November 30, 2022

Archives for October 2022

Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds in Old Lyme Hosts ‘Halloween Extravaganza’ Tonight

OLD LYME — On Monday, Oct. 31, at 8 p.m., Studio 80 + Sculpture Grounds will host a Halloween Extravaganza. The event will take place following all the Halloween activity on Lyme Street.

The night is BYOB and will feature live music from some of the areas best talents. Included on the bill are Ramblin’ Dan “Elvis” Stevens, John “Johnny Cash” Brown, Kip “Buddy Holly” Sturgeon, Braiden “Sinatra” Sunshine, and Ned “Sonny” Ruete and Susan “Cher” Way.

Costumes are encouraged, but not required. All are welcome to attend this festive evening of live music and great company.

Parking is available next door at the Lyme Academy of Fine Art. Handicap parking is available at the Sculpture Grounds.

‘The Country School’ Hosts Open House Tomorrow Afternoon

Field Day fun at The Country School. Students attend the school from Lyme, Old Lyme, Branford, Essex, Guilford, Madison and many other towns.

MADISON, CT – On Sunday, Oct. 30, The Country School in Madison, Conn., will host an Open House from 1 to 3:30 p.m.

Pre-School through 8th Grade families are invited to tour the campus and speak with faculty, families, and administration to learn why parents have trusted their children’s education to The Country School for 68 years.

At 1:30 p.m., there will  be a Kindergarten Readiness Info Session. Assistant Head of School Beth Coyne will facilitate a discussion about how The Country School assesses student readiness, how it meets the needs of all learners, and what you can do to support your child between now and their first day of Kindergarten.

Panel members will include Kindergarten teachers, Beatrice Brett and Chester Sharp, Pre-Kindergarten teacher Karen Chiaia, School Counselor Jennifer Butler, and Reading Specialist Jennifer Hornyak.

Additionally, in honor of The Country School’s 65th Anniversary, the board of trustees is offering merit scholarships to students applying for admission to Grades 4through 8. The recipients of the merit scholarships will be selected on the basis of academic merit and personal promise as demonstrated by performance on school records, in an interview with the Head of School, and on a Merit Scholarship test.

Merit scholarships are awarded to new students and are renewed each year that the students are enrolled at The Country School, provided the recipients stay in strong academic standing and consistently demonstrate good citizenship.

It is The Country School’s expectation that the merit scholarship recipients will contribute significantly to the life of The Country School, creating a stronger overall experience for all students. To learn more and to register for our 65th Anniversary Merit Scholarship opportunity for students entering Grades 4-8, visit https://www.thecountryschool.org/admission/tuition-and-financial-aid/merit-scholarships.

Founded in 1955, The Country School is a coeducational, independent day school serving over 215 students in Pre-School through Grade 8.

To learn more and register for Open House, visit https://go.thecountryschool.org/open-house/.

Third Robbie Collomore Concert Presents Noree Chamber Soloists Playing Schubert, Mozart, Dvořák, Sunday

CHESTER — The third Robbie Collomore Concert will be held Sunday, Nov. 6, at 5 p.m. at the Chester Meeting House. The Noree Chamber Soloists will present a concert of Schubert, Mozart, and Dvořák.

The first piece on the program is Franz Schubert’s String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major. Schubert was only 16 when he composed this quartet. It was first performed by family members in their home, with Franz Schubert on the viola, and has thus been nicknamed the Household Quartet.

When Schubert was growing up, the most common form of instrumental music performed in the home was the string quartet, so he began composing quartets for his family at the age of 14. He wrote six for home performances while still at school at the Imperial City Seminary in 1813 – this is the only one of those six still performed regularly.

Schubert studied with Antonio Salieri while at school, who guided him to a more mature expression of his compositional thoughts. The work is in four movements, three of which are in sonata form. Schubert’s gift for melody is apparent throughout the work, and the finale is a rambunctious Allegro, with recaps from the first movement. It’s an altogether delightful and listenable quartet.

Enjoy a wonderful concert of chamber music presented by very talented young musicians.

The Noree Chamber Soloists feature some of the best young chamber musicians in the greater New York area. The performers are Francesca DePasquale and Elizabeth Frayette, violins; Bethany Hargreaves-Lewis, viola; Yi Qun Xu, cello; and Yoon Lee, piano.

