on this iconic event that celebrates part of the Connecticut River’s heritage and supports the many worthwhile projects of Rotary and Museum.” This volunteer-run event has been organized by the Rotary Club of Essex and is coordinated by Bake Master Joseph Shea. Shea stated that “We offer one of the most unique culinary traditions in New England at one of the most majestic and historic locations. It is a winning combination!” 

In addition to the delicious food, a variety of activities take place throughout the afternoon. For shad lovers, the lure is the secret ingredients and the authentic method of preparing and baking the fish which has been handed down through generations of Connecticut natives.  Nailed onto oak planks with salt pork and placed in front of the bonfire, the fish picks up the smoky flavor of the fire and the seasoned oak boards on which it is baked. Add to this delicacy homemade potato salad, tossed green salad, and pie from Lyman Orchards and your shad experience is complete.

Baking the shad.

Don’t care for shad?  Grilled chicken is also available!  In addition to the food, participants will be able to enjoy live music and touring the Museum, which will be open until 6 pm.  The vibrant atmosphere is enhanced with picnickers and the delicious smell of shad baking around the open fire.  

The $35 adult (Shad or Chicken dinner option) and $10 child (10 and under) ticket includes the full meal including one water or soda (child ticket includes a hot dog and salads) and admission to the Museum.  Tickets, if available, will be $40 on the day of the event. Beer, wine and soda will be available for purchase with a valid ID.  Freshly shucked clams and oysters will also be available at an additional price beginning at 3:00 pm. No carry-in alcohol will be permitted.

Bill Hoffstetler demonstrates the fine art of removing bones
from shad; a fish referred to by local Native Americans as the “inside out porcupine”.

To purchase tickets, visit shop.ctrivermuseum.org or buy them in person at the Centerbrook Package Store, Essex Hardware, or the Connecticut River Museum.  There will be no parking on the Museum grounds and on-street parking is very limited.  On the day of the event, a free shuttle will be running between the Museum and the Essex Town Hall parking lot. 

The Connecticut River Museum is located on the Essex waterfront at 67 Main Street and is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Mondays until after Memorial Day. The Museum, located in the historic Steamboat Dock building, offers exhibits and programs about the history and environment of the Connecticut River. For a full listing of Museum programs and events, visit www.ctrivermuseum.org or call 860-767-8269.

The Rotary Club of Essex is the local chapter of Rotary International whose membership is made up of service minded professionals.  The club and its members are committed to improving the community, connecting with other professionals, sharing their time and experience with the young, supporting global causes, and using their skills to help others.  For more information about the Shad Bake and Rotary Club visit http://www.rotaryclubofessex.com.

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I-Park Open to the Public Today on National Trails Day

Painters will be working ‘En Plein Air’ in I-Park on National Trails Day. Photo by Nancy Pinney.

EAST HADDAM — I-Park artists-in-residence program will open its scenic campus to lovers of nature, art and music in observance of Connecticut Trails Day on Saturday, June 1. The grounds will be open from 2 to 6 pm, joining 250 other events in this annual statewide celebration. Rain date will be Sunday, June 2.

Normally closed to the public to ensure the privacy of its resident artists, I-Park’s campus and its 26 trails will be open for strolling, hiking and exploring. Visitors are offered the pleasure of discovering the property’s confluence of woods, fields, waterways and stone walls — as well as the abundance of site-responsive artworks that have been installed on the property since I-Park’s founding in 2001.

Landscape painters from throughout the region will be stationed around the grounds, capturing the beauty of the setting and representing the merger of art and nature that has been a hallmark of I-Park’s residency program.

The Grays, a percussion-based improvisational quartet from Chester that performs original compositions, will be playing from 2 to 4 pm.  Guests are welcome to sit and listen to the music or even bring a picnic lunch.

Since 2002, Mie Preckler has been working on a large-scale, ongoing site intervention, “A Conversation with the Gravel Pit”. Over time she has persuaded the landscape to bend gently to her will, creating Mie’s Trail and exposing the site-specific topography of this previously barren industrial site. Mie returns to I-Park every year to maintain this work and document the subtle changes that have taken place since her last visit. She will lead a guided walk of the trail at 4:30 pm.

This is a free, family-friendly event and reservations are requested. To reserve your space, go to i-park.org. For additional information, write events@i-park,org or call 860-873-2468.

Note that due to the fragileness of the art work and trails, pets are not permitted on the I-Park grounds.

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