Visit http://collomoreconcerts.org/ to order tickets or for more information about upcoming concerts, or call 203-488-8403.

Old Lyme Church Invites Community to Free “Rhythm of the Saints” Concert, Nov. 5, Sacred Jazz Worship  Service, Nov. 6

Dr. Michael White and His New Orleans Jazz Ensemble Return to Old Lyme 

OLD LYME – During the weekend of Nov. 5 and 6, the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme  (FCCOL) will hold a free  “Rhythm of the Saints” Concert on Saturday night followed by a Sacred Jazz Worship  Service on Sunday morning – with both events featuring the return of Dr. Michael White and his New Orleans Jazz Ensemble.  

The concert will take place on Saturday, Nov. 5, at 5 p.m., and the worship service on  Sunday, Nov. 6, at 10 a.m. Both events will take place in the Meetinghouse, are free and open to all area residents. Seating is available on a first come, first served basis.  

In announcing the special events, Senior Minister Rev. Steve Jungkeit said, “During the final days of October and into the first week of November, Christian churches mark All Saint’s Day, or All Soul’s Day. It is a time in which we honor the lives  of those who have died during the past year, but it’s also a time to recognize the  wisdom of those who have come before us.”

He continued, “In similar fashion, African and Indigenous  traditions use that time to honor their own wisdom keepers of the past, in celebrations  that often last for several days. It’s a cultural practice that we in Old Lyme do well to  emulate and uphold.’  

Jungkeit added, “Once again this year, Dr. Michael White and his New Orleans Jazz Ensemble return to  Old Lyme to help us all to recognize and affirm the ancestral voices that have guided us individually and collectively along our life journeys.”  

He elaborated, “With a sound that reaches back to the earliest days of jazz – one that is, in truth, older  than jazz, and older than the country itself – Michael White’s music calls to the  ancestors, even as it raises the tired and flagging spirits of those privileged to hear these  ancient/modern songs.”

Jungkeit concluded, “The jazz ensemble’s songs establish a rhythm for the saints, both the living and dead, for both the past and present.”

Key Points on How to Request Absentee Ballots for the State Election, Referendum

LYME/OLD LYME — On Tuesday, Nov. 8, voters in Lyme and Old Lyme will cast their ballots in not only the State Election but also the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools $57.6 million Bond Referendum for renovation and expansion of four school buildings. 

If you wish to vote by Absentee Ballot, there are some important points to understand about how you obtain your ballot. The key issue is that you must request two separate Absentee Ballots – one for the Election, and one for the Referendum.

You cannot request both Absentee Ballots on the same form,

Also, you cannot request the Referendum Ballot via the state of Connecticut’s online portal.

You should submit your applications as soon as possible to receive your ballots and then return them in time to be counted.

The last day for Town Clerks to issue Absentee Ballots is Monday, Nov. 7.  

Completed ballots must be returned no later than 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 8.

The Town Clerk of the town in which you are registered or qualified to vote is the one who will handle you ballot request(s).

You can request an Absentee Ballot for the State Election in one of three ways:

  • Online via the State of Connecticut Online Absentee Ballot Request Portal at https://oabr-sots.ct.gov/. If you have a valid Connecticut Driver’s License or Non-Driver ID number, you may use this portal to request your absentee ballot for the State Election only. The Town Clerk’s office will receive applications daily from the State, and your Absentee Ballot will be processed by the Town Clerk’s office and mailed to you.

  • By printing out an application from the state’s website at https://bit.ly/2ulgNDz and then submitting it to the Town Clerk’s office in the town where you are registered or qualified to vote.

  • By going to the Town Clerk’s office in person to request an Absentee Ballot.

You can request an Absentee Ballot for the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools $57.6 million Bond Referendum in one of two ways:

  • By printing out an application from the state’s website at https://bit.ly/2ulgNDz and then submitting it to the Town Clerk’s office in the town where you are registered or qualified to vote.
  • By going to the Town Clerk’s office in person to request an Absentee Ballot.

Lyme Town Clerk Linda Winzer helpfully explained to LymeLine why voters need two Absentee Ballots, saying, “These are two separate events occurring on the same day.” She continued, “As you will see in Section III [of the Application for Absentee Ballot], the applicant is directed to “Check only one”, either “Election” or “Referendum”, which necessitates two forms if the voter wishes to vote in both events.”

Winzer clarified, “If someone submits an Absentee Ballot application and has checked “Election” in Section III of the application, they will receive an election ballot.  

If someone submits an Absentee Ballot application and has checked “Referendum” in Section III of the application, they will receive a referendum ballot.  

If they wish to vote in both, they have to submit two forms, one with “Election” checked and one with “Referendum” checked.”  

She stressed, “ If the voter is using the State’s online portal, they will only receive an Election ballot.”

If you are voting in person on Nov. 8, the polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.

A View from My Porch: Bumble Bee Economics 

Prologue:

Christina and I both grew up in homes that observed meatless Fridays, which lasted until the Second Vatican Council; after which Pope John XXIII, seeking to modernize the Church, enacted several reforms, which included an end to both Latin services and meatless Fridays.

However, in deference to Christina’s sense of nostalgia for life before the Vatican Council, we still occasionally have tuna melts for dinner on Fridays. I am glad that she is not nostalgic for creamed tuna and peas on toast, any variations of tuna casserole, or fish sticks. 

This essay is not about the popular recipes of the 1950s and 60s. Rather, I am reviewing an economic and retail commodities practice that emerged over the last few decades; and which really became evident to me when I realized that my tuna salad now required less mayo, diced celery, onion, and pickle relish per drained can of Bumble Bee tuna than it did in the past. 

Shrinkflation:

Some companies have reduced the size of their products in order to offset price increases that would have otherwise occurred as a result of inflation or increased production and materials costs. This practice, which crosses countries and industries, is referred to as “shrinkflation”, and was first labeled as such by economist and presidential advisor, Philippa Malmgren.

Accordingly, instead of substantially increasing the price of a product, which would be readily apparent to buyers, manufacturers reduce the size, but might maintain the original price and original “look and feel” on the store shelf.

In these cases, the retail price of the product might not increase, but the price per unit of weight or volume does. The phenomenon has become quite common in the food and beverage industries. Note that I use some recognizable brand names below as examples that illustrate this economic concept. However, I have no financial interest in any of them beyond that of a super market customer.  

Tuna School:  

There are two main varieties of tuna in grocery stores; “light” tuna, largely skipjack, and “white” tuna, primarily albacore; and both may be packed in either oil or water. According to the USDA, one-half cup of canned tuna in oil contains 145 calories, while a half cup in water has only 66 calories.

The “Daily Beast” reported in 2017 that “gone are the days of the six-ounce can of tuna, leaving buyers and sandwich lovers outraged.” Most brands are now 5 oz “net weight”, which actually includes the water or oil in which they are packed. Further, labels now indicate a “drained weight” of 4 oz in that 5 oz. can! 

According to the National Fisheries Institute, Americans eat about a billion pounds of canned and pouched tuna every year; about one-third of the world’s consumption; and so, these small weight reductions really add up. 

Coffee:

My parents probably included a “one pound” can of coffee on their shopping lists for brewing in their home percolator; — possibly “Maxwell House” or “Chase and Sanborn”.   With the exception of the occasional thermos-full, they probably consumed their “cuppa(s) joe” mostly at home. They did not enjoy the convenience or ambience of “Starbucks” or “Dunkins”. 

In 1993, American news commentator, Andy Rooney, continued his earlier investigation of the practices of “corporate coffee” and reported that, “in 1988 ‘Chock Full O’ Nuts’ had not only reduced the amount of coffee in their one pound can, but they’d also reduced the size of the print that indicated how much is inside.”

His 1993 update reported that “it’s now down to 13 ounces. If they’re not going to put a pound in it, they should at least use a smaller can.” He continued “Maxwell House still says it’s good to the last drop”. Maybe so, but there have been fewer and fewer drops over the years.” 

In a recent trip to our local super market, I noticed that both Maxwell House and Chase and Sanborn are now only 10.5 ounces.

Mr. Rooney is no longer with us.

The Ice Cream Chronicles:

Breyer’s, founded in 1866 in Philadelphia, is the oldest ice cream company in the United States. They incorporated in 1908, and remained  independent until their 1926 sale to the National Dairy Products Corporation/Sealtest, which became “Kraftco” in 1968; and eventually sold its ice cream brands to Unilever, the largest producer of soap in the world. 

Breyers downsized their half-gallons from 64 to 56 ounces, and then again, in 2008, to 48 ounces. They then went on to reformulate their products. Their new product is no longer even called “ice cream”, which is required by the USDA to contain at least 10 percent milk fat, but is now “frozen dairy dessert.” Breyers also removed their “all natural” from their cartons. Forty percent of Breyers’ production is now “frozen dairy dessert”. Many other ice cream producers have converted to 48-ounce cartons, and also offer frozen dairy desserts as an alternative to real ice cream. 

Of note, Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield still produce their ice cream in pint cartons that contain a full 16-ounces of ice cream. Their “New York Super Fudge Chunk” flavor is a staple in our house; and Christina will occasionally treat herself to a heaping teaspoon for dessert. 

Unfortunately, the Haagen Dazs “pint” is now 14 ounces.

Shrinkflation Innovation:

I believe that a little “sleight of Hand is required to make “shrinkflation” profitable for the manufacturer.  For example, if the “look and feel” of the downsized can of tuna bears a strong resemblance to the original 6 ounce can, you’re probably less likely to stop in the middle of the aisle and read the label. The new Breyers carton looks a lot like the original black half gallon carton. 

If you check the bottom of your peanut butter container, you’ll notice a dimple. The producers of Skippy peanut butter added a small indentation to the bottom of their jars in 2009. Originally 18 ounces, this subtle change reduced the weight to 16.3 ounces. The dimple was adopted by most manufactures of peanut butter.

Breakfast cereals have appeared to wax and wane by a few fractions over the past several years; and cereal boxes have changed dimensions. 

Companies did not change the height or width of the box, just made it thinner. Consequently, cereal boxes actually contain less cereal; but on the shelf, with the unchanged front panel facing out, they look the same.

Some Thoughts:

I guess that I can summarize this essay with “caveat emptor”, which is Latin for “let the buyer beware”.  As I recall, it’s the principle that the buyer alone is responsible for checking the quality and suitability of goods before a purchase is made. 

However, according to a Harvard study, most consumers would rather get less than pay more. In investigating this essay, I began reading the conclusions  of Edgar Dworsky, a consumer advocate and former assistant attorney general in Massachusetts,  who has documented shrinkflation on his “Consumer World” website for years.

Sources: 

  • Chernev, Alexander. “Customers Will Pay More for Less”. Harvard Business Review. 06/2012.
  • Dua, Shrey. “What Is Shrinkflation? 5 Examples in 2022”. 06/13/2022. Investor Place 
  • Dworsky, Edgar. “Consumer World Newsletter” Several Dates. 
  • Malmgren, Philippa. “Signals: How Everyday Signs Can Help Us Navigate the World’s Turbulent Economy”. Weidenfeld & Nicolson. (2016).
  • Rooney, Andy A “Pound of Coffee?” 03/09/ 2003. CBS “Sixty Minutes”.
  • Durbin, Dee-Ann. “No, you’re not imagining it — package sizes are shrinking” June 8, 2022. Associated Press.
  • Sherman, William. “Tuna Shrinkage: Cans Now Five Ounces, More Expensive”.  07/14/2017. The Daily Beast
  • Vosding, Adam. “Americans consume a whopping amount of canned tuna each year.” 02/24/2022. Mashed. com
Tom Gotowka

Editor’s Note: This is the opinion of Thomas D. Gotowka.

About the author: Tom Gotowka is a resident of Old Lyme, whose entire adult career has been in healthcare. He will sit on the Navy side at the Army/Navy football game. He always sit on the crimson side at any Harvard/Yale contest. He enjoys reading historic speeches and considers himself a scholar of the period from FDR through JFK. A child of AM Radio, he probably knows the lyrics of every rock and roll or folk song published since 1960. He hopes these experiences give readers a sense of what he believes “qualify” him to write this column.

Obituary: Death Announced of Donald Arthur ‘Don’ Quigley of Old Lyme, Services This Morning in OL

OLD LYME – Donald Arthur “Don” Quigley died peacefully Oct. 19, 2022, surrounded by his loved ones. Don was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 15, 1943, to parents Thomas Arthur and Rebecca Hunsicker …

In September of 1968, Don married Charlotte Cavanagh, and they settled in Old Lyme. It was here that they had their three children, Derek, Colleen and Thomas. During this time, Don self-built their beautiful family home on Jean Drive …

He was an avid rower, and a member of the Lyme/Old Lyme Rowing Association, also serving on the board. Don was a very active member in the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, where he served as both a treasurer and a deacon …

Don is survived by Charlotte, his wife of 54 years. He is also survived by his three children, Derek (Dana), Colleen, and Tom (Jessica) …

A private burial service for the family will be held at 10:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at the Duck River Cemetery in Old Lyme. Friends and family are invited to a memorial service at 11 a.m. at the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme, 4 Lyme Street, Old Lyme. Memorial contributions may be made to the First Congregational Church of Old Lyme. https://fccol.org/donate/

Visit this link to read the full obituary published by The Day on Oct. 26, 2022.

Dispose of Unwanted Medications at ‘Drug Take-Back Day’ in Old Lyme, Saturday

OLD LYME — On Saturday, Oct. 29, the Lyme-Old Lyme Prevention Coalition (LOLPC) and Lymes’ Youth Service Bureau (LYSB) are holding another Drug Take-Back Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Old Lyme Firehouse on Lyme Street. This event will have drive-through format.

Bring unwanted medications for safe disposal — this includes both prescription and over-the-counter medications.

The event is free and anonymous, with no questions asked.

In addition to LOLPC and LYSB, the event is sponsored by the Old Lyme Police and Fire Departments, CT State Police, and the National Drug Enforcement Agency

For further information, contact Alli Behnke, Prevention Coordinator at LYSB by phone at 860-434-7208 x210 or by email at abehnke@lysb.org

 

Lyme-Old Lyme Lions Host Photographer Caryn B. Davis, Tonight; All Welcome

Caryn B. Davis

OLD LYME — The Lyme-Old Lyme Lions Club will host photographer and author Caryn B. Davis at its upcoming full membership meeting on Thursday, Oct. 27, at 7 p.m. at Memorial Town Hall, 65 Lyme St., Old Lyme.

Davis’s book, Connecticut Waters: Celebrating Our Coastline & Waterways is a tribute to Connecticut’s maritime roots. The book takes readers on a nautical journey exploring the many ways Nutmeggers use our waterways for industry, education and recreation, and how these waterways have shaped our culture as a state.

Her talk will include her photography and stories from her research which beautifully capture the shoreline.

In addition, Davis will speak to an area very important to the Lions Club–the preservation and restoration of vision. She will speak about her work with Orbis International,  a nonprofit organization dedicated  to eradicating blindness worldwide.

Orbis has converted a DC10 airplane into a flying eye hospital and has performed surgeries on the aircraft which is a teaching facility. There is a classroom, screening room, recovery room, and operating room on board.

Davis was a media producer on board the Orbis and will share videos and photos of the surgeries that were left behind as teaching tools.

Orbis has flown to 11 third countries on eye saving missions.

Lyme-Old Lyme Lions programs are free and open to the public.  The Lyme-Old Lyme Lions also welcomes new members.  There will be a social at 6:30 p.m. The program begins at 7 p.m.

For more information, call Karen Geisler at (860) 434-5321.

Final Public Meeting on LOL Schools’ $57.6M Proposed Building/Renovation Plan to be Held TONIGHT in Old Lyme

Tonight, the final Public Meeting about the Lyme-Old Lyme Schools proposed $57.6 million building plan will be held at Mile Creek School. Along with Mile Creek, Lyme School (pictured above) is also included in the plan for renovations and construction across four of the Region 18 schools.

OLD LYME — The third and final meeting to be held the Lyme-Old Lyme (LOL) Schools Board of Education about their proposed $57.6 million Renovation/Building plan will be held Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 7 p.m. at Mile Creek School. All are welcome.

The plan is the subject of referendum to be held Nov. 8, in Lyme and Old Lyme. The ballot question will read as follows and offer the option of a ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ response.

Shall the resolution appropriating and authorizing bonds in the amount of $57,555,000, of which it is expected that an estimated $9,775,000 shall be reimbursed by the State of Connecticut, for the planning, design, demolition, construction, renovation, equipping and furnishing of Mile Creek School, Center School, Lyme Consolidated School and Lyme-Old Lyme Middle School and related costs, be approved?

Asked what format the Public Meetings would take, LOL Schools Superintendent Ian Neviaser told LymeLine by email, “I will be presenting an overview of the project including financial implications and then will open the floor for questions.”

Neviaser added, “We encourage everyone to show up to learn more about this proposal and help inform their vote for November 8,” continuing, “We may also have a Zoom option for remote questions.”

He noted, “Those who cannot attend can watch the presentations on our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCF2_W7yYtFwx067Ici9776Q/live.”

Check this article, Separate Absentee Ballots Needed for Nov. 8 State Election, School Building Referendum; Ballots Now Available, to review absentee voting requirements for the referendum.

Lyme Resident, Acclaimed Artist Judy Cotton Presents Debut Book at Lyme Academy This Afternoon; All Welcome

OLD LYME — On Wednesday, Oct. 26, at 4 p.m., Lyme Academy of Fine Arts invites community members to a Tea & Talk with Judy Cotton as she shares her first book Swimming Home: A Memoir. 

This free event will take place at de Gerenday’s Fine Art Materials and Curiosities located on the campus of the Academy at 84 Lyme St. (South Entrance) in Old Lyme.

Cotton will read excerpts from her book, and a discussion with the internationally-recognized artist and author will follow.

Copies of Cotton’s debut publication will be available for purchase for $25.99 along with a book signing that will take place after the event.

The author explains, ”This memoir is an effort to understand my mother and the country I loved and left behind for a life in the arts in America. But my complicated feeling for her and the country, Australia, stayed with me.”

Cotton explains that she likes to use words in the same way that she paints. She illustrates that concept with this excerpt: “Morning light in Sydney has a quality of powdered gold, spilt celestial talcum. It gets up the nose … Fragrance sheets the air. Walking through it is like wading through a tidal river in bursts of warm and cold … it was September, the wattle was flowering, and it smelt like napalm.”

Chris Gordon’s review of Swimming Home describes the book as, “… watertight; it immediately conjures up images of tidal currents and the fearsome mystery of deep water, alongside hopeful shallow rifts.

Washington Post Art Critic Sebastian Smee describes Cotton as “… an enthusiastic observer of the natural world, both in the wilds of America and in her native Australia.” He adds, “Cotton has long been drawn to life in flux. And this memoir is just that — a moving feast of observation and obligation, of wit and internal struggle, and of a portrait of a family told with great pathos.”

Born in Australia in 1941, Cotton has lived and worked in the U.S. since 1971. She is a visual artist with work held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Lyman Allyn Art Museum, the Florence Griswold Museum, the National Gallery of Australia and numerous private collections.

From 1974 to 1993, Cotton was the New York contributing editor for Vogue Australia.

In 2008, she began to live in Lyme full time alongside the Connecticut river, which has influenced and informed her work.

For more information about the event, call Cameron Paynter at 860-434-8725.

To learn more about events, lectures, workshops and programs offered at the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts, visit www.lymeacademy.edu.

Editor’s Note: The mission of the Lyme Academy of Fine Arts is to teach the foundational skills of drawing, painting, and sculpture in the figurative tradition. By its commitment to training students in these skills and an engagement with contemporary discourse, the Academy will empower a new generation of artists. Through its programs and related ventures, including the opening of de Gerenday’s Fine Art Materials and Curiosities on its historic campus, the Academy is committed to enriching the cultural life of the community. 

Learn more by visiting www.lymeacademy.edu.

Duck River Garden Club Presents Talk on Growing Herbs, Pairing Them With Vegetables, TONIGHT

OLD LYME — This evening, Wednesday, Oct. 26, Rosemary Ostfeld will be the guest presenter at the monthly Duck River Garden Club program held at Memorial Town Hall on Lyme Street in Old Lyme at 7 p.m.

Ostfeld is the founder and CEO of Healthy PlanEat, a sustainable food tech startup based in East Lyme which helps farmers using sustainable growing practices to sell their organic foods directly to local customers.

The program, Growing Culinary Herbs and Pairing with Fresh Vegetables for Year-Round Enjoyment, will feature information on how various cultures flavor their cuisines and herbs for growing a regional-specific herb garden.

Join the Duck River Garden Club for a 6:40 p.m. social followed by this program at 7 p.m.  Visitors are welcome and the program is free.

For more information, call Linda Clough at (860) 601-0446.